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Big Green Egg Grill

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I got the BGE about a month ago and finally had a party/grill-out/BBQ. Two Sundays ago, I threw on two smaller pork butts (between 4-6 pounds) using the Renowned Mr. Brown method and borrowing pointers from the FBG master grilling thread. I also prepared crostinis, grilled romaine lettuce, atomic buffalo turds, and a fatty from Scott's ultra-handy grilling blog.

Verdict? Everything turned out surprisingly perfect. I had never made pulled pork and was surprised at how well it turned out. I took the butts off the grill right around 190 degrees, wrapped them in aluminum foil, placed them in a cooler with beach towels, and gave them 3 hours to rest (it was still morning). I pulled them apart easily, sprayed some more apple juice/apple cider vinegar/lemon juice mix on and threw in the rest of the rub spices. Because it turned out so well, I did the same with another pork butt yesterday to similar fantastic results.

Thanks for the all of the pointers here, though I know the Egg deserves much of the credit. That thing is a joy to smoke on.

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I got the BGE about a month ago and finally had a party/grill-out/BBQ. Two Sundays ago, I threw on two smaller pork butts (between 4-6 pounds) using the Renowned Mr. Brown method and borrowing pointers from the FBG master grilling thread. I also prepared crostinis, grilled romaine lettuce, atomic buffalo turds, and a fatty from Scott's ultra-handy grilling blog.

Verdict? Everything turned out surprisingly perfect. I had never made pulled pork and was surprised at how well it turned out. I took the butts off the grill right around 190 degrees, wrapped them in aluminum foil, placed them in a cooler with beach towels, and gave them 3 hours to rest (it was still morning). I pulled them apart easily, sprayed some more apple juice/apple cider vinegar/lemon juice mix on and threw in the rest of the rub spices. Because it turned out so well, I did the same with another pork butt yesterday to similar fantastic results.

Thanks for the all of the pointers here, though I know the Egg deserves much of the credit. That thing is a joy to smoke on.

Wow!! How many people did you feed? Congrats on that new Grill. I've gotta get me one of these...

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I got the BGE about a month ago and finally had a party/grill-out/BBQ. Two Sundays ago, I threw on two smaller pork butts (between 4-6 pounds) using the Renowned Mr. Brown method and borrowing pointers from the FBG master grilling thread. I also prepared crostinis, grilled romaine lettuce, atomic buffalo turds, and a fatty from Scott's ultra-handy grilling blog.

Verdict? Everything turned out surprisingly perfect. I had never made pulled pork and was surprised at how well it turned out. I took the butts off the grill right around 190 degrees, wrapped them in aluminum foil, placed them in a cooler with beach towels, and gave them 3 hours to rest (it was still morning). I pulled them apart easily, sprayed some more apple juice/apple cider vinegar/lemon juice mix on and threw in the rest of the rub spices. Because it turned out so well, I did the same with another pork butt yesterday to similar fantastic results.

Thanks for the all of the pointers here, though I know the Egg deserves much of the credit. That thing is a joy to smoke on.

Wow!! How many people did you feed? Congrats on that new Grill. I've gotta get me one of these...

I'd say in the neighborhood of 40 people, with several of them bringing side dishes. The amount of food turned out to be just right, as the last stragglers in toward the end of the party finished off what were going to be scant leftovers. Many compliments were handed out on the results of TheFanatic's recipes.

:thumbup:

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I got the BGE about a month ago and finally had a party/grill-out/BBQ. Two Sundays ago, I threw on two smaller pork butts (between 4-6 pounds) using the Renowned Mr. Brown method and borrowing pointers from the FBG master grilling thread. I also prepared crostinis, grilled romaine lettuce, atomic buffalo turds, and a fatty from Scott's ultra-handy grilling blog.

Verdict? Everything turned out surprisingly perfect. I had never made pulled pork and was surprised at how well it turned out. I took the butts off the grill right around 190 degrees, wrapped them in aluminum foil, placed them in a cooler with beach towels, and gave them 3 hours to rest (it was still morning). I pulled them apart easily, sprayed some more apple juice/apple cider vinegar/lemon juice mix on and threw in the rest of the rub spices. Because it turned out so well, I did the same with another pork butt yesterday to similar fantastic results.

Thanks for the all of the pointers here, though I know the Egg deserves much of the credit. That thing is a joy to smoke on.

