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Cast Iron Skillet omnibus

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I haven't read through this whole thread, but lots of talk about how good steaks, burgers, cornbread, certain types of fish, and FRIED chicken are in a cast iron skillet.We eat a ton of chicken at my house; any other ways of doing chicken in the CIS rather than frying? Any types of recipes with just oil & seasonings? Can you do marinated chicken (let's say in Italian dressing) in a CIS? What about some blackened chicken with cajun seasoning? TIA.

CIS is essetial to any type of blackening, it's the truest way to cook in that manner.Keys to good blackening foods are1. Skillet has to be extremely hot, I place mine directly on the coals and let stand for @ 15 minutes and them drop some water on the skillet, if the water bubbles then it's ready.2. Butter, there must be butter for a truely good blackened recipe.3. I also use a garlic paste on meat and chicken.
Cool, thanks. I'll have to dig up some recipes. This sounds good.Last question - if I'm cooking indoors, is there any way I'm going to be able to get the skillet hot enough on an electric range?

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I haven't read through this whole thread, but lots of talk about how good steaks, burgers, cornbread, certain types of fish, and FRIED chicken are in a cast iron skillet.We eat a ton of chicken at my house; any other ways of doing chicken in the CIS rather than frying? Any types of recipes with just oil & seasonings? Can you do marinated chicken (let's say in Italian dressing) in a CIS? What about some blackened chicken with cajun seasoning? TIA.

CIS is essetial to any type of blackening, it's the truest way to cook in that manner.Keys to good blackening foods are1. Skillet has to be extremely hot, I place mine directly on the coals and let stand for @ 15 minutes and them drop some water on the skillet, if the water bubbles then it's ready.2. Butter, there must be butter for a truely good blackened recipe.3. I also use a garlic paste on meat and chicken.
Cool, thanks. I'll have to dig up some recipes. This sounds good.Last question - if I'm cooking indoors, is there any way I'm going to be able to get the skillet hot enough on an electric range?
You don't want to because you'll smoke the house out.

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I haven't read through this whole thread, but lots of talk about how good steaks, burgers, cornbread, certain types of fish, and FRIED chicken are in a cast iron skillet.

We eat a ton of chicken at my house; any other ways of doing chicken in the CIS rather than frying? Any types of recipes with just oil & seasonings? Can you do marinated chicken (let's say in Italian dressing) in a CIS? What about some blackened chicken with cajun seasoning? TIA.

CIS is essetial to any type of blackening, it's the truest way to cook in that manner.

Keys to good blackening foods are

1. Skillet has to be extremely hot, I place mine directly on the coals and let stand for @ 15 minutes and them drop some water on the skillet, if the water bubbles then it's ready.

2. Butter, there must be butter for a truely good blackened recipe.

3. I also use a garlic paste on meat and chicken.

Cool, thanks. I'll have to dig up some recipes. This sounds good.

Last question - if I'm cooking indoors, is there any way I'm going to be able to get the skillet hot enough on an electric range?

You don't want to because you'll smoke the house out.
I should have stated this in my first post, but he is correct, this will create a lot of smoke and should never be done inside.

If you don't feel like making your own blackening spice try this

http://shop.chefpaul.com/index.asp?PageAct...D&ProdID=57

very good for store bought.

Just make sure whatever you cook in basted in butter first, then apply seasoning, place in hot skillet, pour butter over and cook, when you flip it again pour butter on it.

For a quick but good garlic paste take some peeled cloves (6-10) place in a food processor and add some ground black peppercorn, white pepper, crushed seasalt and a little ginger, puree and then apply evenly to food with a butter knife, then apply butter, then seasoning and cook. The garlic paste will give you a really good blackening bark.

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I haven't read through this whole thread, but lots of talk about how good steaks, burgers, cornbread, certain types of fish, and FRIED chicken are in a cast iron skillet.We eat a ton of chicken at my house; any other ways of doing chicken in the CIS rather than frying? Any types of recipes with just oil & seasonings? Can you do marinated chicken (let's say in Italian dressing) in a CIS? What about some blackened chicken with cajun seasoning? TIA.

