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HellToupee

Cast Iron Skillet omnibus

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Will do - we have a block of rooms set up - her original wedding was THE weekend of the week that Katrina hit, so the hotel is being super cool abou tmaking sure she has rooms that weekend. But, the groom needs a lot of rooms for his family (all Denver folks) and I wouldn't want to interfere with that. It is 25-75 against my coming - too many expenses right now to do the big air fare (currently $340 from Denver for the weekend of their wedding). IF I come, believe me - your restauranty is HIGH on my list of things to do - I've been drooling about eating in New Orleans - and specifically Dante's - since last offseason (when we first started talking about where you work).

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Will do - we have a block of rooms set up - her original wedding was THE weekend of the week that Katrina hit, so the hotel is being super cool abou tmaking sure she has rooms that weekend. But, the groom needs a lot of rooms for his family (all Denver folks) and I wouldn't want to interfere with that.

It is 25-75 against my coming - too many expenses right now to do the big air fare (currently $340 from Denver for the weekend of their wedding). IF I come, believe me - your restauranty is HIGH on my list of things to do - I've been drooling about eating in New Orleans - and specifically Dante's - since last offseason (when we first started talking about where you work).

We are ready for you marc! Scroll down on the page for your update.

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Will do - we have a block of rooms set up - her original wedding was THE weekend of the week that Katrina hit, so the hotel is being super cool abou tmaking sure she has rooms that weekend.  But, the groom needs a lot of rooms for his family (all Denver folks) and I wouldn't want to interfere with that. 

It is 25-75 against my coming - too many expenses right now to do the big air fare (currently $340 from Denver for the weekend of their wedding).  IF I come, believe me - your restauranty is HIGH on my list of things to do - I've been drooling about eating in New Orleans - and specifically Dante's - since last offseason (when we first started talking about where you work).

We are ready for you marc! Scroll down on the page for your update.

:lmao:

Now I HAVE to get there - I'm roylalty (or is that another FBGuy?)

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If you were asking about the tea joe....

You gotta boil it and add about 20 pounds of sugar while you do.

I wasn't going to say it since it was grandma's recipe...but honestly...sweet tea couldn't be named more appropriately...it's just tea...with sugar...

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If you were asking about the tea joe....

You gotta boil it and add about 20 pounds of sugar while you do.

I wasn't going to say it since it was grandma's recipe...but honestly...sweet tea couldn't be named more appropriately...it's just tea...with sugar...

Boiling it vs Sun tea is huge here. The tea that has been cooked with the sugar is much better than sweet sun tea could ever hope to be.

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If you were asking about the tea joe....

You gotta boil it and add about 20 pounds of sugar while you do.

I wasn't going to say it since it was grandma's recipe...but honestly...sweet tea couldn't be named more appropriately...it's just tea...with sugar...

Boiling it vs Sun tea is huge here. The tea that has been cooked with the sugar is much better than sweet sun tea could ever hope to be.

I agree...I just mentioned Sun tea because I missed it...

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I spent a week with my family in NC last spring. The tea was like crack. I was ready to sell my organs for a fix once I got back up North.I tried a couple recipes but couldn't even come close to that Southern nectar. I suspect they brew it with opium, that's why I couldn't stop drinking it.I have a couple of old cast irons I got at a garage sale. They have some rust on them but I haven't tried to clean them up. After this thread, maybe I will.

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My ex-ex-ex (three G.F.'s ago) used to make sun tea out here in Colorado all the time.You need constant sun - which we get in Colorado - if you get a sunny morning and a gray afternoon it won't turn out properly.

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My ex-ex-ex (three G.F.'s ago) used to make sun tea out here in Colorado all the time.

You need constant sun - which we get in Colorado - if you get a sunny morning and a gray afternoon it won't turn out properly.

Out here in Murrieta...all's I got is sun...my friend says "Murrieta" is old Native American for "Surface of the Sun"...

But it still doesn't come out like it used to when I was back home...

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I have a couple of old cast irons I got at a garage sale. They have some rust on them but I haven't tried to clean them up. After this thread, maybe I will.

don't get them wet - use some steel wool with nothing first, and then, if necessary, use a special tough stain soap withOUT any water and with the steel wool - that should remove the VAST BULK of the rust and any nasty coating.

