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Cast Iron Skillet omnibus

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Newb w/ the CIS so wondering, when cooking bacon on the stove top (gas), what the recommended time/setting (L/M/H) for preheating is?Does this apply for all stovetop cooking?TIA

Not sure about pre-heating or even cooking bacon in a cast iron skillet but I've switched to making bacon on parchment paper on a cookie sheet at about 300 and it's the best bacon I have ever made.
I put bacon in the cast iron skillet and put it in the oven. I used to do 300 or 325 degrees, but now I like 425 better.

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Newb w/ the CIS so wondering, when cooking bacon on the stove top (gas), what the recommended time/setting (L/M/H) for preheating is?Does this apply for all stovetop cooking?TIA

Not sure about pre-heating or even cooking bacon in a cast iron skillet but I've switched to making bacon on parchment paper on a cookie sheet at about 300 and it's the best bacon I have ever made.
I put bacon in the cast iron skillet and put it in the oven. I used to do 300 or 325 degrees, but now I like 425 better.
How often do you flip?

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I put bacon in the cast iron skillet and put it in the oven. I used to do 300 or 325 degrees, but now I like 425 better.

How often do you flip?
I don't flip it at all.

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I put bacon in the cast iron skillet and put it in the oven. I used to do 300 or 325 degrees, but now I like 425 better.

How often do you flip?
I don't flip it at all.
Do we have an approximate cooking time for these different cooking temps?This sounds like a good way to go.

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I put bacon in the cast iron skillet and put it in the oven. I used to do 300 or 325 degrees, but now I like 425 better.

How often do you flip?
I don't flip it at all.
Do we have an approximate cooking time for these different cooking temps?This sounds like a good way to go.
I don't ever time it, but at 425 degrees it takes probably around 15 minutes. I just put it in the oven, go play around in the FFA for a bit, and when my sixth sense tells me it should be about done, I go check on it. It's usually right on. If I had to guess, I'd say it's usually around 15 minutes.

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Newb w/ the CIS so wondering, when cooking bacon on the stove top (gas), what the recommended time/setting (L/M/H) for preheating is?Does this apply for all stovetop cooking?TIA

Not sure about pre-heating or even cooking bacon in a cast iron skillet but I've switched to making bacon on parchment paper on a cookie sheet at about 300 and it's the best bacon I have ever made.
The thing I like about the PP method is that there is minimal mess to clean up. Fold the paper up at the sides so the grease doesn't get on the sheet before you put it in the oven, let it sit for a bit after baking to let it harden a bit and then just pick up the paper and chuck it. I used to make bacon in a cast iron skillet but cleaning the skillet after was a pain (but no more so than if it was on the oven in a pan). If it saves cleaning a greasy pan, I'm all in.

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Newb w/ the CIS so wondering, when cooking bacon on the stove top (gas), what the recommended time/setting (L/M/H) for preheating is?Does this apply for all stovetop cooking?TIA

Not sure about pre-heating or even cooking bacon in a cast iron skillet but I've switched to making bacon on parchment paper on a cookie sheet at about 300 and it's the best bacon I have ever made.
The thing I like about the PP method is that there is minimal mess to clean up. Fold the paper up at the sides so the grease doesn't get on the sheet before you put it in the oven, let it sit for a bit after baking to let it harden a bit and then just pick up the paper and chuck it. I used to make bacon in a cast iron skillet but cleaning the skillet after was a pain (but no more so than if it was on the oven in a pan). If it saves cleaning a greasy pan, I'm all in.
I pour the grease into a cup, which I cover and keep in the refrigerator. It's great for frying eggs, etc.

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Newb w/ the CIS so wondering, when cooking bacon on the stove top (gas), what the recommended time/setting (L/M/H) for preheating is?Does this apply for all stovetop cooking?TIA

Not sure about pre-heating or even cooking bacon in a cast iron skillet but I've switched to making bacon on parchment paper on a cookie sheet at about 300 and it's the best bacon I have ever made.
The thing I like about the PP method is that there is minimal mess to clean up. Fold the paper up at the sides so the grease doesn't get on the sheet before you put it in the oven, let it sit for a bit after baking to let it harden a bit and then just pick up the paper and chuck it. I used to make bacon in a cast iron skillet but cleaning the skillet after was a pain (but no more so than if it was on the oven in a pan). If it saves cleaning a greasy pan, I'm all in.
I pour the grease into a cup, which I cover and keep in the refrigerator. It's great for frying eggs, etc.
I've got a jar full of it, I can't use it that fast.

