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#1 Hoosier16

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 06:29 PM

Holy crap! Alright, he is from a division 3 college named Huntingdon (Alabama?). He's also a bit light (5'10", 162), but looks pretty well built in the videos below. But, take a look at his pro day numbers below.

Pro Day results:

40: 4.31
10: 1.47
Vertical: 44"
Broad: 10'6"
Shuttle: 3.76
3 Cone: 6.67

Is this the next Welker?

Pro Day video


Highlights



#2 ninerfanatic492000

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 07:08 PM

So what is Dexter Jackson doing these days?

#3 duaneok66

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 07:11 PM

162 is more than a bit light.

#4 Hoosier16

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 07:17 PM

So what is Dexter Jackson doing these days?

Dexter? He's listed at 180. You must have meant DeSean. He's 169. Plus, Dexter had only a 29.5 vertical. I think I can jump that high.

Edited by Hoosier16, 22 March 2012 - 07:21 PM.


#5 Hoosier16

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 07:18 PM

162 is more than a bit light.

Hard to believe 7 pounds makes a whole lot of difference.

#6 wiscstlatlmia

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 09:11 PM

162 is more than a bit light.

Hard to believe 7 pounds makes a whole lot of difference.

Well, hes certainly not playing in the slot at 162

Edited by wiscstlatlmia, 22 March 2012 - 09:11 PM.


#7 Pots

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 11:56 PM

http://www.youtube.c...feature=related Couple of easy drops, but if he can concentrate on catching the ball more, looks very promising.

#8 duaneok66

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 03:20 AM

162 is more than a bit light.

Hard to believe 7 pounds makes a whole lot of difference.

it does when 169 is at the far left of the spectrum already.

#9 petenice15

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 03:49 AM

A 4.3 40 pretty much makes him a Raider. Let's see if the tradition continues Post Al Davis.

#10 ATC1

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 05:33 AM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5fmGd4_5Q4Y&feature=related Couple of easy drops, but if he can concentrate on catching the ball more, looks very promising.

Kinda hard to concentrate on catching the ball when there is a 260lb waiting for him after. Wait this is Roger Gooddell's NFL? Scratch that last statement. 1st round!!

#11 matttyl

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 05:48 AM

His video says he's 178 lbs, where the fairly big difference coming from? Did he lose some weight to put in a faster 40? If he is in fact 178 (or something close to it), he's very close to Welker size.

#12 Hang 10

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 05:49 AM

At that size I bet he has to run around pretty fast in the shower just to get wet.

#13 Hoosier16

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 06:55 AM

His video says he's 178 lbs, where the fairly big difference coming from? Did he lose some weight to put in a faster 40? If he is in fact 178 (or something close to it), he's very close to Welker size.

He definitely doesn't look super thin in the videos. I pulled the 162 from his listing on NFLDraftScout. That's probably old and the 178 may be more accurate. I'm sure they don't update the guys from division 3 to often. I'll have to see if DraftScout updates it.

#14 Xue

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 02:04 PM


His video says he's 178 lbs, where the fairly big difference coming from? Did he lose some weight to put in a faster 40? If he is in fact 178 (or something close to it), he's very close to Welker size.

He definitely doesn't look super thin in the videos. I pulled the 162 from his listing on NFLDraftScout. That's probably old and the 178 may be more accurate. I'm sure they don't update the guys from division 3 to often. I'll have to see if DraftScout updates it.

178 is not close to Welker size. Welker is around 190.

Pearcy was 165 lbs at the Pro Day according to Tony Pauline: http://sportsillustr...days/index.html

Tiny Huntingdon College in Montgomery, Alabama earned notice in the scouting community when receiver Cody Pearcy stole the show during the Alabama State pro day. Pearcy, a Division III all-American receiver who registered 44 receptions for 766 yards and 8 touchdowns last season, turned in a workout that would've made combine king Stephen Hill jealous. His numbers included 4.31 seconds in the 40, 3.76 seconds in the short shuttle, 6.7 second in the three-cone, a vertical jump of 44 inches and 10-6 in the broad jump. Only his marks in the broad jump and three-cone were bettered by receivers at the combine.

Measuring 5-11 and 165 pounds
, Peacy also excelled as a return specialist for Huntingdon. Yesterday's workout bought the small-school receiver a ticket to rookie minicamp, where he'll surely get an opportunity to display his skill as a slot receiver and return specialist.



