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GStrot

Ran a 10k in June

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So, over the weekend I may have bet a guy that I could run a 10k in under an hour. Luckily, the next 10k in the area isn't until June 2.

I can do 2 miles in about 20 minutes right now. But, I am not a fan of the running and the thought of running for an hour straight makes me want to take a nap.

In case the guy calls me on this, anyone have a good traning program to get my butt in enough shape to do a 10k in 60 minutes in the next 4 months?

TIA

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You'll be able to do 10K in under an hour easily. Having said that, I'll be surprised if this thread doesn't get at least 25,000 responses. Maybe more.

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if you can't run a 10k in under an hour after 4 months of training, you should kill yourself. seriously.

good luck!

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I can do 2 miles in about 20 minutes right now.

I am assuming this is on a treadmill? You will find that you do it much faster during an actual race.

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You'll be able to do 10K in under an hour easily.

That is why I took the bet. I may have sandbagged a bit on my running ability when I was talking to him. He has been training for a marathon for six months (and has a few more months to go) and I told him that was no big deal and that I could run a 5k in a month. He told me a 10k was harder and he would give me 3 months. Half marathons were discussed at one point but he was convinced that a 10k was impossible for me. Alcohol was involved.

Is that a good program? Should pace myself at around 6.2 mph when doing those runs during the week?

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if you can't run a 10k in under an hour after 4 months of training, you should kill yourself. seriously.good luck!

Very motivating.

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I can do 2 miles in about 20 minutes right now.

I am assuming this is on a treadmill? You will find that you do it much faster during an actual race.
Really? I would have thought it would be the opposite. Without a treadmill there to "pace" me, I would have thought I would go slower.

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if you can't run a 10k in under an hour after 4 months of training, you should kill yourself. seriously.good luck!

Very motivating.
:yawn:

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I would be pretty worried if you couldn't run 10K in an hour

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I can do 2 miles in about 20 minutes right now.

I am assuming this is on a treadmill? You will find that you do it much faster during an actual race.
Really? I would have thought it would be the opposite. Without a treadmill there to "pace" me, I would have thought I would go slower.
I find treadmill speeds to be slower than what someone can actually run.

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I would be pretty worried if you couldn't run 10K in an hour

Maybe I will set my personal goal higher. Is 50 minutes reasonable? Running 7.4 miles per hour for an hour seems a bit much. I am no Kenyan.

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I can do 2 miles in about 20 minutes right now.

I am assuming this is on a treadmill? You will find that you do it much faster during an actual race.
Really? I would have thought it would be the opposite. Without a treadmill there to "pace" me, I would have thought I would go slower.
I find treadmill speeds to be slower than what someone can actually run.
If the treadmill is slower than they can run, why would people not just ... um ... make it go faster?

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I can do 2 miles in about 20 minutes right now.

I am assuming this is on a treadmill? You will find that you do it much faster during an actual race.
Really? I would have thought it would be the opposite. Without a treadmill there to "pace" me, I would have thought I would go slower.
I find treadmill speeds to be slower than what someone can actually run.
If the treadmill is slower than they can run, why would people not just ... um ... make it go faster?
He means you get adrenline in a racing environment that allows you to tolerte more pain then in practice. I have run many races and they are almost always your fastest times.

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50 is a good goal. 10 minute miles is almost not running.

I am almost not a runner. Do I not need a training program? Should I just eat a lot of pasta the night before and cruise my way to a 1 hour 10k?

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I can do 2 miles in about 20 minutes right now.

I am assuming this is on a treadmill? You will find that you do it much faster during an actual race.
Really? I would have thought it would be the opposite. Without a treadmill there to "pace" me, I would have thought I would go slower.
I find treadmill speeds to be slower than what someone can actually run.
If the treadmill is slower than they can run, why would people not just ... um ... make it go faster?
He means you get adrenline in a racing environment that allows you to tolerte more pain then in practice. I have run many races and they are almost always your fastest times.
I should have bet more.

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50 is a good goal. 10 minute miles is almost not running.

I am almost not a runner. Do I not need a training program? Should I just eat a lot of pasta the night before and cruise my way to a 1 hour 10k?
run 3-4 miles a week 4 times a week. If you are just looking to complete the distance you should have no problem.

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50 is a good goal. 10 minute miles is almost not running.

I am almost not a runner. Do I not need a training program? Should I just eat a lot of pasta the night before and cruise my way to a 1 hour 10k?
run 3-4 miles a week 4 times a week. If you are just looking to complete the distance you should have no problem.
I should have bet a lot more.