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There are tornado warnings here in the Boston area today (for serious), so I just cooked some steak tips that had been marinating for 2 days in my cast iron skillet rather than outside on the grill. I dare say that they may have been every bit as good as grilled tips.

Before I bought this fine piece of equipment (12" Lodge), I was weary about it supposedly being stick-free without the use of cooking spray. I still find it difficult to cook eggs or even bacon in it without having them stick, but the steak tips came out amazing. Any tips on seasoning this thing to make the surface easier to work with? I had read that you're supposed to rub some oil into it, then bake it in the oven for awhile, then just never use soap or any abrasive cleaners on it. I found this to be almost completely ineffective. Everything still stuck to it, and I would inevitably have to scrub it down to get any leftover food off of it... then repeat the seasoning process, all to practically no avail.

Nonetheless, it's the manliest piece of cookware in my kitchen, and I store it right up on the stove for all to admire.

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Newb w/ the CIS so wondering, when cooking bacon on the stove top (gas), what the recommended time/setting (L/M/H) for preheating is?Does this apply for all stovetop cooking?TIA

Not sure about pre-heating or even cooking bacon in a cast iron skillet but I've switched to making bacon on parchment paper on a cookie sheet at about 300 and it's the best bacon I have ever made.
The thing I like about the PP method is that there is minimal mess to clean up. Fold the paper up at the sides so the grease doesn't get on the sheet before you put it in the oven, let it sit for a bit after baking to let it harden a bit and then just pick up the paper and chuck it. I used to make bacon in a cast iron skillet but cleaning the skillet after was a pain (but no more so than if it was on the oven in a pan). If it saves cleaning a greasy pan, I'm all in.
I pour the grease into a cup, which I cover and keep in the refrigerator. It's great for frying eggs, etc.
This is all my grandparents ever used to cook in.

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There are tornado warnings here in the Boston area today (for serious), so I just cooked some steak tips that had been marinating for 2 days in my cast iron skillet rather than outside on the grill. I dare say that they may have been every bit as good as grilled tips.

Before I bought this fine piece of equipment (12" Lodge), I was weary about it supposedly being stick-free without the use of cooking spray. I still find it difficult to cook eggs or even bacon in it without having them stick, but the steak tips came out amazing. Any tips on seasoning this thing to make the surface easier to work with? I had read that you're supposed to rub some oil into it, then bake it in the oven for awhile, then just never use soap or any abrasive cleaners on it. I found this to be almost completely ineffective. Everything still stuck to it, and I would inevitably have to scrub it down to get any leftover food off of it... then repeat the seasoning process, all to practically no avail.

Nonetheless, it's the manliest piece of cookware in my kitchen, and I store it right up on the stove for all to admire.

Same here for the most part. Haven't tried eggs but pancakes are ok. Need to really scrub it to get the black bits off.

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There are tornado warnings here in the Boston area today (for serious), so I just cooked some steak tips that had been marinating for 2 days in my cast iron skillet rather than outside on the grill. I dare say that they may have been every bit as good as grilled tips

Well? What's the damn recipe?

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Couple of points here

1. When cleaning use table salt, just a lot of table salt in the skillet and use some damp paper towles to scrub, makes cleaning without detergent much easier.

2. After a few uses, once you have cleaned the skillet give it a good spraying with Pam or Spray on olive oil, rub in with paper towels and then repeat, then store. This should help with the sticking of food.

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Couple of points here1. When cleaning use table salt, just a lot of table salt in the skillet and use some damp paper towles to scrub, makes cleaning without detergent much easier.2. After a few uses, once you have cleaned the skillet give it a good spraying with Pam or Spray on olive oil, rub in with paper towels and then repeat, then store. This should help with the sticking of food.

After cleaning I rub with oil and leave it in a warm oven. It rebakes the finish.

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I have been wanting to get into CIS cooking for some time. Gonna have to go through this thread. :lmao:

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After cleaning I rub with oil and leave it in a warm oven. It rebakes the finish.

For some reason I love these sentences/words.

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I put bacon in the cast iron skillet and put it in the oven. I used to do 300 or 325 degrees, but now I like 425 better.

How often do you flip?
I don't flip it at all.
Do we have an approximate cooking time for these different cooking temps?

This sounds like a good way to go.

