Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

fourd

Members
  • Content Count

    1,544
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

75 Excellent

About fourd

  • Rank
    Footballguy
  1. Is it so difficult for you to understand that ACA was only a stepping stone for Democrats to a larger goal? It sorta is when they could have taken a larger step initially by introducing a government healthcare plan for those that want to choose it. That move alone makes me wonder if we'll ever get single payer Liberals wanted a gov't option. Republicans and a couple moderate Dems wouldn't go for it. Tell us how single payer is going to lower our costs. We were told Obamacare would lower premiums $2500. Medicare is vastly more efficient than private sector insurance. How so?
  2. Stage 1 of 'Operation Single Payer' is working out exactly like I expected it to work out. Can we have a list of all your stages? TIA. bump Stage 2 - the mess that is ACA will lead to an expansion of Medicare Stage 3 - cost of expanded Medicare will be so high that people will finally see the cost savings from a single payer system Stage 4 - single payer will pass Medicare is already single payer. Yet you say the cost will be so high we'll need to go to single payer?
  3. Co-ops are not the government, but you already knew that. The co-ops were made out of the ACA and funded directly by the government to add competition to the market. They were suppose to be non-profit (funny just how true that turned out to be), and weren't going to be run by insurance exes. The experiments didn't work and failed on a spectacular scale, wasting billions in tax payer money.Oh, and another one went belly up since my post yesterday. This one in Oregon. That makes 8 now. You conveniently forget to add how "the government" sliced the funding in the two budget wars and also changed the operating rules. Government funded program failures tend to be a self fulfilling prophecy after the sabotaging of the small government crowd. The National Alliance of State Health CO-OPs, a trade association representing the Obamacare co-ops, has blamed the problems on the Obamacare law itself and programming decisions by Obama administration officials. Following Health Republic’s collapse, Kelly Crowe, NASHCO’s CEO, released a statement saying “from practically their inception, health insurance co-ops have been hamstrung by both the structure of the program and the way in which [Obamacare] was implemented.” Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2015/09/28/feds-admit-more-obamacare-co-op-flops-ahead/#ixzz3oqQ2zVmm And then the next paragraph states- Capitalization levels “were insufficient” and the program contained numerous “regulatory obstacles,” she said. Capitalization levels were "cut" in the two budget battles as well as preventing CMS from shifting funds to handle the shortfalls in the risk corridor program. The regulatory obstacle of not being able to use any of the loan money for advertising, needing to repay the loans back on a fixed scheduled, etc. made them terribly vulnerable to the transitional (grandmothered) policies removing a good chunk of the healthy existing individual market from the new markets. Unlike the established competition, operating at loss to get a foothold wasn't an allowed option. It is a small wonder that any of them are still in business. In other words there is nothing in those two paragraphs that refute anything i posted. In fact "doomed from the start" is pretty much what I posted a week or two ago. But good try! And from that article - "This shortfall occurred despite two earlier injections of additional transitional reinsurance program recoveries into the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) individual market." There was never going to be enough money.
  4. Co-ops are not the government, but you already knew that. The co-ops were made out of the ACA and funded directly by the government to add competition to the market. They were suppose to be non-profit (funny just how true that turned out to be), and weren't going to be run by insurance exes. The experiments didn't work and failed on a spectacular scale, wasting billions in tax payer money.Oh, and another one went belly up since my post yesterday. This one in Oregon. That makes 8 now. You conveniently forget to add how "the government" sliced the funding in the two budget wars and also changed the operating rules. Government funded program failures tend to be a self fulfilling prophecy after the sabotaging of the small government crowd. The National Alliance of State Health CO-OPs, a trade association representing the Obamacare co-ops, has blamed the problems on the Obamacare law itself and programming decisions by Obama administration officials. Following Health Republic’s collapse, Kelly Crowe, NASHCO’s CEO, released a statement saying “from practically their inception, health insurance co-ops have been hamstrung by both the structure of the program and the way in which [Obamacare] was implemented.” Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2015/09/28/feds-admit-more-obamacare-co-op-flops-ahead/#ixzz3oqQ2zVmm And then the next paragraph states- Capitalization levels “were insufficient” and the program contained numerous “regulatory obstacles,” she said. Capitalization levels were "cut" in the two budget battles as well as preventing CMS from shifting funds to handle the shortfalls in the risk corridor program. The regulatory obstacle of not being able to use any of the loan money for advertising, needing to repay the loans back on a fixed scheduled, etc. made them terribly vulnerable to the transitional (grandmothered) policies removing a good chunk of the healthy existing individual market from the new markets. Unlike the established competition, operating at loss to get a foothold wasn't an allowed option. It is a small wonder that any of them are still in business. In other words there is nothing in those two paragraphs that refute anything i posted. In fact "doomed from the start" is pretty much what I posted a week or two ago. But good try! Who did that? Good try!
  5. You seriously can't make this stuff up. You should read the spin that the Huffington post put on their story about this bill. Oh the irony. You mean how Dems and Reps are making the ACA better by working together? Ignoring that they are taking it apart?
  6. http://www.newyorker.com/humor/borowitz-report/integrity-disqualifies-sanders-white-house
  7. Oh, and I forgot I didn't mention this before.... COBRA is an individual right. That means that you can accept it for your daughter (so she can keep the coverage and pediatrician) and decline it for you and your wife and you two can find alternative options on the exchange or potentially go without for the next few months. I don't have an option for that. I can either insure myself($348), insure myself and my wife($784), insure myself and my daughter($686), or insure all 3 of us($1056). Those are the only options I have on the paperwork. Call your COBRA administrator. Your daughter is a qualified beneficiary and can be the only one in your family that elects COBRA. Edit - Your wife would also be able to take COBRA by herself, or her and your daughter could elect it.
  8. http://finance.yahoo.com/news/insurers-face-health-overhaul-losses-2014-011557301--finance.html
  9. Hard for any more shoes to drop when government keeps them suspended in midair.
  10. On the Cadillac tax. https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-democratic-threat-to-obamacare/2015/09/30/30bed068-679d-11e5-8325-a42b5a459b1e_story.html
  11. That's not really fair though. If you don't cherry-pick the highest increases you get an accurate picture of the system as a whole. I'm missing your point? What is not fair? And what was cherry picked? I think I might even agree. By looking at ALL the data you can't prove that the cost of insurance is exploding and you undermine the narrative. Also, you are not a true patriot. They didn't look at all the data. They looked at 30 states for 3 years and didn't look at any premiums since the ACA took over the individual market. I did in the post above. I'd love to hear a counter. It's written by Jonathan Gruber, for goodness sake. Though he assures us the data is accurate. What did he say about Americans?
  12. We'll know on Thursday. I believe, though, that Minnesota had some of the lowest average rates in the country in 2014. That wasn't going to last. Crazy that they lost $135M last year, so they're going to need to make up for that - and then likely tack on a little more for actual profit. Nothing to see here. TGunz and BFS have assured us all is well.