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I can do 2 miles in about 20 minutes right now.

I am assuming this is on a treadmill? You will find that you do it much faster during an actual race.
Really? I would have thought it would be the opposite. Without a treadmill there to "pace" me, I would have thought I would go slower.
I find treadmill speeds to be slower than what someone can actually run.
If the treadmill is slower than they can run, why would people not just ... um ... make it go faster?
He means you get adrenline in a racing environment that allows you to tolerte more pain then in practice. I have run many races and they are almost always your fastest times.
:mellow: Perhaps its because I hate running on a treamill, but I am hard pressed to run 3.2 miles in 30 minutes on a treadmill, yet I am ALWAYS well under 30 minutes in a 5K race. :stalker: Adrenaline + people all around you + some downhills ??? Note: I definitely do not consider myself a "serious runner".

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I can do 2 miles in about 20 minutes right now.

I am assuming this is on a treadmill? You will find that you do it much faster during an actual race.
Really? I would have thought it would be the opposite. Without a treadmill there to "pace" me, I would have thought I would go slower.
I find treadmill speeds to be slower than what someone can actually run.
If the treadmill is slower than they can run, why would people not just ... um ... make it go faster?
He means you get adrenline in a racing environment that allows you to tolerte more pain then in practice. I have run many races and they are almost always your fastest times.
:goodposting: Perhaps its because I hate running on a treamill, but I am hard pressed to run 3.2 miles in 30 minutes on a treadmill, yet I am ALWAYS well under 30 minutes in a 5K race. :goodposting: Adrenaline + people all around you + some downhills ??? Note: I definitely do not consider myself a "serious runner".
Can you run a 10k before June and report back if this is still the case?

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I ran a 10K a few years ago and it was my first. I made the mistake of getting out to too quick of a start. You have to pace your self properly but I guess I was overexcited and got ahead of myself.

My main suggestion would be to pace yourself in the first 3 miles and then let it fly.

I am in the process of training for the NYC marathon right now and I try to keep myself at a 9 minute mile pace. I could probably push myself a bit harder but I figure if I can finish the thing at a 10-12 minute pace Ill finish under 5 hours and that it my goal.

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I ran a 10K a few years ago and it was my first. I made the mistake of getting out to too quick of a start. You have to pace your self properly but I guess I was overexcited and got ahead of myself. My main suggestion would be to pace yourself in the first 3 miles and then let it fly.I am in the process of training for the NYC marathon right now and I try to keep myself at a 9 minute mile pace. I could probably push myself a bit harder but I figure if I can finish the thing at a 10-12 minute pace Ill finish under 5 hours and that it my goal.

How did you train for the 10k? Just run a few miles a few days a week? What was your time?Thanks for the advice and good luck with the NYC marathon!

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I think that if your pace is around 10 minutes a mile (which is like my natural, untrained pace also), if you really want to build speed, you are going to have to run faster.

I would first get the distance part under your belt in your training, spend like 2 months getting to where you are running the race distance (or a bit longer) the last week of the 2 months.

Then I would work on speed. Try and lower your times. Once a week run sprints and short distances fast. Consider running hills/stairs one day a week if it's a hilly course.

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I think that if your pace is around 10 minutes a mile (which is like my natural, untrained pace also), if you really want to build speed, you are going to have to run faster.I would first get the distance part under your belt in your training, spend like 2 months getting to where you are running the race distance (or a bit longer) the last week of the 2 months.Then I would work on speed. Try and lower your times. Once a week run sprints and short distances fast. Consider running hills/stairs one day a week if it's a hilly course.

What is the Swedish term for speed training?My goal is to finish in 59:59 or under, I don't think I need to really work on my speed? Do I? :confused:

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50 is a good goal. 10 minute miles is almost not running.

:confused:when I started running I would be happy with a 10 minute mile.. and then I realized I was happy about it because it wasn't difficult and I could almost speed walk at the same pace.I did 5 miles in 40 minutes on Tuesday night and it was the best work-out I've had in a while.

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I ran a 10K a few years ago and it was my first. I made the mistake of getting out to too quick of a start. You have to pace your self properly but I guess I was overexcited and got ahead of myself. My main suggestion would be to pace yourself in the first 3 miles and then let it fly.I am in the process of training for the NYC marathon right now and I try to keep myself at a 9 minute mile pace. I could probably push myself a bit harder but I figure if I can finish the thing at a 10-12 minute pace Ill finish under 5 hours and that it my goal.

