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Otis

Band of Brothers

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I'm sure there were all kinds of OFFICIAL threads floating around here when this thing was on the HoBO, but I never bothered checking it out while it was on TV. Was just recently forced into watching it, and after I hit the end of the first episode I was completely hooked. Spent a full day watching the first 6 episodes, and then I tore through the rest as fast as netflix would turn the others around to me. For anyone who hasn't seen this, definitely worth a watch.

:sadbanana:

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Agreed. It's outstanding, which is why I bought it, and I'm picky about which DVD's I'll bother to buy.

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What was your favorite episode, Otis?

Mine was the one that focused on the medic at Bastogne. :shrug:

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It is good :shrug:

I am glad you liked it, although I am surprised you liked it.

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I haven't seen them all, but the most difficult episode to watch by far was when they found the concentration camp. :kicksrock:

Awesome series though.....

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Welcome to 6 years ago guy. :coffee:

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I've watched it several times. Each time its harder and harder to watch the episode where they find the concentration camp. It may just be me, oh well.

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Welcome to 6 years ago guy. :coffee:

I was going to say the same thing. Otis is right, it is awesome. 6 years ago if you went to ArcticEdges house this was on the TV 95% of the time.

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Major Dick Winters, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division, in an interview, read from a letter he had received from one of men he once commanded. It goes a little something like this: I treasure my remark to a grandson who asked, "Grandpa, were you a hero in the war?" "No", I answered, "But I served in a company of heroes".

My allergies flare up every time I see this in the movie.

Edited by SHIZNITTTT

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Good reminder.. gonna have to watch this again. Flat out brilliant stuff.

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The D-day drop and the episode where the big guy is stranded alone and gets in a fight in the barn are my favorites.

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Welcome to 6 years ago guy. :rolleyes:

I was going to say the same thing. Otis is right, it is awesome. 6 years ago if you went to ArcticEdges house this was on the TV 95% of the time.
That's true.

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If you get the chance, watch all of the extras where they interview the actual men of Easy Company, follow a reunion, and interview Dick Winters. The entire DVD set is so powerful, you have to take it in small doses IMO. I've probably seen them all 5 or 6 times and I never get tired of them. Glad to see you discovered it. :rolleyes:

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I am glad to have bought this series. I will watch this again since it was brought up here. I like the one where Spears take control of the attack on the village and runs between the two squads while the Germans watch him and must thing he is a crazy man.

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I am glad to have bought this series. I will watch this again since it was brought up here. I like the one where Spears take control of the attack on the village and runs between the two squads while the Germans watch him and must thing he is a crazy man.

:rolleyes: My favorite scene.

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I am glad to have bought this series. I will watch this again since it was brought up here. I like the one where Spears take control of the attack on the village and runs between the two squads while the Germans watch him and must thing he is a crazy man.

:rolleyes: My favorite scene.
Sad but true reality just before that of the panicking leader getting men killed as he doesn't know what to do and they're just sitting ducks.

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Major Dick Winters, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division, in an interview, read from a letter he had received from one of men he once commanded. It goes a little something like this: I treasure my remark to a grandson who asked, "Grandpa, were you a hero in the war?" "No", I answered, "But I served in a company of heroes".My allergies flare up every time I see this in the movie.

If there's ever been a more deserving posthumous medal of honor winner....shame how he just won't get it when he's alive, disgraceful really. Sidenote might interest you, he's responded to every letter he's ever gotten and the post office delivers them without the correct address, ya just get the town right and they'll get it to him. He earned a living near Hershey PA using Hershey's waste and somehow making animal food from it.This country felt(apparently) he didn't do enough and called him back into active duty years later, he went to Washington to state his case and get out of it....long story His autobiography is equally fascinating

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I am glad to have bought this series. I will watch this again since it was brought up here. I like the one where Spears take control of the attack on the village and runs between the two squads while the Germans watch him and must thing he is a crazy man.

:bag: My favorite scene.
Sad but true reality just before that of the panicking leader getting men killed as he doesn't know what to do and they're just sitting ducks.
:rolleyes: Good leaders are hard to find, and in warfare the bad ones get men killed. I liked the way that that was presented. Also, Spears was a freaking madman who actively maintained (though never outright admitted to) the story about him killing those German prisoners, even though to this day it's still debated whether or not it happened. There are just some guys who are too crazy to die. :shrug: Edited by redman

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One of my favorite scenes is after the war is over and Captain Sobel walks past Major Winters and tries to avoid him.

