Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums
Twilight

*** Official Lost Season 6 ***

Recommended Posts

Were you upset in Star Wars when the rebels found the port on the plans for the Death Star that they could use to blow the whole thing up? Why didn't they reveal that earlier?

Why didn't the Death Star just warp to a point that had a direct shot at the rebel moon? :bag:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were you upset in Star Wars when the rebels found the port on the plans for the Death Star that they could use to blow the whole thing up? Why didn't they reveal that earlier?

Why didn't the Death Star just warp to a point that had a direct shot at the rebel moon? :lmao:
Why did the force allow Leia to kiss her brother like that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were you upset in Star Wars when the rebels found the port on the plans for the Death Star that they could use to blow the whole thing up? Why didn't they reveal that earlier?

Why didn't the Death Star just warp to a point that had a direct shot at the rebel moon? :shrug:
Gravity wells, son. Gravity wells. Edited by Iraqi Information Minister

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were you upset in Star Wars when the rebels found the port on the plans for the Death Star that they could use to blow the whole thing up? Why didn't they reveal that earlier?

Why didn't the Death Star just warp to a point that had a direct shot at the rebel moon? :shrug:
Why did the force allow Leia to kiss her brother like that?
That reminds me, did anyone see the article in Slate about the identical male twins in Europe who make pr0ns "together"? :X

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were you upset in Star Wars when the rebels found the port on the plans for the Death Star that they could use to blow the whole thing up? Why didn't they reveal that earlier?

Star Wars was a space opera, not strict sci-fi, so it was easy to suspend disbelief. Lost was sold as a show grounded in reality with the sci-fi bits they would explain. Edited by cstu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5 episodes ago they introduced an invisible lighthouse that nobody had seen up until that point

3 seasons ago they introduced an underground station with a giant f'n cable going from the jungle to the ocean that nobody had ever seen before

6 seasons ago they introduced a hatch buried in the ground that nobody had ever seen before...

The invisible lighthouse was just as dumb as the invisible cave. And it seems to have had no real purpose. And they just mentioned it in the middle of the final season. Not sure you're helping your case here.

The other stuff wasn't invisible, it was just difficult to locate. The hatch wasn't something "nobody had ever seen before." The Losties hadn't seen it because it was buried underground and they had only been on the island for like a month at that point, but the Dharma initiative had most surely seen it. Desmond was even living in there. It wasn't invisible. I'd have to go back and watch the stuff with the underwater hatch because I don't remember the details, but I think I'd have a similar response that I just had about the hatch.

In any case, introducing a new place in season one or season three isn't really problematic. It's introducing the most important place in the world after 95% of the show has finished that's the problem.

The Dharma people had been killed by the Others. However, the Others didn't know about the Hatch, or where is was - despite Dharma still making food drops somehow to Desmond.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were you upset in Star Wars when the rebels found the port on the plans for the Death Star that they could use to blow the whole thing up? Why didn't they reveal that earlier?

Why didn't the Death Star just warp to a point that had a direct shot at the rebel moon? :D
Why did the force allow Leia to kiss her brother like that?
That reminds me, did anyone see the article in Slate about the identical male twins in Europe who make pr0ns "together"? :lmao:
If this is your way of ensuring that no one ever uses Star Wars as a reference point for anything, well played.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fact that the alternate universe wasn't introduced until season 6.

OK, so something you saw in season 6 is your proof that tdoss was correct that the writers changed purgatory to real life in season 1/2 in response to the internet rumors? Seriously? Well, no worries, we won't ever agree on this. You think they were supposed to all be dead all along and I don't.
Damn dude...is this the way you've responded in these types of threads in the past? I've never paid much attention to who's posting what but you're tiptoeing the jerk line pretty strongly with this type of sarcastic response.We're just having a discussion about a show here...not critiquing your child's performance in the talent show.
Usually not, and sorry for hurting anyone's feelings. Also, relax, when I said no worries, I meant it. We don't have to agree and it really doesn't matter, no sarchasm at all. Although, this thread has been awful. Previous season's threads were more about discussing what happened, what might happen and things we all missed. This thread has been a big ##### fest and most people that enjoyed the show and enjoyed the previous threads have been annoyed (myself included) that mosts posts in it were #####ing and whining. And unfortunately, these same people didn't just say their peace and explain it, they kept posting and kept posting. I am all for constructive criticism which can actually be discussed, but at least back it up, don't just whine over and over and over again.I am just trying to get down to why you feel like the story changed early on. Shuke agreed with your post that the writers intended for it to all be purgatory and then changed that on the fly because of us. I just don't see it and see no evidence that they did change. I just wanted to know if there is anything concrete. Do you watch V? I do and it is pretty damn obvious when a show gets rewritten during the first season to save it. Shows doing well don't do that. Also, someone in here posted about how arrogant the show folks sounded in an interview before the finale. I would tend to agree that they probably think very highly of themselves and I don't think they would cave to internet rumors.
And I contend that they think so highly of themselves that they couldn't admit to telegraphing their punches early on so they switched gears...or donkey wheels...whathaveyou.
Contention is fine, but I was hoping for something tangible. If you want to have a hunch or a feeling that's your right, but I still think there is a lot more tangible evidence that the island was always real life and intended to be that from the beginning. I am still all ears to listen to your thoughts if you can point me to anything you think signals switching gears. I got shuke's thoughts, but as I said before, if a show switched gears you shouldn't first notice it in season 6.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were you upset in Star Wars when the rebels found the port on the plans for the Death Star that they could use to blow the whole thing up? Why didn't they reveal that earlier?

Why didn't the Death Star just warp to a point that had a direct shot at the rebel moon? :popcorn:
Why did the force allow Leia to kiss her brother like that?
That reminds me, did anyone see the article in Slate about the identical male twins in Europe who make pr0ns "together"? :X
If this is your way of ensuring that no one ever uses Star Wars as a reference point for anything, well played.
No, it was just kind of a throwaway thought. Maybe one of the more disturbing things I've ever heard about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW, it was a lot of fun folks. Can't believe I have been on this site for 6 years now and to be honest, most of it in here in these threads. I joined after lurking for a bit right after the pilot episode aired. I remember all of the great discussions, finding the easter eggs in the show and online. These threads were pretty damn entertaining, at least until this one, which wasn't all bad. Maybe someone will kickoff the official DVD release thread to discuss any new info they give us in there.