How did you train for the 10k? Just run a few miles a few days a week? What was your time?Thanks for the advice and good luck with the NYC marathon!
I ran something called the Nike Run Hit wonder in central Park. It was all of these one hit wonder bands playing on the route. It was fun but I was able to download a training session they set up. I think it was mostly 3-4 mile runs with one week a 5 miler, another week an 8 miler and a 2 miler. I cant remeber off the top of my head but it was laid out nice for me and easy to follow. Just plug a few Social D Cds into the ipod and that should keep you going. As Ness would say, reach for the skyedited to add that I ran it in just over 60 minutes but that was from the start to end. There was like 3 minutes where we basically walked because so many people were running

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You'll be able to do 10K in under an hour easily.

That is why I took the bet. I may have sandbagged a bit on my running ability when I was talking to him. He has been training for a marathon for six months (and has a few more months to go) and I told him that was no big deal and that I could run a 5k in a month. He told me a 10k was harder and he would give me 3 months. Half marathons were discussed at one point but he was convinced that a 10k was impossible for me. Alcohol was involved.

Is that a good program? Should pace myself at around 6.2 mph when doing those runs during the week?

:confused:

I generally use http://runnersworld.com/ for articles, discussion boards and their training program.

10K

Also, anything written by Hal Higdon is well worth a read.

10K in 3 months, really not too difficult.

A race is almost always faster than training runs, even if you don't mean for it to be. Adrenaline, girls in latex, etc. Motivation. As already stated, don't start out too fast.

I highly recomend either getting a partner who is close to your pace (hopefully just a little better) or finding scenic runs. Or both.

Good luck.

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I can do 2 miles in about 20 minutes right now.

I am assuming this is on a treadmill? You will find that you do it much faster during an actual race.
absolutely true.. I don't know why it happens but running on a treadmill always feels faster than the MPH indicates..by the way.. if you are training on a treadmill turn the incline up to 1.0 which is more similar to running in real conditions because of the speed of the belt or something..it will help your knees to stay off the concrete too much

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I did 5 miles in 40 minutes on Tuesday night and it was the best work-out I've had in a while.

So, is a 50 minute 10k (basically a 5 miles in 40 minute pace) too ambitious?

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I think that if your pace is around 10 minutes a mile (which is like my natural, untrained pace also), if you really want to build speed, you are going to have to run faster.I would first get the distance part under your belt in your training, spend like 2 months getting to where you are running the race distance (or a bit longer) the last week of the 2 months.Then I would work on speed. Try and lower your times. Once a week run sprints and short distances fast. Consider running hills/stairs one day a week if it's a hilly course.

What is the Swedish term for speed training?My goal is to finish in 59:59 or under, I don't think I need to really work on my speed? Do I? :yes:
You will finish under that time without working on speed, yes.I did the bay-to-breakers race in SF, which is like a 12k, in 54 minutes without working on my speed, or hills. I figure I was averaging 9 minute miles while training. As many have pointed out, race day you are always faster and have to watch yourself from getting out too quick and tiring.

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I ran a 10K a few years ago and it was my first. I made the mistake of getting out to too quick of a start. You have to pace your self properly but I guess I was overexcited and got ahead of myself. My main suggestion would be to pace yourself in the first 3 miles and then let it fly.I am in the process of training for the NYC marathon right now and I try to keep myself at a 9 minute mile pace. I could probably push myself a bit harder but I figure if I can finish the thing at a 10-12 minute pace Ill finish under 5 hours and that it my goal.

How did you train for the 10k? Just run a few miles a few days a week? What was your time?Thanks for the advice and good luck with the NYC marathon!
I ran something called the Nike Run Hit wonder in central Park. It was all of these one hit wonder bands playing on the route. It was fun but I was able to download a training session they set up. I think it was mostly 3-4 mile runs with one week a 5 miler, another week an 8 miler and a 2 miler. I cant remeber off the top of my head but it was laid out nice for me and easy to follow. Just plug a few Social D Cds into the ipod and that should keep you going. As Ness would say, reach for the skyedited to add that I ran it in just over 60 minutes but that was from the start to end. There was like 3 minutes where we basically walked because so many people were running
:yes:

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You'll be able to do 10K in under an hour easily.

That is why I took the bet. I may have sandbagged a bit on my running ability when I was talking to him. He has been training for a marathon for six months (and has a few more months to go) and I told him that was no big deal and that I could run a 5k in a month. He told me a 10k was harder and he would give me 3 months. Half marathons were discussed at one point but he was convinced that a 10k was impossible for me. Alcohol was involved.