#15 cstu

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 02:27 PM

Link

Even the most hard-core football fans are unlikely to have heard of Cody Pearcy. As a wide receiver Pearcy rewrote his college team’s record book. He was an all-American receiver who registered 44 receptions for 766 yards and 8 touchdowns in 2011; in 2010 Pearcy caught 51 passes for 1,078 yards and 12 touchdowns. But the team Pearcy starred for was the Huntingdon (AL) Hawks, a Division III team.

Pearcy was also a high school football star in Phenix City, Alabama. Besides football, he also lettered in basketball, golf and soccer. But there was no interest in him from any major college football programs. There almost never is for a White kid who stars at wide receiver, running back or cornerback, among other positions. For some reason only blacks are considered capable of continuing their high school success in college. White high school stars are routinely downgraded or ignored altogether by the extremely important “scouting” services such as Rivals, or are considered only at positions they didn’t even play in high school, you know, more “racially appropriate” ones.

Take a look at Pearcy’s Pro Day workout at Alabama State the other day, the link for which is given at the end of this article. His phenomenal numbers included 4.31 seconds in the 40, 3.76 seconds in the short shuttle, 6.7 seconds in the three-cone, a vertical jump of 44 inches and 10-6 in the broad jump. Only his marks in the broad jump and three-cone were bettered by any of the receivers at the NFL Combine last month, the prestigious annual February event that most college players must attend in order to better their chances of being drafted into the NFL. In other words, Cody Pearcy from little Huntingdon College is more “athletic” than all of the best and most-touted black receivers from the nation’s premier college football programs, as measured by the tests given at the Combine.

The NFL Combine is an invitation-only event and even many Whites who slip through the cracks of the Caste System and excel at “taboo” positions at major college football programs are ignored when Combine invites are given out. Certainly no White Division III players like Cody Pearcy stand a snowball’s chance in hell of being invited. But, unknown, small college, White receiver Cody Pearcy outperformed all receivers at the Combine at his Pro Day.

So why does such a gifted athlete languish at a small school? To those who understand the NFL’s Caste System the answer is obvious. Pearcy looked to be about the only White person at his Pro Day other than one of the coaches. It’s a reversal of how things were in football in the 1950s and early ’60s, when a black player was a rarity, and had to be very good to get a shot and was often a better athlete than the sea of White players around him. Now it’s the black players milling around watching someone more athletic than them excel at one event after another. The difference is that the NFL was interested in finding black players and playing them in the early days when the league was desegregating; but now we’ve had 30 years of the NFL resegregating around blacks and an ideology of black athletic supremacy and the league has zero interest in having a level playing field for Whites at most positions. Pearcy has but a very tiny chance of ever playing in the NFL. Sadly, his story is little different than that of hundreds of White football players who have NFL talent but very rarely get a fair opportunity to show it. The NFL’s long-standing extreme affirmative action policies make sure of that.

Here’s Pearcy’s Pro Day workout: http://www.youtube.c...h?v=gQIkjE3rAWI


Edited by cstu, 24 March 2012 - 02:36 PM.

“He who climbs upon the highest mountains laughs at all tragedies, real or imaginary.”

 

 


#16 cstu

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 02:40 PM



His video says he's 178 lbs, where the fairly big difference coming from? Did he lose some weight to put in a faster 40? If he is in fact 178 (or something close to it), he's very close to Welker size.

He definitely doesn't look super thin in the videos. I pulled the 162 from his listing on NFLDraftScout. That's probably old and the 178 may be more accurate. I'm sure they don't update the guys from division 3 to often. I'll have to see if DraftScout updates it.

178 is not close to Welker size. Welker is around 190.

Pearcy was 165 lbs at the Pro Day according to Tony Pauline: http://sportsillustr...days/index.html

Tiny Huntingdon College in Montgomery, Alabama earned notice in the scouting community when receiver Cody Pearcy stole the show during the Alabama State pro day. Pearcy, a Division III all-American receiver who registered 44 receptions for 766 yards and 8 touchdowns last season, turned in a workout that would've made combine king Stephen Hill jealous. His numbers included 4.31 seconds in the 40, 3.76 seconds in the short shuttle, 6.7 second in the three-cone, a vertical jump of 44 inches and 10-6 in the broad jump. Only his marks in the broad jump and three-cone were bettered by receivers at the combine.