Hey 'bugs, been a big fan of you and HULK in these threads, solid work all six seasons :goodposting:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW, it was a lot of fun folks. Can't believe I have been on this site for 6 years now and to be honest, most of it in here in these threads. I joined after lurking for a bit right after the pilot episode aired. I remember all of the great discussions, finding the easter eggs in the show and online. These threads were pretty damn entertaining, at least until this one, which wasn't all bad. Maybe someone will kickoff the official DVD release thread to discuss any new info they give us in there.

Hey 'bugs, been a big fan of you and HULK in these threads, solid work all six seasons :lmao:
:P It has been fun. HULK was awesome. I usually didn't partake of some of his super huge spoilers, but loved his research. Even though FCL (can't recall his first Seinfeld alias) got testy sometimes, he had a lot of good posts. Too many people to mention, although I love packersfan as well. Not because we always seemed to agree, but because I still like his pic. Heck, in this season I am pretty sure I mentioned a couple times how much I missed Levin. Not knocking anyone, but I think it is a testament to the series winding down and the discussion level dying down when The Dude and Dentist quadrupled the number of posts from me (and I have posted a lot the last couple days) and HULK in a Lost thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A VERY good read here from someone who is supposedly a writer for Bad Robot. Don't know if that's true or not, but it was backed up later in this thread. Either way...

http://www.spoilertv.co.uk/forum/viewtopic...342&start=0

Good stuff on here! I can finally throw in my two cents! I've had to bite my tongue for far too long. Also, hopefully I can answer some of John's questions about Dharma and the "pointless breadcrumbs" that really, weren't so pointless ...

First ...

The Island:

It was real. Everything that happened on the island that we saw throughout the 6 seasons was real. Forget the final image of the plane crash, it was put in purposely to f*&k with people's heads and show how far the show had come. They really crashed. They really survived. They really discovered Dharma and the Others. The Island keeps the balance of good and evil in the world. It always has and always will perform that role. And the Island will always need a "Protector". Jacob wasn't the first, Hurley won't be the last. However, Jacob had to deal with a malevolent force (MIB) that his mother, nor Hurley had to deal with. He created the devil and had to find a way to kill him -- even though the rules prevented him from actually doing so.

Thus began Jacob's plan to bring candidates to the Island to do the one thing he couldn't do. Kill the MIB. He had a huge list of candidates that spanned generations. Yet everytime he brought people there, the MIB corrupted them and caused them to kill one another. That was until Richard came along and helped Jacob understand that if he didn't take a more active role, then his plan would never work.

Enter Dharma -- which I'm not sure why John is having such a hard time grasping. Dharma, like the countless scores of people that were brought to the island before, were brought there by Jacob as part of his plan to kill the MIB. However, the MIB was aware of this plan and interferred by "corrupting" Ben. Making Ben believe he was doing the work of Jacob when in reality he was doing the work of the MIB. This carried over into all of Ben's "off-island" activities. He was the leader. He spoke for Jacob as far as they were concerned. So the "Others" killed Dharma and later were actively trying to kill Jack, Kate, Sawyer, Hurley and all the candidates because that's what the MIB wanted. And what he couldn't do for himself.

Dharma was originally brought in to be good. But was turned bad by MIB's corruption and eventually destroyed by his pawn Ben. Now, was Dharma only brought there to help Jack and the other Canditates on their overall quest to kill Smokey? Or did Jacob have another list of Canidates from the Dharma group that we were never aware of? That's a question that is purposley not answered because whatever answer the writers came up with would be worse than the one you come up with for yourself. Still ... Dharma's purpose is not "pointless" or even vague. Hell, it's pretty blantent.

Still, despite his grand plan, Jacob wanted to give his "candidates" (our Lostaways) the one thing he, nor his brother, were ever afforded: free will. Hence him bringing a host of "candidates" through the decades and letting them "choose" which one would actually do the job in the end. Maybe he knew Jack would be the one to kill Flocke and that Hurley would be the protector in the end. Maybe he didn't. But that was always the key question of the show: Fate vs Free-will. Science vs Faith. Personally I think Jacob knew from the beginning what was going to happen and that everyone played a part over 6 seasons in helping Jack get to the point where he needed to be to kill Smokey and make Hurley the protector -- I know that's how a lot of the writers viewed it. But again, they won't answer that (nor should they) because that ruins the fun.

In the end, Jack got to do what he always wanted to do from the very first episode of the show: Save his fellow Lostaways. He got Kate and Sawyer off the island and he gave Hurley the purpose in life he'd always been missing. And, in Sideways world (which we'll get to next) he in fact saved everyone by helping them all move on ...

Now...

Sideways World:

Sideways world is where it gets really cool in terms of theology and metaphysical discussion (for me at least -- because I love history/religion theories and loved all the talks in the writer's room about it). Basically what the show is proposing is that we're all linked to certain people during our lives. Call them soulmates (though it's not exactly the best word). But these people we're linked to are with us duing "the most important moments of our lives" as Christian said. These are the people we move through the universe with from lifetime to lifetime. It's loosely based in Hinduisim with large doses of western religion thrown into the mix.

The conceit that the writers created, basing it off these religious philosophies, was that as a group, the Lostaways subconsciously created this "sideways" world where they exist in purgatory until they are "awakened" and find one another. Once they all find one another, they can then move on and move forward. In essence, this is the show's concept of the afterlife. According to the show, everyone creates their own "Sideways" purgatory with their "soulmates" throughout their lives and exist there until they all move on together. That's a beautiful notion. Even if you aren't religious or even spirtual, the idea that we live AND die together is deeply profound and moving.

It's a really cool and spirtual concept that fits the whole tone and subtext the show has had from the beginning. These people were SUPPOSED to be together on that plane. They were supposed to live through these events -- not JUST because of Jacob. But because that's what the universe or God (depending on how religious you wish to get) wanted to happen. The show was always about science vs faith -- and it ultimately came down on the side of faith. It answered THE core question of the series. The one question that has been at the root of every island mystery, every character backstory, every plot twist. That, by itself, is quite an accomplishment.