CIS is essetial to any type of blackening, it's the truest way to cook in that manner.Keys to good blackening foods are1. Skillet has to be extremely hot, I place mine directly on the coals and let stand for @ 15 minutes and them drop some water on the skillet, if the water bubbles then it's ready.2. Butter, there must be butter for a truely good blackened recipe.3. I also use a garlic paste on meat and chicken.
Cool, thanks. I'll have to dig up some recipes. This sounds good.Last question - if I'm cooking indoors, is there any way I'm going to be able to get the skillet hot enough on an electric range?
You don't want to because you'll smoke the house out.
Good info. Thanks for the warning. Thought it might be a problem when Joe B. mentioned setting off his fire alarm earlier in the thread.

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Mine periodically gets some rust. What am I doing wrong?

:blackdot:
You are probably putting it in a drying rack after you are done washing it out and just the little bit of water sitting on it is rusting it. After washing mine I typically put it on a burner for a little while until it dries out. I never put it in a drying rack with the other pots and pans where the moist atmosphere will cause it to rust. I used to have the same problem on the bottom side of mine where it wasn't getting as baked on of a surface as the top side was. I used some steel wool to get the rust off, applied a bit of oil to the whole thing and reseasoned it. To the guy asking about getting stuck food out of there, put it on the stovetop with a half inch to an inch of water in the bottom and bring it to a boil. Scrape around the bottom with a spatula to loosen up anything stuck. Most anything will come up with this method and if not the steel wool or a brillo pad will do the trick.To the guy worried about preseasoned pans, I bought mine that way and have never had any problems with it. From what I've read they've gotten rave reviews and that the oil actually penetrates deeper into the metal in a preseasoned pan than in one you season yourself. Just buy whatever is available as it isn't like it's difficult to season one anyhow but the preseasoned is definitely nice as it's already ready to roll.

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Mine periodically gets some rust.

What am I doing wrong?

:blackdot:
You are probably putting it in a drying rack after you are done washing it out and just the little bit of water sitting on it is rusting it. After washing mine I typically put it on a burner for a little while until it dries out. I never put it in a drying rack with the other pots and pans where the moist atmosphere will cause it to rust. I used to have the same problem on the bottom side of mine where it wasn't getting as baked on of a surface as the top side was. I used some steel wool to get the rust off, applied a bit of oil to the whole thing and reseasoned it.

To the guy asking about getting stuck food out of there, put it on the stovetop with a half inch to an inch of water in the bottom and bring it to a boil. Scrape around the bottom with a spatula to loosen up anything stuck. Most anything will come up with this method and if not the steel wool or a brillo pad will do the trick.

To the guy worried about preseasoned pans, I bought mine that way and have never had any problems with it. From what I've read they've gotten rave reviews and that the oil actually penetrates deeper into the metal in a preseasoned pan than in one you season yourself. Just buy whatever is available as it isn't like it's difficult to season one anyhow but the preseasoned is definitely nice as it's already ready to roll.

Adding baking soda to this method works even better. Just a tablespoon or so is all that's needed for a 12" skillet.

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I'm going to have to dig my 12" CIS out now and get it reseasoned after reading this over lunch.

Can I season my pan using my grill outside instead of getting the house all hot and smokey?

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Mine periodically gets some rust. What am I doing wrong?

:rolleyes:
You are probably putting it in a drying rack after you are done washing it out and just the little bit of water sitting on it is rusting it. After washing mine I typically put it on a burner for a little while until it dries out. I never put it in a drying rack with the other pots and pans where the moist atmosphere will cause it to rust. I used to have the same problem on the bottom side of mine where it wasn't getting as baked on of a surface as the top side was. I used some steel wool to get the rust off, applied a bit of oil to the whole thing and reseasoned it. To the guy asking about getting stuck food out of there, put it on the stovetop with a half inch to an inch of water in the bottom and bring it to a boil. Scrape around the bottom with a spatula to loosen up anything stuck. Most anything will come up with this method and if not the steel wool or a brillo pad will do the trick.To the guy worried about preseasoned pans, I bought mine that way and have never had any problems with it. From what I've read they've gotten rave reviews and that the oil actually penetrates deeper into the metal in a preseasoned pan than in one you season yourself. Just buy whatever is available as it isn't like it's difficult to season one anyhow but the preseasoned is definitely nice as it's already ready to roll.
:goodposting: MICJ

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Can you use the CIS on a Weber gas grill? Don't want to smoke the house out on the electric range.

I've got several CIS at the cottage, they are probably 40+ years old at least. I'll bring one back with me next week.

