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"Waterproofing an upstairs bathroom floor"


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#1 Knocks

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 12:08 PM

I have an upstairs bathroom that was added as a renovation of the origiinal attic space. One time toilet overflows and water goes through seams in baseboards and under toilet into insulation, ceiling and finally through a light fixture in the downstairs bedroom below. Second time water fitting fails and LOTS of water goes into same places. Water stains now in the ceiling of that bedroom.

I cut a hole into the floor of upstairs bath, removed wet isulation and ran fans to dry it all out. After replacing insulation and covering hole in floor I'm plannign on using sheet vinyl to recover bathroom floor. Im also going to seal around the toilet base both under it and at the floor seam to keep water from running back into there.

Heres my main question. With a brick crapping 19 yo upstairs Im convinced the toilet will overflow again at some point. Is there any way to cut the vinyl at a 45 in each corner and run it up the walls, say 2" and seal all the corners while still making it look good? Seems that will look pretty crappy when done and would make it hard to replace the baseboard.

Is there a better way? Ive thought about just caulking at the floor and baseboard seam, but that will grab and keep dirt.

Anyone with experience or ideas?
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#2 Gamblor

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 12:34 PM

Id invest in a better toilet before I attempted to waterproof the floor. you are just putting a bandaid on the problem by trying to waterproof and will still result in a disgusting mess to clean up when it overflows.

Spend a bit of money on a decent toilet and no worries.

Edited by Gamblor, 19 September 2007 - 12:35 PM.


#3 El Floppo

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 12:58 PM

Id invest in a better toilet before I attempted to waterproof the floor. you are just putting a bandaid on the problem by trying to waterproof and will still result in a disgusting mess to clean up when it overflows.Spend a bit of money on a decent toilet and no worries.

:mellow: Better yet, get the 19yo some books on proper diet... roughage, fibre etc.
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#4 Chaos Commish

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 01:46 PM

My mom's kitchen and both bathrooms had sheet vinyl flooring that went up the walls three inches. In the corner where the floor meets the wall there was a quarter round wooden insert that helped the vinyl turn up the wall. It was installed with finish nails like a baseboard and a pain to remove. This created a vinyl baseboard three inches high. It was capped with fake brass 4' trim pieces about a half inch wide that from what I could tell allowed whoever installed it to trim the vinyl to a perfect fit. The trim pieces were attached the wall with glue and finish nails. Those floors would have held three inches of water if not for the doors. They weren't an eyesore at all, and the quarter rounds made for very easy to clean and sterile corners. Something she complains about since I installed tile and baseboards is how much harder it is to clean the corners.

#5 littletank

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 01:57 PM

My mom's kitchen and both bathrooms had sheet vinyl flooring that went up the walls three inches. In the corner where the floor meets the wall there was a quarter round wooden insert that helped the vinyl turn up the wall. It was installed with finish nails like a baseboard and a pain to remove. This created a vinyl baseboard three inches high. It was capped with fake brass 4' trim pieces about a half inch wide that from what I could tell allowed whoever installed it to trim the vinyl to a perfect fit. The trim pieces were attached the wall with glue and finish nails. Those floors would have held three inches of water if not for the doors. They weren't an eyesore at all, and the quarter rounds made for very easy to clean and sterile corners. Something she complains about since I installed tile and baseboards is how much harder it is to clean the corners.

Welcome back to the 70's.2 other options.1. Run a waterproof membrane under the sheet vinyl floor and up the wall behind the wood base. (2. Tile the floor and do atleast a wainscot of tile on the walls.

Edited by littletank, 19 September 2007 - 01:59 PM.