How much you want to extrapolate from that is up to you as the viewer. Think about season 1 when we first found the Hatch. Everyone thought that's THE answer! Whatever is down there is the answer! Then, as we discovered it was just one station of many. One link in a very long chain that kept revealing more, and more of a larger mosiac.

But the writer's took it even further this season by contrasting this Sideways "purgatory" with the Island itself. Remember when Michael appeared to Hurley, he said he was not allowed to leave the Island. Just like the MIB. He wasn't allowed into this sideways world and thus, was not afforded the opportunity to move on. Why? Because he had proven himself to be unworthy with his actions on the Island. He failed the test. The others, passed. They made it into Sideways world when they died -- some before Jack, some years later. In Hurley's case, maybe centuries later. They exist in this sideways world until they are "awakened" and they can only move on TOGETHER because they are linked. They are destined to be together for eternity. That was their destiny.

They were NOT linked to Anna Lucia, Daniel, Roussou, Alex, Miles, Lupidis, (and all the rest who weren't in the chuch -- basically everyone who wasn't in season 1). Yet those people exist in Sideways world. Why? Well again, here's where they leave it up to you to decide. The way I like to think about it, is that those people who were left behind in Sideways world have to find their own soulmates before they can wake up. It's possible that those links aren't people from the island but from their other life (Anna's parnter, the guy she shot --- Roussou's husband, etc etc).

A lot of people have been talking about Ben and why he didn't go into the Church. And if you think of Sideways world in this way, then it gives you the answer to that very question. Ben can't move on yet because he hasn't connected with the people he needs to. It's going to be his job to awaken Roussou, Alex, Anna Lucia (maybe), Ethan, Goodspeed, his father and the rest. He has to attone for his sins more than he did by being Hurley's number two. He has to do what Hurley and Desmond did for our Lostaways with his own people. He has to help them connect. And he can only move on when all the links in his chain are ready to. Same can be said for Faraday, Charlotte, Whidmore, Hawkins etc. It's really a neat, and cool concept. At least to me.

But, from a more "behind the scenes" note: the reason Ben's not in the church, and the reason no one is in the church but for Season 1 people is because they wrote the ending to the show after writing the pilot. And never changed it. The writers always said (and many didn't believe them) that they knew their ending from the very first episode. I applaud them for that. It's pretty fantastic. Originally Ben was supposed to have a 3 episode arc and be done. But he became a big part of the show. They could have easily changed their ending and put him in the church -- but instead they problem solved it. Gave him a BRILLIANT moment with Locke outside the church ... and then that was it. I loved that. For those that wonder -- the original ending started the moment Jack walked into the church and touches the casket to Jack closing his eyes as the other plane flies away. That was always JJ's ending. And they kept it.

For me the ending of this show means a lot. Not only because I worked on it, but because as a writer it inspired me in a way the medium had never done before. I've been inspired to write by great films. Maybe too many to count. And there have been amazing TV shows that I've loved (X-Files, 24, Sopranos, countless 1/2 hour shows). But none did what LOST did for me. None showed me that you could take huge risks (writing a show about faith for network TV) and stick to your creative guns and STILL please the audience. I learned a lot from the show as a writer. I learned even more from being around the incredible writers, producers, PAs, interns and everyone else who slaved on the show for 6 years.

In the end, for me, LOST was a touchstone show that dealt with faith, the afterlife, and all these big, spirtual questions that most shows don't touch. And to me, they never once waivered from their core story -- even with all the sci-fi elements they mixed in. To walk that long and daunting of a creative tightrope and survive is simply astounding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A VERY good read here from someone who is supposedly a writer for Bad Robot. Don't know if that's true or not, but it was backed up later in this thread. Either way...

http://www.spoilertv.co.uk/forum/viewtopic...342&start=0

Good stuff on here! I can finally throw in my two cents! I've had to bite my tongue for far too long. Also, hopefully I can answer some of John's questions about Dharma and the "pointless breadcrumbs" that really, weren't so pointless ...

First ...

The Island:

It was real. Everything that happened on the island that we saw throughout the 6 seasons was real. Forget the final image of the plane crash, it was put in purposely to f*&k with people's heads and show how far the show had come. They really crashed. They really survived. They really discovered Dharma and the Others. The Island keeps the balance of good and evil in the world. It always has and always will perform that role. And the Island will always need a "Protector". Jacob wasn't the first, Hurley won't be the last. However, Jacob had to deal with a malevolent force (MIB) that his mother, nor Hurley had to deal with. He created the devil and had to find a way to kill him -- even though the rules prevented him from actually doing so.

Thus began Jacob's plan to bring candidates to the Island to do the one thing he couldn't do. Kill the MIB. He had a huge list of candidates that spanned generations. Yet everytime he brought people there, the MIB corrupted them and caused them to kill one another. That was until Richard came along and helped Jacob understand that if he didn't take a more active role, then his plan would never work.

Enter Dharma -- which I'm not sure why John is having such a hard time grasping. Dharma, like the countless scores of people that were brought to the island before, were brought there by Jacob as part of his plan to kill the MIB. However, the MIB was aware of this plan and interferred by "corrupting" Ben. Making Ben believe he was doing the work of Jacob when in reality he was doing the work of the MIB. This carried over into all of Ben's "off-island" activities. He was the leader. He spoke for Jacob as far as they were concerned. So the "Others" killed Dharma and later were actively trying to kill Jack, Kate, Sawyer, Hurley and all the candidates because that's what the MIB wanted. And what he couldn't do for himself.

Dharma was originally brought in to be good. But was turned bad by MIB's corruption and eventually destroyed by his pawn Ben. Now, was Dharma only brought there to help Jack and the other Canditates on their overall quest to kill Smokey? Or did Jacob have another list of Canidates from the Dharma group that we were never aware of? That's a question that is purposley not answered because whatever answer the writers came up with would be worse than the one you come up with for yourself. Still ... Dharma's purpose is not "pointless" or even vague. Hell, it's pretty blantent.