Measuring 5-11 and 165 pounds
, Peacy also excelled as a return specialist for Huntingdon. Yesterday's workout bought the small-school receiver a ticket to rookie minicamp, where he'll surely get an opportunity to display his skill as a slot receiver and return specialist.

He's small but he has Desean Jackson size and speed.
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#17 cstu

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 02:42 PM

http://www.youtube.c...feature=related Couple of easy drops, but if he can concentrate on catching the ball more, looks very promising.

Kinda hard to concentrate on catching the ball when there is a 260lb waiting for him after. Wait this is Roger Gooddell's NFL? Scratch that last statement. 1st round!!

Pretty bad hands from that video.
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#18 jurb26

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 02:50 PM

Shouldn't the title read; "now imagine he's black?" :confused:

#19 Lott's Fingertip

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 09:53 PM

Link

Even the most hard-core football fans are unlikely to have heard of Cody Pearcy. As a wide receiver Pearcy rewrote his college team’s record book. He was an all-American receiver who registered 44 receptions for 766 yards and 8 touchdowns in 2011; in 2010 Pearcy caught 51 passes for 1,078 yards and 12 touchdowns. But the team Pearcy starred for was the Huntingdon (AL) Hawks, a Division III team.

Pearcy was also a high school football star in Phenix City, Alabama. Besides football, he also lettered in basketball, golf and soccer. But there was no interest in him from any major college football programs. There almost never is for a White kid who stars at wide receiver, running back or cornerback, among other positions. For some reason only blacks are considered capable of continuing their high school success in college. White high school stars are routinely downgraded or ignored altogether by the extremely important “scouting” services such as Rivals, or are considered only at positions they didn’t even play in high school, you know, more “racially appropriate” ones.

Take a look at Pearcy’s Pro Day workout at Alabama State the other day, the link for which is given at the end of this article. His phenomenal numbers included 4.31 seconds in the 40, 3.76 seconds in the short shuttle, 6.7 seconds in the three-cone, a vertical jump of 44 inches and 10-6 in the broad jump. Only his marks in the broad jump and three-cone were bettered by any of the receivers at the NFL Combine last month, the prestigious annual February event that most college players must attend in order to better their chances of being drafted into the NFL. In other words, Cody Pearcy from little Huntingdon College is more “athletic” than all of the best and most-touted black receivers from the nation’s premier college football programs, as measured by the tests given at the Combine.

The NFL Combine is an invitation-only event and even many Whites who slip through the cracks of the Caste System and excel at “taboo” positions at major college football programs are ignored when Combine invites are given out. Certainly no White Division III players like Cody Pearcy stand a snowball’s chance in hell of being invited. But, unknown, small college, White receiver Cody Pearcy outperformed all receivers at the Combine at his Pro Day.

So why does such a gifted athlete languish at a small school? To those who understand the NFL’s Caste System the answer is obvious. Pearcy looked to be about the only White person at his Pro Day other than one of the coaches. It’s a reversal of how things were in football in the 1950s and early ’60s, when a black player was a rarity, and had to be very good to get a shot and was often a better athlete than the sea of White players around him. Now it’s the black players milling around watching someone more athletic than them excel at one event after another. The difference is that the NFL was interested in finding black players and playing them in the early days when the league was desegregating; but now we’ve had 30 years of the NFL resegregating around blacks and an ideology of black athletic supremacy and the league has zero interest in having a level playing field for Whites at most positions. Pearcy has but a very tiny chance of ever playing in the NFL. Sadly, his story is little different than that of hundreds of White football players who have NFL talent but very rarely get a fair opportunity to show it. The NFL’s long-standing extreme affirmative action policies make sure of that.

Here’s Pearcy’s Pro Day workout: http://www.youtube.c...h?v=gQIkjE3rAWI

:tinfoilhat:

That is an... interesting site.
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#20 ex-ghost

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 08:30 AM


Link

Even the most hard-core football fans are unlikely to have heard of Cody Pearcy. As a wide receiver Pearcy rewrote his college team’s record book. He was an all-American receiver who registered 44 receptions for 766 yards and 8 touchdowns in 2011; in 2010 Pearcy caught 51 passes for 1,078 yards and 12 touchdowns. But the team Pearcy starred for was the Huntingdon (AL) Hawks, a Division III team.