"Captain Sobel, Captain Sobel, we salute the rank, not the man.."

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I love the assault on the guns scene. The guy that used to play baseball pegging the German with the grenade in the back is money.

:goodposting: It was an outstanding rendition of that true event, and it is indeed literally used to this day as a textbook example of a small unit infantry assault on a fortified position. That and the Rangers on Point du Hoc saved a lot of lives on the beach that day by taking out those guns.

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Some of you may find this page fascinating as I do Link.

Website by Airborne Historian and renowned expert Mark Bando. Link takes you to his "Band Of Brother's" page where he breaks down each episode and critiques the authenticity of each episode. He adds pictures and interviews from the actual soldiers regarding the episodes. Bando does not come from a "negative" angle but an angle for the history buffs like myself. For the most part, Bando praises the mini-series for it's overwhelming accuracy. On the D-Day drop episode critique, he qoutes one of the soldiers stating the American's could see the naval artillery shells passing over them. The soldier stated they looked like "flying Volkswagons" as they passed over them. Insight's like this is what Bando gives you.

My favorite character is Lt. Spears...dude was a mad man. Wikipedia did a pretty good job on their "Band Of Brothers Page". The Wiki link I provided takes you to the main character page where you get historical background on the real characters. Lot's of cool information and some have pictures of the real members.

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What was your favorite episode, Otis? Mine was the one that focused on the medic at Bastogne. :thumbup:

I'm not Otis, but "Why We Fight" was amazing.

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I took a redeye flight to London and arrived dead-tired at 10 AM. I had to stay up until their bedtime if I was to have any chance of getting adjusted to the time zone, and I had my portable DVD player and BOB, which I had never seen.

I watched the whole thing... I really need to watch it again in a more coherent state where I can appreciate each episode.

The episode in the forest with the exploding trees was the most powerful to me.

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Some of you may find this page fascinating as I do Link.

Website by Airborne Historian and renowned expert Mark Bando. Link takes you to his "Band Of Brother's" page where he breaks down each episode and critiques the authenticity of each episode.

Very interesting, thanks.

Gotta say though saying Spielberg didn't consult the right people in the first paragraph is silly. The author couldn't be a better historian on some of these battles and he had the living BOB. Cmon now

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Some of you may find this page fascinating as I do Link.

Website by Airborne Historian and renowned expert Mark Bando. Link takes you to his "Band Of Brother's" page where he breaks down each episode and critiques the authenticity of each episode.

Very interesting, thanks.

Gotta say though saying Spielberg didn't consult the right people in the first paragraph is silly. The author couldn't be a better historian on some of these battles and he had the living BOB. Cmon now

:thumbup:

That site does have a lot of good info but gimme a break. Yes there are plenty of "errors" in BOB...it wasn't a documentary. This is true for every historical drama.

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The episode in the forest with the exploding trees was the most powerful to me.

This is the one I was referring to - the one that featured the medic at Bastogne. Very poignant.

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book is great too..

I was just going to say this too. Worth getting if you enjoyed BoB. A good deal of it you'll already know, but it'll give a lot more detail.

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I watched the whole series and for some reason all I can remember is the scene where they parachute in and someone gets lost or something :shrug: And maybe some scene where the soldiers are holed up near a wall or something...or maybe a parade in the Netherlands or something :lmao:

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I watched the whole series and for some reason all I can remember is the scene where they parachute in and someone gets lost or something :shrug: And maybe some scene where the soldiers are holed up near a wall or something...or maybe a parade in the Netherlands or something :lmao:

You don't remember blood and gore and guts and veins your teeth? Eating dead burnt bodies? I mean kill? Kill. KILL. KILL!!!

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I watched the whole series and for some reason all I can remember is the scene where they parachute in and someone gets lost or something :shrug: And maybe some scene where the soldiers are holed up near a wall or something...or maybe a parade in the Netherlands or something :lmao:

You don't remember blood and gore and guts and veins your teeth? Eating dead burnt bodies? I mean kill? Kill. KILL. KILL!!!
That's all I honestly remember. There were people at my work (specifically an old slick talking saleswhore) saying how it was the best series ever. She obviously didn't see The Shining miniseries.

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Some of you may find this page fascinating as I do Link.

Website by Airborne Historian and renowned expert Mark Bando. Link takes you to his "Band Of Brother's" page where he breaks down each episode and critiques the authenticity of each episode.