Still, despite his grand plan, Jacob wanted to give his "candidates" (our Lostaways) the one thing he, nor his brother, were ever afforded: free will. Hence him bringing a host of "candidates" through the decades and letting them "choose" which one would actually do the job in the end. Maybe he knew Jack would be the one to kill Flocke and that Hurley would be the protector in the end. Maybe he didn't. But that was always the key question of the show: Fate vs Free-will. Science vs Faith. Personally I think Jacob knew from the beginning what was going to happen and that everyone played a part over 6 seasons in helping Jack get to the point where he needed to be to kill Smokey and make Hurley the protector -- I know that's how a lot of the writers viewed it. But again, they won't answer that (nor should they) because that ruins the fun.

In the end, Jack got to do what he always wanted to do from the very first episode of the show: Save his fellow Lostaways. He got Kate and Sawyer off the island and he gave Hurley the purpose in life he'd always been missing. And, in Sideways world (which we'll get to next) he in fact saved everyone by helping them all move on ...

Now...

Sideways World:

Sideways world is where it gets really cool in terms of theology and metaphysical discussion (for me at least -- because I love history/religion theories and loved all the talks in the writer's room about it). Basically what the show is proposing is that we're all linked to certain people during our lives. Call them soulmates (though it's not exactly the best word). But these people we're linked to are with us duing "the most important moments of our lives" as Christian said. These are the people we move through the universe with from lifetime to lifetime. It's loosely based in Hinduisim with large doses of western religion thrown into the mix.

The conceit that the writers created, basing it off these religious philosophies, was that as a group, the Lostaways subconsciously created this "sideways" world where they exist in purgatory until they are "awakened" and find one another. Once they all find one another, they can then move on and move forward. In essence, this is the show's concept of the afterlife. According to the show, everyone creates their own "Sideways" purgatory with their "soulmates" throughout their lives and exist there until they all move on together. That's a beautiful notion. Even if you aren't religious or even spirtual, the idea that we live AND die together is deeply profound and moving.

It's a really cool and spirtual concept that fits the whole tone and subtext the show has had from the beginning. These people were SUPPOSED to be together on that plane. They were supposed to live through these events -- not JUST because of Jacob. But because that's what the universe or God (depending on how religious you wish to get) wanted to happen. The show was always about science vs faith -- and it ultimately came down on the side of faith. It answered THE core question of the series. The one question that has been at the root of every island mystery, every character backstory, every plot twist. That, by itself, is quite an accomplishment.

How much you want to extrapolate from that is up to you as the viewer. Think about season 1 when we first found the Hatch. Everyone thought that's THE answer! Whatever is down there is the answer! Then, as we discovered it was just one station of many. One link in a very long chain that kept revealing more, and more of a larger mosiac.

But the writer's took it even further this season by contrasting this Sideways "purgatory" with the Island itself. Remember when Michael appeared to Hurley, he said he was not allowed to leave the Island. Just like the MIB. He wasn't allowed into this sideways world and thus, was not afforded the opportunity to move on. Why? Because he had proven himself to be unworthy with his actions on the Island. He failed the test. The others, passed. They made it into Sideways world when they died -- some before Jack, some years later. In Hurley's case, maybe centuries later. They exist in this sideways world until they are "awakened" and they can only move on TOGETHER because they are linked. They are destined to be together for eternity. That was their destiny.

They were NOT linked to Anna Lucia, Daniel, Roussou, Alex, Miles, Lupidis, (and all the rest who weren't in the chuch -- basically everyone who wasn't in season 1). Yet those people exist in Sideways world. Why? Well again, here's where they leave it up to you to decide. The way I like to think about it, is that those people who were left behind in Sideways world have to find their own soulmates before they can wake up. It's possible that those links aren't people from the island but from their other life (Anna's parnter, the guy she shot --- Roussou's husband, etc etc).

A lot of people have been talking about Ben and why he didn't go into the Church. And if you think of Sideways world in this way, then it gives you the answer to that very question. Ben can't move on yet because he hasn't connected with the people he needs to. It's going to be his job to awaken Roussou, Alex, Anna Lucia (maybe), Ethan, Goodspeed, his father and the rest. He has to attone for his sins more than he did by being Hurley's number two. He has to do what Hurley and Desmond did for our Lostaways with his own people. He has to help them connect. And he can only move on when all the links in his chain are ready to. Same can be said for Faraday, Charlotte, Whidmore, Hawkins etc. It's really a neat, and cool concept. At least to me.

But, from a more "behind the scenes" note: the reason Ben's not in the church, and the reason no one is in the church but for Season 1 people is because they wrote the ending to the show after writing the pilot. And never changed it. The writers always said (and many didn't believe them) that they knew their ending from the very first episode. I applaud them for that. It's pretty fantastic. Originally Ben was supposed to have a 3 episode arc and be done. But he became a big part of the show. They could have easily changed their ending and put him in the church -- but instead they problem solved it. Gave him a BRILLIANT moment with Locke outside the church ... and then that was it. I loved that. For those that wonder -- the original ending started the moment Jack walked into the church and touches the casket to Jack closing his eyes as the other plane flies away. That was always JJ's ending. And they kept it.

For me the ending of this show means a lot. Not only because I worked on it, but because as a writer it inspired me in a way the medium had never done before. I've been inspired to write by great films. Maybe too many to count. And there have been amazing TV shows that I've loved (X-Files, 24, Sopranos, countless 1/2 hour shows). But none did what LOST did for me. None showed me that you could take huge risks (writing a show about faith for network TV) and stick to your creative guns and STILL please the audience. I learned a lot from the show as a writer. I learned even more from being around the incredible writers, producers, PAs, interns and everyone else who slaved on the show for 6 years.

In the end, for me, LOST was a touchstone show that dealt with faith, the afterlife, and all these big, spirtual questions that most shows don't touch. And to me, they never once waivered from their core story -- even with all the sci-fi elements they mixed in. To walk that long and daunting of a creative tightrope and survive is simply astounding.

ABC issued a press release stating that they inserted the images of the plane without consulting with the creators of the show as a "cushion" to the late news. The last image of the show was supposed to be Jack closing his eye, thus esentially making the rest of what this guy wrote impossible to believe as originating from the Bad Robot production company.. Also, nobody, but season 1 people in the Church?? Desmond, Penny, Libby?? Edited by tikitime

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's the issue. Yes it's a TV show and they couldn't necessary plan out the entirety. But everytime they introduced a new mystery or question they should have had a pretty good idea of how they would resolve it and how it fit the overall story. They totally encouraged the fans to embrace and engage in puzzling out the mythology and then at the end said it wasn't the story they were interested in telling.

