Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums
HellToupee

Cast Iron Skillet omnibus

Recommended Posts

Cast Iron Skillet fans unite. Lots of good info .

 

Edited by HellToupee
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I paid $12 at Walmart for a 10" Lodge Cast Iron skillet. Already seasoned. I use it about 1x month. But for that price, so what?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Care is the most important part - and seasoning it the first time you use it is a gosh darned MUST DO.They are great for certain things, not so great on others.Some folks hate the clean up factor, some folks see it as easier than ev everything except a non-stick skillet - including th edishes you eat your meals off of (I'm in camp 2).That said, the flavor you get from cooking in a cast iron skillet is STRAIGHT UP irreplaceable in other cookware. Not even a grill gives the same kind of flavor as a cast iron skillet for certain kinds of cooking.I'd consider a 14" for your first one rather than a 12 - you'll get more us eout of a bigger one than a smaller one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in the process of buying new cookware and I'm thinking about adding a 12inch cast iron.Never had one but always wanted to pick one up. How much use does it get in your kitchen?

Hi HT,

I would recommend the Logic line from Lodge https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefront/prod...1404&menu=logic

The Logic line is pre seasoned so you don't have to do any of the normal prep and seasoning. Big plus. The 12" will get a ton of use.

It's heavy but that's really the only drawback.

It's inexpensive and you should be able to pass it on to your kids because it'll last for a long time. Good stuff.

J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in the process of buying new cookware and I'm thinking about adding a 12inch cast iron.Never had one but always wanted to pick one up. How much use does it get in your kitchen?

Hi HT,

I would recommend the Logic line from Lodge https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefront/prod...1404&menu=logic

The Logic line is pre seasoned so you don't have to do any of the normal prep and seasoning. Big plus. The 12" will get a ton of use.

It's heavy but that's really the only drawback.

It's inexpensive and you should be able to pass it on to your kids because it'll last for a long time. Good stuff.

J

My dad gave me one for Christmas last year that belonged to his family and has to be pretty old. Very cool.

:thumbup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Burgers, esp. , taste way better in a cast iron skillet.Lots of thngs like gumbos and what not - eggs even taste better in them Basically, anything with meat in it tastes better in the cast iron.Cleaning - the way *I* clean mine is that I simply wipe it out, rinse it off, and let it dry by heating it on the stove. If it is really soiled, or something burnt onto it, I'll heat it with water and a drop (no more) of dish liquid in it, wipe it using a rag and a pair of thongs, and then (using a potholder) dump the dirty soap water in the sink, rinse it well, return it to the heated stove and wait for the water to evaporate off it. Remove it from the heat, let it cool overnight or for a few hours, put away.What you must remember in cleaning cast ioron skillets is that standing water plus iron = rust. Rust does not taste good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any secret to cornbread in a C-I-S? I intend to make some ham/bean soup or some brunswick stew and want to try my first batch of cornbread in the cast iron skillet. :banned:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Burgers, esp. , taste way better in a cast iron skillet.

Lots of thngs like gumbos and what not - eggs even taste better in them Basically, anything with meat in it tastes better in the cast iron.

Cleaning - the way *I* clean mine is that I simply wipe it out, rinse it off, and let it dry by heating it on the stove. If it is really soiled, or something burnt onto it, I'll heat it with water and a drop (no more) of dish liquid in it, wipe it using a rag and a pair of thongs, and then (using a potholder) dump the dirty soap water in the sink, rinse it well, return it to the heated stove and wait for the water to evaporate off it. Remove it from the heat, let it cool overnight or for a few hours, put away.

What you must remember in cleaning cast ioron skillets is that standing water plus iron = rust. Rust does not taste good.

interesting, need to look into this.

I did have a cast iron flat thing for pancakes and stuff, needless to say, it was rusty after the first time I used it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...wipe it using a rag and a pair of thongs...

hey, whatever floats your boat

:lmao:

That should read "tongs." These months of new found single-dome must be wearing on me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Burgers, esp. , taste way better in a cast iron skillet.