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I'm going to have to dig my 12" CIS out now and get it reseasoned after reading this over lunch.Can I season my pan using my grill outside instead of getting the house all hot and smokey?

Sure can

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Can you use the CIS on a Weber gas grill? Don't want to smoke the house out on the electric range.I've got several CIS at the cottage, they are probably 40+ years old at least. I'll bring one back with me next week.

Both on the grill or directly on the coals

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I haven't yet waded throught this whole thread due to time contraints, but I wanted to throw this out to you CIS peeps-

How will this baby fare on the 4 burner propane stove that comes with my pop up camper? I just picked it up last night to replace a lightly rusted griddle I didn't feel comfotable using...

I don't know much about CI cooking at all. :o Can rusting CI be rejuvenated?

TIA

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Bump to the metal heads 'cuz I'm hittin' the road in the mornin'... :bow:

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I haven't yet waded throught this whole thread due to time contraints, but I wanted to throw this out to you CIS peeps-

How will this baby fare on the 4 burner propane stove that comes with my pop up camper? I just picked it up last night to replace a lightly rusted griddle I didn't feel comfotable using...

I don't know much about CI cooking at all. :thumbdown: Can rusting CI be rejuvenated?

TIA

Should work fine on there provided it can give you enough BTU's to get that sucker heated up. In order for it to cook evenly you really need to preheat the sucker for 5-10 minutes before cooking to let it heat up. CI takes a longer time to preheat than your average pan but it maintains it's heat very well and doesn't fluctuate as much when you add food to it. Rusting CI can be rejuvenated by getting out the steel wool and getting the rust off (provided it isn't too rusty) and reseasoning. It is very, very difficult to ruin a CIS.

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I haven't yet waded throught this whole thread due to time contraints, but I wanted to throw this out to you CIS peeps-

How will this baby fare on the 4 burner propane stove that comes with my pop up camper? I just picked it up last night to replace a lightly rusted griddle I didn't feel comfotable using...

I don't know much about CI cooking at all. :popcorn: Can rusting CI be rejuvenated?

TIA

Should work fine on there provided it can give you enough BTU's to get that sucker heated up. In order for it to cook evenly you really need to preheat the sucker for 5-10 minutes before cooking to let it heat up. CI takes a longer time to preheat than your average pan but it maintains it's heat very well and doesn't fluctuate as much when you add food to it. Rusting CI can be rejuvenated by getting out the steel wool and getting the rust off (provided it isn't too rusty) and reseasoning. It is very, very difficult to ruin a CIS.
Well...It took me like 20 mins to get the griddle hot enough to cook up french toast and sausages for 12, but it did the job.

I gave it a light scrubbing, a good towel drying, then sat it in the sun to make sure it was dry. I'm going to give it a light oiling tonight and keep it in the house to prevent rusting.

:stirspot:

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I got a cast iron dutch oven a few days ago to go with my skillet, and I am extremely impressed with myself for the oxtail stew I made today. In the dutch oven on the stove, I sauteed two pounds (including the bones) of oxtail in rendered duck fat until brown (just a few minutes), then added one large, chopped onion until somewhat translucent (another few minutes). Then I added a little over a cup of turkey stock and a little over a cup of red wine (I didn't measure; I just eyeballed it), along with some salt and pepper, and put the dutch oven in the conventional oven preheated to 325. I cooked it at 325 for about 40 minutes, then added a six-ounce can of tomato paste, one large chopped nopal (the stem of a de-spined prickly pear cactus), a couple tablespoons of garlic paste, and some herbs and spices (rosemary, basil, oregano, chile powder), and continued to cook for about 2.5 more hours at 325, then reduced the heat to 200 and cooked for another hour or so. I removed the oxtail meat from the bones (it fell right off) and discarded the bones, returning the meat to the stew. I put it in the fridge for a few hours until we were ready to eat, heated it quickly on the stove, and ... mmmmmm.

Next time I make it, and there will be a next time, I don't think I'll do anything differently.

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Used my CI grill tonight for basket burgers :goodposting:

Another cleaning question...

I got a scrub brush just for the CI cookware, but how does one get all the grease off of the brush as well as the CI cookware?

It IS getting easier to clean though...the scrub brush (not too stiff plasic bristles) w/ some kosher salt :thumbup: But the grease in the brush still is a big ??? for me. Sorry for the noob ???'s still.