Pearcy was also a high school football star in Phenix City, Alabama. Besides football, he also lettered in basketball, golf and soccer. But there was no interest in him from any major college football programs. There almost never is for a White kid who stars at wide receiver, running back or cornerback, among other positions. For some reason only blacks are considered capable of continuing their high school success in college. White high school stars are routinely downgraded or ignored altogether by the extremely important “scouting” services such as Rivals, or are considered only at positions they didn’t even play in high school, you know, more “racially appropriate” ones.

Take a look at Pearcy’s Pro Day workout at Alabama State the other day, the link for which is given at the end of this article. His phenomenal numbers included 4.31 seconds in the 40, 3.76 seconds in the short shuttle, 6.7 seconds in the three-cone, a vertical jump of 44 inches and 10-6 in the broad jump. Only his marks in the broad jump and three-cone were bettered by any of the receivers at the NFL Combine last month, the prestigious annual February event that most college players must attend in order to better their chances of being drafted into the NFL. In other words, Cody Pearcy from little Huntingdon College is more “athletic” than all of the best and most-touted black receivers from the nation’s premier college football programs, as measured by the tests given at the Combine.

The NFL Combine is an invitation-only event and even many Whites who slip through the cracks of the Caste System and excel at “taboo” positions at major college football programs are ignored when Combine invites are given out. Certainly no White Division III players like Cody Pearcy stand a snowball’s chance in hell of being invited. But, unknown, small college, White receiver Cody Pearcy outperformed all receivers at the Combine at his Pro Day.

So why does such a gifted athlete languish at a small school? To those who understand the NFL’s Caste System the answer is obvious. Pearcy looked to be about the only White person at his Pro Day other than one of the coaches. It’s a reversal of how things were in football in the 1950s and early ’60s, when a black player was a rarity, and had to be very good to get a shot and was often a better athlete than the sea of White players around him. Now it’s the black players milling around watching someone more athletic than them excel at one event after another. The difference is that the NFL was interested in finding black players and playing them in the early days when the league was desegregating; but now we’ve had 30 years of the NFL resegregating around blacks and an ideology of black athletic supremacy and the league has zero interest in having a level playing field for Whites at most positions. Pearcy has but a very tiny chance of ever playing in the NFL. Sadly, his story is little different than that of hundreds of White football players who have NFL talent but very rarely get a fair opportunity to show it. The NFL’s long-standing extreme affirmative action policies make sure of that.

Here’s Pearcy’s Pro Day workout: http://www.youtube.c...h?v=gQIkjE3rAWI

:tinfoilhat:

That is an... interesting site.

An embarrasing site. Wish I never clicked on it.

#21 identikit

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 08:43 AM

from the site: 'No white running back has run for over 1,000 yards in nearly a quarter of a century. ' Peyton Hillis circa 2010 comes to mind, for one. What a ridiculous joke of a site.

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#22 Faust

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 01:54 PM

Sleeper WRs create buzz with 'unbelievable' pro day efforts

By Rob Rang | The Sports Xchange/CBSSports.com

Excerpt:

Tiny Huntingdon College (Alabama) is not exactly considered a hotbed for NFL talent so when wide receiver Cody Pearcy worked out for scouts a few weeks ago, he went to the Alabama State pro day. There, a handful of scouts (including at least one representative from the New York Giants and Miami Dolphins) watched the Huntingdon's career receptions leader put forth a workout that one scout, upon hearing of the numbers, characterized as an "unbelievable" effort.

Pearcy is certainly smaller than scouts would prefer at 5-feet-10, 161 pounds, but his numbers otherwise were off the charts. Pearcy was clocked as fast as 4.31 seconds in the 40-yard dash, posted a 44-inch vertical jump -- each of which would have led all combine participants this year. Pearcy also recorded a 6.67 time in the three-cone drill and 3.76 seconds in short shuttle -- the fastest time in recent NFL history, according to NFL.com's Combine Tracker. The fastest time recorded in this event at the combine since 2006 came when former University of Tennessee defensive back Jason Allen was clocked at 3.81 seconds. Allen, by the way, was drafted with the No. 16 overall pick by the Miami that year. He's now a member of the Cincinnati Bengals.

As his statistics prove, Pearcy is hardly just a track athlete. He had 46 receptions for 766 yards and eight touchdowns as a senior and finished as the program's career leader in receptions (147), receiving yards (2,632) and receiving touchdowns (25). He also holds the school-record for receiving yards in a game (233) and a season (1,078).



