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Tesla electric cars

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Coming very soon and looking pretty freaking awesome (and reasonably priced):

Link

uh, yeah.

Much of the excitement is pegged to Tesla's launch of the Model S, an electric sedan that the company says will sell for a minimum of $50,000 in 2012.

Hopefully they've worked out all the issues it had when it got reviewed on Top Gear.

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http://autos.yahoo.com/articles/autos_cont...ic-cars-future/

NEW YORK (AP) -- Tesla Motors Inc. begins selling stock to the public on Tuesday. The sale's success depends on how much investors are willing to bet on a car company that has never made a profit, sells a single vehicle and expects to lose money until at least 2012.

As for the car, it's electric -- a kind of vehicle Americans have shown almost no appetite for -- and it's very pricey.

But the Palo Alto, Calif., startup believes Americans' taste in cars is changing. Most analysts agree with Tesla that the internal combustion engine will soon make room for greener forms of powering cars, such as electricity, as gas prices rise and environmental worries mount.

But Tesla faces bigger questions than just consumer taste. It has lost $290.2 million since it was founded in 2003 and has never had a profitable quarter. It doesn't expect the red ink to go away until it starts selling its next vehicle, a four-door electric sedan called the Model S, in large numbers. That isn't scheduled "until 2012, or possibly later," according to its business plan filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The only car that Tesla now offers isn't exactly a hot seller. Priced at more than $100,000, the two-door Roadster showed the world what electric cars can do, like accelerate to 60 mph in under 4 seconds. But Tesla has sold just 1,000 since 2008.

"They're going to have to have a dazzling road show explaining their numbers, which are not good," said Scott Sweet, who owns the research firm IPO Boutique.

Tesla will be the first automaker to go public since Ford Motor Co. held its initial public offering in 1956. It expects the stock sale to raise up to $211.2 million, which will fund the Model S and other corporate activities. On Monday the company raised the number of shares it plans to sell to 13.3 million from 11.1 million, a sign that investors are feeling upbeat about its prospects.

Tesla expects the shares to be priced between $14 and $16.

Tesla's goal is to build 20,000 Model S sedans a year, which are expected to cost about $50,000 after federal tax credits. Tesla's production target puts it on par with other sporty luxury car brands, like Porsche, which sold about 20,000 cars in the U.S. last year.

Whether Americans will take to electric cars is another question.

One of the biggest obstacles to the wider adoption of electric vehicles has been their limited range compared with gas-fueled rivals. Supporters can argue that most people drive fewer than 40 miles a day, well within the range of the 300-mile-per-charge Model S. But Americans love their road trips and dread the thought of an electric car running out of juice mid-journey.

"There are very few places you can plug in your electric vehicle where you park, during your day, at the office," said Angus MacKenzie, editor in chief of Motor Trend magazine.

Even if Americans embrace electric cars, by the time the Model S arrives it will likely have stiff competition. Nissan Motor Co. is already taking orders on its electric car, the Leaf, which gets 100 miles per charge and is priced at about $25,000 after tax credits. The Chevrolet Volt, an electric car with a gasoline range-extender, goes on sale by the end of this year with a $35,000 price tag.

Tesla itself warned investors that it could lose any competitive edge if it fails to keep up with the latest advances in electric car technology.

But Tesla has its strengths, including some high-profile backers. Chief among them is CEO Elon Musk, the 38-year-old entrepreneur who was an inspiration for the playboy business mogul of the Iron Man films, Tony Stark. Musk's resume includes founding PayPal and running the rocket manufacturer Space Exploration Technologies.

"He's been successful at attracting capital, not just at this company, but other ventures," said Matt Therian, analyst with the IPO research firm Renaissance Capital in Greenwich, Conn.

Another key supporter is the U.S. government, which has kicked in a $465 million loan through an Energy Department program designed to encourage electric car technologies.

Other backers include Toyota Motor Corp., which last month agreed to sell Tesla a plant in Fremont, Calif., and invest $50 million in the electric car maker. Tesla plans to use the plant to build the Model S.