Then rinse, wipe out, scrub again if necessary - and RE-SEASON THAT BAD BOY - maybe a few times actually to get rid of that other person's nasty mistreatment of these beautiful pieces of cookware - and you should be good to go.

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I spent a week with my family in NC last spring. The tea was like crack. I was ready to sell my organs for a fix once I got back up North.

I tried a couple recipes but couldn't even come close to that Southern nectar. I suspect they brew it with opium, that's why I couldn't stop drinking it.

I have a couple of old cast irons I got at a garage sale. They have some rust on them but I haven't tried to clean them up. After this thread, maybe I will.

Dude...brother...I KNOW you didn't try to make Sun Tea...or any tea for that matter with that stank nasty Jersey water!?!?!
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My ex-ex-ex (three G.F.'s ago) used to make sun tea out here in Colorado all the time.

You need constant sun - which we get in Colorado - if you get a sunny morning and a gray afternoon it won't turn out properly.

Out here in Murrieta...all's I got is sun...my friend says "Murrieta" is old Native American for "Surface of the Sun"...

But it still doesn't come out like it used to when I was back home...

Hmm - very strange, maybe it is the water.

I know this defeats the purpose of sun tea, but try BOILING the water first to remove impurities, and then making the sun tea. Also, did you buy a special sun tea jug just for the heck of it? I know it makes no difference what kind of clear jug you use, but plastic versus glass can make a HUGE difference.

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p.s.- with sun tea - also keep in mind that it is much drier in California than in the south and that humidity goes a long way to keeping sun tea tasty.

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I spent a week with my family in NC last spring. The tea was like crack.  I was ready to sell my organs for a fix once I got back up North.

I tried a couple recipes but couldn't even come close to that Southern nectar.  I suspect they brew it with opium, that's why I couldn't stop drinking it.

I have a couple of old cast irons I got at a garage sale.  They have some rust on them but I haven't tried to clean them up.  After this thread, maybe I will.

Dude...brother...I KNOW you didn't try to make Sun Tea...or any tea for that matter with that stank nasty Jersey water!?!?!

Hey I tried to keep it as Southern as I could. I fried up some roadkill and kissed my sister before brewing it up.

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I spent a week with my family in NC last spring. The tea was like crack.  I was ready to sell my organs for a fix once I got back up North.

I tried a couple recipes but couldn't even come close to that Southern nectar.  I suspect they brew it with opium, that's why I couldn't stop drinking it.

I have a couple of old cast irons I got at a garage sale.  They have some rust on them but I haven't tried to clean them up.  After this thread, maybe I will.

Dude...brother...I KNOW you didn't try to make Sun Tea...or any tea for that matter with that stank nasty Jersey water!?!?!

Hey I tried to keep it as Southern as I could. I fried up some roadkill and kissed my sister before brewing it up.

It is this very reason here why your tea didn't come out right...and if you continue your bashing of the beloved South...you will never get the rust out of those skillets...this I vow...

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I spent a week with my family in NC last spring. The tea was like crack.  I was ready to sell my organs for a fix once I got back up North.

I tried a couple recipes but couldn't even come close to that Southern nectar.  I suspect they brew it with opium, that's why I couldn't stop drinking it.

I have a couple of old cast irons I got at a garage sale.  They have some rust on them but I haven't tried to clean them up.  After this thread, maybe I will.

Dude...brother...I KNOW you didn't try to make Sun Tea...or any tea for that matter with that stank nasty Jersey water!?!?!

Hey I tried to keep it as Southern as I could. I fried up some roadkill and kissed my sister before brewing it up.

It is this very reason here why your tea didn't come out right...and if you continue your bashing of the beloved South...you will never get the rust out of those skillets...this I vow...

I'd ask you not to bash NJ, but really, what's the point... it's NJ.

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I spent a week with my family in NC last spring. The tea was like crack.  I was ready to sell my organs for a fix once I got back up North.

I tried a couple recipes but couldn't even come close to that Southern nectar.  I suspect they brew it with opium, that's why I couldn't stop drinking it.

I have a couple of old cast irons I got at a garage sale.  They have some rust on them but I haven't tried to clean them up.  After this thread, maybe I will.

Dude...brother...I KNOW you didn't try to make Sun Tea...or any tea for that matter with that stank nasty Jersey water!?!?!