:thumbup:

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I got the BGE about a month ago and finally had a party/grill-out/BBQ. Two Sundays ago, I threw on two smaller pork butts (between 4-6 pounds) using the Renowned Mr. Brown method and borrowing pointers from the FBG master grilling thread. I also prepared crostinis, grilled romaine lettuce, atomic buffalo turds, and a fatty from Scott's ultra-handy grilling blog.

Verdict? Everything turned out surprisingly perfect. I had never made pulled pork and was surprised at how well it turned out. I took the butts off the grill right around 190 degrees, wrapped them in aluminum foil, placed them in a cooler with beach towels, and gave them 3 hours to rest (it was still morning). I pulled them apart easily, sprayed some more apple juice/apple cider vinegar/lemon juice mix on and threw in the rest of the rub spices. Because it turned out so well, I did the same with another pork butt yesterday to similar fantastic results.

Thanks for the all of the pointers here, though I know the Egg deserves much of the credit. That thing is a joy to smoke on.

Wow!! How many people did you feed? Congrats on that new Grill. I've gotta get me one of these...

I'd say in the neighborhood of 40 people, with several of them bringing side dishes. The amount of food turned out to be just right, as the last stragglers in toward the end of the party finished off what were going to be scant leftovers. Many compliments were handed out on the results of TheFanatic's recipes.

:lmao:

That sounds like the perfect day to me. Glad it went so well. I'm doing some mad grilling on Friday but on a big POS I like to call my Char Griller draft monster that I have to fight constantly to keep to a proper temp. I'd probably get bored with a BGE. Wouldn't be anything for me to do...

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Quick Question:

Anyone have a good method for clearing the bottom grate holes and the side holes?

Typically, I get a 3-4 good cooks in then I can tell the airflow isn't optimal. I have been careful when loading the lump, searching out and placing the largest pieces on the grate and over the vent holes (and refraining from just dumping the bag in).

Maybe I am overloading it?

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Quick Question:Anyone have a good method for clearing the bottom grate holes and the side holes?Typically, I get a 3-4 good cooks in then I can tell the airflow isn't optimal. I have been careful when loading the lump, searching out and placing the largest pieces on the grate and over the vent holes (and refraining from just dumping the bag in).Maybe I am overloading it?

I always give the lump a good stir before I use it. This stirring should allow some of the ash to fall down. For the side holes though you sometimes just need to look down at them (move the lump) and then unplug them. It takes about a minute or so to do the stir and clean the side air holes but its worth it.Every few cooks, clean out the majority of the ash from the bottom. Every month or so (depending on how much you cook), do a deep clean. This is as simple as putting in a small amount of lump, putting the grill and the fly wheel inside the grill and opening up the bottom vent completely. This will create a very hot fire which will clean the grill, the grates and the fly wheel. Let it burn itself out.In the morning or when it cools, do a good cleaning of the ash to remove as much as you can. Edited by andy_b

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;)

When I started my thread on that Char-Griller Duo, I had no idea what a BGE was until someone mentioned it there... the more I am reading up on the egg the more I am convincing myself to take the plunge on the purchase. Hmmm....

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Quick Question:Anyone have a good method for clearing the bottom grate holes and the side holes?Typically, I get a 3-4 good cooks in then I can tell the airflow isn't optimal. I have been careful when loading the lump, searching out and placing the largest pieces on the grate and over the vent holes (and refraining from just dumping the bag in).Maybe I am overloading it?

I always give the lump a good stir before I use it. This stirring should allow some of the ash to fall down. For the side holes though you sometimes just need to look down at them (move the lump) and then unplug them. It takes about a minute or so to do the stir and clean the side air holes but its worth it.Every few cooks, clean out the majority of the ash from the bottom. Every month or so (depending on how much you cook), do a deep clean. This is as simple as putting in a small amount of lump, putting the grill and the fly wheel inside the grill and opening up the bottom vent completely. This will create a very hot fire which will clean the grill, the grates and the fly wheel. Let it burn itself out.In the morning or when it cools, do a good cleaning of the ash to remove as much as you can.
Thanks. Good info.Last week, I was jostling the lump precook, ended up pulling the grate up a little on one side. piece of lump go stuck underneath. Out of curiosity, I fired it up as is. Created a pretty sweet two zone fire. Reminded me of the old days. :)

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:)When I started my thread on that Char-Griller Duo, I had no idea what a BGE was until someone mentioned it there... the more I am reading up on the egg the more I am convincing myself to take the plunge on the purchase. Hmmm....

Next to the versatility, the single biggest "pro" is never having to use regular charcoal again. Lump = 90% less ash. Don't miss the days of trash bags of ash cleanup.