Is that a good program? Should pace myself at around 6.2 mph when doing those runs during the week?

:yes:

I generally use http://runnersworld.com/ for articles, discussion boards and their training program.

10K

Also, anything written by Hal Higdon is well worth a read.

10K in 3 months, really not too difficult.

A race is almost always faster than training runs, even if you don't mean for it to be. Adrenaline, girls in latex, etc. Motivation. As already stated, don't start out too fast.

I highly recomend either getting a partner who is close to your pace (hopefully just a little better) or finding scenic runs. Or both.

Good luck.

Thanks for the advice.

I am debating between that plan and the Higdon one. My only concern is with the runners world article it says...

You're a notch above novice. You've been running at least six months and maybe have done a 5-K or two. You run three to five miles three or four days a week, have done a little fast running when you felt like it, and now you want to enter--and finish--what you consider a real "distance race."

If you're a beginner, your 10-K goal is less a personal record (PR) than an LDF (longest distance finished). You want to run the whole 6.2 miles, so you're going for endurance. Because it's likely to take you an hour to get there. "Basic aerobic strength is every runner's first need," says coach Jon Sinclair of Anaerobic Management (anaerobic.net).

The first part is not me, the second part is exactly me. Thoughts?

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Where are you located? I'm sure I can find you a 10k long before June.

As for loading up on pasta, that won't help you in a 10k. Just eat normally (three squares, that is, not a 6pack and a bag of Cheetos) and have a good breakfast the morning of the race and you'll be fine. Carbo-loading is for marathon distances.

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Another recommendation for the Higdon training models. You don't have to run race-pace very often, especially early on. Just get in some miles, let your body adjust (especially your heart - aerobic ability - and then your leg muscles). For a June race, you could start to fine-tune your training in late April and May ...some shorter, harder runs, maybe some hill work (or stairs), maybe a few longer runs that exceed the distance. Really, if you give it any sort of commitment, you'll be fine. As noted, 10 minute miles isn't much at all ..slower than that either includes some walking or reflects no leg lift.

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50 is a good goal. 10 minute miles is almost not running.

I am almost not a runner. Do I not need a training program? Should I just eat a lot of pasta the night before and cruise my way to a 1 hour 10k?
Yes40 mins is on ok goal, 35 mins is a good goal, 30 minutes is a very good goal.Elite runners would go sub 25 pretty easily.

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Another recommendation for the Higdon training models. You don't have to run race-pace very often, especially early on. Just get in some miles, let your body adjust (especially your heart - aerobic ability - and then your leg muscles). For a June race, you could start to fine-tune your training in late April and May ...some shorter, harder runs, maybe some hill work (or stairs), maybe a few longer runs that exceed the distance. Really, if you give it any sort of commitment, you'll be fine. As noted, 10 minute miles isn't much at all ..slower than that either includes some walking or reflects no leg lift.

Circuit training is best for improving times in short distances like this.

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What is the Swedish term for speed training?

Fartlek. :giggle:

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Where are you located? I'm sure I can find you a 10k long before June.

As for loading up on pasta, that won't help you in a 10k. Just eat normally (three squares, that is, not a 6pack and a bag of Cheetos) and have a good breakfast the morning of the race and you'll be fine. Carbo-loading is for marathon distances.

There are plenty. But, he wanted to run his marathon on the same day. So, we may go up to Lake Geneva in Wisconsin in May. But, I told him I don't want to run in the cold. This is how I have so much time. I am crafty.

I was just kidding about the pasta.

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Another recommendation for the Higdon training models. You don't have to run race-pace very often, especially early on. Just get in some miles, let your body adjust (especially your heart - aerobic ability - and then your leg muscles). For a June race, you could start to fine-tune your training in late April and May ...some shorter, harder runs, maybe some hill work (or stairs), maybe a few longer runs that exceed the distance. Really, if you give it any sort of commitment, you'll be fine. As noted, 10 minute miles isn't much at all ..slower than that either includes some walking or reflects no leg lift.

:confused: Thanks for the advice.P.S. Now I can blame any slowness on poor leg lift.

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50 is a good goal. 10 minute miles is almost not running.

I am almost not a runner. Do I not need a training program? Should I just eat a lot of pasta the night before and cruise my way to a 1 hour 10k?
Yes40 mins is on ok goal, 35 mins is a good goal, 30 minutes is a very good goal.Elite runners would go sub 25 pretty easily.
Easy there Joan Benoit Samuelson. 40 minutes is 9 miles an hour. I don't have a high altitude cabin at which I can train.Was your "yes" to the first or second question?

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