Very interesting, thanks.

Gotta say though saying Spielberg didn't consult the right people in the first paragraph is silly. The author couldn't be a better historian on some of these battles and he had the living BOB. Cmon now

:thumbdown:

That site does have a lot of good info but gimme a break. Yes there are plenty of "errors" in BOB...it wasn't a documentary. This is true for every historical drama.

I read that link some more and geesh is he being nitpicky. I wish he'd have had a nitpicky section for some to click on, because the rest of the stuff weeded thru that is interesting.

Some of it is insane really, Winters' leg bag comes off in 3 seconds not 2. The characters could not see thru the hedgerow(and you couldn't when the camera went there) but it's not dense enough?

Back to my original point, if the original BOB's consulted don't recall some of these details, that means they're unimportant. After all it is based on their events recollected by their memory.

I think I have a real strong guess when I say I'm guessing he wasn't included in this and since he met with Winters shortly before and is a historian, he's crushed to not be included. That bitterness about dumb BS is too hard to explain any other way

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I watched the whole series and for some reason all I can remember is the scene where they parachute in and someone gets lost or something :lmao: And maybe some scene where the soldiers are holed up near a wall or something...or maybe a parade in the Netherlands or something :thumbdown:

Plummetting down to earth in a parachute oh so slowly as people on the ground shoot at you, slowly slowly coming down, somehow they're missing. You get down and get all unhooked only to realize you only have a small knife to defend yourself against one of the best armies ever(at the time) and somehow you survive? It's amazing really.I'm not surprised you remember that scene

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I believe they are working on a Band of Brothers - Pacific. I think Tom Hanks and Speilburg are invovled in that one as well.

that's what some referred to Clint's movie as, Flag for our Fathers

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I believe they are working on a Band of Brothers - Pacific. I think Tom Hanks and Speilburg are invovled in that one as well.

that's what some referred to Clint's movie as, Flag for our Fathers
That was a horrible movie. Certainly Clints worse. Way too much over acting and trying to cram a section of history in 2 hours. Just didnt work.

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I watched the whole series and for some reason all I can remember is the scene where they parachute in and someone gets lost or something :shrug: And maybe some scene where the soldiers are holed up near a wall or something...or maybe a parade in the Netherlands or something :thumbup:

You don't remember blood and gore and guts and veins your teeth? Eating dead burnt bodies? I mean kill? Kill. KILL. KILL!!!
Alice's Restaurant?

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I believe they are working on a Band of Brothers - Pacific. I think Tom Hanks and Speilburg are invovled in that one as well.

that's what some referred to Clint's movie as, Flag for our Fathers
Hanks & Spielberg are working on a BoB for the Pacific, have been for about 3 years, should be out this year or next I think. You can read about over at Wild Bill's site. The problem they had with the Pacific is there wasn't one unit that went from Guadalcanal to Okinawa so the series focuses on 5 marines from various units that span the whole campaign. I'm really looking forward to it. Just watched Letters From Iwo Jima on Friday, good flick.

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Some of you may find this page fascinating as I do Link.

Website by Airborne Historian and renowned expert Mark Bando. Link takes you to his "Band Of Brother's" page where he breaks down each episode and critiques the authenticity of each episode.

Very interesting, thanks.

Gotta say though saying Spielberg didn't consult the right people in the first paragraph is silly. The author couldn't be a better historian on some of these battles and he had the living BOB. Cmon now

:thumbup:

That site does have a lot of good info but gimme a break. Yes there are plenty of "errors" in BOB...it wasn't a documentary. This is true for every historical drama.

I read that link some more and geesh is he being nitpicky. I wish he'd have had a nitpicky section for some to click on, because the rest of the stuff weeded thru that is interesting.

Some of it is insane really, Winters' leg bag comes off in 3 seconds not 2. The characters could not see thru the hedgerow(and you couldn't when the camera went there) but it's not dense enough?

Back to my original point, if the original BOB's consulted don't recall some of these details, that means they're unimportant. After all it is based on their events recollected by their memory.

