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Anarchy99

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Anarchy99 last won the day on February 29 2016

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  1. I remember it well. Their first two series they won every home game and lost every road game . . . 8-0 at home, 0-6 on the road. Garnett, Pierce, and Allen as HOFers and playoff Rondo (who some people feel is a borderline HOF candidate). They had a scoring differential in the regular season of +10.2 points per game, went 31-10 on the road, and shouldn't have needed 7 games to beat the Hawks or Cavs (even with a young LeBron).
  2. There have been 13 teams that have blown 3 games to 1 leads in NBA playoff history. Doc Rivers coached three of them . . . 2019-20 Clippers (lost to Nuggets) 2014-15 Clippers (lost to Rockets) 2002-03 Magic (lost to Pistons) No other coach has lost more than one series with a 3-1 lead.
  3. Not to dodge your question, but Tatum is 22 and Brown 23. If we use Golden State as the recent gold standard of teams, Steph was 26 when they first won the title and Klay 24. Then they added a 28 year old KD to the mix a few years later. As I mentioned earlier, I think Boston hoped Walker would be the guy that brought everything together, and in some ways he did in the locker room (not a cancer like Kyrie was) but not as much on the floor. He wasn't as consistent as expected and did not close games out like they needed. He was a defensive liability and had issues with zone defenses (and had some issues with injuries). Had Hayward been healthy, I think we would have seen Boston as a more functional and consistent offense instead of the uninspired offensive mess they were at the end of some games. The Celtics brand that you keep wanting them to have is running an efficient offense getting the ball in the paint and then either getting easy baskets or kicking the ball out for open threes. Defensively, they generally are solid and force a lot of turnovers. That worked in the first round, worked in the second round (series should have been over way earlier except for the miracle 0.5 second shot), and worked against the Heat (Boston was in position to win every game and had the lead in the 4th quarter in all of them). They just didn't play well or consistently in the last few minutes. So their identity is playing three wings, a point guard, and someone in the middle on offense. And they usually play very disruptive defense. That's who they are, whether that counts as "an identity" or not. I heard this morning that Boston played 31 of their last 35 games against playoff teams (between the end of the regular season and playoffs) and was in the lead and in contention in all of them in the last few minutes. They were not blown out by anyone in that time (although some games they faded at the end like last night). So you may disagree that they have an identity, but whatever they were doing was working (and Hayward getting hurt mucked that up). Who knows if their plan would have worked in the regular playoffs, but it was working well enough for them to win. They just played 43 minutes of a 48 minute game. Maybe they can coach that away. Maybe they can mature and play better. Maybe they can take the next step. Maybe they are a couple of pieces that fit better away. But a lot of teams and players don't win right out of the gate. Some go on to further develop, others don't. Way too soon to know what will become of the current Celtics.
  4. In general, BB will sell out the run to take away the pass. NE would much rather keep plays in front of them than risk someone getting behind them. Once in a while they will give up a big play (like against Seattle), but that usually involves a QB throwing the ball into the sunroof of a moving car 40 yards away. Wilson had some insane passes last week (while getting mauled the second he released the ball). That's not bad defense, that's just better offense. That's why for the life of me, I don't understand why opponents don't run way more than they do and hit backs for swing passes in the flat. Those are there every play, every game. But teams try to run deeper routes that are usually covered and try to have more of vertical attack, almost as if to say we are going to succeed in playing how we usually play (which hardly ever works). It is very possible to have 10, 12, 14 play drives against NE if teams are patient and take what the defense gives them. Teams could have 3rd and 2 over and over again if they played it right. Eventually NE will pull guys up and then a slant or a seam route could go for 40 yards. Why offensive coordinators haven't latched on to this is one of life's great mysteries.
  5. NE played Waller about as well as a team could. They kept changing up their coverage from man to zone to hybrids. Seven different guys covered him, sometimes with help over the top, help underneath, robbers, etc. that Carr could not anticipate the coverage or tell who was doing what on a given play. Add in the pressure NE was getting on passing downs and Carr did not have time to wait to see if Waller could get open. There were a couple of times when Waller ended up having space to receive the ball, but that was because the safety moved on to cover someone else. Carr would have needed another second or two to make sure Waller was open, which he usually didn't have. Waller owners should just tip their cap to BB and move on. He will go back to getting a ton of targets in plenty of other games.
  6. Some of the sky-is-falling sports media types in town have grumbled that Stevens and Ainge are a big part of the problem and that either or both should be in a lot more hot water than they are. The talking heads basically feel that if the pieces the Celtics have are as great as people say they are, they would have advanced farther than they have. That may be the Boston is for winners mentality form the past couple of decades and anything but a title is a bad season talking. I do agree with you that against specific teams, they won't have a good answer for a legit big and will have matchup problems. They could probably get away with finding someone that is a defensive specialist against the Giannis / Embiid / Davis / Adebayo types, but again, if it were so easy to defend those guys the rest of the league would have figured it out by now. IMO, one of the big issues is Walker on the defensive end. He is too small and can't handle someone like Butler. Boston can't put someone else on Kemba's guy or they will get killed by three point shooters. And if Kemba has to switch and ends up on someone even better, that possession is all but over. This season has been anything but normal, so the bubble version of the playoffs likely gave some teams more of a chance then if they had to play in hostile arenas. No home court advantage, no fans, and no travel definitely leveled the playing field. It will be interesting to see if a team like Miami can play as well next year not in the bubble or if they just got hot at the right time. The Heat certainly played light years better in the bubble than they did away from it (while Milwaukee went the opposite direction).