#6 Gamblor

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 04:39 PM


My mom's kitchen and both bathrooms had sheet vinyl flooring that went up the walls three inches. In the corner where the floor meets the wall there was a quarter round wooden insert that helped the vinyl turn up the wall. It was installed with finish nails like a baseboard and a pain to remove. This created a vinyl baseboard three inches high. It was capped with fake brass 4' trim pieces about a half inch wide that from what I could tell allowed whoever installed it to trim the vinyl to a perfect fit. The trim pieces were attached the wall with glue and finish nails. Those floors would have held three inches of water if not for the doors. They weren't an eyesore at all, and the quarter rounds made for very easy to clean and sterile corners. Something she complains about since I installed tile and baseboards is how much harder it is to clean the corners.

Welcome back to the 70's.2 other options.1. Run a waterproof membrane under the sheet vinyl floor and up the wall behind the wood base. (2. Tile the floor and do atleast a wainscot of tile on the walls.

But then what - the toilet overflows and he gets ####ty water piling up on the bathroom floor and potentially out the door... :thumbup: Fix the problem at the source.

#7 east2west

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 05:22 PM

Best option install a floor drain.
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#8 shuke

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 06:00 PM

I have an upstairs bathroom that was added as a renovation of the origiinal attic space. One time toilet overflows and water goes through seams in baseboards and under toilet into insulation, ceiling and finally through a light fixture in the downstairs bedroom below. Second time water fitting fails and LOTS of water goes into same places. Water stains now in the ceiling of that bedroom.I cut a hole into the floor of upstairs bath, removed wet isulation and ran fans to dry it all out. After replacing insulation and covering hole in floor I'm plannign on using sheet vinyl to recover bathroom floor. Im also going to seal around the toilet base both under it and at the floor seam to keep water from running back into there. Heres my main question. With a brick crapping 19 yo upstairs Im convinced the toilet will overflow again at some point. Is there any way to cut the vinyl at a 45 in each corner and run it up the walls, say 2" and seal all the corners while still making it look good? Seems that will look pretty crappy when done and would make it hard to replace the baseboard.Is there a better way? Ive thought about just caulking at the floor and baseboard seam, but that will grab and keep dirt.Anyone with experience or ideas?

When you take a really big crap, you need to flush early and flush often.
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#9 ELI2TYREE

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 06:01 PM

get him a bucket to crap in.
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#10 KGB

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 07:12 PM

run it up the wall and cover with baseboard?

#11 Knocks

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 05:32 AM


Id invest in a better toilet before I attempted to waterproof the floor. you are just putting a bandaid on the problem by trying to waterproof and will still result in a disgusting mess to clean up when it overflows.Spend a bit of money on a decent toilet and no worries.

:lmao: Better yet, get the 19yo some books on proper diet... roughage, fibre etc.

Good luck with that...Hes a dolt. Typical 'knows everything' cant tell him anything dolt. :pickle:

Best option install a floor drain.

Good answer. With PVC it may not be that hard. Intriguing.


I have an upstairs bathroom that was added as a renovation of the origiinal attic space. One time toilet overflows and water goes through seams in baseboards and under toilet into insulation, ceiling and finally through a light fixture in the downstairs bedroom below. Second time water fitting fails and LOTS of water goes into same places. Water stains now in the ceiling of that bedroom.I cut a hole into the floor of upstairs bath, removed wet isulation and ran fans to dry it all out. After replacing insulation and covering hole in floor I'm plannign on using sheet vinyl to recover bathroom floor. Im also going to seal around the toilet base both under it and at the floor seam to keep water from running back into there. Heres my main question. With a brick crapping 19 yo upstairs Im convinced the toilet will overflow again at some point. Is there any way to cut the vinyl at a 45 in each corner and run it up the walls, say 2" and seal all the corners while still making it look good? Seems that will look pretty crappy when done and would make it hard to replace the baseboard.Is there a better way? Ive thought about just caulking at the floor and baseboard seam, but that will grab and keep dirt.Anyone with experience or ideas?

When you take a really big crap, you need to flush early and flush often.

Maybe YOU can convince him of that.

get him a bucket to crap in.

I like this also. :lol: But he would not empty it as often as needed. :X

run it up the wall and cover with baseboard?

Seems the baseboard would not sit properly. But I may be wrong.Thanks to all.
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