Hey I tried to keep it as Southern as I could. I fried up some roadkill and kissed my sister before brewing it up.

It is this very reason here why your tea didn't come out right...and if you continue your bashing of the beloved South...you will never get the rust out of those skillets...this I vow...

I'd ask you not to bash NJ, but really, what's the point... it's NJ.

I know bro...it ain't even fair...and honestly there's just no sport in it...

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Wow...I must say I'm impressed, thought I was the only one still using CIS's. Anyone here into using smokers for fish and meat? I've got some great brine recipes for smoked salmon and trout if anyone's interested and am always open for new ideas.

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Wow, colour me shocked that there are households that don't us a cast iron pan. I have the 12" skillet (that I think every household I know has) and a smaller 6" one that is perfect for pancakes, eggs, etc. They are the only 2 pans I use. Maintenance is key... I agree with whoever said they wash them and place them on a hot burner to dry the water off. This keeps them well seasoned.

I also use them to cook in the oven...roasts, chicken, whatever...if it fits in the CIS, thats where it goes. The one I have was my grandmothers. She had a cast iron pot that I woulda loved to have too. (Still eyeing it in moms cupbpard ;))

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Burgers, esp. , taste way better in a cast iron skillet.

Lots of thngs like gumbos and what not - eggs even taste better in them Basically, anything with meat in it tastes better in the cast iron.

Cleaning - the way *I* clean mine is that I simply wipe it out, rinse it off, and let it dry by heating it on the stove. If it is really soiled, or something burnt onto it, I'll heat it with water and a drop (no more) of dish liquid in it, wipe it using a rag and a pair of thongs, and then (using a potholder) dump the dirty soap water in the sink, rinse it well, return it to the heated stove and wait for the water to evaporate off it. Remove it from the heat, let it cool overnight or for a few hours, put away.

What you must remember in cleaning cast ioron skillets is that standing water plus iron = rust. Rust does not taste good.

It's also a tip that you shouldn't use soap in it. Ever. Also, when your done evaporating the water off you can finish it with a drop of oil or two wiped around with a paper towel.

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I've got some great brine recipes for smoked salmon and trout if anyone's interested and am always open for new ideas.

please post the recipe!

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Nothing beats Southern Fried Chicken in a cast iron skillet...

:yes: Main reason why I have one, myself.

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Any secret to cornbread in a C-I-S? I intend to make some ham/bean soup or some brunswick stew and want to try my first batch of cornbread in the cast iron skillet. :banned:

Here's a recipe I have made several times with good results:

Ingredients

Eggs - 2

Butter, melted - 3 oz

Whole milk - 2 c

White cheddar cheese - grated - 6 oz

Sour cream - 8 oz

Corn, creamed - 16 oz can

Polenta - 7 oz (aka corn grits)

Flour, AP - 6 oz

Sugar, granulated - 1 1/3 oz

Salt - 1/2 tsp

Baking powder - 1/2 tsp

Baking soda - 1/2 tsp

Method

1. Mix first six ingredients together in large bowl.

2. Add remaining ingredients. Whisk until well combined. (I found out that I get a more consistent batter by adding the dry ingredients one at a time, whisking briefly after each one).

3. Preheat oven to 350°F. Heat 12" diameter cast iron skillet in oven until hot, approximatley 15 minutes (DO NOT skimp on this step). When hot, oil pan with vegetable oil (or cooking spray, which has also worked in the past). Pour batter into pan (should be about 3/4 full).

4. Bake until golden brown at top edges and firmly set, approximatley 40 minutes, depending on your oven. Don't be afraid to let it go another 10 minutes if necessary. The bread will still seem moist, but will be somewhat firm to the touch. Remove from oven and let bread cool in pan.

5. Slather with butter and consume like a Neanderthal.

You can also alter the recipe to your liking. To add some zest, add a small can of drained green chiles and some Frank's Red Hot sauce to the batter.

Let me know if this works for you.

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I picked up a 12" skillet and love it. 1st thing I used it for was to fry up some bacon. Fried chicken in the cast iron :thumbup:

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Grandma's kitchen always had several. Myself, I've been oblivious to the wonders of this marvel. Given the glowing reviews here it is clear I need to expand my repetoire and the expense seems minimal.I do have a cast iron wok that I favor over my stainless steel one.