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:lmao:When I started my thread on that Char-Griller Duo, I had no idea what a BGE was until someone mentioned it there... the more I am reading up on the egg the more I am convincing myself to take the plunge on the purchase. Hmmm....

Do it. We still don't even really know how to cook on it all that well and haven't even begun to branch out from ordinary grilling, and we love ours.

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I picked up some ribs this weekend and want to use my BGE to cook them today. Problem is, while I've "mastered" steak, chicken, etc., this is my first go at ribs.

Poking around the egghead forum has yielded a lot of people bragging about how great their ribs are, but I haven't seen any kind of basic "set your egg to ____ temp and cook the ribs for _____ minutes/hours" kind of help.

Anyone here with some input for me?

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I picked up some ribs this weekend and want to use my BGE to cook them today. Problem is, while I've "mastered" steak, chicken, etc., this is my first go at ribs.Poking around the egghead forum has yielded a lot of people bragging about how great their ribs are, but I haven't seen any kind of basic "set your egg to ____ temp and cook the ribs for _____ minutes/hours" kind of help.Anyone here with some input for me?

I like the 3-1-1 method. Cook the ribs indirect for 3 hours or so. Then remove and wrap in Heavy Duty Aluminum foil. Put back on indirect for another hour. After that, take the ribs off. Remove the indirect setup. Carefully remove the foil. Cook the ribs direct for the final 1 hour. Flip every 15 minutes, basting the ribs with the sauce each time. I usually have the temp at around 230-250

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I picked up some ribs this weekend and want to use my BGE to cook them today. Problem is, while I've "mastered" steak, chicken, etc., this is my first go at ribs.Poking around the egghead forum has yielded a lot of people bragging about how great their ribs are, but I haven't seen any kind of basic "set your egg to ____ temp and cook the ribs for _____ minutes/hours" kind of help.Anyone here with some input for me?

I like the 3-1-1 method. Cook the ribs indirect for 3 hours or so. Then remove and wrap in Heavy Duty Aluminum foil. Put back on indirect for another hour. After that, take the ribs off. Remove the indirect setup. Carefully remove the foil. Cook the ribs direct for the final 1 hour. Flip every 15 minutes, basting the ribs with the sauce each time. I usually have the temp at around 230-250
whats the easiest way of doing this without burning yourself? Seriously. I got a pair of the big welding gloves, but the indirect setup plate (whatever its called) gets pretty hot.

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I picked up some ribs this weekend and want to use my BGE to cook them today. Problem is, while I've "mastered" steak, chicken, etc., this is my first go at ribs.Poking around the egghead forum has yielded a lot of people bragging about how great their ribs are, but I haven't seen any kind of basic "set your egg to ____ temp and cook the ribs for _____ minutes/hours" kind of help.Anyone here with some input for me?

I like the 3-1-1 method. Cook the ribs indirect for 3 hours or so. Then remove and wrap in Heavy Duty Aluminum foil. Put back on indirect for another hour. After that, take the ribs off. Remove the indirect setup. Carefully remove the foil. Cook the ribs direct for the final 1 hour. Flip every 15 minutes, basting the ribs with the sauce each time. I usually have the temp at around 230-250
whats the easiest way of doing this without burning yourself? Seriously. I got a pair of the big welding gloves, but the indirect setup plate (whatever its called) gets pretty hot.
I've got gloves that are good up to 600 degrees.

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I picked up some ribs this weekend and want to use my BGE to cook them today. Problem is, while I've "mastered" steak, chicken, etc., this is my first go at ribs.Poking around the egghead forum has yielded a lot of people bragging about how great their ribs are, but I haven't seen any kind of basic "set your egg to ____ temp and cook the ribs for _____ minutes/hours" kind of help.Anyone here with some input for me?

I like the 3-1-1 method. Cook the ribs indirect for 3 hours or so. Then remove and wrap in Heavy Duty Aluminum foil. Put back on indirect for another hour. After that, take the ribs off. Remove the indirect setup. Carefully remove the foil. Cook the ribs direct for the final 1 hour. Flip every 15 minutes, basting the ribs with the sauce each time. I usually have the temp at around 230-250
whats the easiest way of doing this without burning yourself? Seriously. I got a pair of the big welding gloves, but the indirect setup plate (whatever its called) gets pretty hot.
I learned the hard way to be very careful removing the plate setter when its hot. I didn't get burned, but my hands were getting hot through the gloves so I rushed putting it down and it cracked into to pieces. It seems they crack easier when hot, so you need to be extra gentle with them - a $65 lesson for me.