#23 Pots

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 02:04 PM



Link

Even the most hard-core football fans are unlikely to have heard of Cody Pearcy. As a wide receiver Pearcy rewrote his college team’s record book. He was an all-American receiver who registered 44 receptions for 766 yards and 8 touchdowns in 2011; in 2010 Pearcy caught 51 passes for 1,078 yards and 12 touchdowns. But the team Pearcy starred for was the Huntingdon (AL) Hawks, a Division III team.

Pearcy was also a high school football star in Phenix City, Alabama. Besides football, he also lettered in basketball, golf and soccer. But there was no interest in him from any major college football programs. There almost never is for a White kid who stars at wide receiver, running back or cornerback, among other positions. For some reason only blacks are considered capable of continuing their high school success in college. White high school stars are routinely downgraded or ignored altogether by the extremely important “scouting” services such as Rivals, or are considered only at positions they didn’t even play in high school, you know, more “racially appropriate” ones.

Take a look at Pearcy’s Pro Day workout at Alabama State the other day, the link for which is given at the end of this article. His phenomenal numbers included 4.31 seconds in the 40, 3.76 seconds in the short shuttle, 6.7 seconds in the three-cone, a vertical jump of 44 inches and 10-6 in the broad jump. Only his marks in the broad jump and three-cone were bettered by any of the receivers at the NFL Combine last month, the prestigious annual February event that most college players must attend in order to better their chances of being drafted into the NFL. In other words, Cody Pearcy from little Huntingdon College is more “athletic” than all of the best and most-touted black receivers from the nation’s premier college football programs, as measured by the tests given at the Combine.

The NFL Combine is an invitation-only event and even many Whites who slip through the cracks of the Caste System and excel at “taboo” positions at major college football programs are ignored when Combine invites are given out. Certainly no White Division III players like Cody Pearcy stand a snowball’s chance in hell of being invited. But, unknown, small college, White receiver Cody Pearcy outperformed all receivers at the Combine at his Pro Day.

So why does such a gifted athlete languish at a small school? To those who understand the NFL’s Caste System the answer is obvious. Pearcy looked to be about the only White person at his Pro Day other than one of the coaches. It’s a reversal of how things were in football in the 1950s and early ’60s, when a black player was a rarity, and had to be very good to get a shot and was often a better athlete than the sea of White players around him. Now it’s the black players milling around watching someone more athletic than them excel at one event after another. The difference is that the NFL was interested in finding black players and playing them in the early days when the league was desegregating; but now we’ve had 30 years of the NFL resegregating around blacks and an ideology of black athletic supremacy and the league has zero interest in having a level playing field for Whites at most positions. Pearcy has but a very tiny chance of ever playing in the NFL. Sadly, his story is little different than that of hundreds of White football players who have NFL talent but very rarely get a fair opportunity to show it. The NFL’s long-standing extreme affirmative action policies make sure of that.

Here’s Pearcy’s Pro Day workout: http://www.youtube.c...h?v=gQIkjE3rAWI

:tinfoilhat:

That is an... interesting site.

An embarrasing site. Wish I never clicked on it.

You're so closed minded. :tinfoilhat:

#24 Tchula

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 02:28 PM

That was an awesome website. TY

#25 ex-ghost

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 02:38 PM




Link

Even the most hard-core football fans are unlikely to have heard of Cody Pearcy. As a wide receiver Pearcy rewrote his college team’s record book. He was an all-American receiver who registered 44 receptions for 766 yards and 8 touchdowns in 2011; in 2010 Pearcy caught 51 passes for 1,078 yards and 12 touchdowns. But the team Pearcy starred for was the Huntingdon (AL) Hawks, a Division III team.

Pearcy was also a high school football star in Phenix City, Alabama. Besides football, he also lettered in basketball, golf and soccer. But there was no interest in him from any major college football programs. There almost never is for a White kid who stars at wide receiver, running back or cornerback, among other positions. For some reason only blacks are considered capable of continuing their high school success in college. White high school stars are routinely downgraded or ignored altogether by the extremely important “scouting” services such as Rivals, or are considered only at positions they didn’t even play in high school, you know, more “racially appropriate” ones.