So its not about having everything planned out beforehand. It's about knowing the answers to all of the mysteries you introduce.

The writers seemed to have sat around like a couple of smoked out teenagers saying "Wouldn't it be cool if...." and that is Lost. "Wouldn't it be cool if there was a smoke monster." "...if there was a four toes statue" "...if there was time travel" They came up with these ideas, without any proper place for them in the mythology of the show. Then when they run out of time they either try to cram a square peg in a round hole and give us WEAK backstories, retcon, or leave it "something to debate" They are all cop outs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last image of the show was supposed to be Jack closing his eye, thus esentially making the rest of what this guy wrote impossible to believe as originating from the Bad Robot production company.

Keep reading - you are trying to point out a discrepancy that doesn't exist.

For those that wonder -- the original ending started the moment Jack walked into the church and touches the casket to Jack closing his eyes as the other plane flies away. That was always JJ's ending. And they kept it.

Regardless, it doesn't matter whether or not you believe that it's a dude from Bad Robot -- the content of his post is the important part. He nailed it.

Also, your question about characters from Season 1 was asked and answered in that thread.

Edited by tribecalledjeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were you upset in Star Wars when the rebels found the port on the plans for the Death Star that they could use to blow the whole thing up? Why didn't they reveal that earlier?

Star Wars was a space opera, not strict sci-fi, so it was easy to suspend disbelief. Lost was sold as a show grounded in reality with the sci-fi bits they would explain.
When was it sold as being "grounded in reality"?Did you miss the first 5 minutes when a bunch of people survived a plane crash?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were you upset in Star Wars when the rebels found the port on the plans for the Death Star that they could use to blow the whole thing up? Why didn't they reveal that earlier?

Star Wars was a space opera, not strict sci-fi, so it was easy to suspend disbelief. Lost was sold as a show grounded in reality with the sci-fi bits they would explain.
When was it sold as being "grounded in reality"?Did you miss the first 5 minutes when a bunch of people survived a plane crash?
Actually, I do think that the creators said early on that everything that was happening on the island could be explained scientifically. That, of course, went out the window at some point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last image of the show was supposed to be Jack closing his eye, thus esentially making the rest of what this guy wrote impossible to believe as originating from the Bad Robot production company.

Keep reading - you are trying to point out a discrepancy that doesn't exist.

For those that wonder -- the original ending started the moment Jack walked into the church and touches the casket to Jack closing his eyes as the other plane flies away. That was always JJ's ending. And they kept it.

Regardless, it doesn't matter whether or not you believe that it's a dude from Bad Robot -- the content of his post is the important part. He nailed it.

Also, your question about characters from Season 1 was asked and answered in that thread.

I think his status as a "Bad Robot" employee is extremely relevant, no? The post is being written as someone who allegedly had inside knowledge, when it is clear that the author of this post did not.

I'm not saying it doesn't have good or interesting ideas, but lots of people here do, and by posing as a Bad Robot employee, he is writing as if he "knows" things regarding motivation, when in relaity it appears that he is merely speculating like the rest of us.

And how did he address my Season 1 question in "that" thread?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am now rewatching the first 5 seasons on Netflix instantly on my PS3. I am so happy to be able to do that and start watching some of things you are all discussing and see if I can figure anything out for things I barely remember cuz I never took notes or participated in very few Lost discussions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am now rewatching the first 5 seasons on Netflix instantly on my PS3. I am so happy to be able to do that and start watching some of things you are all discussing and see if I can figure anything out for things I barely remember cuz I never took notes or participated in very few Lost discussions.

People took notes during this show? :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finale is on right now with enhanced popups. I'm watchin the Blackhawks. Somebody please watch it, and let us know if the popups say anything important.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For both of you, I gave just a couple notes that seem to backup that the ending/end game was planned out at the beginning.

How do you explain the fact that there was never a mention of a magic cave filled with light until, like, a few weeks ago? Even though it was apparently the most important feature of the island by far.
Ummmmm, because they didn't want to give away the ending? Just a hunch.
How would it have given away the ending for us to know there was a super-secret cave with a giant penis in it that had to be inserted into the rock vajayjay to keep the light shining?
I'm sure they didn't want to give away the ending, but the glowy cave was located near the bamboo field where Jack was flung, and where he eventually died. We know that's close to the site of the beach. It's likely that they would have come across it at some point, but they made no mention of it.Why not? Because it was more important to have a sloppy plot hole and have the glowy cave and the bamboo field be near each other (where Jack woke up and died) than to have Jack die somewhere else, in a more remote location of the island where the glowy cave was less likely to be found.Some people would rather have the logical fallacy and the closed narrative loop of Jack waking up and dying in the same place, others wouldn't.
This was a show about relationships. You totally missed the boat on it. :shrug:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I've ever described the writing as "lazy." In fact, I think the opposite. Lost was possibly the most ambitious writing attempt in television history. The idea of writing a series spanning over 100 hours in which there's just one long story, rather than individual episodes or short plot arcs was really bold. The number of characters and the complexity of the whole thing is really impressive. I wish more television shows would try to do groundbreaking stuff like this. I just think that the show ultimately failed to deliver on its promise.

That wasn't directed at you, FWIW. What promise do you feel the show failed to deliver on?
Creating a single coherent supermovie.
So, opening the "supermovie" with the main character's eye opening in a bamboo field after miraculously surviving a plane crash, on an island that is basically magical, his long journey from a man of science to a man of faith and his ultimate sacrifice so the island and his friends stays safe, and his eye closing as he dies in the same field he woke up in isn't a "single coherent supermovie?"The other characters the main character lived with and interacted with were also on a journey of self-discovery and they needed each other to come to this self-realization. The introduction of sub-plots, hatches, additional characters, etc. were all there to push these characters in one direction or another and to help them find their way.This is what the show's main themes were since the pilot episodes. So many other mysteries, characters and plots were introduced over the course of 6 seasons that many people lost track of the main theme and focused on the finer details, and I'm not saying that's right or wrong or good or bad. That's just what happened, but whether a magic light cave was introduced in the last episode or the first doesn't matter as the key themes and redemptive story arcs continued through the show until its conclusion.We can quibble about when things should have been shown or what should or shouldn't have been answered, but at the end of the day, Lost generally stayed true to its fundamental nature from Season 1 until the finale.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can someone explain to me the tie-in between the bomb going off and the sideways purgatory? I don't know if anyone's addressed that yet, but it seems like a cheap and misleading plot device. Am I wrong?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, opening the "supermovie" with the main character's eye opening in a bamboo field after miraculously surviving a plane crash, on an island that is basically magical, his long journey from a man of science to a man of faith and his ultimate sacrifice so the island and his friends stays safe, and his eye closing as he dies in the same field he woke up in isn't a "single coherent supermovie?"