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Friend bought the Bayou Classic Cypress grill (Green Egg knockoff) several months ago. He knows the Big Green Egg as his Dad has one and he has used it extensively. Says there is nothing the Egg did that this won't and does it as well.

BGE cost -- all accessories -- is about $500 more than the Bayou Classic. I'm getting one tomorrow. Lowe's carries them, or at least can order one in for you.

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Bayou classic looks interesting. If my BGE ever dies, I'll look into one.

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Friend bought the Bayou Classic Cypress grill (Green Egg knockoff) several months ago. He knows the Big Green Egg as his Dad has one and he has used it extensively. Says there is nothing the Egg did that this won't and does it as well.BGE cost -- all accessories -- is about $500 more than the Bayou Classic. I'm getting one tomorrow. Lowe's carries them, or at least can order one in for you.

Ok, finally broke down and got one myself. Holy cow, this thing is sweet! It is = to a large Green Egg but considerably cheaper and most accessories are included. I also think it is a lot better looking.First up were two smoked fatties and then Simon & Garfunkel chicken (whole chicken, flat with backbone removed). The fatties were awesome but the chicken was the best, most moist chicken I honestly think I've ever had.Then, got some hand patted angus burgers (1/2 pound) from the butcher. Went with 650*, 2 minutes on each side, then shut it all down and 4 more minutes. I can't possibly describe to you the improvement in taste/texture from a gas grill.Having said that, still learning to regulate the temp. Pointers?For the experienced...how much charcoal do you load? Do you always load it full or do you load it per what you need for that particular cook?

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Having said that, still learning to regulate the temp. Pointers?For the experienced...how much charcoal do you load? Do you always load it full or do you load it per what you need for that particular cook?

For regulating temperature, it is a true feel. Keep the egg clean and temperature regulation is pretty easy. It just takes some practice and you will find comfortable positions for the fly wheel and the boot draft for your various cooking temperatures.For charcoal, I tend to load some where around half way up the fire ring (fire box full and then about half way up the next level). This is for the Egg, I don't know if the Bayou Classic has the same components but I bet it does.Always stir the charcoal to let the dust settle to the bottom and then reach down and make sure the 6 or so side air holes are clean, this is key for easy fire management in the egg.Oh and never walk away from the egg with the bottom door open and the fly wheel off. In a blink of an eye the egg can get extremely hot.

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Having said that, still learning to regulate the temp. Pointers?For the experienced...how much charcoal do you load? Do you always load it full or do you load it per what you need for that particular cook?

For regulating temperature, it is a true feel. Keep the egg clean and temperature regulation is pretty easy. It just takes some practice and you will find comfortable positions for the fly wheel and the boot draft for your various cooking temperatures.For charcoal, I tend to load some where around half way up the fire ring (fire box full and then about half way up the next level). This is for the Egg, I don't know if the Bayou Classic has the same components but I bet it does.Always stir the charcoal to let the dust settle to the bottom and then reach down and make sure the 6 or so side air holes are clean, this is key for easy fire management in the egg.Oh and never walk away from the egg with the bottom door open and the fly wheel off. In a blink of an eye the egg can get extremely hot.
Thanks, and, yes, the components are just the same. Do you light from the top of charcoal pile or bottom, depending on if you are preparing for a low/slow or a fast/hot grill?

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Having said that, still learning to regulate the temp. Pointers?

For the experienced...how much charcoal do you load? Do you always load it full or do you load it per what you need for that particular cook?

For regulating temperature, it is a true feel. Keep the egg clean and temperature regulation is pretty easy. It just takes some practice and you will find comfortable positions for the fly wheel and the boot draft for your various cooking temperatures.

For charcoal, I tend to load some where around half way up the fire ring (fire box full and then about half way up the next level). This is for the Egg, I don't know if the Bayou Classic has the same components but I bet it does.

Always stir the charcoal to let the dust settle to the bottom and then reach down and make sure the 6 or so side air holes are clean, this is key for easy fire management in the egg.

Oh and never walk away from the egg with the bottom door open and the fly wheel off. In a blink of an eye the egg can get extremely hot.

Thanks, and, yes, the components are just the same. Do you light from the top of charcoal pile or bottom, depending on if you are preparing for a low/slow or a fast/hot grill?

I use a mapp torch on the top of the coals for about 15-20 seconds in three spots. Works well for me.

and I can't say enough about the people on the eggheadforum.com for answering questions.

Edited by kip stabone

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2 slabs of ribs will go on in a couple of hours. Been sitting, wrapped and rubbed, since yesterday. Smoked for 2 hours, then tented over apple juice.