Lots of thngs like gumbos and what not - eggs even taste better in them  Basically, anything with meat in it tastes better in the cast iron.

Cleaning - the way *I* clean mine is that I simply wipe it out, rinse it off, and let it dry by heating it on the stove.  If it is really soiled, or something burnt onto it, I'll heat it with water and a drop (no more) of dish liquid in it, wipe it using a rag and a pair of thongs, and then (using a potholder) dump the dirty soap water in the sink, rinse it well, return it to the heated stove and wait for the water to evaporate off it.  Remove it from the heat, let it cool overnight or for a few hours, put away.

What you must remember in cleaning cast ioron skillets is that standing water plus iron = rust.  Rust does not taste good.

interesting, need to look into this.

I did have a cast iron flat thing for pancakes and stuff, needless to say, it was rusty after the first time I used it.

That is more likely b/c you didn't season it before using it the first time rather than washing it and not drying it.

Just a guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Starting your steaks in a skillet is a must...Burgers are fantastic in cast iron...Nothing beats Southern Fried Chicken in a cast iron skillet...Cornbread comes out great in one...There are a number of things you can cook with it...no kitchen is complete without one...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Burgers, esp. , taste way better in a cast iron skillet.

Lots of thngs like gumbos and what not - eggs even taste better in them  Basically, anything with meat in it tastes better in the cast iron.

Cleaning - the way *I* clean mine is that I simply wipe it out, rinse it off, and let it dry by heating it on the stove.  If it is really soiled, or something burnt onto it, I'll heat it with water and a drop (no more) of dish liquid in it, wipe it using a rag and a pair of thongs, and then (using a potholder) dump the dirty soap water in the sink, rinse it well, return it to the heated stove and wait for the water to evaporate off it.  Remove it from the heat, let it cool overnight or for a few hours, put away.

What you must remember in cleaning cast ioron skillets is that standing water plus iron = rust.  Rust does not taste good.

interesting, need to look into this.

I did have a cast iron flat thing for pancakes and stuff, needless to say, it was rusty after the first time I used it.

That is more likely b/c you didn't season it before using it the first time rather than washing it and not drying it.

Just a guess.

Mine's so seasoned that could soak that thing overnight in a sink full of soapy water and it won't even come close to breaking down it's barrier...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing beats Southern Fried Chicken in a cast iron skillet...

MmmmmmYup - not even a deep fryer makes fried chicken as well as an expert with a cast iron skillet. The secret is corn bread and NOT white flour for the breading.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Burgers, esp. , taste way better in a cast iron skillet.

Lots of thngs like gumbos and what not - eggs even taste better in them  Basically, anything with meat in it tastes better in the cast iron.

Cleaning - the way *I* clean mine is that I simply wipe it out, rinse it off, and let it dry by heating it on the stove.  If it is really soiled, or something burnt onto it, I'll heat it with water and a drop (no more) of dish liquid in it, wipe it using a rag and a pair of thongs, and then (using a potholder) dump the dirty soap water in the sink, rinse it well, return it to the heated stove and wait for the water to evaporate off it.  Remove it from the heat, let it cool overnight or for a few hours, put away.

What you must remember in cleaning cast ioron skillets is that standing water plus iron = rust.  Rust does not taste good.

interesting, need to look into this.

I did have a cast iron flat thing for pancakes and stuff, needless to say, it was rusty after the first time I used it.

That is more likely b/c you didn't season it before using it the first time rather than washing it and not drying it.

Just a guess.

Mine's so seasoned that could soak that thing overnight in a sink full of soapy water and it won't even come close to breaking down it's barrier...