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***STUPID QUESTION ALERT *** :bag: Is it OK to use Crisco in a can to season or does it need to be liquid vegetable oil?My current options, pre-grocery store run are that, OLIVE or CANOLA oil. At least I was able to decide for myself that motor, 3-in-1 and WD-40 were probably not the best options.... :P

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Any secret to cornbread in a C-I-S? I intend to make some ham/bean soup or some brunswick stew and want to try my first batch of cornbread in the cast iron skillet.  :banned:

Here's a recipe I have made several times with good results:

Ingredients

Eggs - 2

Butter, melted - 3 oz

Whole milk - 2 c

White cheddar cheese - grated - 6 oz

Sour cream - 8 oz

Corn, creamed - 16 oz can

Polenta - 7 oz (aka corn grits)

Flour, AP - 6 oz

Sugar, granulated - 1 1/3 oz

Salt - 1/2 tsp

Baking powder - 1/2 tsp

Baking soda - 1/2 tsp

Method

1. Mix first six ingredients together in large bowl.

2. Add remaining ingredients. Whisk until well combined. (I found out that I get a more consistent batter by adding the dry ingredients one at a time, whisking briefly after each one).

3. Preheat oven to 350°F. Heat 12" diameter cast iron skillet in oven until hot, approximatley 15 minutes (DO NOT skimp on this step). When hot, oil pan with vegetable oil (or cooking spray, which has also worked in the past). Pour batter into pan (should be about 3/4 full).

4. Bake until golden brown at top edges and firmly set, approximatley 40 minutes, depending on your oven. Don't be afraid to let it go another 10 minutes if necessary. The bread will still seem moist, but will be somewhat firm to the touch. Remove from oven and let bread cool in pan.

5. Slather with butter and consume like a Neanderthal.

You can also alter the recipe to your liking. To add some zest, add a small can of drained green chiles and some Frank's Red Hot sauce to the batter.

Let me know if this works for you.

Thanks irr,

This may be the first recipe I've ever seen for corn bread that doesn't include corn meal. I think there's a law in Georgia about that.

I know you get it from the polenta (very under rated food - good grilled) but that just seemed odd reading it.

I'll give it a try.

J

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:blackdot:

:goodposting:

After years of eating whatever my wife got out of some box from the freezer, I'm slowly taking over the kitchen duties. And my son thanks me for it. "Dad, you're cooking tonight, right?" :D Looks like a CIS will be a good investment. I used to have one..think she threw it out.

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Any secret to cornbread in a C-I-S? I intend to make some ham/bean soup or some brunswick stew and want to try my first batch of cornbread in the cast iron skillet.  :banned:

Here's a recipe I have made several times with good results:

Ingredients

Eggs - 2

Butter, melted - 3 oz

Whole milk - 2 c

White cheddar cheese - grated - 6 oz

Sour cream - 8 oz

Corn, creamed - 16 oz can

Polenta - 7 oz (aka corn grits)

Flour, AP - 6 oz

Sugar, granulated - 1 1/3 oz

Salt - 1/2 tsp

Baking powder - 1/2 tsp

Baking soda - 1/2 tsp

Method

1. Mix first six ingredients together in large bowl.

2. Add remaining ingredients. Whisk until well combined. (I found out that I get a more consistent batter by adding the dry ingredients one at a time, whisking briefly after each one).

3. Preheat oven to 350°F. Heat 12" diameter cast iron skillet in oven until hot, approximatley 15 minutes (DO NOT skimp on this step). When hot, oil pan with vegetable oil (or cooking spray, which has also worked in the past). Pour batter into pan (should be about 3/4 full).

4. Bake until golden brown at top edges and firmly set, approximatley 40 minutes, depending on your oven. Don't be afraid to let it go another 10 minutes if necessary. The bread will still seem moist, but will be somewhat firm to the touch. Remove from oven and let bread cool in pan.

5. Slather with butter and consume like a Neanderthal.

You can also alter the recipe to your liking. To add some zest, add a small can of drained green chiles and some Frank's Red Hot sauce to the batter.

Let me know if this works for you.

Question for you smart guys:

How much is 6 oz of flour?

And 1 1/3 oz of sugar?

Thanks.