What was the meaning of Jack's tattoo?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've thought about the ending now for a week, talked about it with some Lost fans, some who liked it, some who didn't.

I talked to more people that didn't like it than did.

I concluded it was crap.

A friend is going to get the season 6 dvd's and let me know if anything good is on the extras to answer the nerd questions. I might consider elevating the rating of the finale if they go through and take care of the questions from the collegehumor.com video.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can someone explain to me the tie-in between the bomb going off and the sideways purgatory? I don't know if anyone's addressed that yet, but it seems like a cheap and misleading plot device. Am I wrong?

Misleading, yes. Cheap, no. It's intended to make you think that there was an alternative timeline created when the bomb went off so that you don't diagnose that it's actually a purgatory that you're seeing.

So, opening the "supermovie" with the main character's eye opening in a bamboo field after miraculously surviving a plane crash, on an island that is basically magical, his long journey from a man of science to a man of faith and his ultimate sacrifice so the island and his friends stays safe, and his eye closing as he dies in the same field he woke up in isn't a "single coherent supermovie?"

What was the meaning of Jack's tattoo?

Apparently none as they're actually Matthew Fox's real tattoos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, opening the "supermovie" with the main character's eye opening in a bamboo field after miraculously surviving a plane crash, on an island that is basically magical, his long journey from a man of science to a man of faith and his ultimate sacrifice so the island and his friends stays safe, and his eye closing as he dies in the same field he woke up in isn't a "single coherent supermovie?"

What was the meaning of Jack's tattoo?

Read on in my post.

"So many other mysteries, characters and plots were introduced over the course of 6 seasons that many people lost track of the main theme and focused on the finer details, and I'm not saying that's right or wrong or good or bad."

The meaning the show gave us for Jack's tattoo was "He walks among us, but is not one of us." And you're free to interpret it anyway you like. Or you can just disregard it because it doesn't really matter to the "big picture" storyline as the key themes and redemptive story arcs continued through the show until its conclusion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've thought about the ending now for a week, talked about it with some Lost fans, some who liked it, some who didn't.

I talked to more people that didn't like it than did.

I concluded it was crap.

A friend is going to get the season 6 dvd's and let me know if anything good is on the extras to answer the nerd questions. I might consider elevating the rating of the finale if they go through and take care of the questions from the collegehumor.com video.

I'm pretty sure you reached this conclusion long before the finale even aired and nothing short of a collegehumor-like answer video would have made you happy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've thought about the ending now for a week, talked about it with some Lost fans, some who liked it, some who didn't.

I talked to more people that didn't like it than did.

I concluded it was crap.

A friend is going to get the season 6 dvd's and let me know if anything good is on the extras to answer the nerd questions. I might consider elevating the rating of the finale if they go through and take care of the questions from the collegehumor.com video.

I'm pretty sure you reached this conclusion long before the finale even aired and nothing short of a collegehumor-like answer video would have made you happy.
This, although if Bernard sat down for two and a half hours while doing a root canal, and explained a list of "unanswered" questions one by one, that might have made him happy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've thought about the ending now for a week, talked about it with some Lost fans, some who liked it, some who didn't.

I talked to more people that didn't like it than did.

I concluded it was crap.

A friend is going to get the season 6 dvd's and let me know if anything good is on the extras to answer the nerd questions. I might consider elevating the rating of the finale if they go through and take care of the questions from the collegehumor.com video.

I'm pretty sure you reached this conclusion long before the finale even aired and nothing short of a collegehumor-like answer video would have made you happy.
This, although if Bernard sat down for two and a half hours while doing a root canal, and explained a list of "unanswered" questions one by one, that might have made him happy.

This would rule.

The dental scene was probably the highlight of season 6.

I'm going to be writing some fan fiction soon on the back story of Bernard, his dental school years, his early practice struggles, all the assistants he steamed through when he was a swingin' bachelor, the riveting crown he did for Jacob in the 80's, and the day he decided to go black...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A response to the college humor video: http://armchairmogul.wordpress.com/2010/05...ually-answered/

This thread reminds me of being in an English Lit class. The teacher assigns a book to read, and gives a test the next day. The test includes questions like "What do you think that the author meant by...", "Why did the author introduce X...", and "What do you think this character was trying to do when..." You know, questions that you actually have to use your brain for. About 10 seconds after passing it out, half of the class raises their hands and says "Wait! This wasn't in the book!" Of course it wasn't. The teacher is asking to interpret and analyze what you read.

There's reading the book, and then there's thinking about the book. I feel like all the people whining about not getting answers are simply "reading the book" and aren't thinking about the show enough. I don't think that it's the writer's job to come out and slap you in the face with the explanation of exactly what happened, Oceans 11 style. I appreciate having to think about it, it leaves room to understand things on a deeper level and leaves room for multiple interpretations.

Edited by tribecalledjeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can someone explain to me the tie-in between the bomb going off and the sideways purgatory? I don't know if anyone's addressed that yet, but it seems like a cheap and misleading plot device. Am I wrong?

This was the best I came up with, from a post earlier in the thread:The last scene in Season 5 was Juliet detonating Jughead. When Season 6 opens we almost immediately see the island underwater. The logical conclusion, and I think the path the writers wanted us to go down, was that the detonation led to the sinking of the island. This set us up to believe throughout Season 6 that the Sideways World was an actual bone and marrow place, and kept us wondering all along how the two "realities" would eventually be reconciled. So we go through Season 6 with the false assumption that the Sideways World is a real place, and not what, in my interpretation, it turned out to be ... a sort of afterlife "waiting room" where people can gather with those who meant the most to them in life for a journey into whatever afterlife awaits. What we come to find out is that the Sideways World isn't "real." There is no island in that world, and the writers chose to use a visual of the island underwater to represent that idea. We just didn't know it until the very end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've thought about the ending now for a week, talked about it with some Lost fans, some who liked it, some who didn't.