Toyota and others are "in essence, endorsing the concept, the product and management," said Sweet of IPO Boutique.

With everything riding on a little-tested technology, there's an echo of dot com-era bravado in Tesla's IPO.

Investors will decide for themselves whether it takes Iron Man to lift Tesla off the ground.

What it Tesla's plan for people to re-charge these things? Right now, seems like you can't drive more than 150 miles from home, right? How expensive is it to set up charging stations, and where would they be?

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Coming very soon and looking pretty freaking awesome (and reasonably priced):

Link

uh, yeah.

Much of the excitement is pegged to Tesla's launch of the Model S, an electric sedan that the company says will sell for a minimum of $50,000 in 2012.

Hopefully they've worked out all the issues it had when it got reviewed on Top Gear.
What were those issues?

I'm seriously considering making a reservation for the pre-order of the S sedan for my wife.

She drives a Mercedes E300 Turbo diesel that is 10 years old...in my mind one of the greenest cars there is. Even today it has less than 50k miles on it, but I think she'd be pretty psyched to be driving the Tesla...especially in 2 years.

If there are serious concerns I'd like to know. Thanks.

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The Nissan LEAF (all electric) looks pretty good and is going to beat Tesla to market.

The Chevy Volt is definitely going to be available sooner but technically it is a hybrid since it relies on a gasoline generator to keep the battery charged when the battery level falls below 30% (about 40 miles). Total range for the Volt is claimed to be about 300 miles.

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The 0-60 claim isn't surprising. You can tune up an electric motor to go very fast. The problem is that kind of acceleration makes the range lower.

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What it Tesla's plan for people to re-charge these things? Right now, seems like you can't drive more than 150 miles from home, right? How expensive is it to set up charging stations, and where would they be?

Yeah--I wouldn't be a big fan of dropping $50k on a car for it to be pretty much my "going to and from work" car. Why not go buy the Nissan for half the price, and then spend $50k on a luxury car that I could take on road trips, etc.?

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this is pretty cool:

First gear has strong "regenerative braking" that recharges the battery during deceleration and feels like engine braking in low gear on other sports cars.

Regen has been around for years.

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I am thinking about investing in Tesla.

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What it Tesla's plan for people to re-charge these things? Right now, seems like you can't drive more than 150 miles from home, right? How expensive is it to set up charging stations, and where would they be?

Yeah--I wouldn't be a big fan of dropping $50k on a car for it to be pretty much my "going to and from work" car. Why not go buy the Nissan for half the price, and then spend $50k on a luxury car that I could take on road trips, etc.?
Another question, and this might be a really ignorant one:Wherever these charging stations are, will they be 'universal'? Will Volt and Tesla owners be able to use the same method (I don't even know if it's a cord or not) to charge their cars?

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I am thinking about investing in Tesla.

Really? I read this and thought, "They're going to get killed by the big boys..."

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What it Tesla's plan for people to re-charge these things? Right now, seems like you can't drive more than 150 miles from home, right? How expensive is it to set up charging stations, and where would they be?

Yeah--I wouldn't be a big fan of dropping $50k on a car for it to be pretty much my "going to and from work" car. Why not go buy the Nissan for half the price, and then spend $50k on a luxury car that I could take on road trips, etc.?
Another question, and this might be a really ignorant one:Wherever these charging stations are, will they be 'universal'? Will Volt and Tesla owners be able to use the same method (I don't even know if it's a cord or not) to charge their cars?
I don't think the Volt has a "fast" charging option like the LEAF does. The Volt charges in 10 hours at 120 VAC and 4 hours at 240 VAC.

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I am thinking about investing in Tesla.

Really? I read this and thought, "They're going to get killed by the big boys..."
Which big boys? As far as I know, the big three doesn't have a fully-electric car for sale.

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I am thinking about investing in Tesla.