The chorizo fatties will go on after that, for tailgate tomorrow.

Just picked up some Royal Oak lump at GFS (RO makes their storebrand) -- from what I read on NakedWhiz it is a superior lump and smoke. $12.99 for 20lbs.

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Having said that, still learning to regulate the temp. Pointers?For the experienced...how much charcoal do you load? Do you always load it full or do you load it per what you need for that particular cook?

For regulating temperature, it is a true feel. Keep the egg clean and temperature regulation is pretty easy. It just takes some practice and you will find comfortable positions for the fly wheel and the boot draft for your various cooking temperatures.For charcoal, I tend to load some where around half way up the fire ring (fire box full and then about half way up the next level). This is for the Egg, I don't know if the Bayou Classic has the same components but I bet it does.Always stir the charcoal to let the dust settle to the bottom and then reach down and make sure the 6 or so side air holes are clean, this is key for easy fire management in the egg.Oh and never walk away from the egg with the bottom door open and the fly wheel off. In a blink of an eye the egg can get extremely hot.
I use an electric starter and typically put it in the middle of the coal. After about 12 minutes I have a nice fire going. Before I take the starter out, I spread the lump around and then close the egg to let it start to come up to temp.If the egg is clean and the air holes are clear, I use this method if I am cooking a pizza at 500 for 10 minutes or ribs for 6 hours at 225, seems to work ok for me.Thanks, and, yes, the components are just the same. Do you light from the top of charcoal pile or bottom, depending on if you are preparing for a low/slow or a fast/hot grill?

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...$699 + tax for the grill alone, which is all I bought. Had a friend buy the other accessories, which included the nest, rack for ribs, the add-on tray tables for the sides of the grill, bag of charcoal, a lighter, and... I think that's it. The nest and the add-on tray tables alone came to about $260 extra, so he paid about $300 total for all the accessories he bought.Opted against the pizza stone yesterday, but pretty sure that's the next purchase.

From where did you purchase this, YSR?

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...

$699 + tax for the grill alone, which is all I bought. Had a friend buy the other accessories, which included the nest, rack for ribs, the add-on tray tables for the sides of the grill, bag of charcoal, a lighter, and... I think that's it. The nest and the add-on tray tables alone came to about $260 extra, so he paid about $300 total for all the accessories he bought.

Opted against the pizza stone yesterday, but pretty sure that's the next purchase.

From where did you purchase this, YSR?
Hey!

I actually got mine at a local place in Jacksonville. I am pretty sure I went to the BGE website and did a dealer locator to find the places and then called each to hear pricing.

As an update, we absolutely LOVE this grill. We figured out how to smoke things (see above re: my ribs question) and are HOOKED. In fact, we had ribs 3 nights in a row (BF tends to get a little obsessive and wanted to try new rubs :unsure:).

He has a really nice Jenn-Air gas grill that he hasn't even thought about hooking up since I gave him the BGE for a housewarming gift in FL last year.

Really, really enjoying it and I assume we will even more as we continue to learn it.

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:football:

Took the plunge yesterday. After looking for used, I went new. I would rather add the eggcessories as I go and spend more money than buy all used really for one simple reason. If I take care of this thing, it really is a life time purchase considering their warranty is absolutely top notch. I bought a large, a nest, and the side pieces for about $800. Steeper than used, of course, but I cannot wait to get cooking on this BGE. The $640 price of the large Egg is about as good as you can get it new. Plus, from all accounts, in February the price is going up. I hope to be posting pics as I use this thing for many, many years.

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:goodposting:

Took the plunge yesterday. After looking for used, I went new. I would rather add the eggcessories as I go and spend more money than buy all used really for one simple reason. If I take care of this thing, it really is a life time purchase considering their warranty is absolutely top notch. I bought a large, a nest, and the side pieces for about $800. Steeper than used, of course, but I cannot wait to get cooking on this BGE. The $640 price of the large Egg is about as good as you can get it new. Plus, from all accounts, in February the price is going up. I hope to be posting pics as I use this thing for many, many years.

Yeah, $100 price increase across the board on all eggs bought from the manufacturer in 2011. You got one left over from 2010. Those things aren't cheap to start with... sheesh....

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:unsure:

Took the plunge yesterday. After looking for used, I went new. I would rather add the eggcessories as I go and spend more money than buy all used really for one simple reason. If I take care of this thing, it really is a life time purchase considering their warranty is absolutely top notch. I bought a large, a nest, and the side pieces for about $800. Steeper than used, of course, but I cannot wait to get cooking on this BGE. The $640 price of the large Egg is about as good as you can get it new. Plus, from all accounts, in February the price is going up. I hope to be posting pics as I use this thing for many, many years.