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Used my CI grill tonight for basket burgers :thumbup:Another cleaning question...I got a scrub brush just for the CI cookware, but how does one get all the grease off of the brush as well as the CI cookware?It IS getting easier to clean though...the scrub brush (not too stiff plasic bristles) w/ some kosher salt :thumbup: But the grease in the brush still is a big ??? for me. Sorry for the noob ???'s still.

If there is a lot of grease in the pan try to pour it off before it cools or warm it up just a bit to get it to where most of it will pour off. Alternately you can let it set up and then just scrape it out of there with a spatula so there isn't as much in there. I posted earlier up the page a method where you put a small amount of water in the pan and bring to a simmer, scraping up anything stuck to the bottom. This will get all of the grease out as well and you can probably just wipe out the bottom of the pan with some paper towels once you pour off the water.

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Used my CIS for the first time last night to cook a T-Bone steak. Outstanding results

Pre-heat the oven to 500 degress. Once it was pre-heated, I place the CIS in there for several minutes to get it hot. I took it out and placed it on a burner turned to high. I seared both sides for 90 seconds and then took the steak/CIS and placed it back in the oven (500 degress) for 7 minutes.

Turned out great.

Seasoning I used was marinating it in a teriaki marinade and then seasoning with Sea Salt and Pepper

Only issue was CIS has food crusted on it now. I am under the assumption that it is because I did not sear the sides long enough and when I turned the steak over it leaft some of it. If it was seared long enough there should not have been anything to crust on th CIS, right?

Unless I am missing something

Edited by Big B

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Used my CIS for the first time last night to cook a T-Bone steak. Outstanding resultsPre-heat the oven to 500 degress. Once it was pre-heated, I place the CIS in there for several minutes to get it hot. I took it out and placed it on a burner turned to high. I seared both sides for 90 seconds and then took the steak/CIS and placed it back in the oven (500 degress) for 7 minutes.Turned out great.Seasoning I used was marinating it in a teriaki marinade and then seasoning with Sea Salt and PepperOnly issue was CIS has food crusted on it now. I am under the assumption that it is because I did not sear the sides long enough and when I turned the steak over it leaft some of it. If it was seared long enough there should not have been anything to crust on th CIS, right?Unless I am missing something

Your teriyaki marinade probably has some sugar in it which is going to make it burn to the pan more. CIS is nonstick for the most part but not flawlessly nonstick. A bit of oil in the pan would make it stick less.BTW, just toss the CIS in there when you start preheating and you won't have to wait for it to heat up, it'll be ready when your oven is. Could be it didn't heat up enough even in a few minutes of heating up in there and that lead to more sticking. It takes quite a while for a CIS to preheat.

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I thought I heard in the past that acidic things (citrus juices in the food, tomato sauces) were bad for seasoning on cast iron items. Is this true? Does it alter taste?

Mine seems to get smoky even when I don't have the heat up that high. Plus, if I make pancakes in it they seem to pick up a "cooked oil" flavor, but not in a good way. Am I doing something wrong with the care of my pan?

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I thought I heard in the past that acidic things (citrus juices in the food, tomato sauces) were bad for seasoning on cast iron items. Is this true? Does it alter taste? Mine seems to get smoky even when I don't have the heat up that high. Plus, if I make pancakes in it they seem to pick up a "cooked oil" flavor, but not in a good way. Am I doing something wrong with the care of my pan?

I've done pasta sauces in it quite a bit, just don't leave it sitting in there too long as iron ends up going into the food. A little of this won't hurt you though as many of us don't get enough iron in our diets anyhow, especially womenfolk. Not sure what is up with the "cooked oil" flavor though as I've used cast iron griddles on the stovetop without odd tastes coming through. Maybe try cleaning it off really good and reseasoning it. Could be that something was on it that went rancid or something. I'm not sure what would cause this.

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Re: getting the grease out of the cleaning brush.Run it through your dishwasher.

I figured that this would work, but just was paranoid about the whole soap thing....:dumb:

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Picked up 10" and 12" Logic skillets at Wal Mart on Friday, used them on the grill for my mother-in-law's birthday grillout. Cooked marinated steaks and porkchops with them. Worked well, and steaks/chops tasted great. The only problem was maintaining heat, which may have more to do with my old, cheap, and poorly-maintained propane grill, combined with the amount of cooking I was doing. I had about 10 steaks and 4 chops to cook, plus vegetable skewers and shrimp kabobs.