Really? I read this and thought, "They're going to get killed by the big boys..."
Which big boys? As far as I know, the big three doesn't have a fully-electric car for sale.
Right, but it sounds like Nissan and Chevy will have their electric cars:1. to market first, and2. at a lower price point, with3. consumer namebrand recognition, and4. superior marketing capacity (unless Tesla will market through established dealers?).That doesn't sound like a recipe for success for Tesla, IMHO.

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What it Tesla's plan for people to re-charge these things? Right now, seems like you can't drive more than 150 miles from home, right? How expensive is it to set up charging stations, and where would they be?

Yeah--I wouldn't be a big fan of dropping $50k on a car for it to be pretty much my "going to and from work" car. Why not go buy the Nissan for half the price, and then spend $50k on a luxury car that I could take on road trips, etc.?
Another question, and this might be a really ignorant one:Wherever these charging stations are, will they be 'universal'? Will Volt and Tesla owners be able to use the same method (I don't even know if it's a cord or not) to charge their cars?
Last I checked there were some charging stations throughout CA. I'd imagine those options are expanding slowly and have some uniformity.As for why get a pricey car to commute, you should really take a look at how you actually use your car. If you're like most people, you'll rarely use your car for extended driving that would put you outside the range of the Roadster. And even with the lower range option of the newer model, you'll rarely travel beyond range.

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Coming very soon and looking pretty freaking awesome (and reasonably priced):

Link

uh, yeah.

Much of the excitement is pegged to Tesla's launch of the Model S, an electric sedan that the company says will sell for a minimum of $50,000 in 2012.

Hopefully they've worked out all the issues it had when it got reviewed on Top Gear.
What were those issues?

I'm seriously considering making a reservation for the pre-order of the S sedan for my wife.

She drives a Mercedes E300 Turbo diesel that is 10 years old...in my mind one of the greenest cars there is. Even today it has less than 50k miles on it, but I think she'd be pretty psyched to be driving the Tesla...especially in 2 years.

If there are serious concerns I'd like to know. Thanks.

16 hour charge time, much shorter drive range if not on an eco-drive, overheating, and one car had the brakes fail, while charging.

Top Gear video review.

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This is a straight cash-out IPO for the early investors and founders. None of the capital will be going to thew company's coffers.

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I am thinking about investing in Tesla.

Really? I read this and thought, "They're going to get killed by the big boys..."
Which big boys? As far as I know, the big three doesn't have a fully-electric car for sale.
Right, but it sounds like Nissan and Chevy will have their electric cars:1. to market first, and2. at a lower price point, with3. consumer namebrand recognition, and4. superior marketing capacity (unless Tesla will market through established dealers?).That doesn't sound like a recipe for success for Tesla, IMHO.
Cool. I didn't know that they were releasing their own EVs this quickly.

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I am thinking about investing in Tesla.

Really? I read this and thought, "They're going to get killed by the big boys..."
Which big boys? As far as I know, the big three doesn't have a fully-electric car for sale.
Right, but it sounds like Nissan and Chevy will have their electric cars:1. to market first, and2. at a lower price point, with3. consumer namebrand recognition, and4. superior marketing capacity (unless Tesla will market through established dealers?).That doesn't sound like a recipe for success for Tesla, IMHO.
Cool. I didn't know that they were releasing their own EVs this quickly.
Volt: November 2010Leaf: December 2010

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I am thinking about investing in Tesla.

Really? I read this and thought, "They're going to get killed by the big boys..."
Which big boys? As far as I know, the big three doesn't have a fully-electric car for sale.
Right, but it sounds like Nissan and Chevy will have their electric cars:1. to market first, and2. at a lower price point, with3. consumer namebrand recognition, and4. superior marketing capacity (unless Tesla will market through established dealers?).That doesn't sound like a recipe for success for Tesla, IMHO.
Cool. I didn't know that they were releasing their own EVs this quickly.
I believe that Telsa signed a deal with Nissan (IIRC) that helps with funding and distribution.

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What it Tesla's plan for people to re-charge these things? Right now, seems like you can't drive more than 150 miles from home, right? How expensive is it to set up charging stations, and where would they be?