I don't ever time it, but at 425 degrees it takes probably around 15 minutes. I just put it in the oven, go play around in the FFA for a bit, and when my sixth sense tells me it should be about done, I go check on it. It's usually right on. If I had to guess, I'd say it's usually around 15 minutes.
Cooked our bacon this way and in the cast iron skillet, everyone liked it in the oven best. We got a dutch oven and cooked apple crisp for our first cook, it was excellent (though we'll make a couple changes).

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we bought one of those reversible cast iron grill/griddles but then realized it cant be used on our flat top electric stove :goodposting:

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we bought one of those reversible cast iron grill/griddles but then realized it cant be used on our flat top electric stove :lmao:

Why not? Is the bottom not smooth?

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we bought one of those reversible cast iron grill/griddles but then realized it cant be used on our flat top electric stove :goodposting:

Why not? Is the bottom not smooth?
no...the flat side had ridges around the edge (to contain grease an whatnot) and the grill side would make very little contact with the burnersgoogle research made it sound like it wouldnt heat probperly plus i was worried about scratching the stove

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Added a cast iron Dutch oven to my arsenal early this year. I use it about twice as often as I use my CI fry pans -- which I still use a lot! Great for soups, stews, even popcorn. Just keep your tomato and pineapple away from it -- they tend to remove the temper from the iron, and add unwanted ferric flavor.

Edited by aardball44

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getting my first cast iron skillet for Christmas... gonna cook up some bacon and then some corned beef hash in the morning.

:goodposting:

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Just read an article in Cook's Illustrated about how to season Cast Iron. A reader wrote in her method and they tried it and said it was amazing.

She used Flaxseed oil, then did the normal seasoning process, oil the skillet, wipe out excess, cook for an hour upside down in the oven. But she did that 5 times. When they tried it, they said it not only had a perfect, smooth black coating, but they washed it in a dishwasher 5 times with no degradation whatsoever. I'm going to try it on mine.

Edited by TexanFan02

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Just read an article in Cook's Illustrated about how to season Cast Iron. A reader wrote in her method and they tried it and said it was amazing.She used Saffron oil, then did the normal seasoning process, oil the skillet, wipe out excess, cook for an hour upside down in the oven. But she did that 5 times. When they tried it, they said it not only had a perfect, smooth black coating, but they washed it in a dishwasher 5 times with no degradation whatsoever. I'm going to try it on mine.

She used flaxseed oil, per the article.

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Just read an article in Cook's Illustrated about how to season Cast Iron. A reader wrote in her method and they tried it and said it was amazing.She used Saffron oil, then did the normal seasoning process, oil the skillet, wipe out excess, cook for an hour upside down in the oven. But she did that 5 times. When they tried it, they said it not only had a perfect, smooth black coating, but they washed it in a dishwasher 5 times with no degradation whatsoever. I'm going to try it on mine.

She used flaxseed oil, per the article.
Oops, good catch, thanks.

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Just read an article in Cook's Illustrated about how to season Cast Iron. A reader wrote in her method and they tried it and said it was amazing.She used Saffron oil, then did the normal seasoning process, oil the skillet, wipe out excess, cook for an hour upside down in the oven. But she did that 5 times. When they tried it, they said it not only had a perfect, smooth black coating, but they washed it in a dishwasher 5 times with no degradation whatsoever. I'm going to try it on mine.

I'm so doing this this weekend since we're going to be snowed in anyway. :thumbup:

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My wife picked up a Paula Deen cast iron casserole. Am I going to be able to tell any difference between this and a Lodge dutch oven?

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My wife picked up a Paula Deen cast iron casserole. Am I going to be able to tell any difference between this and a Lodge dutch oven?

Staub dutch ovens are the absolute best...there is no debate. The 12 and 3/4 oval dutch oven is a work of God.

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Just read an article in Cook's Illustrated about how to season Cast Iron. A reader wrote in her method and they tried it and said it was amazing.She used Saffron oil, then did the normal seasoning process, oil the skillet, wipe out excess, cook for an hour upside down in the oven. But she did that 5 times. When they tried it, they said it not only had a perfect, smooth black coating, but they washed it in a dishwasher 5 times with no degradation whatsoever. I'm going to try it on mine.

I'm so doing this this weekend since we're going to be snowed in anyway. :goodposting:
I messed up my original quote, so make sure you use Flaxseed oil. I'm not even sure if there is a Saffron oil :thumbup:Also, one thing I forgot that was in the article was:Warm the skillet for 20 minutes before applying oil to "open up the pores".