Overall, I really enjoyed the taste, and will definitely use this method when grilling good cuts of meat.

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If you like steaks this is a great recipe from Alton Brown for steaks in a cast iron skillet.1 boneless rib eye steak, 1 1/2-inch thick Canola oil to coat Kosher salt and ground black pepperPlace 10 to 12-inch cast iron skillet in oven and heat oven to 500 degrees. Bring steak(s) to room temperature. When oven reaches temperature, remove pan and place on range over high heat. Coat steak lightly with oil and season both sides with a generous pinch of salt. Grind on black pepper to taste. Immediately place steak in the middle of hot, dry pan. Cook 30 seconds without moving. Turn with tongs and cook another 30 seconds, then put the pan straight into the oven for 2 minutes. Flip steak and cook for another 2 minutes. (This time is for medium rare steaks. If you prefer medium, add a minute to both of the oven turns.) Remove steak from pan, cover loosely with foil, and rest for 2 minutes. Serve whole or slice thin and fan onto plate.

Just bought a seasoned 12" CIS for $7 and an 8" for $4 at HEB on clearance. Had a sirloin in the fridge and tried this recipe. Came out tasty and tender (for a sirloin). :thumbup:

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I got a cast iron dutch oven a few days ago to go with my skillet, and I am extremely impressed with myself for the oxtail stew I made today. In the dutch oven on the stove, I sauteed two pounds (including the bones) of oxtail in rendered duck fat until brown (just a few minutes), then added one large, chopped onion until somewhat translucent (another few minutes). Then I added a little over a cup of turkey stock and a little over a cup of red wine (I didn't measure; I just eyeballed it), along with some salt and pepper, and put the dutch oven in the conventional oven preheated to 325. I cooked it at 325 for about 40 minutes, then added a six-ounce can of tomato paste, one large chopped nopal (the stem of a de-spined prickly pear cactus), a couple tablespoons of garlic paste, and some herbs and spices (rosemary, basil, oregano, chile powder), and continued to cook for about 2.5 more hours at 325, then reduced the heat to 200 and cooked for another hour or so. I removed the oxtail meat from the bones (it fell right off) and discarded the bones, returning the meat to the stew. I put it in the fridge for a few hours until we were ready to eat, heated it quickly on the stove, and ... mmmmmm.Next time I make it, and there will be a next time, I don't think I'll do anything differently.

I have a question. HOW DID YOU GET OUT OF COOKING DUTIES IN LAS VEGAS?That will not happen again.J

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Damn you guys...

First, it was getting a smoker last year and brining chickens. Now it's getting a CIS or 2. My wife wants to cook less and less now!

Edited by Usual21

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If you like steaks this is a great recipe from Alton Brown for steaks in a cast iron skillet.1 boneless rib eye steak, 1 1/2-inch thick Canola oil to coat Kosher salt and ground black pepperPlace 10 to 12-inch cast iron skillet in oven and heat oven to 500 degrees. Bring steak(s) to room temperature. When oven reaches temperature, remove pan and place on range over high heat. Coat steak lightly with oil and season both sides with a generous pinch of salt. Grind on black pepper to taste. Immediately place steak in the middle of hot, dry pan. Cook 30 seconds without moving. Turn with tongs and cook another 30 seconds, then put the pan straight into the oven for 2 minutes. Flip steak and cook for another 2 minutes. (This time is for medium rare steaks. If you prefer medium, add a minute to both of the oven turns.) Remove steak from pan, cover loosely with foil, and rest for 2 minutes. Serve whole or slice thin and fan onto plate.

Just bought a seasoned 12" CIS for $7 and an 8" for $4 at HEB on clearance. Had a sirloin in the fridge and tried this recipe. Came out tasty and tender (for a sirloin). :shrug:
Nice bump. Not sure how I missed this post the first couple of times around.Tipsy, do you have a cornbread recipe?

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If you like steaks this is a great recipe from Alton Brown for steaks in a cast iron skillet.

1 boneless rib eye steak, 1 1/2-inch thick

Canola oil to coat

Kosher salt and ground black pepper

Place 10 to 12-inch cast iron skillet in oven and heat oven to 500 degrees. Bring steak(s) to room temperature.