Yeah--I wouldn't be a big fan of dropping $50k on a car for it to be pretty much my "going to and from work" car. Why not go buy the Nissan for half the price, and then spend $50k on a luxury car that I could take on road trips, etc.?
Another question, and this might be a really ignorant one:

Wherever these charging stations are, will they be 'universal'? Will Volt and Tesla owners be able to use the same method (I don't even know if it's a cord or not) to charge their cars?

Last I checked there were some charging stations throughout CA. I'd imagine those options are expanding slowly and have some uniformity.

As for why get a pricey car to commute, you should really take a look at how you actually use your car. If you're like most people, you'll rarely use your car for extended driving that would put you outside the range of the Roadster. And even with the lower range option of the newer model, you'll rarely travel beyond range.

Oh sure, I agree... I just don't see the logic in dropping $50k on a car like that when I could get a more affordable Chevy or Nissan. Plus, I just got back from a road trip vacation to Virginia. I would be bummed to have to leave my $50,000 car at home and crawl into my Chevy Malibu to get me where I'm going. Edited by pinequick

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I am thinking about investing in Tesla.

Really? I read this and thought, "They're going to get killed by the big boys..."
Which big boys? As far as I know, the big three doesn't have a fully-electric car for sale.
Right, but it sounds like Nissan and Chevy will have their electric cars:1. to market first, and2. at a lower price point, with3. consumer namebrand recognition, and4. superior marketing capacity (unless Tesla will market through established dealers?).That doesn't sound like a recipe for success for Tesla, IMHO.
While all the cars are electric, and in some sense I guess they're competing, they have different price points for a reason. The Tesla model is a luxury sedan designed to compete with Mercedes, BMW, Lexus, etc. That is most decidedly not the market Nissan and Chevy have targeted. Also, considering they are largely targeting a niche market for the time being, I think Tesla has sufficient brand recognition created by the Roadster, and the potential to effectively target their demographic with a focused campaign. I think this also helps in regards to their limited dealerships, though if their partnership with Toyota more fully develops that could cease to be an issue.

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I am thinking about investing in Tesla.

Really? I read this and thought, "They're going to get killed by the big boys..."
Which big boys? As far as I know, the big three doesn't have a fully-electric car for sale.
Right, but it sounds like Nissan and Chevy will have their electric cars:

1. to market first, and

2. at a lower price point, with

3. consumer namebrand recognition, and

4. superior marketing capacity (unless Tesla will market through established dealers?).

That doesn't sound like a recipe for success for Tesla, IMHO.

While all the cars are electric, and in some sense I guess they're competing, they have different price points for a reason. The Tesla model is a luxury sedan designed to compete with Mercedes, BMW, Lexus, etc. That is most decidedly not the market Nissan and Chevy have targeted.

Also, considering they are largely targeting a niche market for the time being, I think Tesla has sufficient brand recognition created by the Roadster, and the potential to effectively target their demographic with a focused campaign. I think this also helps in regards to their limited dealerships, though if their partnership with Toyota more fully develops that could cease to be an issue.

If that's their market with this car, then I think they've got a fighting chance. $50,000 for that range of car is really reasonable.

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What it Tesla's plan for people to re-charge these things? Right now, seems like you can't drive more than 150 miles from home, right? How expensive is it to set up charging stations, and where would they be?

Yeah--I wouldn't be a big fan of dropping $50k on a car for it to be pretty much my "going to and from work" car. Why not go buy the Nissan for half the price, and then spend $50k on a luxury car that I could take on road trips, etc.?
Another question, and this might be a really ignorant one:

Wherever these charging stations are, will they be 'universal'? Will Volt and Tesla owners be able to use the same method (I don't even know if it's a cord or not) to charge their cars?

Last I checked there were some charging stations throughout CA. I'd imagine those options are expanding slowly and have some uniformity.

As for why get a pricey car to commute, you should really take a look at how you actually use your car. If you're like most people, you'll rarely use your car for extended driving that would put you outside the range of the Roadster. And even with the lower range option of the newer model, you'll rarely travel beyond range.

