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Cast Iron Skillet omnibus

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Lodge was one of the clients I worked with in Chattanooga. The skillets are great, and it is a good company ...

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Lodge was one of the clients I worked with in Chattanooga. The skillets are great, and it is a good company ...

All of mine are Lodge. Why are they a good company?

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Lodge was one of the clients I worked with in Chattanooga. The skillets are great, and it is a good company ...

All of mine are Lodge. Why are they a good company?

Nice people, pleasure to do work for, made in USA ...

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For the cast iron skillet cornbread there is something that one can do to add a little bit of extra flavor and that is to cook just a small amount of bacon in the pan first and leaving a bit of the drippings in the pan. Cornbread that gets some small tidbits of bacon crusted on the bottom can't help but be damn good stuff.

I use bacon grease as the fat in my cornbread (cooked in a cast iron skillet) and I can vouch for its tastiness.

BTW, my wife cuts the crispy bottom off of her cornbread and throws it away. Proof that women are absolutely insane,

Of course I rescue the crispy bottom and eat it with butter. :bag:

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For the cast iron skillet cornbread there is something that one can do to add a little bit of extra flavor and that is to cook just a small amount of bacon in the pan first and leaving a bit of the drippings in the pan.  Cornbread that gets some small tidbits of bacon crusted on the bottom can't help but be damn good stuff.

I use bacon grease as the fat in my cornbread (cooked in a cast iron skillet) and I can vouch for its tastiness.

BTW, my wife cuts the crispy bottom off of her cornbread and throws it away. Proof that women are absolutely insane,

Of course I rescue the crispy bottom and eat it with butter. :bag:

AN ABSOLUTE TRAVESTY!!!

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For the cast iron skillet cornbread there is something that one can do to add a little bit of extra flavor and that is to cook just a small amount of bacon in the pan first and leaving a bit of the drippings in the pan.  Cornbread that gets some small tidbits of bacon crusted on the bottom can't help but be damn good stuff.

I use bacon grease as the fat in my cornbread (cooked in a cast iron skillet) and I can vouch for its tastiness.

BTW, my wife cuts the crispy bottom off of her cornbread and throws it away. Proof that women are absolutely insane,

Of course I rescue the crispy bottom and eat it with butter. :bag:

AN ABSOLUTE TRAVESTY!!!

That's what I'm sayin'!

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Just picked up a 13 1/4" Lodge Logic. :)

Question - Ive blackened fish in other pans and they have pretty much smelled like fish for months afterwards. Is this going to be the same way? Should I avoid doing Salmon as the first meal and stick to steak?

I'm actually interested in this as well. I've got some mesquite salmon that historically ruins pans. Will my skillet be safe?

it'll hold the fish smell. i have a seperate one I use for fish. you can clean it and recondition it every time but that's a big pain. they're cheap and last for lifetimes, spend a couple bucks on a 10 incher to use for fish and other seafood.

VILL

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Any secret to cornbread in a C-I-S? I intend to make some ham/bean soup or some brunswick stew and want to try my first batch of cornbread in the cast iron skillet.  :banned:

Here's a recipe I have made several times with good results:

Ingredients

Eggs - 2

Butter, melted - 3 oz

Whole milk - 2 c

White cheddar cheese - grated - 6 oz

Sour cream - 8 oz

Corn, creamed - 16 oz can

Polenta - 7 oz (aka corn grits)

Flour, AP - 6 oz

Sugar, granulated - 1 1/3 oz

Salt - 1/2 tsp

Baking powder - 1/2 tsp

Baking soda - 1/2 tsp

Method

1. Mix first six ingredients together in large bowl.

2. Add remaining ingredients. Whisk until well combined. (I found out that I get a more consistent batter by adding the dry ingredients one at a time, whisking briefly after each one).

3. Preheat oven to 350°F. Heat 12" diameter cast iron skillet in oven until hot, approximatley 15 minutes (DO NOT skimp on this step). When hot, oil pan with vegetable oil (or cooking spray, which has also worked in the past). Pour batter into pan (should be about 3/4 full).

4. Bake until golden brown at top edges and firmly set, approximatley 40 minutes, depending on your oven. Don't be afraid to let it go another 10 minutes if necessary. The bread will still seem moist, but will be somewhat firm to the touch. Remove from oven and let bread cool in pan.