When oven reaches temperature, remove pan and place on range over high heat. Coat steak lightly with oil and season both sides with a generous pinch of salt. Grind on black pepper to taste.

Immediately place steak in the middle of hot, dry pan. Cook 30 seconds without moving. Turn with tongs and cook another 30 seconds, then put the pan straight into the oven for 2 minutes. Flip steak and cook for another 2 minutes. (This time is for medium rare steaks. If you prefer medium, add a minute to both of the oven turns.)

Remove steak from pan, cover loosely with foil, and rest for 2 minutes. Serve whole or slice thin and fan onto plate.

Just bought a seasoned 12" CIS for $7 and an 8" for $4 at HEB on clearance. Had a sirloin in the fridge and tried this recipe. Came out tasty and tender (for a sirloin). :shrug:
Nice bump. Not sure how I missed this post the first couple of times around.

Tipsy, do you have a cornbread recipe?

Here's Alton Brown's cornbread recipe.

2 cups yellow cornmeal

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 tablespoon sugar

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1 cup buttermilk

2 eggs

1 cup creamed corn

2 tablespoons canola oil

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

Place a 10-inch cast iron skillet into the oven.

In a bowl, combine the cornmeal, salt, sugar, baking powder, and baking soda. Whisk together to combine well.

In a large bowl, combine the buttermilk, eggs, and creamed corn, whisking together to combine thoroughly. Add the dry ingredients to the buttermilk mixture and stir to combine. If the batter will not pour, add more buttermilk to the batter.

Add 2 tablespoons canola oil to the cast iron skillet. Pour the batter into the skillet. Bake until the cornbread is golden brown and springs back upon the touch, about 20 minutes.

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If you like steaks this is a great recipe from Alton Brown for steaks in a cast iron skillet.

1 boneless rib eye steak, 1 1/2-inch thick

Canola oil to coat

Kosher salt and ground black pepper

Place 10 to 12-inch cast iron skillet in oven and heat oven to 500 degrees. Bring steak(s) to room temperature.

When oven reaches temperature, remove pan and place on range over high heat. Coat steak lightly with oil and season both sides with a generous pinch of salt. Grind on black pepper to taste.

Immediately place steak in the middle of hot, dry pan. Cook 30 seconds without moving. Turn with tongs and cook another 30 seconds, then put the pan straight into the oven for 2 minutes. Flip steak and cook for another 2 minutes. (This time is for medium rare steaks. If you prefer medium, add a minute to both of the oven turns.)

Remove steak from pan, cover loosely with foil, and rest for 2 minutes. Serve whole or slice thin and fan onto plate.

Just bought a seasoned 12" CIS for $7 and an 8" for $4 at HEB on clearance. Had a sirloin in the fridge and tried this recipe. Came out tasty and tender (for a sirloin). :goodposting:
Nice bump. Not sure how I missed this post the first couple of times around.

Tipsy, do you have a cornbread recipe?

Here's Alton Brown's cornbread recipe.

2 cups yellow cornmeal

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 tablespoon sugar

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1 cup buttermilk

2 eggs

1 cup creamed corn

2 tablespoons canola oil

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

Place a 10-inch cast iron skillet into the oven.

In a bowl, combine the cornmeal, salt, sugar, baking powder, and baking soda. Whisk together to combine well.

In a large bowl, combine the buttermilk, eggs, and creamed corn, whisking together to combine thoroughly. Add the dry ingredients to the buttermilk mixture and stir to combine. If the batter will not pour, add more buttermilk to the batter.

Add 2 tablespoons canola oil to the cast iron skillet. Pour the batter into the skillet. Bake until the cornbread is golden brown and springs back upon the touch, about 20 minutes.

That's the recipe I use. Only change is add a big table spoon of sour cream to the batter and I use 3 tablespoons of sugar instead of 1.

Key is letting the skillet stay in the oven while you preheat it. You want the batter to sizzle when you pour it into the skillet.

Also experiment with different grinds of corn meal. Some is a lot more coarse than others and makes for a different texture.

J

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I just "found" 2 cast iron skillets, however, they have a coating of rust on the inside bottom and sides of the pans. What would be the best way to remove the rust so that i can use these again.

I messed around this weekend using some steel wool, which worked a little. Just wondering if i'm gonna need my steel brush for my drill. Also, is there any type of rust removal products that will help my 'elbow grease'?