See KGB? Listen to TDoss - he's a good ole southern boy cook, IIRC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was a pre-teen, my grandpa used to cook me buckwheat pancakes every Saturday morning and a steak every Saturday night in his old cast iron skillet. If only I had thought to ask for it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any secret to cornbread in a C-I-S? I intend to make some ham/bean soup or some brunswick stew and want to try my first batch of cornbread in the cast iron skillet. :banned:

No secret at all - I usually oil mine with corn oil, preheat it in the oven, then pour the batter into the hot oiled skillet before baking it until done. I use the Dinosaur Bar-B-Que recipe for their honey cornbread. Yummy. :thumbup:

I flat out love my cast iron skillets. I have 6, 8, 10, and 12 inch skillets and use the 12" one at least three times a week. It's been around for at least 20 years and I doubt that any Teflon pan sticks less than this one does. NOTHING sticks to this thing. Just remember the basic rule of cooking - heat the pan, THEN add the oil, and the food won't stick.

When cleaning, keep in mind that every time you wash it with soap a bit of the seasoning will disappear, and eventually you'll need to reseason it.

Seasoning is easy - wipe it down thoroughly with vegetable oil, put it in a 350 degree oven, and let it bake for an hour. Wipe out the excess oil when you're done and it's good to go. I bought a Lodge Logic dutch oven, and used it pre-seasoned - it worked OK, but afterwards I reseasoned it anyway 'cause the food tasted sort of, well, TOO cast-iron-y. But I'm sorta obsessive like that so :shrug:

If you're looking for the best bang for the buck, get a 12" (minimum) Lodge Logic and don't look back - you'll have a kitchen tool that you'll use for years and, if you like blackened steak or salmon, you'll kiss the thing after you finish the meal. One of the best steaks I've had in recent memory was inspired by a previous thread on this board - sear it as hot as possible in a skillet, let it rest for an hour, then finish it in the skillet in a low oven. Used a basic dry rub. Insane. :thumbup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing beats Southern Fried Chicken in a cast iron skillet...

Mmmmmm

Yup - not even a deep fryer makes fried chicken as well as an expert with a cast iron skillet. The secret is corn bread and NOT white flour for the breading.

I totally disagree with the corn meal vs. flour thing here. Southern Fried Chicken is made with white flour....at least in my part of the South.

But yes: Cast Iron is the best. Especially if you fry with propane...only way to get the oil hot enough IMHO. (Like a generator...please remember to use outside!)

My cast iron cookware gets used almost every meal I cook. And I have never used soap on it. I've got a huge skillet, dutch oven, and cornbread molds all in cast iron. The skillet is my favorite. I love heating it until it smokes, searing each side of my steaks, and throwing the whole thing in the oven at 500 to finish them off. Don't forget the stick(s) of butter. And cornbread simply is crap unless cooked in castiron. The metal & oil tend to fry the bottoms of the bread....yummy yum yum.

Joe also suggested getting the preseasoned skillets...this too I disagree with only because of how easy it is to season your own. Most hardware stores have good ones at good prices for some wierd reason.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing beats Southern Fried Chicken in a cast iron skillet...

Mmmmmm

Yup - not even a deep fryer makes fried chicken as well as an expert with a cast iron skillet. The secret is corn bread and NOT white flour for the breading.

I totally disagree with the corn meal vs. flour thing here. Southern Fried Chicken is made with white flour....at least in my part of the South.
In a cast iron skillet or deep fried? I find fried chicken kind of tricky with flour in a cast iron skillet and corn meal (tyhus the breading itself) stays on better if made with corn meal.

Just my opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing beats Southern Fried Chicken in a cast iron skillet...

Mmmmmm

Yup - not even a deep fryer makes fried chicken as well as an expert with a cast iron skillet. The secret is corn bread and NOT white flour for the breading.

I totally disagree with the corn meal vs. flour thing here. Southern Fried Chicken is made with white flour....at least in my part of the South.
In a cast iron skillet or deep fried? I find fried chicken kind of tricky with flour in a cast iron skillet and corn meal (tyhus the breading itself) stays on better if made with corn meal.

Just my opinion.

P.S. - note that I said "fried chicken" - even though I was responsding to "southern" fried chicken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the best steaks I've had in recent memory was inspired by a previous thread on this board - sear it as hot as possible in a skillet, let it rest for an hour, then finish it in the skillet in a low oven. Used a basic dry rub. Insane. :thumbup:

Hi Bakes,

Glad that worked out for you. I set my smoke alarm off twice with that the other day.

