Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Truman

How many golf balls can you fit into a Boeing 777?

75 posts in this topic

I'm interviewing for a consultancy firm overseas. They emailed me 4 questions like this and want a response in 24 hours, before deciding whether I am worthy of a full interview. What is the purpose of this type of question, and what kind of answer do they expect?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

shouldnt be that hard to figure out if you can find out the interior ft3 of a 777

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i hate interview questions like that. Stupid riddles. only there to make :( feel good after having been stuffed into lockers for the first 18 years of his life.

FTR, i got like 3 of those stupid riddles in one of my first real job interviews out of college. Nailed 'em and they hired me. Worked there for 5 years, but i should've known what a bunch of pain the ###es worked there from the interview.

Seriously though, think to yourself, is it the type of company that actually ants to know the answer? Or, do they want some creative answer? Once you know that, either answer will be easy to come up with

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm interviewing for a consultancy firm overseas. They emailed me 4 questions like this and want a response in 24 hours, before deciding whether I am worthy of a full interview. What is the purpose of this type of question, and what kind of answer do they expect?

The purpose is to see your reasoning skills.The answer does not matter, but rather the thought process you put into it does. Think of it as, the answer is "showing your work" rather than the conclusion from that work.I interviewed with multiple consulting firms when I was getting my MBA and had to answer questions like this.Off the top of my head I would say that each seat in a 777 is 2 feet wide. There are 11 seats across plus two aisles that consist of 4 feet each. This is 30 feet wide. A golf ball is 2 inches across. Thus you can fit 180 balls across...You would then want to go into how high it is, take into consideration that it is not a box but a cylinder so you need to make adjustments for that. You need to deduct out space for seats, but remember you can fit balls into overhead compartments, bathrooms, the cockpit, the luggage compartment down below, and in seat pockets.This is just off the top of my head, but giving a detailed example such as this shows that you are considering all the options and your creativity in it.I never got this question but got manhole covers / public telephones in NYC as well as some others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Strange that they would send this to you and give you 24 hours. I used to get questions like this when I was interviewing for consulting positions out of college, but apparently they wanted to see how I thought through the problem. That's a bit different than giving someone 24 hours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Strange that they would send this to you and give you 24 hours. I used to get questions like this when I was interviewing for consulting positions out of college, but apparently they wanted to see how I thought through the problem. That's a bit different than giving someone 24 hours.

:confused: They must be getting soft. Typically they ask you the question on the spot and you have to go into it right there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can fit seven golf balls in a Boeing 777 with plenty of room to spare.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can fit seven golf balls in a Boeing 777 with plenty of room to spare.

:confused:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

google is your friend...

Let’s assume that we will only fit balls into the main body of the aircraft. It would be possible to fill the gas tanks in the wings with golf balls, but we will just fill the cockpit, the main body and the tail section with golf balls.

In a Boeing 777 you have 2 aisles with 3 seats between each aisle and window, and 4 seats between the aisles. A seat is roughly 50 centimeters wide and an aisle is roughly 50 centimeters wide as well. That makes for a total width of (12x50=600 centimeters) 6 meters.

We assume that there are 300 seats on the aircraft, and every occupant is given 1.5 meters of space along the length of the aircraft (chair, including margin for reclining of chair and leg space). That gives us 30 rows (10 seats in each row) of seats each occupying 1.5 meters which gives a total length of 45 meters.

There are 3 additional factors that need to be added to this to get the total length of the aircraft: emergency exits, tail section (storage of food etc.) and cockpit. If there are 2 sets of emergency exits (1 on each side) that will roughly add another 1 meter each, in total 2 meters. We are now up to a length of 47 meters. Let’s then assume that the cockpit requires another 3 meters (not including the nose of the aircraft that carries navigation and communications equipment). The tail needs to support the rear fins (2 horizontal and 1 vertical) and needs to be sturdy. Let’s assume it is 10 meters long. We now have a cigar shaped tube roughly 60 meters long and 6 meters in diameter. For simplicity’s sake, let’s also assume that the floor and the ceiling of the aircraft make this into a box rather than a tube (even though the ends are still tapered). The inner sides of the aircraft would still be curved but for simplicity’s sake we will ignore that. The height of the aircraft is assumed to be 2 meters. Our box is thus 2x60x6 with tapered ends.