5. Slather with butter and consume like a Neanderthal.

You can also alter the recipe to your liking. To add some zest, add a small can of drained green chiles and some Frank's Red Hot sauce to the batter.

Let me know if this works for you.

:blackdot:

I've never heard of cornbread out of a CIS before, but halfway through page 1 I was already salivating. I kept thinking to myself sombody better have posted a recipe for this before I get to the end of the thread. A CIS is a beautiful thing.

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My skillet just arrived from Lodge! :)

[openspackageimmediately]

The handle is broken off. :kicksrock:

It's been trying couple of weeks. :(

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My skillet just arrived from Lodge! :)

[openspackageimmediately]

The handle is broken off. :kicksrock:

It's been trying couple of weeks. :(

:no: hate when that happens

next up for me is a dutch oven

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Everything is sticking to the pan. I have followed the instructions, I haven't used soap and I oil it before I put it away.

I've used it 4 times now and I thought maybe it just needed to be broken in.

Any advice?

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Everything is sticking to the pan. I have followed the instructions, I haven't used soap and I oil it before I put it away.

I've used it 4 times now and I thought maybe it just needed to be broken in.

Any advice?

Throw it in the oven at 450 for about 15-20 minutes before you cook with it.

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Everything is sticking to the pan.  I have followed the instructions, I haven't used soap and I oil it before I put it away.

I've used it 4 times now and I thought maybe it just needed to be broken in.

Any advice?

Throw it in the oven at 450 for about 15-20 minutes before you cook with it.

A cast iron pan HAS TO BE pre-heated before you can use it.

non-stick spray is fine to use, too.

No matter what they say, you wil lnever flip a fried egg in a non-stick pan w/o nonstick spray.

Who cares if stuff sticks? Keep cooking it till it burns off.

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Everything is sticking to the pan.  I have followed the instructions, I haven't used soap and I oil it before I put it away.

I've used it 4 times now and I thought maybe it just needed to be broken in.

Any advice?

Throw it in the oven at 450 for about 15-20 minutes before you cook with it.

A cast iron pan HAS TO BE pre-heated before you can use it.

non-stick spray is fine to use, too.

No matter what they say, you wil lnever flip a fried egg in a non-stick pan w/o nonstick spray.

Who cares if stuff sticks? Keep cooking it till it burns off.

Thanks guys.

I guess I don't care if stuff sticks, I just didn't think it would from some remarks here. I do preheat it and I have tried non-stick spray, olive oil, & veggie oil. :shrug: Oh well.

I just took some KC strip steaks off. That's twice today I have used it. :banned:

Food does taste better for some reason using a CIS.

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Everything is sticking to the pan.  I have followed the instructions, I haven't used soap and I oil it before I put it away.

I've used it 4 times now and I thought maybe it just needed to be broken in.

Any advice?

Throw it in the oven at 450 for about 15-20 minutes before you cook with it.

A cast iron pan HAS TO BE pre-heated before you can use it.

non-stick spray is fine to use, too.

No matter what they say, you wil lnever flip a fried egg in a non-stick pan w/o nonstick spray.

Who cares if stuff sticks? Keep cooking it till it burns off.

Thanks guys.

I guess I don't care if stuff sticks, I just didn't think it would from some remarks here. I do preheat it and I have tried non-stick spray, olive oil, & veggie oil. :shrug: Oh well.

I just took some KC strip steaks off. That's twice today I have used it. :banned:

Food does taste better for some reason using a CIS.

I bet steaks didn't stick!!!

If they did, you cooked them wrong.

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Everything is sticking to the pan.  I have followed the instructions, I haven't used soap and I oil it before I put it away.

I've used it 4 times now and I thought maybe it just needed to be broken in.

Any advice?

Throw it in the oven at 450 for about 15-20 minutes before you cook with it.

A cast iron pan HAS TO BE pre-heated before you can use it.

non-stick spray is fine to use, too.

No matter what they say, you wil lnever flip a fried egg in a non-stick pan w/o nonstick spray.

Who cares if stuff sticks? Keep cooking it till it burns off.

Thanks guys.

I guess I don't care if stuff sticks, I just didn't think it would from some remarks here. I do preheat it and I have tried non-stick spray, olive oil, & veggie oil. :shrug: Oh well.