J

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Question for you smart guys:

How much is 6 oz of flour?

And 1 1/3 oz of sugar?

Thanks.

J

1 oz = 1/8 cup. So, 6 oz is 3/4 cup.

:bag:

Edited by Ike

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***STUPID QUESTION ALERT *** :bag:

Is it OK to use Crisco in a can to season or does it need to be liquid vegetable oil?

My current options, pre-grocery store run are that, OLIVE or CANOLA oil.

At least I was able to decide for myself that motor, 3-in-1 and WD-40 were probably not the best options.... :P

It would be better to use liquid.

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I used my cast iron dutch oven yesterday. It was the first time I used my new (new = i've had it for a year and never used it) propane cooker for frying chicken....PERFECT!FYI: Don't overheat that grease. I initially turned my propane up to full blast and the oil got over 500 degrees....way to hot. It needs to be around 350-375.

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***STUPID QUESTION ALERT ***  :bag:

Is it OK to use Crisco in a can to season or does it need to be liquid vegetable oil?

My current options, pre-grocery store run are that, OLIVE or CANOLA oil.

At least I was able to decide for myself that motor, 3-in-1 and WD-40 were probably not the best options.... :P

It would be better to use liquid.

:thumbup: Thanks! I've been really strugling with this thing and I think I'm just overthinking the process. I'll clean it up, re-season the sucka and see how that works out.

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***STUPID QUESTION ALERT ***  :bag:

Is it OK to use Crisco in a can to season or does it need to be liquid vegetable oil?

My current options, pre-grocery store run are that, OLIVE or CANOLA oil.

At least I was able to decide for myself that motor, 3-in-1 and WD-40 were probably not the best options.... :P

It would be better to use liquid.

:thumbup: Thanks! I've been really strugling with this thing and I think I'm just overthinking the process. I'll clean it up, re-season the sucka and see how that works out.

Crisco is perfectly fine, it melts down to an oil. Actually, it tastes better than veg oil. Thing is, you are adding a ton of fat.

Ike

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I used my cast iron dutch oven yesterday. It was the first time I used my new (new = i've had it for a year and never used it) propane cooker for frying chicken....PERFECT!

FYI: Don't overheat that grease. I initially turned my propane up to full blast and the oil got over 500 degrees....way to hot. It needs to be around 350-375.

:thumbup:

Chicken works best at 375 in my experience.

French fries: blanch at 325, remove, increase temp to 375, fry.

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I've never cooked with one before, but you've all got me convinced that I need one.My other non stick ones need replacing now anyway.I've got the wife and four kids, what size do I need ? 12", 13 1/4", or the biggie 15 1/4"?Looking forward to it.TIA

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***STUPID QUESTION ALERT ***  :bag:

Is it OK to use Crisco in a can to season or does it need to be liquid vegetable oil?

My current options, pre-grocery store run are that, OLIVE or CANOLA oil.

At least I was able to decide for myself that motor, 3-in-1 and WD-40 were probably not the best options.... :P

It would be better to use liquid.

:thumbup: Thanks! I've been really strugling with this thing and I think I'm just overthinking the process. I'll clean it up, re-season the sucka and see how that works out.

Crisco is perfectly fine, it melts down to an oil. Actually, it tastes better than veg oil. Thing is, you are adding a ton of fat.

Ike

Both vegetable oil and vegetable shortening are fat, the difference is that crisco is partially hydrogenated so it has trans fats. This doesn't make any difference though just in seasoning a pan as you're not adding a bunch of trans fats to your food. Actually, Alton Brown's book talks about seasoning cast iron pans (it is his go-to pan as well) and he actually recommends using vegetable shortening instead of oil but I can't remember why.

I have a 12" lodge cast iron pan that is indespensible in my household. I just have to be very careful to watch that the Mrs. doesn't go and stick the thing in the sink to soak (have caught her doing this a couple of times). Personally, I feel that every household should have one of them.

For the cast iron skillet cornbread there is something that one can do to add a little bit of extra flavor and that is to cook just a small amount of bacon in the pan first and leaving a bit of the drippings in the pan. Cornbread that gets some small tidbits of bacon crusted on the bottom can't help but be damn good stuff.

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I've never cooked with one before, but you've all got me convinced that I need one.

My other non stick ones need replacing now anyway.