Oh sure, I agree... I just don't see the logic in dropping $50k on a car like that when I could get a more affordable Chevy or Nissan. Plus, I just got back from a road trip vacation to Virginia. I would be bummed to have to leave my $50,000 car at home and crawl into my Chevy Malibu to get me where I'm going.
If the Model S is anything like the Roadster, it'll be a luxury sedan that just happens to be electric. That will not be the case for either the Volt or the Leaf. They're just not competing for the same consumers so I dont see why someone would be making the choice you describe.

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If that's their market with this car, then I think they've got a fighting chance. $50,000 for that range of car is really reasonable.

Well, its $50k base AFTER tax rebates.

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Joining late to this thread, but the EV's are very interesting to me. I recently went to a "lunch and learn" presentation by Progress Energy in St. Petersburg, FL. The utility is partnering with TECO to support "Get Ready Tampa Bay".

They rolled out the polar bear commercial of the Nissan Leaf. The car looks a bit homely for my taste, but I heard some good things:

It's an all electric vehicle that has a range of 100 miles. at $.1378/kwh which is the nominal electric residential rate around here, the equivalent cost is $3.13/charge. At $3.00/Gallon, when you do the math, electric gets the equivalent of 100+ miles/gallon.

The carbon footprint of using gasoline cars is 17 lbs of CO2 per 100 miles, while the EV has an equivalent footprint of 1.17 lbs of CO2. Obviously it has no emmisions, so the CO2 emmision footprint is assumed at the electric plant.

The state of Florida recieved 2 grants recently (one private sector and one public) to install 300 + 300 charging stations from Orlando to Tampa. It is expected that the new electric cars will operate similar to computers in that they will have their own IP addresses and the smart grid will actually be able to track your car. Similarly, you can log on to the grid's website, and check in real time if charging stations are working, so you aren't hooked up to a dead station in vain.

As far as charging stations go, there is a type I station, (those were installed a decade or more ago), a type II station (which is being installed now), and expect type III charging stations soon. Type III will be a quick charge type station, but are very expensive. Also, the type I stations took a variety of plugs, while the type II stations have been designed to take any type of plug. There is concern on the toll the type III charging stations will have on the lithium Ion batteries. Also, surge protection and lightning strikes are legal considerations the insurance industry has never had to worry about till now.

The "Get Ready Tampa Bay" organization is getting help from local business, and state and county govt to assist in penetrating the market. Businesses such as "Buffalo Wild Wings" are investing in charging stations as a loss leader to lure in "green minded" customers who want to watch the game while charging their cars. Apartment managers are considering them to offer a "green incentive". A parking lot garage is being constructed with roughed in conduit for future charging stations when they are accessible and vanpools can meet the demand.

The speaker talked about a deal where you lease the Nissan Leaf for $350/mo with $99 down. It's as pricey as a low end BMW or Lexus, and a corolla looks nicer, so there's that to consider. But he bought one anyway and is awaiting his shipment in November. Currently they are selling them in blocks of 20000. The industry as a whole hopes to have 1 million EVs on the road by 2015.

Between my wife and I, we spend about $350/month in gas alone, all city miles. She drives a large oversized SUV and I drive a little sedan. I figure I drive about 20 miles roundtrip per day, while she drives about 30. If I bought an EV, I'd use it and save about $100/mo in gas.

My wife asked, but what about maintenance? What if it breaks down? What is the resale? What about insurance?

All leads to me considering a lease with maint agreement. Don't know enough about the maintenance cost agreement, but I am intruiged.

Also, the charge time on a standard 120 volt receptacle is 18 hours whereas if you get a 220 volt receptacle (the kind you use with your electric dyer), you can reduce the charge cycle to 6 to 8 hours.

The shorter cycle is key for charging at night.

Progress Energy claims that the "off peak" electricity that is unused due to underloaded generators at night could potentially be tapped to account for 70% of all american passenger cars on the road today.