Take a look at Pearcy’s Pro Day workout at Alabama State the other day, the link for which is given at the end of this article. His phenomenal numbers included 4.31 seconds in the 40, 3.76 seconds in the short shuttle, 6.7 seconds in the three-cone, a vertical jump of 44 inches and 10-6 in the broad jump. Only his marks in the broad jump and three-cone were bettered by any of the receivers at the NFL Combine last month, the prestigious annual February event that most college players must attend in order to better their chances of being drafted into the NFL. In other words, Cody Pearcy from little Huntingdon College is more “athletic” than all of the best and most-touted black receivers from the nation’s premier college football programs, as measured by the tests given at the Combine.

The NFL Combine is an invitation-only event and even many Whites who slip through the cracks of the Caste System and excel at “taboo” positions at major college football programs are ignored when Combine invites are given out. Certainly no White Division III players like Cody Pearcy stand a snowball’s chance in hell of being invited. But, unknown, small college, White receiver Cody Pearcy outperformed all receivers at the Combine at his Pro Day.

So why does such a gifted athlete languish at a small school? To those who understand the NFL’s Caste System the answer is obvious. Pearcy looked to be about the only White person at his Pro Day other than one of the coaches. It’s a reversal of how things were in football in the 1950s and early ’60s, when a black player was a rarity, and had to be very good to get a shot and was often a better athlete than the sea of White players around him. Now it’s the black players milling around watching someone more athletic than them excel at one event after another. The difference is that the NFL was interested in finding black players and playing them in the early days when the league was desegregating; but now we’ve had 30 years of the NFL resegregating around blacks and an ideology of black athletic supremacy and the league has zero interest in having a level playing field for Whites at most positions. Pearcy has but a very tiny chance of ever playing in the NFL. Sadly, his story is little different than that of hundreds of White football players who have NFL talent but very rarely get a fair opportunity to show it. The NFL’s long-standing extreme affirmative action policies make sure of that.

Here’s Pearcy’s Pro Day workout: http://www.youtube.c...h?v=gQIkjE3rAWI

:tinfoilhat:

That is an... interesting site.

An embarrasing site. Wish I never clicked on it.

You're so closed minded. :tinfoilhat:

Happy to be.

#26 cstu

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 03:03 PM

That was an awesome website. TY

:stirspot:
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#27 cstu

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 03:25 PM



His video says he's 178 lbs, where the fairly big difference coming from? Did he lose some weight to put in a faster 40? If he is in fact 178 (or something close to it), he's very close to Welker size.

He definitely doesn't look super thin in the videos. I pulled the 162 from his listing on NFLDraftScout. That's probably old and the 178 may be more accurate. I'm sure they don't update the guys from division 3 to often. I'll have to see if DraftScout updates it.

178 is not close to Welker size. Welker is around 190.

Pearcy was 165 lbs at the Pro Day according to Tony Pauline: http://sportsillustr...days/index.html

Tiny Huntingdon College in Montgomery, Alabama earned notice in the scouting community when receiver Cody Pearcy stole the show during the Alabama State pro day. Pearcy, a Division III all-American receiver who registered 44 receptions for 766 yards and 8 touchdowns last season, turned in a workout that would've made combine king Stephen Hill jealous. His numbers included 4.31 seconds in the 40, 3.76 seconds in the short shuttle, 6.7 second in the three-cone, a vertical jump of 44 inches and 10-6 in the broad jump. Only his marks in the broad jump and three-cone were bettered by receivers at the combine.

Measuring 5-11 and 165 pounds
, Peacy also excelled as a return specialist for Huntingdon. Yesterday's workout bought the small-school receiver a ticket to rookie minicamp, where he'll surely get an opportunity to display his skill as a slot receiver and return specialist.

For comparison, Desean Jackson was 5-9.6, 169 at the combine and ran a 4.35 40 (4.29 Pro Day), 34.5" vertical, 10-02" broad jump, 4.19 short shuttle, and 6.82 3 cone.
“He who climbs upon the highest mountains laughs at all tragedies, real or imaginary.”

 

 


#28 Donnybrook

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 05:15 PM

Rob Rang reports that in addition to Cody Pearcy another sleeper wide receiver had a unbelievable pro day
http://www.cbssports.com/general/blog/rob-rang/18042151/sleeper-wrs-create-buzz-with-unbelievable-pro-day-efforts

....
South Dakota State wideout Dale Moss, 6-3 and 213 pounds, was clocked between 4.38-4.45 seconds in the 40-yard dash. He also posted a 41.5-inch vertical and a 10-10 broad jump, demonstrating exciting explosiveness. Perhaps most impressive was the burst and change of direction ability Moss showed during shuttle drills. Rarely are taller athletes capable of pivoting as fluidly as shorter athletes, but that is precisely what Moss did, clocking in at a stunning 6.32 seconds in the three-cone drill and 4.08 seconds in the short-shuttle.