That is an excellent price. I think I spent more on the Large BGE 4 years ago.

Have a great time with it. Remember to not do any real high temp cookings (550+) for the first couple of cooks.

If you have not already found it, the link below has some great info, tips, recipes, forum etc for BGE

http://www.eggheadforum.com

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:confused:

Took the plunge yesterday. After looking for used, I went new. I would rather add the eggcessories as I go and spend more money than buy all used really for one simple reason. If I take care of this thing, it really is a life time purchase considering their warranty is absolutely top notch. I bought a large, a nest, and the side pieces for about $800. Steeper than used, of course, but I cannot wait to get cooking on this BGE. The $640 price of the large Egg is about as good as you can get it new. Plus, from all accounts, in February the price is going up. I hope to be posting pics as I use this thing for many, many years.

Yeah, $100 price increase across the board on all eggs bought from the manufacturer in 2011. You got one left over from 2010. Those things aren't cheap to start with... sheesh....
Yeah, that's what I was told. Do you know if they are redesigning or something? I could've bought a used one for $400 as well, but I really wanted the warranty as I fully expect to have this thing forever.

:wub:

Took the plunge yesterday. After looking for used, I went new. I would rather add the eggcessories as I go and spend more money than buy all used really for one simple reason. If I take care of this thing, it really is a life time purchase considering their warranty is absolutely top notch. I bought a large, a nest, and the side pieces for about $800. Steeper than used, of course, but I cannot wait to get cooking on this BGE. The $640 price of the large Egg is about as good as you can get it new. Plus, from all accounts, in February the price is going up. I hope to be posting pics as I use this thing for many, many years.

That is an excellent price. I think I spent more on the Large BGE 4 years ago.

Have a great time with it. Remember to not do any real high temp cookings (550+) for the first couple of cooks.

If you have not already found it, the link below has some great info, tips, recipes, forum etc for BGE

http://www.eggheadforum.com

Thanks, the place near me proclaimed they have them cheapest and they weren't kidding. Thanks for the reminder about the high temps. I am thinking of low and slow for the first month with some pulled pork and/or some ribs. Chicken thighs are also likely going to be in there as well. Pretty pumped, should be picking it up sometime mid to late this week :thumbup:

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Congrats. You'll absolutely love it.

I'd suggest a spatchcock chicken as the first cook. Very forgiving and let's yu get used to adjusting the vents for temp control. Biggest suggestion is start shutting them down when you get close to your target temp 375 dome temp for chicken is about right. Try to get your cooking grid elevated for spatchcock. Egghead forum has tons of posts on how to do that

Oh, and regarding the gasket. If the new ones are still coming with the grey felt gaskets you will absolutely lose it at some point. Tey just don't last. Personally ive been cooking without a gasket for 2 years now and really don't miss one.

Have fun!

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Congrats. You'll absolutely love it. I'd suggest a spatchcock chicken as the first cook. Very forgiving and let's yu get used to adjusting the vents for temp control. Biggest suggestion is start shutting them down when you get close to your target temp 375 dome temp for chicken is about right. Try to get your cooking grid elevated for spatchcock. Egghead forum has tons of posts on how to do thatOh, and regarding the gasket. If the new ones are still coming with the grey felt gaskets you will absolutely lose it at some point. Tey just don't last. Personally ive been cooking without a gasket for 2 years now and really don't miss one. Have fun!

Yeah, I am going to buy some fire bricks and elevate the cooking grid. I've seen some other ingenious ways to do so, but this seems like the easiest and is not permanent. It does have the gray felt if I remember from the store. I've read that they burn so an aftermarket one is a good idea at some point.I am going to also buy some welder's gloves, as eventually I would like to make that brick oven type of pizza. I am also going to buy a Thermapen instant thermometer, and maybe even a remote therm, but just have to do some research. That spatchcock chicken is one I've been eyeing, so I might make that first :goodposting:

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We have three grills, and only use the BGE. And we use it a LOT.

Got the pizza stone for Christmas this year. Do we need the plate setter? Anyone have experience with pizzas?

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We have three grills, and only use the BGE. And we use it a LOT.Got the pizza stone for Christmas this year. Do we need the plate setter? Anyone have experience with pizzas?