A ball is roughly 5 centimeters in diameter. We can therefore fit 120 balls in width, 40 balls in height and 1200 balls in length. This does not account for the space occupied by the seats (and other equipment). Let’s assume the seats cover 15 % of the total volume. This gives us 85% out of 120x40x1200=5 760 000 balls, which is 4 896 000 balls. Let’s say that the tapered ends can carry half the amount of balls per meter of length compared to the midsection. That means that we need to subtract half of the balls that fit into a 13 meter section (cockpit and tail end, 3+10 meters, assuming no chairs). That corresponds to 120 balls in width, 40 balls in height and 260 balls in length, all divided by 2. Mathematically written 0.5(120x40x260)=624 000.

This gives us a total of 4 896 000-624 000 which is 4 272 000 golf balls.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are using clubs with too much loft if you are worrying about that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One, cause after that the plane isn't empty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm interviewing for a consultancy firm overseas. They emailed me 4 questions like this and want a response in 24 hours, before deciding whether I am worthy of a full interview. What is the purpose of this type of question, and what kind of answer do they expect?

The purpose is to see your reasoning skills.The answer does not matter, but rather the thought process you put into it does. Think of it as, the answer is "showing your work" rather than the conclusion from that work.I interviewed with multiple consulting firms when I was getting my MBA and had to answer questions like this.Off the top of my head I would say that each seat in a 777 is 2 feet wide. There are 11 seats across plus two aisles that consist of 4 feet each. This is 30 feet wide. A golf ball is 2 inches across. Thus you can fit 180 balls across...You would then want to go into how high it is, take into consideration that it is not a box but a cylinder so you need to make adjustments for that. You need to deduct out space for seats, but remember you can fit balls into overhead compartments, bathrooms, the cockpit, the luggage compartment down below, and in seat pockets.This is just off the top of my head, but giving a detailed example such as this shows that you are considering all the options and your creativity in it.I never got this question but got manhole covers / public telephones in NYC as well as some others.
you are making it too complicated. I can only check in 2 bags at 50 lbs each, so 100 lbs divided by the weight of one golf ball will be your answer. You can go a step further and estimate how many golf balls you can fit in your carry on bag and have it still fit in the thingy that measures the size of the carry on luggage. So legally, without having to pay for oversized luggage, you can fit X amount of golf balls.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

google is your friend...Let’s assume that we will only fit balls into the main body of the aircraft. It would be possible to fill the gas tanks in the wings with golf balls, but we will just fill the cockpit, the main body and the tail section with golf balls.In a Boeing 777 you have 2 aisles with 3 seats between each aisle and window, and 4 seats between the aisles. A seat is roughly 50 centimeters wide and an aisle is roughly 50 centimeters wide as well. That makes for a total width of (12x50=600 centimeters) 6 meters.We assume that there are 300 seats on the aircraft, and every occupant is given 1.5 meters of space along the length of the aircraft (chair, including margin for reclining of chair and leg space). That gives us 30 rows (10 seats in each row) of seats each occupying 1.5 meters which gives a total length of 45 meters.There are 3 additional factors that need to be added to this to get the total length of the aircraft: emergency exits, tail section (storage of food etc.) and cockpit. If there are 2 sets of emergency exits (1 on each side) that will roughly add another 1 meter each, in total 2 meters. We are now up to a length of 47 meters. Let’s then assume that the cockpit requires another 3 meters (not including the nose of the aircraft that carries navigation and communications equipment). The tail needs to support the rear fins (2 horizontal and 1 vertical) and needs to be sturdy. Let’s assume it is 10 meters long. We now have a cigar shaped tube roughly 60 meters long and 6 meters in diameter. For simplicity’s sake, let’s also assume that the floor and the ceiling of the aircraft make this into a box rather than a tube (even though the ends are still tapered). The inner sides of the aircraft would still be curved but for simplicity’s sake we will ignore that. The height of the aircraft is assumed to be 2 meters. Our box is thus 2x60x6 with tapered ends.A ball is roughly 5 centimeters in diameter. We can therefore fit 120 balls in width, 40 balls in height and 1200 balls in length. This does not account for the space occupied by the seats (and other equipment). Let’s assume the seats cover 15 % of the total volume. This gives us 85% out of 120x40x1200=5 760 000 balls, which is 4 896 000 balls. Let’s say that the tapered ends can carry half the amount of balls per meter of length compared to the midsection. That means that we need to subtract half of the balls that fit into a 13 meter section (cockpit and tail end, 3+10 meters, assuming no chairs). That corresponds to 120 balls in width, 40 balls in height and 260 balls in length, all divided by 2. Mathematically written 0.5(120x40x260)=624 000.This gives us a total of 4 896 000-624 000 which is 4 272 000 golf balls.