Just as Pearcy's time in the short shuttle would have ranked as the best in recent NFL history (at least among those results taken at the combine), Moss' effort in the three-cone drill also would have led all 2012 combine participants and is faster than the numbers put forth last year by former Oregon wide receiver Jeff Maehl, who led all 2011 prospects with a 6.42 second time.

Moss is a particularly intriguing athlete because he only has one year of football experience. His first four years at SDSU were spent on the basketball team (he averaged 7.6 points and 5.4 rebounds in 2010-11) before he emerged as the Jackrabbits' leading receiver in 2011, catching 61 passes for 949 yards and six touchdowns.

Obviously scouts will have to do more homework on these two athletes to warrant using a draft pick on them. But considering the incredible upside each appears to possess, don't be surprised if both ultimately hear their names called on the draft's third day.



#29 Hoosier16

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 06:12 PM

Rob Rang reports that in addition to Cody Pearcy another sleeper wide receiver had a unbelievable pro day
http://www.cbssports.com/general/blog/rob-rang/18042151/sleeper-wrs-create-buzz-with-unbelievable-pro-day-efforts



....
South Dakota State wideout Dale Moss, 6-3 and 213 pounds, was clocked between 4.38-4.45 seconds in the 40-yard dash. He also posted a 41.5-inch vertical and a 10-10 broad jump, demonstrating exciting explosiveness. Perhaps most impressive was the burst and change of direction ability Moss showed during shuttle drills. Rarely are taller athletes capable of pivoting as fluidly as shorter athletes, but that is precisely what Moss did, clocking in at a stunning 6.32 seconds in the three-cone drill and 4.08 seconds in the short-shuttle.

Just as Pearcy's time in the short shuttle would have ranked as the best in recent NFL history (at least among those results taken at the combine), Moss' effort in the three-cone drill also would have led all 2012 combine participants and is faster than the numbers put forth last year by former Oregon wide receiver Jeff Maehl, who led all 2011 prospects with a 6.42 second time.

Moss is a particularly intriguing athlete because he only has one year of football experience. His first four years at SDSU were spent on the basketball team (he averaged 7.6 points and 5.4 rebounds in 2010-11) before he emerged as the Jackrabbits' leading receiver in 2011, catching 61 passes for 949 yards and six touchdowns.

Obviously scouts will have to do more homework on these two athletes to warrant using a draft pick on them. But considering the incredible upside each appears to possess, don't be surprised if both ultimately hear their names called on the draft's third day.




I like his size a lot better. Here are his highlights:

Moss


Some good dunks in there.

#30 wiscstlatlmia

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 06:58 PM


Rob Rang reports that in addition to Cody Pearcy another sleeper wide receiver had a unbelievable pro day
http://www.cbssports.com/general/blog/rob-rang/18042151/sleeper-wrs-create-buzz-with-unbelievable-pro-day-efforts



....
South Dakota State wideout Dale Moss, 6-3 and 213 pounds, was clocked between 4.38-4.45 seconds in the 40-yard dash. He also posted a 41.5-inch vertical and a 10-10 broad jump, demonstrating exciting explosiveness. Perhaps most impressive was the burst and change of direction ability Moss showed during shuttle drills. Rarely are taller athletes capable of pivoting as fluidly as shorter athletes, but that is precisely what Moss did, clocking in at a stunning 6.32 seconds in the three-cone drill and 4.08 seconds in the short-shuttle.

Just as Pearcy's time in the short shuttle would have ranked as the best in recent NFL history (at least among those results taken at the combine), Moss' effort in the three-cone drill also would have led all 2012 combine participants and is faster than the numbers put forth last year by former Oregon wide receiver Jeff Maehl, who led all 2011 prospects with a 6.42 second time.

Moss is a particularly intriguing athlete because he only has one year of football experience. His first four years at SDSU were spent on the basketball team (he averaged 7.6 points and 5.4 rebounds in 2010-11) before he emerged as the Jackrabbits' leading receiver in 2011, catching 61 passes for 949 yards and six touchdowns.

Obviously scouts will have to do more homework on these two athletes to warrant using a draft pick on them. But considering the incredible upside each appears to possess, don't be surprised if both ultimately hear their names called on the draft's third day.