Obviously I am far from the authority, but I was under the assumption that the plate setter is almost a must have for both raising the grill and indirect cooking. I see it used all the time inverted, too. I hope others on here chime in but the eggheadforum.com is awesome.

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We have three grills, and only use the BGE. And we use it a LOT.

Got the pizza stone for Christmas this year. Do we need the plate setter? Anyone have experience with pizzas?

The place setter is really for indirecting. With a traditional grill, you put the coals on one side and the food on the other. That's not possible with the shape of the BGE. The place setter redirects the heat away from the meat.

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We have three grills, and only use the BGE. And we use it a LOT.Got the pizza stone for Christmas this year. Do we need the plate setter? Anyone have experience with pizzas?

Plate setter is a must have for indirect cooking. The plate setter is not for raising the grid per say. Raising the grid is usually associated with direct griing like spatchcocking. Trying a spatchcock for the first cook is perfect. I have done a lot of pizza on egg and it is great. Get a 14 inch stone for the large BGE. While you would think you could fit bigger don't. You need the air flow that the 14in will provide. I did not like the BGE pizza stone at all 4 years ago so I bought a different brand .

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We have three grills, and only use the BGE. And we use it a LOT.Got the pizza stone for Christmas this year. Do we need the plate setter? Anyone have experience with pizzas?

Obviously I am far from the authority, but I was under the assumption that the plate setter is almost a must have for both raising the grill and indirect cooking. I see it used all the time inverted, too. I hope others on here chime in but the eggheadforum.com is awesome.
There are 2 main issues of plate setter as follows1) invert and place grill on legs. This is used for all indirect cooking (ribs, shoulder, etc). Do NOT confuse this configuration with "raising the grill" Raising the grill in the egg tends to be much more used in direct cooking. The plate setter is not used in direct cooking. Their are many ways to raise the grill.2) Feet down. Spacer on top of plate setter (the ceramic feet they give you are perfect). Pizza stone on top of spacers. This is for pizza, bread making etc Edited by NewlyRetired

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One other link that is invaluable to ceramic cookers like the BGE is http://www.nakedwhiz.com/infocentral.htm

If you are going to spatchcock, go there. They have near flawless step by step instructions.

There are also a million other tips, hints and reviews. It is a great place to get a rough idea of what type of lump you should be using. It has pretty much the largest data base of lump I have seen with reviews and comments on nearly every brand.

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I have one and LOVE it. Get rid of the gass grill. The only thing you will use it for is to store tools for your egg. Your egg can do anything that your gass can and will do it better and the food will taste 10x better.

Make sure you visit the biggreeneggforums. This is another must visit site http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramic.htm

The egg will cook you one of the best steaks you have ever eaten.

Here is what you do.

Get a 1.5 - 1.75 inch thick ribeye or strip.

Set it out a few hours before you plan to cook so it can warm up to room temp.

30 minutes before you start, rub them down with olive oil, then I use a generous amount of crushed black pepper and sea/kosher salt. I also put some garlic powder on.

Load up the grill with whatever kind of lump charcoal you have. DO NOT use briquetts.(sp) Open up the bottom vent and do not put the daisey wheel on the top. In about 20 minutes you should be around 1000 degrees and ready to go! When the flames are shooting 3 feet out of the top, its there.

Sear your steaks for 90 seconds per side and pull them off. Close down the bottom vent and put the daisy wheel on the top. You want the temp to drop to around 400 degrees. This will take about 30 minutes. Great time to cook some appetizers like bacon wrapped scallops!

Once your grill is down to 400 degrees, cook the steaks for 4-5 minutes per side for medium rare. I like mine rare and do 2 minutes per side.

Enjoy! Best steak you will ever have and I have ate at Ruth Chris and alot of the other major steak houses. Their meat is better quality, but there is not much difference is taste, tenderness, and how juicy they are.

Feel free to pm me for more help.

I thought one of the major benefits of a ceramic "egg" style grill was that it didn't use direct source heat, and therefore, you don't have to turn your steaks because both top and bottom heat equally. Also, because of this, it defeats the purpose of searing on each side--if you cook at 700-800 degrees, you will get a good automatic searing without flipping the steaks.

Am I wrong here?

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I have one and LOVE it. Get rid of the gass grill. The only thing you will use it for is to store tools for your egg. Your egg can do anything that your gass can and will do it better and the food will taste 10x better.

Make sure you visit the biggreeneggforums. This is another must visit site http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramic.htm

The egg will cook you one of the best steaks you have ever eaten.

Here is what you do.

Get a 1.5 - 1.75 inch thick ribeye or strip.