I've got the wife and four kids, what size do I need ? 12", 13 1/4", or the biggie 15 1/4"?

Looking forward to it.

TIA

I'd probably go with the 13 1/4 as my 12" is very heavy and can be difficult to lift if I've deglazed it to make a pan sauce and need to pour it off or something. The 15 1/4 is going to be massive. If you need to have more space than the 13 1/4" one offers, you'll probably have to cook those whatevers in a couple of batches anyhow.

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I use the Dinosaur Bar-B-Que recipe for their honey cornbread. Yummy.

Can you expand on this? Where can I find it?

Is it related to this?

Any secret to cornbread in a C-I-S? I intend to make some ham/bean soup or some brunswick stew and want to try my first batch of cornbread in the cast iron skillet.  :banned:

No secret at all - I usually oil mine with corn oil, preheat it in the oven, then pour the batter into the hot oiled skillet before baking it until done. I use the Dinosaur Bar-B-Que recipe for their honey cornbread. Yummy. :thumbup:

I flat out love my cast iron skillets. I have 6, 8, 10, and 12 inch skillets and use the 12" one at least three times a week. It's been around for at least 20 years and I doubt that any Teflon pan sticks less than this one does. NOTHING sticks to this thing. Just remember the basic rule of cooking - heat the pan, THEN add the oil, and the food won't stick.

When cleaning, keep in mind that every time you wash it with soap a bit of the seasoning will disappear, and eventually you'll need to reseason it.

Seasoning is easy - wipe it down thoroughly with vegetable oil, put it in a 350 degree oven, and let it bake for an hour. Wipe out the excess oil when you're done and it's good to go. I bought a Lodge Logic dutch oven, and used it pre-seasoned - it worked OK, but afterwards I reseasoned it anyway 'cause the food tasted sort of, well, TOO cast-iron-y. But I'm sorta obsessive like that so :shrug:

If you're looking for the best bang for the buck, get a 12" (minimum) Lodge Logic and don't look back - you'll have a kitchen tool that you'll use for years and, if you like blackened steak or salmon, you'll kiss the thing after you finish the meal. One of the best steaks I've had in recent memory was inspired by a previous thread on this board - sear it as hot as possible in a skillet, let it rest for an hour, then finish it in the skillet in a low oven. Used a basic dry rub. Insane. :thumbup:

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Just picked up a 13 1/4" Lodge Logic. :)

Question - Ive blackened fish in other pans and they have pretty much smelled like fish for months afterwards. Is this going to be the same way? Should I avoid doing Salmon as the first meal and stick to steak?

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Just picked up a 13 1/4" Lodge Logic. :)

Question - Ive blackened fish in other pans and they have pretty much smelled like fish for months afterwards. Is this going to be the same way? Should I avoid doing Salmon as the first meal and stick to steak?

I'm actually interested in this as well. I've got some mesquite salmon that historically ruins pans. Will my skillet be safe?

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Just picked up a 13 1/4" Lodge Logic. :)

Question - Ive blackened fish in other pans and they have pretty much smelled like fish for months afterwards. Is this going to be the same way? Should I avoid doing Salmon as the first meal and stick to steak?

1st thing you should cook in it is bacon :thumbup:
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***STUPID QUESTION ALERT *** :bag:

Is it OK to use Crisco in a can to season or does it need to be liquid vegetable oil?

My current options, pre-grocery store run are that, OLIVE or CANOLA oil.

At least I was able to decide for myself that motor, 3-in-1 and WD-40 were probably not the best options.... :P

It would be better to use liquid.

:thumbup: Thanks! I've been really strugling with this thing and I think I'm just overthinking the process. I'll clean it up, re-season the sucka and see how that works out.

Crisco is perfectly fine, it melts down to an oil. Actually, it tastes better than veg oil. Thing is, you are adding a ton of fat.

Ike

Both vegetable oil and vegetable shortening are fat, the difference is that crisco is partially hydrogenated so it has trans fats. This doesn't make any difference though just in seasoning a pan as you're not adding a bunch of trans fats to your food. Actually, Alton Brown's book talks about seasoning cast iron pans (it is his go-to pan as well) and he actually recommends using vegetable shortening instead of oil but I can't remember why.

AB uses crisco because it has a higher smoke point vs oil
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