Nice find. The weird thing is the blogger who wrote that is the same guy who's screening my answer for the position. Sounds like he got the job anyway, so it does give me a nice guide of what response they're looking for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One, cause after that the plane isn't empty.

I like that except for the question didn't specify an empty plane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems that everybody thinks this would be a dimension issue and fitting them in. I would first ask if the plane needs to take off. If so, it would be a weight issue. With a take-off weight at around 750,000 lbs. and a payload capacity of around 230,000 pounds. How much does a golf ball weigh? I bet you could fit them all in up to the max weight.

Shredhead beat me too it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what's the maximum take-off weight of a boeing 777, and how much of that is payload weight? that's probably less than the weight of the golf balls you could possibly fit in there, assuming you wanted it to be able to take off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same kinda crappy question but I was asked on the spot....actually interviewing for a low paying job with the Eagles marketing department I was asked how many piano tuners (as in the profession) there were in Philadelphia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shredhead beat me too it.

Not really, I was going for the regulation 2 bags of luggage plus carry on weight limit angle. you went with the total cargo load weight limit. Same principle, we just went 2 different ways with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same kinda crappy question but I was asked on the spot....actually interviewing for a low paying job with the Eagles marketing department I was asked how many piano tuners (as in the profession) there were in Philadelphia.

You can tune a piano but you can't tuna fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, are all of you going by cubic feet taking into account the airspace between the golf balls? Due to the spherical shape of the golf ball, you are going to have a lot of unoccupied space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, are all of you going by cubic feet taking into account the airspace between the golf balls? Due to the spherical shape of the golf ball, you are going to have a lot of unoccupied space.

plus there is packing inefficiency for randomly placed spheres.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, are all of you going by cubic feet taking into account the airspace between the golf balls? Due to the spherical shape of the golf ball, you are going to have a lot of unoccupied space.

plus there is packing inefficiency for randomly placed spheres.
Good point! Do you think the OP would get the job if he just answered "Lots"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, are all of you going by cubic feet taking into account the airspace between the golf balls? Due to the spherical shape of the golf ball, you are going to have a lot of unoccupied space.

plus there is packing inefficiency for randomly placed spheres.
Good point! Do you think the OP would get the job if he just answered "Lots"
i don't know what the heck he's consulting for. i was always under the impression that consultants were highly skilled, highly specialized individuals with large amounts of experience in what they consult for.obviously, they need someone with experience as a ball packer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