I just took some KC strip steaks off. That's twice today I have used it. :banned:

Food does taste better for some reason using a CIS.

I bet steaks didn't stick!!!

If they did, you cooked them wrong.

No they did not. :D

I used it three times today actually. Scrambled eggs & Nueske's bacon for breakfast, crab cakes for lunch and steaks for dinner.

I think the taste of scrambled eggs is the most improved.

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For the cast iron skillet cornbread there is something that one can do to add a little bit of extra flavor and that is to cook just a small amount of bacon in the pan first and leaving a bit of the drippings in the pan. Cornbread that gets some small tidbits of bacon crusted on the bottom can't help but be damn good stuff.

I use bacon grease as the fat in my cornbread (cooked in a cast iron skillet) and I can vouch for its tastiness.

BTW, my wife cuts the crispy bottom off of her cornbread and throws it away. Proof that women are absolutely insane,

Of course I rescue the crispy bottom and eat it with butter. :bag:

I've been on these boards for a year and a half or so, and there are very few things that are posted here that stop me cold and put a chill in my heart. I've even learned to shrug off Larry Boy, for crying out loud. NOTHING fazes me.

THAT fazed me.

Edited by bakes

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:blackdot: for the CIS info - gonna pick one up tomorrow and cook some steaks for dinner. Dunno why I don't already have one as we used one all the time I was growing up. (course, from reading this I see we actually abused one all the years I was growing up - washed it in soapy water after every use.)

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Guest MelvinTScupper

In a cast iron skillet or deep fried? I find fried chicken kind of tricky with flour in a cast iron skillet and corn meal (tyhus the breading itself) stays on better if made with corn meal.

Just my opinion.

In cast iron of course.

I must admit I've never actually tried the cornmeal thing, but a cousin of mine used to crush Corn Flakes into her flour and made some pretty amazing chicken.

One way to combat the flour not sticking issue is to "marinate" your chicken in an ice water bath before cooking. A lot of southern chefs also go the buttermilk route which also helps the flour stick.

We do the buttermilk. Makes it better.

J

The enzymes in the buttermilk also breakdown the chicken and make it more tender. It's what I use exclusively. I also make my own spice mix, that's more spicy.

Awesome.

BTW, the name you're looking for on cast iron, if it hasn't been mentioned is "Griswold" We have 3-4 of these beauties. I'd also recommend just going to an antique store to buy these. They're guaranteed seasoned, and you don't pay much more for the good ones.

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Guest MelvinTScupper

So walk me through this, you don't clean your pan?

just water and a paper towel.

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Thought I had previously noticed a thread here on cast iron cooking. :confused:

Glad I was able to find it! My Grandmother died recently and I was given a pair of skillets that my great great grandfather (a civil war vet) cooked with later in his life.

Now I will be able to properly use these skillets, creating great meals and remembering my rich family history at the same time.

Great info! Thanks to all!!

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Any new delicious cast iron skillet recipes to share?

I just got my first one and am seasoning it as we speak ;)

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For the cast iron skillet cornbread there is something that one can do to add a little bit of extra flavor and that is to cook just a small amount of bacon in the pan first and leaving a bit of the drippings in the pan.  Cornbread that gets some small tidbits of bacon crusted on the bottom can't help but be damn good stuff.

I use bacon grease as the fat in my cornbread (cooked in a cast iron skillet) and I can vouch for its tastiness.

BTW, my wife cuts the crispy bottom off of her cornbread and throws it away. Proof that women are absolutely insane,

Of course I rescue the crispy bottom and eat it with butter. :goodposting:

I've been on these boards for a year and a half or so, and there are very few things that are posted here that stop me cold and put a chill in my heart. I've even learned to shrug off Larry Boy, for crying out loud. NOTHING fazes me.

THAT fazed me.

I cut it off too

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Hey tipsey,

Would you share the recipie with the FBG brethren?

J

When you learn how to spell my name. :thumbup:

I assume you are talking about the chicken....

It's not really a recipie rather than an entire childhood watching & helping her cook it up on Sundays. Crisco, Flour, Salt, Pepper, Cast Iron, Milk or Buttermilk (i use buttermilk often, but she never would have) Outdoor Propane cooker.

You cannot let the chicken stay submerged, so don't overfill your pot with too much chicken or oil. You must check the oil for correct temp by throwing flour on it & seeing how quickly it frys. You can overheat it, and the smoke that comes off the flour will be your first clue. Like with most cooking, it is all about technique as my chef says constantly.