I talked to more people that didn't like it than did.

I concluded it was crap.

A friend is going to get the season 6 dvd's and let me know if anything good is on the extras to answer the nerd questions. I might consider elevating the rating of the finale if they go through and take care of the questions from the collegehumor.com video.

I'm pretty sure you reached this conclusion long before the finale even aired and nothing short of a collegehumor-like answer video would have made you happy.
This, although if Bernard sat down for two and a half hours while doing a root canal, and explained a list of "unanswered" questions one by one, that might have made him happy.

This would rule.

The dental scene was probably the highlight of season 6.

I'm going to be writing some fan fiction soon on the back story of Bernard, his dental school years, his early practice struggles, all the assistants he steamed through when he was a swingin' bachelor, the riveting crown he did for Jacob in the 80's, and the day he decided to go black...

:bag::lmao::lmao:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can someone explain to me the tie-in between the bomb going off and the sideways purgatory? I don't know if anyone's addressed that yet, but it seems like a cheap and misleading plot device. Am I wrong?

This was the best I came up with, from a post earlier in the thread:The last scene in Season 5 was Juliet detonating Jughead. When Season 6 opens we almost immediately see the island underwater. The logical conclusion, and I think the path the writers wanted us to go down, was that the detonation led to the sinking of the island. This set us up to believe throughout Season 6 that the Sideways World was an actual bone and marrow place, and kept us wondering all along how the two "realities" would eventually be reconciled. So we go through Season 6 with the false assumption that the Sideways World is a real place, and not what, in my interpretation, it turned out to be ... a sort of afterlife "waiting room" where people can gather with those who meant the most to them in life for a journey into whatever afterlife awaits. What we come to find out is that the Sideways World isn't "real." There is no island in that world, and the writers chose to use a visual of the island underwater to represent that idea. We just didn't know it until the very end.
Yeah, that's pretty much what I came up with. Pretty ####ty story-telling, IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can someone explain to me the tie-in between the bomb going off and the sideways purgatory? I don't know if anyone's addressed that yet, but it seems like a cheap and misleading plot device. Am I wrong?

This was the best I came up with, from a post earlier in the thread:

The last scene in Season 5 was Juliet detonating Jughead. When Season 6 opens we almost immediately see the island underwater. The logical conclusion, and I think the path the writers wanted us to go down, was that the detonation led to the sinking of the island. This set us up to believe throughout Season 6 that the Sideways World was an actual bone and marrow place, and kept us wondering all along how the two "realities" would eventually be reconciled. So we go through Season 6 with the false assumption that the Sideways World is a real place, and not what, in my interpretation, it turned out to be ... a sort of afterlife "waiting room" where people can gather with those who meant the most to them in life for a journey into whatever afterlife awaits. What we come to find out is that the Sideways World isn't "real." There is no island in that world, and the writers chose to use a visual of the island underwater to represent that idea. We just didn't know it until the very end.

Yeah, that's pretty much what I came up with. Pretty ####ty story-telling, IMO.
Seriously? You're angry because the climax of the story didn't occur at the beginning of the season?

I mean really - were you upset that they didn't tell you Bruce Willis' character was dead at the beginning of The Sixth Sense? Should Verbal Kint have told Detective Kujan that he was really Keyser Soze when he first started talking?

Oh, oh! I know! Have a pop up bubble during the first fight in Fight Club telling you that Durden isn't real.

Honestly. Some people's kids...

Edited by Iraqi Information Minister

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can someone explain to me the tie-in between the bomb going off and the sideways purgatory? I don't know if anyone's addressed that yet, but it seems like a cheap and misleading plot device. Am I wrong?

This was the best I came up with, from a post earlier in the thread:

The last scene in Season 5 was Juliet detonating Jughead. When Season 6 opens we almost immediately see the island underwater. The logical conclusion, and I think the path the writers wanted us to go down, was that the detonation led to the sinking of the island. This set us up to believe throughout Season 6 that the Sideways World was an actual bone and marrow place, and kept us wondering all along how the two "realities" would eventually be reconciled. So we go through Season 6 with the false assumption that the Sideways World is a real place, and not what, in my interpretation, it turned out to be ... a sort of afterlife "waiting room" where people can gather with those who meant the most to them in life for a journey into whatever afterlife awaits. What we come to find out is that the Sideways World isn't "real." There is no island in that world, and the writers chose to use a visual of the island underwater to represent that idea. We just didn't know it until the very end.

Yeah, that's pretty much what I came up with. Pretty ####ty story-telling, IMO.
Seriously? You're angry because the climax of the story didn't occur at the beginning of the season?

I mean really - were you upset that they didn't tell you Bruce Willis' character was dead at the beginning of The Sixth Sense? Should Verbal Kint have told Detective Kujan that he was really Keyser Soze when he first started talking?

Oh, oh! I know! Have a pop up bubble during the first fight in Fight Club telling you that Durden isn't real.

Honestly. Some people's kids...

If they had just started showing the flash-sideways alongside the normal timeline, that would've been fine. But deliberately making Purgatory World appearing to be a result of the bomb is weak IMO. Big difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A response to the college humor video: http://armchairmogul.wordpress.com/2010/05...ually-answered/

This thread reminds me of being in an English Lit class. The teacher assigns a book to read, and gives a test the next day. The test includes questions like "What do you think that the author meant by...", "Why did the author introduce X...", and "What do you think this character was trying to do when..." You know, questions that you actually have to use your brain for. About 10 seconds after passing it out, half of the class raises their hands and says "Wait! This wasn't in the book!" Of course it wasn't. The teacher is asking to interpret and analyze what you read.

There's reading the book, and then there's thinking about the book. I feel like all the people whining about not getting answers are simply "reading the book" and aren't thinking about the show enough. I don't think that it's the writer's job to come out and slap you in the face with the explanation of exactly what happened, Oceans 11 style. I appreciate having to think about it, it leaves room to understand things on a deeper level and leaves room for multiple interpretations.