google is your friend...Let’s assume that we will only fit balls into the main body of the aircraft. It would be possible to fill the gas tanks in the wings with golf balls, but we will just fill the cockpit, the main body and the tail section with golf balls.In a Boeing 777 you have 2 aisles with 3 seats between each aisle and window, and 4 seats between the aisles. A seat is roughly 50 centimeters wide and an aisle is roughly 50 centimeters wide as well. That makes for a total width of (12x50=600 centimeters) 6 meters.We assume that there are 300 seats on the aircraft, and every occupant is given 1.5 meters of space along the length of the aircraft (chair, including margin for reclining of chair and leg space). That gives us 30 rows (10 seats in each row) of seats each occupying 1.5 meters which gives a total length of 45 meters.There are 3 additional factors that need to be added to this to get the total length of the aircraft: emergency exits, tail section (storage of food etc.) and cockpit. If there are 2 sets of emergency exits (1 on each side) that will roughly add another 1 meter each, in total 2 meters. We are now up to a length of 47 meters. Let’s then assume that the cockpit requires another 3 meters (not including the nose of the aircraft that carries navigation and communications equipment). The tail needs to support the rear fins (2 horizontal and 1 vertical) and needs to be sturdy. Let’s assume it is 10 meters long. We now have a cigar shaped tube roughly 60 meters long and 6 meters in diameter. For simplicity’s sake, let’s also assume that the floor and the ceiling of the aircraft make this into a box rather than a tube (even though the ends are still tapered). The inner sides of the aircraft would still be curved but for simplicity’s sake we will ignore that. The height of the aircraft is assumed to be 2 meters. Our box is thus 2x60x6 with tapered ends.A ball is roughly 5 centimeters in diameter. We can therefore fit 120 balls in width, 40 balls in height and 1200 balls in length. This does not account for the space occupied by the seats (and other equipment). Let’s assume the seats cover 15 % of the total volume. This gives us 85% out of 120x40x1200=5 760 000 balls, which is 4 896 000 balls. Let’s say that the tapered ends can carry half the amount of balls per meter of length compared to the midsection. That means that we need to subtract half of the balls that fit into a 13 meter section (cockpit and tail end, 3+10 meters, assuming no chairs). That corresponds to 120 balls in width, 40 balls in height and 260 balls in length, all divided by 2. Mathematically written 0.5(120x40x260)=624 000.This gives us a total of 4 896 000-624 000 which is 4 272 000 golf balls.

Nice find. The weird thing is the blogger who wrote that is the same guy who's screening my answer for the position. Sounds like he got the job anyway, so it does give me a nice guide of what response they're looking for.
wait, what?So he asked you a question in which he has already posted an answer on the internet? Are you applying for a job with the Special Olympics?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One, cause after that the plane isn't empty.

I like that except for the question didn't specify an empty plane.
Well then, how do I know I can fit any in at all?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what's the maximum take-off weight of a boeing 777, and how much of that is payload weight? that's probably less than the weight of the golf balls you could possibly fit in there, assuming you wanted it to be able to take off.

There's nothing in the question to warrant that assumption.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what's the maximum take-off weight of a boeing 777, and how much of that is payload weight? that's probably less than the weight of the golf balls you could possibly fit in there, assuming you wanted it to be able to take off.

There's nothing in the question to warrant that assumption.
sure there is. they called it a boeing 777, not a large asymmetric cylinder. that identifier has meaning, unless the person writing the question is an idiot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