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If you like steaks this is a great recipe from Alton Brown for steaks in a cast iron skillet.

1 boneless rib eye steak, 1 1/2-inch thick

Canola oil to coat

Kosher salt and ground black pepper

Place 10 to 12-inch cast iron skillet in oven and heat oven to 500 degrees. Bring steak(s) to room temperature.

When oven reaches temperature, remove pan and place on range over high heat. Coat steak lightly with oil and season both sides with a generous pinch of salt. Grind on black pepper to taste.

Immediately place steak in the middle of hot, dry pan. Cook 30 seconds without moving. Turn with tongs and cook another 30 seconds, then put the pan straight into the oven for 2 minutes. Flip steak and cook for another 2 minutes. (This time is for medium rare steaks. If you prefer medium, add a minute to both of the oven turns.)

Remove steak from pan, cover loosely with foil, and rest for 2 minutes. Serve whole or slice thin and fan onto plate.

Just bought a seasoned 12" CIS for $7 and an 8" for $4 at HEB on clearance. Had a sirloin in the fridge and tried this recipe. Came out tasty and tender (for a sirloin). :confused:
Nice bump. Not sure how I missed this post the first couple of times around.

Tipsy, do you have a cornbread recipe?

Here's Alton Brown's cornbread recipe.

2 cups yellow cornmeal

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 tablespoon sugar

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1 cup buttermilk

2 eggs

1 cup creamed corn

2 tablespoons canola oil

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

Place a 10-inch cast iron skillet into the oven.

In a bowl, combine the cornmeal, salt, sugar, baking powder, and baking soda. Whisk together to combine well.

In a large bowl, combine the buttermilk, eggs, and creamed corn, whisking together to combine thoroughly. Add the dry ingredients to the buttermilk mixture and stir to combine. If the batter will not pour, add more buttermilk to the batter.

Add 2 tablespoons canola oil to the cast iron skillet. Pour the batter into the skillet. Bake until the cornbread is golden brown and springs back upon the touch, about 20 minutes.

That's the recipe I use. Only change is add a big table spoon of sour cream to the batter and I use 3 tablespoons of sugar instead of 1.

Key is letting the skillet stay in the oven while you preheat it. You want the batter to sizzle when you pour it into the skillet.

Also experiment with different grinds of corn meal. Some is a lot more coarse than others and makes for a different texture.

J

Are you sure you are in the south putting that much sugar into corn bread?

Kidding...I like it a touch sweeter as well.

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I just "found" 2 cast iron skillets, however, they have a coating of rust on the inside bottom and sides of the pans. What would be the best way to remove the rust so that i can use these again.

I messed around this weekend using some steel wool, which worked a little. Just wondering if i'm gonna need my steel brush for my drill. Also, is there any type of rust removal products that will help my 'elbow grease'?

Cast Iron Electrolysis Rust Removal

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If you like steaks this is a great recipe from Alton Brown for steaks in a cast iron skillet.

1 boneless rib eye steak, 1 1/2-inch thick

Canola oil to coat

Kosher salt and ground black pepper

Place 10 to 12-inch cast iron skillet in oven and heat oven to 500 degrees. Bring steak(s) to room temperature.

When oven reaches temperature, remove pan and place on range over high heat. Coat steak lightly with oil and season both sides with a generous pinch of salt. Grind on black pepper to taste.

Immediately place steak in the middle of hot, dry pan. Cook 30 seconds without moving. Turn with tongs and cook another 30 seconds, then put the pan straight into the oven for 2 minutes. Flip steak and cook for another 2 minutes. (This time is for medium rare steaks. If you prefer medium, add a minute to both of the oven turns.)

Remove steak from pan, cover loosely with foil, and rest for 2 minutes. Serve whole or slice thin and fan onto plate.

Just bought a seasoned 12" CIS for $7 and an 8" for $4 at HEB on clearance. Had a sirloin in the fridge and tried this recipe. Came out tasty and tender (for a sirloin). :shrug:
Nice bump. Not sure how I missed this post the first couple of times around.

Tipsy, do you have a cornbread recipe?

Here's Alton Brown's cornbread recipe.

2 cups yellow cornmeal

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 tablespoon sugar

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1 cup buttermilk

2 eggs

1 cup creamed corn

2 tablespoons canola oil

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

Place a 10-inch cast iron skillet into the oven.