It is good though.

I wound up going with the square griddle for the steaks https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefront/prod...&idProduct=3986 and it was perfect. Easily got 3 big NY Strips on it without crowding. :thumbup:

J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you like steaks this is a great recipe from Alton Brown for steaks in a cast iron skillet.1 boneless rib eye steak, 1 1/2-inch thick Canola oil to coat Kosher salt and ground black pepperPlace 10 to 12-inch cast iron skillet in oven and heat oven to 500 degrees. Bring steak(s) to room temperature. When oven reaches temperature, remove pan and place on range over high heat. Coat steak lightly with oil and season both sides with a generous pinch of salt. Grind on black pepper to taste. Immediately place steak in the middle of hot, dry pan. Cook 30 seconds without moving. Turn with tongs and cook another 30 seconds, then put the pan straight into the oven for 2 minutes. Flip steak and cook for another 2 minutes. (This time is for medium rare steaks. If you prefer medium, add a minute to both of the oven turns.) Remove steak from pan, cover loosely with foil, and rest for 2 minutes. Serve whole or slice thin and fan onto plate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...And cornbread simply is crap unless cooked in castiron. The metal & oil tend to fry the bottoms of the bread....yummy yum yum.

Listen to the man. He knows of what he speaks. That's why I preheat the oiled pan before adding the batter. My kids fight over the crunchy bits.

Joe also suggested getting the preseasoned skillets...this too I disagree with only because of how easy it is to season your own. Most hardware stores have good ones at good prices for some wierd reason.

I'll second that as well. I've bought most of mine at either Snow's Hardware in Orleans, MA or Eureka Tent & Camping (Johnson Outdoor) in Binghamton NY. Better prices than anywhere, even Wal-Mart. :shrug::thumbup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every camping trip should include said skillet...oh man...I'm dying for some catfish fried up in a cast iron skillet...And I don't get the "preseasoned" nonsense...seasoning your skillet could not be easier...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a cast iron skillet or deep fried? I find fried chicken kind of tricky with flour in a cast iron skillet and corn meal (tyhus the breading itself) stays on better if made with corn meal.

Just my opinion.

In cast iron of course.

I must admit I've never actually tried the cornmeal thing, but a cousin of mine used to crush Corn Flakes into her flour and made some pretty amazing chicken.

One way to combat the flour not sticking issue is to "marinate" your chicken in an ice water bath before cooking. A lot of southern chefs also go the buttermilk route which also helps the flour stick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

P.S. - note that I said "fried chicken" - even though I was responsding to "southern" fried chicken

I'm still pissed you would use cornmeal. :hot::hot::)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Burgers, esp. , taste way better in a cast iron skillet.

Lots of thngs like gumbos and what not - eggs even taste better in them Basically, anything with meat in it tastes better in the cast iron.

Cleaning - the way *I* clean mine is that I simply wipe it out, rinse it off, and let it dry by heating it on the stove. If it is really soiled, or something burnt onto it, I'll heat it with water and a drop (no more) of dish liquid in it, wipe it using a rag and a pair of thongs, and then (using a potholder) dump the dirty soap water in the sink, rinse it well, return it to the heated stove and wait for the water to evaporate off it. Remove it from the heat, let it cool overnight or for a few hours, put away.

What you must remember in cleaning cast ioron skillets is that standing water plus iron = rust. Rust does not taste good.

interesting, need to look into this.

I did have a cast iron flat thing for pancakes and stuff, needless to say, it was rusty after the first time I used it.

That is more likely b/c you didn't season it before using it the first time rather than washing it and not drying it.

Just a guess.

Mine's so seasoned that could soak that thing overnight in a sink full of soapy water and it won't even come close to breaking down it's barrier...

See KGB? Listen to TDoss - he's a good ole southern boy cook, IIRC.

good info here. hell I didnt even know what seasoning was. I think I'll do it myself next time...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a cast iron skillet or deep fried?  I find fried chicken kind of tricky with flour in a cast iron skillet and corn meal (tyhus the breading itself) stays on better if made with corn meal.