Disclaimer is that I am indeed a "Green Freak", tree hugger, etc. I love to do what I can to save the planet.

But if this technology can lead to raising the middle finger to OPEC and the oil industy, I am all aboard.

Edited by Raiderfan32904

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Saw a showroom for these at the mall yesterday. They had a Model S on display and holy ####, that's one sharp car. The sales lady told me that within the next 2-3 year's, the base model price will be just north of half the current tag, which is comparable to a BMW 5 series (currently about $50k). If/when that happens, we are going to take a serious look at one for us. Just a gorgeous car in and out.

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Saw a showroom for these at the mall yesterday. They had a Model S on display and holy ####, that's one sharp car. The sales lady told me that within the next 2-3 year's, the base model price will be just north of half the current tag, which is comparable to a BMW 5 series (currently about $50k). If/when that happens, we are going to take a serious look at one for us. Just a gorgeous car in and out.

Yep. CANT WAIT :thumbup:

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I'm very tempted to lease a Honda FCX Clarity hydrogen fuel cell car. The lease is $600/mo. and that includes maintenance and insurance. It gets 60 miles per kg of hydrogen, which costs $5/kg. There's a Shell fueling station near where I live and Shell just opened a new station in Newport Beach where they are giving away unlimited free hydrogen. With a range of 240 miles that means I could theoretically I could drive to SD and back for free.

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I'm very tempted to lease a Honda FCX Clarity hydrogen fuel cell car. The lease is $600/mo. and that includes maintenance and insurance. It gets 60 miles per kg of hydrogen, which costs $5/kg. There's a Shell fueling station near where I live and Shell just opened a new station in Newport Beach where they are giving away unlimited free hydrogen. With a range of 240 miles that means I could theoretically I could drive to SD and back for free.

Hydrogen fueled vehicles?
:thumbup:

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I'm very tempted to lease a Honda FCX Clarity hydrogen fuel cell car. The lease is $600/mo. and that includes maintenance and insurance. It gets 60 miles per kg of hydrogen, which costs $5/kg. There's a Shell fueling station near where I live and Shell just opened a new station in Newport Beach where they are giving away unlimited free hydrogen. With a range of 240 miles that means I could theoretically I could drive to SD and back for free.

That works out to 12 miles per $1 fuel. You could get a Prius which is close to miles per dollar and save yourself a hell of a lot on the lease.

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I'm very tempted to lease a Honda FCX Clarity hydrogen fuel cell car. The lease is $600/mo. and that includes maintenance and insurance. It gets 60 miles per kg of hydrogen, which costs $5/kg. There's a Shell fueling station near where I live and Shell just opened a new station in Newport Beach where they are giving away unlimited free hydrogen. With a range of 240 miles that means I could theoretically I could drive to SD and back for free.

Hydrogen fueled vehicles?
:thumbup:
Thank god we don't use anything flammable now to fuel our cars.

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I'm very tempted to lease a Honda FCX Clarity hydrogen fuel cell car. The lease is $600/mo. and that includes maintenance and insurance. It gets 60 miles per kg of hydrogen, which costs $5/kg. There's a Shell fueling station near where I live and Shell just opened a new station in Newport Beach where they are giving away unlimited free hydrogen. With a range of 240 miles that means I could theoretically I could drive to SD and back for free.

That works out to 12 miles per $1 fuel. You could get a Prius which is close to miles per dollar and save yourself a hell of a lot on the lease.
The Clarity has maintenance for the full length of the lease so I wouldn't have to spend a dime except for fuel. I looked into a Prius V Five, which would be a similarly sized car and the lease was close to $600. The Clarity also has unlimited miles.

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I hope they make it. Needing a half billion from uncle sam to stay afloat isn't a good sign.

This bodes well me thinks:

Motortrend Car of the Year :excited:

Tesla is a cool story and the Model S looks awesome. Only concern is the volume - 3200 for the year won't pay many bills or the gov't loan. C-Max sold about 3200 units last month and outsold Prius V.