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Just read an article in Cook's Illustrated about how to season Cast Iron. A reader wrote in her method and they tried it and said it was amazing.She used Saffron oil, then did the normal seasoning process, oil the skillet, wipe out excess, cook for an hour upside down in the oven. But she did that 5 times. When they tried it, they said it not only had a perfect, smooth black coating, but they washed it in a dishwasher 5 times with no degradation whatsoever. I'm going to try it on mine.

I'm so doing this this weekend since we're going to be snowed in anyway. :thumbup:
I messed up my original quote, so make sure you use Flaxseed oil. I'm not even sure if there is a Saffron oil :lmao:Also, one thing I forgot that was in the article was:Warm the skillet for 20 minutes before applying oil to "open up the pores".
:hot: Thanks!

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I made this cornbread last night thanks you you people. I took a mixture of the two recipes in here, and some cornbread recipes I found on the internet.

First time making anything like this, and it turned out very tasty.

CORNBREAD

GB all of you.

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The Logic line is pre seasoned so you don't have to do any of the normal prep and seasoning. Big plus. The 12" will get a ton of use.

I just picked up a 12" from Target ($16) to cook up some filet mignons for New Years tonight.It's pre-seasoned (as Joe notes above), but any need to do some extra seasoning prior to first use? Just don't want my nice filets to get ruined due to using this CIS for the very first time tonight.

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If you like steaks this is a great recipe from Alton Brown for steaks in a cast iron skillet.1 boneless rib eye steak, 1 1/2-inch thick Canola oil to coat Kosher salt and ground black pepperPlace 10 to 12-inch cast iron skillet in oven and heat oven to 500 degrees. Bring steak(s) to room temperature. When oven reaches temperature, remove pan and place on range over high heat. Coat steak lightly with oil and season both sides with a generous pinch of salt. Grind on black pepper to taste. Immediately place steak in the middle of hot, dry pan. Cook 30 seconds without moving. Turn with tongs and cook another 30 seconds, then put the pan straight into the oven for 2 minutes. Flip steak and cook for another 2 minutes. (This time is for medium rare steaks. If you prefer medium, add a minute to both of the oven turns.) Remove steak from pan, cover loosely with foil, and rest for 2 minutes. Serve whole or slice thin and fan onto plate.

Would anything need to be adjusted for the above with filet mignon? I have 3 fairly small/medium pieces that are about 2" thick. Like medium rare.Also, read that it's not good to put salt on filets before cooking as it attracts the juices to the surface and you lose them during the cook....said to put salt on after done cooking. Agree or disagree?

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One of the best steaks I've had in recent memory was inspired by a previous thread on this board - sear it as hot as possible in a skillet, let it rest for an hour, then finish it in the skillet in a low oven.  Used a basic dry rub.  Insane.  :lol:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hi Bakes,

Glad that worked out for you. I set my smoke alarm off twice with that the other day.

It is good though.

Hey Joe!

Yeah it did - couldn't remember who posted that, but just outstanding - great flavor and texture when it's cooked that way.

Also considering this technique. Couple questions...

- when you let it rest just take it off the skillet and onto a plate for 1 hour....just sitting on the countertop at room temperature for that hour I'm assuming?

- when finishing at low in an oven...what temp. would be good for this? And about how long for med. rare filet mignon (small/med size, 2" thick)

thanks

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If you like steaks this is a great recipe from Alton Brown for steaks in a cast iron skillet.1 boneless rib eye steak, 1 1/2-inch thick Canola oil to coat Kosher salt and ground black pepperPlace 10 to 12-inch cast iron skillet in oven and heat oven to 500 degrees. Bring steak(s) to room temperature. When oven reaches temperature, remove pan and place on range over high heat. Coat steak lightly with oil and season both sides with a generous pinch of salt. Grind on black pepper to taste. Immediately place steak in the middle of hot, dry pan. Cook 30 seconds without moving. Turn with tongs and cook another 30 seconds, then put the pan straight into the oven for 2 minutes. Flip steak and cook for another 2 minutes. (This time is for medium rare steaks. If you prefer medium, add a minute to both of the oven turns.) Remove steak from pan, cover loosely with foil, and rest for 2 minutes. Serve whole or slice thin and fan onto plate.

Would anything need to be adjusted for the above with filet mignon? I have 3 fairly small/medium pieces that are about 2" thick. Like medium rare.Also, read that it's not good to put salt on filets before cooking as it attracts the juices to the surface and you lose them during the cook....said to put salt on after done cooking. Agree or disagree?
I wouldn't worry about it pulling juices out during the cook. oil/salt/pepper right about 15 mins before going in the pan... you're good to go. If you have a good steak, and you don't pierce the steak with a fork, and make sure you let it rest before cutting into it... it will be plenty juicy. Don't worry about it.