Put that chicken in ice water in a big bowl/tub for at least an hour before you cook. Dip it in the milk & toss in bag with flour & seasonings. Shake it like a polariod picture. Cook immediately after coating in flour. NEVER EVER DOUBLE DIP IN THE MILK....LUMPS! Keep that chicken moving around the pot constantly. Remember to let it have room to float. A crowded pot = goo on your chicken. Remove from heat to newspaper & salt immediately....while its still bubbling hot.

Golly I'm glad I have leftover Ruth's Chris in my fridge from our anniversary dinner last night. I am so hungry after being in this thread for the last half hour.

Tipsy

So you don't soak the cut up chicken in salt water overnight? My grandma and my mom swear it is the first key. My grandpa ran a poultry house so they fried a few chickens in their time. My mom eventually moved to an electric skillet but my grandma never swayed from the black iron skillet. Though my mom would make non-sweet, thin cornbread in the skillet at the same time.

Also - they just used white flour and lots of black pepper - no milk bath. Have you ever deboned thighs and layed them out flat? Wow ...my favorite man.

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:excited:

I just got my very first cast iron skillet. Can't wait to season it tomorrow and make me some bacon.

how did the bacon turn out? 1st thing I cooked in mine was bacon.
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I'm in the process of buying new cookware and I'm thinking about adding a 12inch cast iron.Never had one but always wanted to pick one up. How much use does it get in your kitchen?

More than anything else I own by far. You can do anything with cast iron.

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Just found this thread -- may be the best thread in the history of FBGs. Gotta go buy a skillet now....

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I've got two cast iron skillets and use them nearly every day.

My favorite is a 12" family heirloom I was awarded when my Polish grandmother died. It must be more than fifty years old. Relatively lightweight, seasoned to perfection. The other is a pre-seasoned 12" beast I picked up a few years ago. It probably weighs twice as much as the first one, and I only break it out when the "good one" is already in use.

My wife still tends to leave them soaking overnight in the sink, though. :lmao:

Edited by aardball44

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Mine periodically gets some rust.

What am I doing wrong?

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:pickle:

I just got my very first cast iron skillet. Can't wait to season it tomorrow and make me some bacon.

how did the bacon turn out? 1st thing I cooked in mine was bacon.
Surprisingly good, considering it's a brand new pan and has no personality yet.

The instructions it came with said to season it by boiling a combination of whole milk and vegetable oil in it. But after reading this thread, Wikipedia, and a web page on cast iron, I felt comfortable enough to disregard the instructions and do my own thing.

After scouring it, I heated it up on the stove and rendered some bone marrow in it. Then, with the rendered fat still in it, I fried up some bacon. (The bacon stayed a lot flatter than it does in my aluminum pan, instead of curling up.) I ate the bacon, then washed the skillet with hot water and a brush. Dried it by heating it on the stove.

Then I greased the pan with coconut oil, and let it bake upside down in the oven at 425 F for a little over an hour. I let it cool in the oven.

A few hours later I preheated it in the oven then put the rest of my bone marrow in it and roasted it for a few minutes at 450 F. Then ate the marrow, washed the pan with hot water and a brush, and dried it by heating it on the stove.

Anyone see anything I'm doing wrong so far? Marrow and coconut oil are both mostly saturated fat, which Wikipedia says is good. Bacon has decent fat content as well.

Tonight I'm going to cook a turkey thigh (with skin on) in it, but I haven't decided exactly how yet. Probably by baking it in the oven.

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I just rub mine down with an olive oil spray after every washing, seems to work just fine, skillet is about 10 years old.

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I thought marrow was almost fat free.

It's nearly all fat.
Interesting. Had that totally backwards. Well screw me then.

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Tonight I'm going to cook a turkey thigh (with skin on) in it, but I haven't decided exactly how yet. Probably by baking it in the oven.

Man, that was tasty. I preheated the oven to 400 F with the skillet in it, then melted a bit of butter in the skillet and put the turkey on that. Then I put some butter on the turkey and closed the oven until it melted. Then I sprinkled a mix of salt, pepper, thyme, and turmeric on the turkey. After about 20 minutes, I put more butter on, then more salt, pepper, thyme, and turmeric. I took it out when the internal temp reached 170 F (I think it was about 45 minutes, but I didn't really keep track) and let it sit for about five minutes before eating.One of the best things I've ever cooked. (I'm not giving much of the credit to the cast iron skillet. I'm taking most of the credit for myself.)