  7. They just signed Stevens to a contract extension in August, so he is likely here for several years at a minimum. It does not appear the organization sees Stevens as a problem and it appears they hold him in high regard. I don't think he is going anywhere. As I posted earlier this morning, in the regular season, their three "bigs" were their most efficient players (RWilliams, Theis, and Kanter). Over 100 possessions, they averaged a net +36, +25, and +19 points per 100 possessions respectively. (All those are great numbers . . . LeBrown was at +10 this year, Anthony Davis at +19, Giannis at + 19, and Kawhi at +13.) The Celtics three bigs were at the top of the class on the team in win shares per 48 minutes (.253, .201, .214). By comparison, here were the other main contributors (Tatum .146, Brown .123, Kemba .162, Smart .112, Hayward .158). So say what you want about them needing more size, a real big, etc. . . . they did fine with the guys they had. RWilliams biggest problem has been frequently being dinged up. He didn't play in half the games this season (he was banged up a lot, so hard to tell what he would have done or how much he would have played if healthy). I was not a huge fan of Grant Williams. He seemed slow and out of shape with limited mobility. At 6'6", he really isn't suited to cover someone bigger and more skilled. He didn't bring much to the table in the playoffs as far as I was concerned. They would have been better off playing the other Williams or Kanter more. The numbers will bear out that playing their small ball lineup of Tatum, Brown, Smart, Walker, and Hayward WAS NOT their best option. They fared much better with one of their bigs in. They may get a little more offense with that small ball grouping, but they won't get enough defense or rebounds from that combination. I have always found that in both basketball and football that going conservative at the end of the game to try to burn clock usually is a net negative. It generally takes away chances to score and actually helps opponents catch up. If the Celts kept the peddle to the medal and tried to score in transition, if they tried to run their offense, if they tried to get shots in the paint with 10 seconds still on the shot clock, if they tried to draw fouls, they would probably still be playing. That should be an easy coaching fix, yet they didn't seem to change that throughout the playoffs so maybe it is harder than it looks.
  8. I will share the craziest of dreams I had over the summer (when I had not been listening to VH at all). Back in high school in the early 80's, I dabbled playing bass. I certainly wasn't great at it. In the early 2000's, one of my buddies went and saw a solo Sammy show. That's the back story. In my dream, that friend was out on a trip to Vegas (present day) and bumped into Sammy at a 7-Eleven. They got to chatting about the show my friend had gone to, and he ended up playing a round of golf with the Red Rocker. While they were on the course, it came out that Sammy and Eddie had kissed and made up and were talking about reforming VH with Sammy. But Eddie didn't want Mike back and Sammy didn't want to play with Wolfie. So the conundrum was they had no bass player. My buddy suggested me as a replacement alternative, and Sammy called me directly from the golf course to see if I was interested (ignoring the fact that I hadn't picked up a bass in 35+ years and was a terrible bass player). Ultimately they flew me out to audition and jam with the band. Things worked out great, and I co-wrote what would turn out to be their new single. I ended up being the regular bass player on their new album . . . and then they wanted me to learn their back catalog to be able to tour with them starting in a few weeks (ignoring this thing called COVID). But I was still active on the FBG message boards, so I actually leaked that the band was reforming and I was the new bass player in a Free For All post. No one believed me until I posted a link to the video for the new song and a press release naming me as the new bass player of VH. And then I woke up . . . and at the time I woke up I remembered the lyrics and the music to the song I allegedly co-wrote (I since forget it now). That's how real the dream was. I agree . . . I want more of the drugs I apparently was on that night.
  9. Jayson Tatum is younger today than all the Celtics players that went on to become a HOFer. NONE of those guys had played in a single NBA game at the age Tatum is right now. And he's already played in 45 playoff games. (That will change when Kevin Garnett gets inducted . . . but the point still stands that Tatum is a youngster in terms of his NBA career.)
  10. The Celtics of the past few years really didn't get enough from their big acquisitions. Horford was overpaid for what he delivered. Hayward and Kyrie were hurt and struggled to stay on the court. Kemba was solid this year, but seemed like he came up small at the worst times. Who knows which stats matter and which ones don't, but net scoring per 100 possessions in the regular season : RWilliams +36 Theis +25 Kanter +19 Hayward +9 Wanamaker +6 Tatum +5 Ojeleye +5 Walker +4 Green +4 Smart +3 Brown +2 GWililams -4 Based on that, it certainly appears their three headed hydra of bigs was not the liability that many people have suggested. The C's suffered from completely getting out of their offense in crunch time, chucking up too many threes, not getting back on defense, and committing too many fouls. To me, it seemed like they got one offensive foul called on opponents for every 12 times they tried to draw a charge. Just play defense instead of trying to get a call. While Tatum certainly flashed superstar caliber skills at times, he also did not appear to be a guy that could play iso ball in the last few minutes. Too many times he held the ball until there were two seconds left on the shot clock and tried bombing a three or bailed and passed and forced someone else to shoot with 0.5 on the shot clock. He also had some spotty first halves and some games with a bunch of late turnovers. Maybe he can play like he does in most of the second half throughout the game and in crunch time. Who knows if the core of Tatum / Brown / Smart / Walker can play better and work on closing out games. Brown is signed for 4 more years, Kemba for 3, and Smart for 2. Tatum will get a max deal, but he is under team control for 2 more years. They can pay for most of that by giving him what they are paying Hayward now. They won't be able to make major changes without a trade, so they will either have to develop someone for within or get other small pieces that might fit.
  11. Haven’t seen a New England QB with a play like that in a couple of decades.