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If you like steaks this is a great recipe from Alton Brown for steaks in a cast iron skillet.1 boneless rib eye steak, 1 1/2-inch thick Canola oil to coat Kosher salt and ground black pepperPlace 10 to 12-inch cast iron skillet in oven and heat oven to 500 degrees. Bring steak(s) to room temperature. When oven reaches temperature, remove pan and place on range over high heat. Coat steak lightly with oil and season both sides with a generous pinch of salt. Grind on black pepper to taste. Immediately place steak in the middle of hot, dry pan. Cook 30 seconds without moving. Turn with tongs and cook another 30 seconds, then put the pan straight into the oven for 2 minutes. Flip steak and cook for another 2 minutes. (This time is for medium rare steaks. If you prefer medium, add a minute to both of the oven turns.) Remove steak from pan, cover loosely with foil, and rest for 2 minutes. Serve whole or slice thin and fan onto plate.

Would anything need to be adjusted for the above with filet mignon? I have 3 fairly small/medium pieces that are about 2" thick. Like medium rare.Also, read that it's not good to put salt on filets before cooking as it attracts the juices to the surface and you lose them during the cook....said to put salt on after done cooking. Agree or disagree?
I wouldn't worry about it pulling juices out during the cook. oil/salt/pepper right about 15 mins before going in the pan... you're good to go. If you have a good steak, and you don't pierce the steak with a fork, and make sure you let it rest before cutting into it... it will be plenty juicy. Don't worry about it.
Thanks. Excited to give this a whirl tonight, but after reading through this entire thread now worried about the "smoke" it might create. I live in a 1BR condo building with touchy smoke alarms...is this going to be a problem during the 60 seconds of searing portion in the above directions?

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If you like steaks this is a great recipe from Alton Brown for steaks in a cast iron skillet.1 boneless rib eye steak, 1 1/2-inch thick Canola oil to coat Kosher salt and ground black pepperPlace 10 to 12-inch cast iron skillet in oven and heat oven to 500 degrees. Bring steak(s) to room temperature. When oven reaches temperature, remove pan and place on range over high heat. Coat steak lightly with oil and season both sides with a generous pinch of salt. Grind on black pepper to taste. Immediately place steak in the middle of hot, dry pan. Cook 30 seconds without moving. Turn with tongs and cook another 30 seconds, then put the pan straight into the oven for 2 minutes. Flip steak and cook for another 2 minutes. (This time is for medium rare steaks. If you prefer medium, add a minute to both of the oven turns.) Remove steak from pan, cover loosely with foil, and rest for 2 minutes. Serve whole or slice thin and fan onto plate.

Would anything need to be adjusted for the above with filet mignon? I have 3 fairly small/medium pieces that are about 2" thick. Like medium rare.Also, read that it's not good to put salt on filets before cooking as it attracts the juices to the surface and you lose them during the cook....said to put salt on after done cooking. Agree or disagree?
I wouldn't worry about it pulling juices out during the cook. oil/salt/pepper right about 15 mins before going in the pan... you're good to go. If you have a good steak, and you don't pierce the steak with a fork, and make sure you let it rest before cutting into it... it will be plenty juicy. Don't worry about it.
Thanks. Excited to give this a whirl tonight, but after reading through this entire thread now worried about the "smoke" it might create. I live in a 1BR condo building with touchy smoke alarms...is this going to be a problem during the 60 seconds of searing portion in the above directions?
Assuming you don't go too heavy on the oil you should be alright.

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Assuming you don't go too heavy on the oil you should be alright.

After taking CIS out of 500 degree oven do I then need to spray the CIS with non-stick spray before putting on the oil covered steaks? Or just oil covered steaks onto the heated dry pan OK?

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Assuming you don't go too heavy on the oil you should be alright.

After taking CIS out of 500 degree oven do I then need to spray the CIS with non-stick spray before putting on the oil covered steaks? Or just oil covered steaks onto the heated dry pan OK?
Assuming the pan is properly seasoned you should be able to go right to the dry pan. The problem is if that pan is 500 degrees most sprays will vaporize into smoke almost instantly (that's well above the smoke point of most cooking oils). Part of the reason for the oil on the steak is to aid in avoiding any sticking. Edited by [icon]

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