Set it out a few hours before you plan to cook so it can warm up to room temp.

30 minutes before you start, rub them down with olive oil, then I use a generous amount of crushed black pepper and sea/kosher salt. I also put some garlic powder on.

Load up the grill with whatever kind of lump charcoal you have. DO NOT use briquetts.(sp) Open up the bottom vent and do not put the daisey wheel on the top. In about 20 minutes you should be around 1000 degrees and ready to go! When the flames are shooting 3 feet out of the top, its there.

Sear your steaks for 90 seconds per side and pull them off. Close down the bottom vent and put the daisy wheel on the top. You want the temp to drop to around 400 degrees. This will take about 30 minutes. Great time to cook some appetizers like bacon wrapped scallops!

Once your grill is down to 400 degrees, cook the steaks for 4-5 minutes per side for medium rare. I like mine rare and do 2 minutes per side.

Enjoy! Best steak you will ever have and I have ate at Ruth Chris and alot of the other major steak houses. Their meat is better quality, but there is not much difference is taste, tenderness, and how juicy they are.

Feel free to pm me for more help.

I thought one of the major benefits of a ceramic "egg" style grill was that it didn't use direct source heat, and therefore, you don't have to turn your steaks because both top and bottom heat equally. Also, because of this, it defeats the purpose of searing on each side--if you cook at 700-800 degrees, you will get a good automatic searing without flipping the steaks.

Am I wrong here?

yes you are wrong if I understand your statement.

The eggs have two styles of cooking

1) Direct heat in which the meat is directly over the flame.

2) Indirect cooking in which a plate setter is used to block the flame and funnel the heat up the sides of the egg.

You most certainly want to flip your steak when searing at a high temp over direct heat IMO.

Edited by NewlyRetired

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Hi tat,

What size grill did you get? The relatively small size of the Big Green Egg has been the biggest thing holding me back from getting one. (That and having 3 other grills / smokers already at my house...)

I do a great steak with the Palm Steakhouse method of searing it on a really high heat cast iron skillet, then resting and then finishing in the oven. So I'm not sure I'd use it for steaks.

But the size for the cost thing has held me back. What do you think?

J

Can anyone give me more details (times/temps) on this method?

Would it also work searing 1st on a super hot Webber?

Thanks

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Hi tat,

What size grill did you get? The relatively small size of the Big Green Egg has been the biggest thing holding me back from getting one. (That and having 3 other grills / smokers already at my house...)

I do a great steak with the Palm Steakhouse method of searing it on a really high heat cast iron skillet, then resting and then finishing in the oven. So I'm not sure I'd use it for steaks.

But the size for the cost thing has held me back. What do you think?

J

Can anyone give me more details (times/temps) on this method?

Would it also work searing 1st on a super hot Webber?

Thanks

Watch this video by Alton Brown. It should help with the basics of the method you are asking about. It is the best way I have found to cook a consistent steak. I use this technique on the Egg and inside during bad weather.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PiQ0VOJmCbg

Edited by NewlyRetired

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Bought the Maverick E-732, should be here soon. Pretty pumped to have that sucker monitor my low and slow cooks without much of a hassle.

Just received mine last night. It's nice not having to take the battery off to turn the thing off like the prior model. I still think the interface could be more user friendly but I am really looking forward to testing its range as the ET-73 didn't work so well in my house.

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Bought the Maverick E-732, should be here soon. Pretty pumped to have that sucker monitor my low and slow cooks without much of a hassle.

Just received mine last night. It's nice not having to take the battery off to turn the thing off like the prior model. I still think the interface could be more user friendly but I am really looking forward to testing its range as the ET-73 didn't work so well in my house.
Yeah, I think this is key. I have read really good things. I think the low and slow overnights are easier to monitor now.

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The store I bought it from is pretty slow in putting this thing together, so I went and told them I will pick it up in pieces and put it together. Weekend project :shrug: But I am hopeful it's not hard. The guy told me "that if I go to school, I can do it." What kind of school? How does being a cardiologist help me build a Big Green Egg?

Anyone ever put one together?

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The store I bought it from is pretty slow in putting this thing together, so I went and told them I will pick it up in pieces and put it together. Weekend project :loco: But I am hopeful it's not hard. The guy told me "that if I go to school, I can do it." What kind of school? How does being a cardiologist help me build a Big Green Egg?Anyone ever put one together?

I am literally the most unhandy guy in the world and the BGE was as easy as can be to put together. It was 5 years ago but I don't remember it even taking too long.Youtube has some videos on it in case you want to take a peak at the work.

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