google is your friend...Let’s assume that we will only fit balls into the main body of the aircraft. It would be possible to fill the gas tanks in the wings with golf balls, but we will just fill the cockpit, the main body and the tail section with golf balls.In a Boeing 777 you have 2 aisles with 3 seats between each aisle and window, and 4 seats between the aisles. A seat is roughly 50 centimeters wide and an aisle is roughly 50 centimeters wide as well. That makes for a total width of (12x50=600 centimeters) 6 meters.We assume that there are 300 seats on the aircraft, and every occupant is given 1.5 meters of space along the length of the aircraft (chair, including margin for reclining of chair and leg space). That gives us 30 rows (10 seats in each row) of seats each occupying 1.5 meters which gives a total length of 45 meters.There are 3 additional factors that need to be added to this to get the total length of the aircraft: emergency exits, tail section (storage of food etc.) and cockpit. If there are 2 sets of emergency exits (1 on each side) that will roughly add another 1 meter each, in total 2 meters. We are now up to a length of 47 meters. Let’s then assume that the cockpit requires another 3 meters (not including the nose of the aircraft that carries navigation and communications equipment). The tail needs to support the rear fins (2 horizontal and 1 vertical) and needs to be sturdy. Let’s assume it is 10 meters long. We now have a cigar shaped tube roughly 60 meters long and 6 meters in diameter. For simplicity’s sake, let’s also assume that the floor and the ceiling of the aircraft make this into a box rather than a tube (even though the ends are still tapered). The inner sides of the aircraft would still be curved but for simplicity’s sake we will ignore that. The height of the aircraft is assumed to be 2 meters. Our box is thus 2x60x6 with tapered ends.A ball is roughly 5 centimeters in diameter. We can therefore fit 120 balls in width, 40 balls in height and 1200 balls in length. This does not account for the space occupied by the seats (and other equipment). Let’s assume the seats cover 15 % of the total volume. This gives us 85% out of 120x40x1200=5 760 000 balls, which is 4 896 000 balls. Let’s say that the tapered ends can carry half the amount of balls per meter of length compared to the midsection. That means that we need to subtract half of the balls that fit into a 13 meter section (cockpit and tail end, 3+10 meters, assuming no chairs). That corresponds to 120 balls in width, 40 balls in height and 260 balls in length, all divided by 2. Mathematically written 0.5(120x40x260)=624 000.This gives us a total of 4 896 000-624 000 which is 4 272 000 golf balls.

Nice find. The weird thing is the blogger who wrote that is the same guy who's screening my answer for the position. Sounds like he got the job anyway, so it does give me a nice guide of what response they're looking for.
wait, what?So he asked you a question in which he has already posted an answer on the internet? Are you applying for a job with the Special Olympics?
That was my first thought.My second was to find another place to apply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, are all of you going by cubic feet taking into account the airspace between the golf balls? Due to the spherical shape of the golf ball, you are going to have a lot of unoccupied space.

a sphere of radius R occupies about 52.4% of the volume that a cube with L=W=H=2R does.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The screener already posted the answer Al Gore's playspace. I'm trying to figure what would actually being worse: Going in and just making crap up ("I triangulated the dimensions, and once you include the cosign of the tangent, you have room for 15,000 balls."), or giving him the EXACT SAME answer that he posted on the web. I think I'd go with the latter. But it would seriously be funny as hell to see how someone reacted.

"umm, where did you come up with that answer?"

-- I CALCULATED that shiit, homey!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How many golf balls can you fit into a Boeing 777?

How many do you have in your bag?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you got everyone to give an honest answer...take the average of all those answers. Collectively, this place, or any place for that matter, is very, very accurate. Wisdom of Crowds

That being said, I will guess 8 million. :thumbdown:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be the one :thumbdown: to defend this kind of question. I used to work in a group that did a lot of product forecasting and I was amazed at the number of people who lacked common sense who worked in the dept. Not that I would ask something so silly as golf balls in a Boeing 777, but when hiring, I would ask questions that would check if people could fathom the difference between a billion dollars and a million dollars with relevant real-world examples.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what's the maximum take-off weight of a boeing 777, and how much of that is payload weight? that's probably less than the weight of the golf balls you could possibly fit in there, assuming you wanted it to be able to take off.

There's nothing in the question to warrant that assumption.
sure there is. they called it a boeing 777, not a large asymmetric cylinder. that identifier has meaning, unless the person writing the question is an idiot.
Sure the identifier has meaning. It is a quick way of giving the dimensions of the asymmetrical cylinder. There's absolutely no takeoff requirement.

People reading too much into things has caused more problems in the history of our species than could ever be listed here. I wish people would stop doing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.