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Ok, so I have my CIS and a new cast-iron reversible griddle/grill. It came preseasoned, but I did wash it down with hot water before using it the first time.

I grilled some ribeye's on it and they were fantastic. But, some of the garlic on the grill itself burnt and became a PITA to get off...

How in the hell do you clean that stuff off? Was it not enough oil on the grill before cooking? I did preheat the grill plenty before using it. That was just one mofo to clean.

please learn me on the best way to prepare the CIS/grill for cooking and the easiest way to clean that damn PITA. I obviously am doing something wrong as there is NO WAY that I would go thru the cleaning I went thru the other night, daily.

TIA.

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Ok, so I have my CIS and a new cast-iron reversible griddle/grill. It came preseasoned, but I did wash it down with hot water before using it the first time.I grilled some ribeye's on it and they were fantastic. But, some of the garlic on the grill itself burnt and became a PITA to get off...How in the hell do you clean that stuff off? Was it not enough oil on the grill before cooking? I did preheat the grill plenty before using it. That was just one mofo to clean.please learn me on the best way to prepare the CIS/grill for cooking and the easiest way to clean that damn PITA. I obviously am doing something wrong as there is NO WAY that I would go thru the cleaning I went thru the other night, daily.TIA.

I have that problem from time to time. Steel wool is your friend. I've never had anything that wouldn't come off with steel wool and a little elbow grease. If something is REALLY stuck on, use a knife to get it out. Remember, you can't hurt cast iron. But, nothing should ever be too hard to get off if it's seasoned properly. You will probably have to reseason it periodically, but it's not hard. I'm not sure I trust the "preseasoned" skillets, season it yourself, it can't hurt.

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Ok, so I have my CIS and a new cast-iron reversible griddle/grill. It came preseasoned, but I did wash it down with hot water before using it the first time.I grilled some ribeye's on it and they were fantastic. But, some of the garlic on the grill itself burnt and became a PITA to get off...How in the hell do you clean that stuff off? Was it not enough oil on the grill before cooking? I did preheat the grill plenty before using it. That was just one mofo to clean.please learn me on the best way to prepare the CIS/grill for cooking and the easiest way to clean that damn PITA. I obviously am doing something wrong as there is NO WAY that I would go thru the cleaning I went thru the other night, daily.TIA.

I have that problem from time to time. Steel wool is your friend. I've never had anything that wouldn't come off with steel wool and a little elbow grease. If something is REALLY stuck on, use a knife to get it out. Remember, you can't hurt cast iron. But, nothing should ever be too hard to get off if it's seasoned properly. You will probably have to reseason it periodically, but it's not hard. I'm not sure I trust the "preseasoned" skillets, season it yourself, it can't hurt.
Noted. I'll season it myself and go from there. Thanks!

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Mine periodically gets some rust. What am I doing wrong?

:thumbup:

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I haven't read through this whole thread, but lots of talk about how good steaks, burgers, cornbread, certain types of fish, and FRIED chicken are in a cast iron skillet.

We eat a ton of chicken at my house; any other ways of doing chicken in the CIS rather than frying? Any types of recipes with just oil & seasonings? Can you do marinated chicken (let's say in Italian dressing) in a CIS? What about some blackened chicken with cajun seasoning? TIA.

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I haven't read through this whole thread, but lots of talk about how good steaks, burgers, cornbread, certain types of fish, and FRIED chicken are in a cast iron skillet.We eat a ton of chicken at my house; any other ways of doing chicken in the CIS rather than frying? Any types of recipes with just oil & seasonings? Can you do marinated chicken (let's say in Italian dressing) in a CIS? What about some blackened chicken with cajun seasoning? TIA.

CIS is essetial to any type of blackening, it's the truest way to cook in that manner.Keys to good blackening foods are1. Skillet has to be extremely hot, I place mine directly on the coals and let stand for @ 15 minutes and them drop some water on the skillet, if the water bubbles then it's ready.2. Butter, there must be butter for a truely good blackened recipe.3. I also use a garlic paste on meat and chicken. Edited by Megla

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