It's also based on historical facts. Why not strive to be historically accurate as possible? :porked:

I think I have a real strong guess when I say I'm guessing he wasn't included in this and since he met with Winters shortly before and is a historian, he's crushed to not be included. That bitterness about dumb BS is too hard to explain any other way

DO NOT READ THIS UNLESS YOU WISH TO KNOW WHAT REALLY HAPPENED,

The above is part of a disclaimer that precedes the numerous pages critiquing the Band Of Brother's mini-series. Mark Bando did not write it for the casual fan but for the die hard history buffs who wanted to know where the series may have hedged on the literal facts. Yes, Bando is being nit picky. So????? I personally appreciated knowing where the series strayed from the actual facts. As Bando stated in the disclaimer....if you don't care to know then move on.

I'd like to begin by saying that I enjoyed watching this series very much and that subsequent viewings become even more enjoyable, as the viewer grasps details that were missed in prior viewings. As stated elsewhere on this site, I rated the series at 8.5 on a scale of 1-10 overall

He doesn't sound too bitter to me.

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I read that link some more and geesh is he being nitpicky. I wish he'd have had a nitpicky section for some to click on, because the rest of the stuff weeded thru that is interesting. Some of it is insane really, Winters' leg bag comes off in 3 seconds not 2. The characters could not see thru the hedgerow(and you couldn't when the camera went there) but it's not dense enough?Back to my original point, if the original BOB's consulted don't recall some of these details, that means they're unimportant. After all it is based on their events recollected by their memory. I think I have a real strong guess when I say I'm guessing he wasn't included in this and since he met with Winters shortly before and is a historian, he's crushed to not be included. That bitterness about dumb BS is too hard to explain any other way

Bri you know me a little from other threads regarding BoB and the 101st so you know I’m not talking out of my ### here. I’m not trying to defend Bando but I see his point. As a little history that some of you may not know, Bando started researching the 101st long, long before BoB was ever a concept. Sometime in the 60’s Mark started interviewing some 101st vets, had a knack for it and meticulously record everything. What he found was almost 99% of the vets never talked to anyone other than their brothers-in-arms about their experiences so there was no recorded history of this great division. He almost single handedly took the task to heart and made it his life’s work record as much history as possible about these great men. He understood then what few realize today; our WWII vets are a finite commodity dying off at a rate of 1,500 a day. He has interviewed almost 1,000 101st vets over the course of years and is, without a doubt, the foremost historian on the division.Does he come off nitpicky and bitter in his review? When I first read it I thought so too but understand, he put in 20 years with no interest in “cashing in” on these guys, just his love & respect for them. I think he has a right to be a little miffed because every one of these guys knew Bando long before Stephen Ambrose knew them. Bando has always, always preached “get it right”. Don’t misrepresent history because now there are millions of people that think they know the basic story of E Company but in truth they know bits and pieces. But because so many people have seen it there is a crop of folks that think they are experts on the 101st and this absolutely rubs him the wrong way. He also has disdain for Ambrose and his “historical” writings (he has been accused of plagiarism in the past with some very damning evidence).As I said I’m not trying to defend Bando because without BoB I would have never gotten involved with my research into WWII or the veterans of that era. It has lead to an incredibly rewarding part of my life that I would have simply never had. I can say the same for Ambrose. While I agree that he was lazy in some of his writings, I can’t fault him for BoB. I get Bando’s point of view in that his extensive body of work is largely overlooked because of BoB. He has never dissed the any members of E Company, his only point is that E Company by themselves did not carry the 101st. There were other Companies in the Division that did as much or more than E Company and get no recognition. I think this is what chaps Bando’s ### the most, not that he gets overlooked but that other veterans that chewed the same dirt with Easy get much less attention.

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I watched the whole series and for some reason all I can remember is the scene where they parachute in and someone gets lost or something :pickle: And maybe some scene where the soldiers are holed up near a wall or something...or maybe a parade in the Netherlands or something :headbang:

You don't remember blood and gore and guts and veins your teeth? Eating dead burnt bodies? I mean kill? Kill. KILL. KILL!!!
Alice's Restaurant?
Yep. Got as far as typing "You don't remember blood and gore..." and the rest just sort of came out naturally.

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Some of you may find this page fascinating as I do Link.

Website by Airborne Historian and renowned expert Mark Bando. Link takes you to his "Band Of Brother's" page where he breaks down each episode and critiques the authenticity of each episode.

Very interesting, thanks.

Gotta say though saying Spielberg didn't consult the right people in the first paragraph is silly. The author couldn't be a better historian on some of these battles and he had the living BOB. Cmon now

:shrug:

That site does have a lot of good info but gimme a break. Yes there are plenty of "errors" in BOB...it wasn't a documentary. This is true for every historical drama.