Just my opinion.

In cast iron of course.

I must admit I've never actually tried the cornmeal thing, but a cousin of mine used to crush Corn Flakes into her flour and made some pretty amazing chicken.

One way to combat the flour not sticking issue is to "marinate" your chicken in an ice water bath before cooking. A lot of southern chefs also go the buttermilk route which also helps the flour stick.

We do the buttermilk. Makes it better.

J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought this complete set at Costco or Sam's Club for something like $20 or $30 max...

And honestly...it's the only cookware that you will never ever replace. I cannot fathom a reason for ever needing to buy a replacement skillet. A second one...sure...if you're cooking up a lot of fish, chicken and/or cornbread...but that skillet will far outlast any other item in your kitchen...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the best steaks I've had in recent memory was inspired by a previous thread on this board - sear it as hot as possible in a skillet, let it rest for an hour, then finish it in the skillet in a low oven. Used a basic dry rub. Insane. :thumbup:

Hi Bakes,

Glad that worked out for you. I set my smoke alarm off twice with that the other day.

It is good though.

I wound up going with the square griddle for the steaks https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefront/prod...&idProduct=3986 and it was perfect. Easily got 3 big NY Strips on it without crowding. :thumbup:

J

Hey Joe!

Yeah it did - couldn't remember who posted that, but just outstanding - great flavor and texture when it's cooked that way.

I need to get one of those square griddles - I have a big rectangular one that covers two burners on the stove or half the gas grill, but the 12" square size seems pretty much ideal for cooking a few steaks on one burner than a 12" round skillet. Less crowding. Cool!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Best salmon I have evah had:BLACKENED FISH3 parts Paprika (sweet)1½ parts Salt¾ parts Black Pepper¾ parts White Pepper1 parts Red Pepper (cayenne)½ parts Oregano (dried leaves)½ parts Thyme (dried leaves)1 parts Onion Powder1 parts Garlic Powder----11 Total partsCast Iron Skillet (with little or no lip/side)Unsalted ButterCooking Instructions1.)Mix all spices together.2.)Set cast iron skillet directly on coals at maximum heat for 30 minutes or more.3.)Filet fish (remove skin and back bone).4.)Slice fish filet long ways so it is approximately ¼" thick. Take the extra time to properly slice the fish. The thinner you slice the filets the better the blackened fish will be. The filets should be approximately 3" by 4" by ¼".5.)Dry filets on paper towels.6.)Melt a lot of unsalted butter, enough to thoroughly soak all filets.7.)Dip fillets in butter, thoroughly coating the fillets.8.)Put a liberal layer of spice on the fish.9.)Cook outdoors, obviously.10.)Set filets on skillet (put spice on top side if not already done).11.)Flip filets over when bottom side is blackened (15 to 45 seconds per side depending on temperature of skillet and thickness of filet).12.)Remove filets when both sides are blackened.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buttermilk definitely makes it better...I will sometimes double dip my chicken...basically I'll get the oil to a little higher temperature than I'd normally cook it in...take the chicken that was soaking in cold buttermilk...dip it in my seasoning/flour mixture...throw it in the skillet for a minute or so...take the chicken out and lower the temperature and add pat or two of butter (IMPORTANT!)...roll the chicken in the seasoning/flour mixture again and throw the chicken back into the skillet...cover with tinfoil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We do the buttermilk. Makes it better.

J

I think the biggest trick is being able to get the oil hot enough and maintain that heat during cooking. The only way to do that (unless you have better stoves than any restaurant i've ever worked at) is to cook it outside with a propane cooker. Plus, the roar of the fire & gas sounds cool. And you don't mess up your kitchen.

Thats it. Southern Food Festival at the McStaggers tomorrow.