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How much does it cost you to charge one of these cars?

The 300 mile battery is 85Kwh. At a national average of .10/kwh you are looking at $8.50 a fillup that works out to .03 a mile.

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Just got mine. A couple things:

- They got my order wrong and sent me a Model S but not the Performance model. Shot my salesman an email and he called me within minutes. Basically asked me if I'd accept a model similar to the one I ordered, I told them "no" quite sternly. They said fine, hold onto the one you got as a demo till we build you one.

- Even though it's not the performance model, it's as fast as any sedan I've ever driven. I'm pretty psyched to see what the suped version can do.

- Total mindfu** getting into the car and not having to turn the key or push a start button, just put it in drive and go. Not hearing an engine is also strange.

- It seems they have proliferated where I live as I felt I saw one almost every day the last 2 months, but I still got stopped at the supermarket by a curious Lexus owner. Spent 15 mins BSing with him about it, he seemed pretty impressed.

- Really no complaints about the car outside of them messing up my order but they did right by me in the end.

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How much does it cost you to charge one of these cars?

The 300 mile battery is 85Kwh. At a national average of .10/kwh you are looking at $8.50 a fillup that works out to .03 a mile.

A friend of mine says it's going to cost him around ~300 per year

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Just got mine. A couple things:

- They got my order wrong and sent me a Model S but not the Performance model. Shot my salesman an email and he called me within minutes. Basically asked me if I'd accept a model similar to the one I ordered, I told them "no" quite sternly. They said fine, hold onto the one you got as a demo till we build you one.

- Even though it's not the performance model, it's as fast as any sedan I've ever driven. I'm pretty psyched to see what the suped version can do.

- Total mindfu** getting into the car and not having to turn the key or push a start button, just put it in drive and go. Not hearing an engine is also strange.

- It seems they have proliferated where I live as I felt I saw one almost every day the last 2 months, but I still got stopped at the supermarket by a curious Lexus owner. Spent 15 mins BSing with him about it, he seemed pretty impressed.

- Really no complaints about the car outside of them messing up my order but they did right by me in the end.

Congrats! Awesome cars.

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Great link demonstrating the cost savings...

http://www.teslamotors.com/goelectric#savings

So you save about 5K every 35,000 miles. Definitely substantial, but it's going to be a long time before this is a break even proposition with a 62K starting price on these things still.

Not really. It's still a higher end luxury vehicle. You can't compare it to a Prius or anything. It's roughly the same size/performance caliber as a 550i, which has the same starting price. The few thousand dollars you save each year in opex is essentially gravy.

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$7,500 min tax credit, too, iirc

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$7,500 min tax credit, too, iirc

They've included that in their $62K starting price.

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$7,500 min tax credit, too, iirc

They've included that in their $62K starting price.

Of course they have.

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Great link demonstrating the cost savings...

http://www.teslamotors.com/goelectric#savings

So you save about 5K every 35,000 miles. Definitely substantial, but it's going to be a long time before this is a break even proposition with a 62K starting price on these things still.

The Motortrend article says they start at 50k.

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Just got mine. A couple things:

- They got my order wrong and sent me a Model S but not the Performance model. Shot my salesman an email and he called me within minutes. Basically asked me if I'd accept a model similar to the one I ordered, I told them "no" quite sternly. They said fine, hold onto the one you got as a demo till we build you one.

- Even though it's not the performance model, it's as fast as any sedan I've ever driven. I'm pretty psyched to see what the suped version can do.

- Total mindfu** getting into the car and not having to turn the key or push a start button, just put it in drive and go. Not hearing an engine is also strange.

- It seems they have proliferated where I live as I felt I saw one almost every day the last 2 months, but I still got stopped at the supermarket by a curious Lexus owner. Spent 15 mins BSing with him about it, he seemed pretty impressed.

- Really no complaints about the car outside of them messing up my order but they did right by me in the end.

Wonder what kind of deal somebody could get on your "demo" when you kick it back to them.

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