I read that link some more and geesh is he being nitpicky. I wish he'd have had a nitpicky section for some to click on, because the rest of the stuff weeded thru that is interesting.

Some of it is insane really, Winters' leg bag comes off in 3 seconds not 2. The characters could not see thru the hedgerow(and you couldn't when the camera went there) but it's not dense enough?

Back to my original point, if the original BOB's consulted don't recall some of these details, that means they're unimportant. After all it is based on their events recollected by their memory.

I think I have a real strong guess when I say I'm guessing he wasn't included in this and since he met with Winters shortly before and is a historian, he's crushed to not be included. That bitterness about dumb BS is too hard to explain any other way

Sites like that are for :goodposting: 's who like to masturbate their ego by putting their knowledge of their preferred subject matter on display by nitpicking stuff. Get a life, Herbie.

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He also has disdain for Ambrose and his “historical” writings (he has been accused of plagiarism in the past with some very damning evidence).

What Ambrose to my understanding was accused of was non-attribution, which certainly was a form of plagiarism, but he wasn't quoting entire sections, word for word, like some have in recent years, such as Doris Kearns Goodwin.

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He also has disdain for Ambrose and his “historical” writings (he has been accused of plagiarism in the past with some very damning evidence).

What Ambrose to my understanding was accused of was non-attribution, which certainly was a form of plagiarism, but he wasn't quoting entire sections, word for word, like some have in recent years, such as Doris Kearns Goodwin.
I don't want to hijack this thread so I'll leave it alone after this post:

http://www.weeklystandard.com/Content/Publ...00/738lfddv.asp

IN 1995, a history professor at the University of Pennsylvania, Thomas Childers, published a book about his uncle's B-24 crew in World War II. Entitled "Wings of Morning: The Story of the Last American Bomber Shot Down over Germany in World War II," the book was well received by critics. Jonathan Yardley of the Washington Post called it "powerful and unselfconsciously beautiful." It sold fifteen thousand copies in hardcover and remains available in paperback.

In 2001, Stephen Ambrose, perhaps America's most popular historian and one of its most prolific, also published a book that focuses on a B-24 crew in World War II. This crew's pilot was George McGovern, later a senator and Democratic presidential candidate. Entitled "The Wild Blue: The Men and Boys Who Flew the B-24s over Germany," the book got mixed reviews. But it nonetheless rose quickly on the best-seller list, ranking twelfth on last week's New York Times non-fiction list. The first printing was half a million copies.

The two books are similar in more than just subject. Whole passages in "The Wild Blue" are barely distinguishable from those in "Wings of Morning." Sentences in Ambrose's book are identical to sentences in Childers's. Key phrases from "Wings of Morning," such as "glittering like mica" and "up, up, up," are repeated verbatim in "The Wild Blue." None of these--the passages, sentences, phrases--is put in quotation marks and ascribed to Childers. The only attribution Childers gets in "The Wild Blue" is a mention in the bibliography and four footnotes. And the footnotes give no indication that an entire passage has been lifted with only a few alterations from "Wings of Morning" or that a Childers sentence has been copied word-for-word. So, for example, one six-paragraph passage in "The Wild Blue" is structured like the corresponding section of "Wings of Morning," with ten sentences nearly identical to sentences in Childers's book and one completely identical. All this is dealt with in a single footnote that cites pages 21 to 27 in "Wings of Morning" with no further explanation or credit.

http://media.www.dailypennsylvanian.com/me...m-2158919.shtml

Stephen Ambrose, the well- known historian who recently admitted using wording similar to that in passages of Penn History Professor Thomas Childers' Wings of Morning in his Wild Blue, has been accused of borrowing passages from the late Jay Monaghan's Custer: The Life of General George Armstrong Custer.

Forbes magazine is reporting that in his 1975 book Crazy Horse and Custer, Ambrose used similar phrases to those written in Monaghan's 1959 work. The new accusation comes just one day after the publication of a Weekly Standard article in which Ambrose is accused of plagiarizing Childers' work.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Again, don't mean a hill of beans to me as I'm fairly certain he was the only one who wrote BoB although some of his facts in the book and mini-series thereafter were wrong as well, most notably Albert Blithe dying shortly after he was wounded in France. This was due mainly to the members of E Company not knowing what happened to him after he was wounded but he did stay in the service and went on to fight in Korea and achieve the rank of Master Sergent.

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