Fried Chicken

Corn Bread

Collard Greens

White Beans & Rice

Mash Po

and Sweet Tea. I make the best freaking sweat tea on the planet. It's grandmas recipie (so is the chicken & corn bread).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a great thread. Not only did I ruin my one attempted meal, I also ruined the CIS with my multiple attempts to (incorrectly) clean it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the best steaks I've had in recent memory was inspired by a previous thread on this board - sear it as hot as possible in a skillet, let it rest for an hour, then finish it in the skillet in a low oven.  Used a basic dry rub.  Insane.  :thumbup:

Hi Bakes,

Glad that worked out for you. I set my smoke alarm off twice with that the other day.

It is good though.

I wound up going with the square griddle for the steaks https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefront/prod...&idProduct=3986 and it was perfect. Easily got 3 big NY Strips on it without crowding. :thumbup:

J

Hey Joe!

Yeah it did - couldn't remember who posted that, but just outstanding - great flavor and texture when it's cooked that way.

I need to get one of those square griddles - I have a big rectangular one that covers two burners on the stove or half the gas grill, but the 12" square size seems pretty much ideal for cooking a few steaks on one burner than a 12" round skillet. Less crowding. Cool!

Hi Bakes,

Yeah I looked at several different models but the problem for me was crowding. Plus I was worried about steaming the meat with the higher sides. The square griddle worked perfectly.

I think next time I'm going to do the thing outside over the charcoal chimney for searing and then bringing it in to the oven. I really do think it's better than the grill. (never thought I'd say that)

J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hushpuppies come out nice in a skillet as well...Really...if you know what you're doing...there's not much that can't be done in a cast iron skillet...but there are certain food items that are just off the charts fantastic when prepared in cast iron...as mentioned already in this thread...Just thought of another one...Salmon Cakes!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We do the buttermilk. Makes it better.

J

I think the biggest trick is being able to get the oil hot enough and maintain that heat during cooking. The only way to do that (unless you have better stoves than any restaurant i've ever worked at) is to cook it outside with a propane cooker. Plus, the roar of the fire & gas sounds cool. And you don't mess up your kitchen.

Thats it. Southern Food Festival at the McStaggers tomorrow.

Fried Chicken

Corn Bread

Collard Greens

White Beans & Rice

Mash Po

and Sweet Tea. I make the best freaking sweat tea on the planet. It's grandmas recipie (so is the chicken & corn bread).

Hey tipsey,

Would you share the recipie with the FBG brethren?

J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a great thread. Not only did I ruin my one attempted meal, I also ruined the CIS with my multiple attempts to (incorrectly) clean it.

Can't ruin one...just scrub it clean...use steel wool and comet to take out the rust...and start all over...reseason as already detailed earlier and you'll be good to go...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

P.S. - note that I said "fried chicken" - even though I was responsding to "southern" fried chicken

I'm still pissed you would use cornmeal. :hot::hot::)

:lmao:

Sorry - I like the flavort of it - but I'm a western boy, not a southern one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We do the buttermilk. Makes it better.

J

I think the biggest trick is being able to get the oil hot enough and maintain that heat during cooking. The only way to do that (unless you have better stoves than any restaurant i've ever worked at) is to cook it outside with a propane cooker. Plus, the roar of the fire & gas sounds cool. And you don't mess up your kitchen.

Thats it. Southern Food Festival at the McStaggers tomorrow.

Fried Chicken

Corn Bread

Collard Greens

White Beans & Rice

Mash Po

and Sweet Tea. I make the best freaking sweat tea on the planet. It's grandmas recipie (so is the chicken & corn bread).

Hey tipsey,

Would you share the recipie with the FBG brethren?

J

And, tipsy, if you are EVER out here in Denver, get in touch with me.

Some white boys from Jacksonville florida opened the best southern food place west of the Mississippi out here in Colorado called "Tom's home cookin'" - sweet tea like you wouldn't believe existed outside the south, and catfish is their speciality.

(p.s. - you may ask how I know it is the best? ex-g.f. is a Nothe Cacky lacky native who livced the vast bulk of her life east of the mississippi and south of the Mason Dixon. She confirmed what I suspected about that place - and she's the one who pointed out the sweet tea thing to me)

BTW, I may be in New Orleans for a wedding in mid-Feb - is Dante's re-opened/still open? You back at work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bakes,

Yeah I looked at several different models but the problem for me was crowding. Plus I was worried about steaming the meat with the higher sides. The square griddle worked perfectly.