I like his size a lot better. Here are his highlights:

Moss


Some good dunks in there.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8t_7GiLpxKM

If you like Moss, you'll love this guy

#31 Hoosier16

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 02:47 AM



Rob Rang reports that in addition to Cody Pearcy another sleeper wide receiver had a unbelievable pro day
http://www.cbssports.com/general/blog/rob-rang/18042151/sleeper-wrs-create-buzz-with-unbelievable-pro-day-efforts



....
South Dakota State wideout Dale Moss, 6-3 and 213 pounds, was clocked between 4.38-4.45 seconds in the 40-yard dash. He also posted a 41.5-inch vertical and a 10-10 broad jump, demonstrating exciting explosiveness. Perhaps most impressive was the burst and change of direction ability Moss showed during shuttle drills. Rarely are taller athletes capable of pivoting as fluidly as shorter athletes, but that is precisely what Moss did, clocking in at a stunning 6.32 seconds in the three-cone drill and 4.08 seconds in the short-shuttle.

Just as Pearcy's time in the short shuttle would have ranked as the best in recent NFL history (at least among those results taken at the combine), Moss' effort in the three-cone drill also would have led all 2012 combine participants and is faster than the numbers put forth last year by former Oregon wide receiver Jeff Maehl, who led all 2011 prospects with a 6.42 second time.

Moss is a particularly intriguing athlete because he only has one year of football experience. His first four years at SDSU were spent on the basketball team (he averaged 7.6 points and 5.4 rebounds in 2010-11) before he emerged as the Jackrabbits' leading receiver in 2011, catching 61 passes for 949 yards and six touchdowns.

Obviously scouts will have to do more homework on these two athletes to warrant using a draft pick on them. But considering the incredible upside each appears to possess, don't be surprised if both ultimately hear their names called on the draft's third day.




I like his size a lot better. Here are his highlights:

Moss


Some good dunks in there.

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=8t_7GiLpxKM

If you like Moss, you'll love this guy

Yawn.

Only 10 total dunks in his career? Meh. He couldn't even fill a 3 minute highlight video. He looks like he'd be a TE, but those guys complain every time someone slaps them on the arm. I don't think he could take an NFL hit.

#32 cstu

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 12:24 PM

Rob Rang reports that in addition to Cody Pearcy another sleeper wide receiver had a unbelievable pro day
http://www.cbssports.com/general/blog/rob-rang/18042151/sleeper-wrs-create-buzz-with-unbelievable-pro-day-efforts



....
South Dakota State wideout Dale Moss, 6-3 and 213 pounds, was clocked between 4.38-4.45 seconds in the 40-yard dash. He also posted a 41.5-inch vertical and a 10-10 broad jump, demonstrating exciting explosiveness. Perhaps most impressive was the burst and change of direction ability Moss showed during shuttle drills. Rarely are taller athletes capable of pivoting as fluidly as shorter athletes, but that is precisely what Moss did, clocking in at a stunning 6.32 seconds in the three-cone drill and 4.08 seconds in the short-shuttle.

Just as Pearcy's time in the short shuttle would have ranked as the best in recent NFL history (at least among those results taken at the combine), Moss' effort in the three-cone drill also would have led all 2012 combine participants and is faster than the numbers put forth last year by former Oregon wide receiver Jeff Maehl, who led all 2011 prospects with a 6.42 second time.

Moss is a particularly intriguing athlete because he only has one year of football experience. His first four years at SDSU were spent on the basketball team (he averaged 7.6 points and 5.4 rebounds in 2010-11) before he emerged as the Jackrabbits' leading receiver in 2011, catching 61 passes for 949 yards and six touchdowns.

Obviously scouts will have to do more homework on these two athletes to warrant using a draft pick on them. But considering the incredible upside each appears to possess, don't be surprised if both ultimately hear their names called on the draft's third day.


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“He who climbs upon the highest mountains laughs at all tragedies, real or imaginary.”

 

 


#33 cstu

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Posted 04 May 2012 - 09:39 PM

Pearcy was signed by the Falcons and Moss was signed by the Packers. I thought this was an interesting stat about Moss:

He dropped just one of 97 passes thrown to him, according to research by the NFL Draft Report.

Not bad for a WR with one year of football experience.

Edited by cstu, 05 May 2012 - 12:21 AM.

“He who climbs upon the highest mountains laughs at all tragedies, real or imaginary.”

 

 





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