In a bowl, combine the cornmeal, salt, sugar, baking powder, and baking soda. Whisk together to combine well.

In a large bowl, combine the buttermilk, eggs, and creamed corn, whisking together to combine thoroughly. Add the dry ingredients to the buttermilk mixture and stir to combine. If the batter will not pour, add more buttermilk to the batter.

Add 2 tablespoons canola oil to the cast iron skillet. Pour the batter into the skillet. Bake until the cornbread is golden brown and springs back upon the touch, about 20 minutes.

That's the recipe I use. Only change is add a big table spoon of sour cream to the batter and I use 3 tablespoons of sugar instead of 1.

Key is letting the skillet stay in the oven while you preheat it. You want the batter to sizzle when you pour it into the skillet.

Also experiment with different grinds of corn meal. Some is a lot more coarse than others and makes for a different texture.

J

Are you sure you are in the south putting that much sugar into corn bread?

Kidding...I like it a touch sweeter as well.

:X Don't rat me out sho nuff...

J

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Sugary corn bread is dessert. Had a pulled pork sandwich the other day served on cornbread. The cornbread tasted like pound cake - ruined it for me.

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Sugary corn bread is dessert. Had a pulled pork sandwich the other day served on cornbread. The cornbread tasted like pound cake - ruined it for me.

Pork sandwich on top of cornbread? Never heard of it.J

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Sugary corn bread is dessert. Had a pulled pork sandwich the other day served on cornbread. The cornbread tasted like pound cake - ruined it for me.

Pork sandwich on top of cornbread? Never heard of it.J
Semi-fancy grill trying to be nouveau, I believe. Would have been good on regular cornbread.

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Sugary corn bread is dessert. Had a pulled pork sandwich the other day served on cornbread. The cornbread tasted like pound cake - ruined it for me.

Not sure who puts that much sugar in their corn bread though...sounds way too sweet.I like to take a sweater butter to brush over the top and let it melt in right before cutting and serving.

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Sugary corn bread is dessert. Had a pulled pork sandwich the other day served on cornbread. The cornbread tasted like pound cake - ruined it for me.

Not sure who puts that much sugar in their corn bread though...sounds way too sweet.

I like to take a sweater butter to brush over the top and let it melt in right before cutting and serving.

Does it get caught in your teeth? :confused:

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Sugary corn bread is dessert. Had a pulled pork sandwich the other day served on cornbread. The cornbread tasted like pound cake - ruined it for me.

Not sure who puts that much sugar in their corn bread though...sounds way too sweet.

I like to take a sweater butter to brush over the top and let it melt in right before cutting and serving.

Does it get caught in your teeth? ;)
I like the keep the bread warm...

sweeter... :bowtie::doh:

Edited by sho nuff

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Sugary corn bread is dessert. Had a pulled pork sandwich the other day served on cornbread. The cornbread tasted like pound cake - ruined it for me.

Not sure who puts that much sugar in their corn bread though...sounds way too sweet.

I like to take a sweater butter to brush over the top and let it melt in right before cutting and serving.

Does it get caught in your teeth? ;)
I like the keep the bread warm...

sweeter... :bowtie::doh:

Sugary cornbread is light years better than the dry stuff...and no...it isn't for dessert unless you are using the crumbles left over in a big bowl of milk with even more sugar.

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Sugary corn bread is dessert. Had a pulled pork sandwich the other day served on cornbread. The cornbread tasted like pound cake - ruined it for me.

Not sure who puts that much sugar in their corn bread though...sounds way too sweet.I like to take a sweater butter to brush over the top and let it melt in right before cutting and serving.
3 tablespoons of sugar in a big 12" cast iron skillet really isn't very sweet though. It's good stuff.J

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Newb w/ the CIS so wondering, when cooking bacon on the stove top (gas), what the recommended time/setting (L/M/H) for preheating is?

Does this apply for all stovetop cooking?

TIA

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Newb w/ the CIS so wondering, when cooking bacon on the stove top (gas), what the recommended time/setting (L/M/H) for preheating is?Does this apply for all stovetop cooking?TIA

Not sure about pre-heating or even cooking bacon in a cast iron skillet but I've switched to making bacon on parchment paper on a cookie sheet at about 300 and it's the best bacon I have ever made.

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