I think next time I'm going to do the thing outside over the charcoal chimney for searing and then bringing it in to the oven. I really do think it's better than the grill. (never thought I'd say that)

J

Hey Joe!

Hmm... I'm liking that idea, not only for the intense heat generated by the chimney but also for the side dishes. After searing over the chimney, dump the coals in the Weber, throw on the wok (or veggie pan, whatever) and grill up some onions, peppers, etc. while the steak finishes. If you do the long method, wrap some big old Russets in foil and throw them in the coals for a while as well.

:blackdot: for spring thaw.

There goes my diet right out the window... :rant:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm... I'm liking that idea, not only for the intense heat generated by the chimney but also for the side dishes. After searing over the chimney, dump the coals in the Weber, throw on the wok (or veggie pan, whatever) and grill up some onions, peppers, etc. while the steak finishes. If you do the long method, wrap some big old Russets in foil and throw them in the coals for a while as well.

I like the way you think.

J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey tipsey,

Would you share the recipie with the FBG brethren?

J

When you learn how to spell my name. :boxing:

I assume you are talking about the chicken....

It's not really a recipie rather than an entire childhood watching & helping her cook it up on Sundays. Crisco, Flour, Salt, Pepper, Cast Iron, Milk or Buttermilk (i use buttermilk often, but she never would have) Outdoor Propane cooker.

You cannot let the chicken stay submerged, so don't overfill your pot with too much chicken or oil. You must check the oil for correct temp by throwing flour on it & seeing how quickly it frys. You can overheat it, and the smoke that comes off the flour will be your first clue. Like with most cooking, it is all about technique as my chef says constantly.

Put that chicken in ice water in a big bowl/tub for at least an hour before you cook. Dip it in the milk & toss in bag with flour & seasonings. Shake it like a polariod picture. Cook immediately after coating in flour. NEVER EVER DOUBLE DIP IN THE MILK....LUMPS! Keep that chicken moving around the pot constantly. Remember to let it have room to float. A crowded pot = goo on your chicken. Remove from heat to newspaper & salt immediately....while its still bubbling hot.

Golly I'm glad I have leftover Ruth's Chris in my fridge from our anniversary dinner last night. I am so hungry after being in this thread for the last half hour.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use my cast iron all the time - indoor, on the grill, on the campfire. I use a modified recipe for tenderloin steaks I got at this forum (poster named "Stu Green" I believe) using the cast iron on my gas grill.I have never had a problem cleaning it - never use any soap, just a brush and some water every once in a while.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I miss Sweetened Sun Tea...can't seem to make it happen out here in California...I'm assuming it's the water difference...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And, tipsy, if you are EVER out here in Denver, get in touch with me.

Some white boys from Jacksonville florida opened the best southern food place west of the Mississippi out here in Colorado called "Tom's home cookin'" - sweet tea like you wouldn't believe existed outside the south, and catfish is their speciality.

(p.s. - you may ask how I know it is the best? ex-g.f. is a Nothe Cacky lacky native who livced the vast bulk of her life east of the mississippi and south of the Mason Dixon. She confirmed what I suspected about that place - and she's the one who pointed out the sweet tea thing to me)

BTW, I may be in New Orleans for a wedding in mid-Feb - is Dante's re-opened/still open? You back at work?

I doubt I'll be in Denver again in the near future, but you never know. I demand to eat at this place if I do.

And you must come into Dantes if you make it to town. I would diet before you come down! Thats if we don't all kill each other before then....we have been busier than ever and with the bare minimum of staff. Everyone is working doubles and the customers are unrelenting. Its been quite stressful...to the point that one of the owners took about 6 of the staff to Florida for our 2 days off this week. Hopefully with the students coming back now, we will be able to hire up a little.

Let me know if you need help finding housing. Hotels are pretty full, but rooms are available.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.