Gets it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re-watched the finale last night, but it was the "enhanced" version that aired on Saturday night. Nothing really earth-shattering, but I did learn that Eloise Hawking was once the leader of the Others. I didn't recall that being plainly stated before.

I think the pop-ups also may settle a debate among those who question whether Jughead went off or not. At least twice during the episode Juliet's detonation of Jughead was mentioned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lost Revised - without the Alt/Purgatory.

About this project

A lot of people invested a lot of time and energy in following Lost over the years. I was one of those people. A lot of people were satisfied with the way the series ended. I was not one of those people.

At first, the introduction of the “sideways” world in Season 6 was extremely intriguing. It presented an alternate reality, presumably the result of the atomic-bomb blast at the end of Season 5, in which the characters had seemingly never crashed on the island.

It opened up a lot of possibilities as to where the show was going and where it would end up, and given the history of Lost, we were led to expect that the ultimate connection and reveal would be as original, creative, and satisfying as the rest of the series.

As it turned out, it was none of those things. The entire conceit of the sideways world was to bring all of our heroes together again in the afterlife - one of the most cliched storytelling devices there is. Sure, there was a spin on it, but the whole idea that “there is no now” in the afterlife came across more as a cheat than a genuinely interesting twist.

For one thing, it enabled the creators to conveniently bring all the characters together again at the end of the show, even though not all of them had died by the end of the series. Of course, if they had only featured the already-dead castaways in the sideways world, people would have figured out what it was straight off the bat.

The ultimate reveal bothered me for a lot of reasons, the previously noted “there is no now” concept and general cliche of it among them. But more than that, I felt like the whole creation of the sideways reality cheapened the weight of the characters’ actual deaths (after all, it’s not so bad if they get to reunite happily in the afterlife, right?). More than that, it also cheapened the remainder of the survivors’ lives.

Claire, Kate, Sawyer, Hurley, Desmond, Ben, and others survived the final result of the battle for the island, and all had a good part of their lives left to live. Really, we should have been left wondering what would happen to them next. Instead, we skip ahead to the afterlife, where they’re all already dead. That jump, to me at least, took away from any real anticipation about where these characters are going next.

Ultimately, the sideways world was a gimmick. It was a way to give a happy ending to characters who didn’t actually get a happy ending. It was a way to give an emotional sendoff to the series by tugging at our heartstrings, rather than addressing the numerous hanging threads left over by the plot.

At this point, I’m content to let those threads hang. However, I sincerely believe the show would have been better off without ever introducing the sideways world/afterlife in the first place, and the point of this experiment is to prove that. Or at least try to.

What I’m doing here is simple. I’m re-editing Season 6 of Lost to remove the existence of the sideways world.

If you were a fan of the ultimate resolution of the show, then this experiment isn’t for you. If however, like me, you felt betrayed by the schmaltzy wrap-up and reveal, perhaps this will provide the resolution you need.

I firmly believe this edit will be an improvement over the original, and will be much more satisfying to fans who stuck with the core mythology of the show. Maybe I’m right, maybe I’m wrong. Chances are people will say both.

For me, this is just what I need to do to finally lay the series to rest. Kind of like that guy who re-edited Phantom Menace to get rid of Jar Jar. Sometimes we just feel morally compelled to do these things.

I’m looking forward to hearing what you all think. Keep an eye out for a new episode every week (just like in real life), and let’s cross our fingers and hope the folks at ABC are kind enough to let this run its course. Because that’s what the fans really deserve.

Namaste.

Edited by cstu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lost Revised - without the Alt/Purgatory.

About this project

A lot of people invested a lot of time and energy in following Lost over the years. I was one of those people. A lot of people were satisfied with the way the series ended. I was not one of those people.

At first, the introduction of the “sideways” world in Season 6 was extremely intriguing. It presented an alternate reality, presumably the result of the atomic-bomb blast at the end of Season 5, in which the characters had seemingly never crashed on the island.

It opened up a lot of possibilities as to where the show was going and where it would end up, and given the history of Lost, we were led to expect that the ultimate connection and reveal would be as original, creative, and satisfying as the rest of the series.

As it turned out, it was none of those things. The entire conceit of the sideways world was to bring all of our heroes together again in the afterlife - one of the most cliched storytelling devices there is. Sure, there was a spin on it, but the whole idea that “there is no now” in the afterlife came across more as a cheat than a genuinely interesting twist.

For one thing, it enabled the creators to conveniently bring all the characters together again at the end of the show, even though not all of them had died by the end of the series. Of course, if they had only featured the already-dead castaways in the sideways world, people would have figured out what it was straight off the bat.

The ultimate reveal bothered me for a lot of reasons, the previously noted “there is no now” concept and general cliche of it among them. But more than that, I felt like the whole creation of the sideways reality cheapened the weight of the characters’ actual deaths (after all, it’s not so bad if they get to reunite happily in the afterlife, right?). More than that, it also cheapened the remainder of the survivors’ lives.

Claire, Kate, Sawyer, Hurley, Desmond, Ben, and others survived the final result of the battle for the island, and all had a good part of their lives left to live. Really, we should have been left wondering what would happen to them next. Instead, we skip ahead to the afterlife, where they’re all already dead. That jump, to me at least, took away from any real anticipation about where these characters are going next.

Ultimately, the sideways world was a gimmick. It was a way to give a happy ending to characters who didn’t actually get a happy ending. It was a way to give an emotional sendoff to the series by tugging at our heartstrings, rather than addressing the numerous hanging threads left over by the plot.

At this point, I’m content to let those threads hang. However, I sincerely believe the show would have been better off without ever introducing the sideways world/afterlife in the first place, and the point of this experiment is to prove that. Or at least try to.

What I’m doing here is simple. I’m re-editing Season 6 of Lost to remove the existence of the sideways world.

If you were a fan of the ultimate resolution of the show, then this experiment isn’t for you. If however, like me, you felt betrayed by the schmaltzy wrap-up and reveal, perhaps this will provide the resolution you need.

I firmly believe this edit will be an improvement over the original, and will be much more satisfying to fans who stuck with the core mythology of the show. Maybe I’m right, maybe I’m wrong. Chances are people will say both.

For me, this is just what I need to do to finally lay the series to rest. Kind of like that guy who re-edited Phantom Menace to get rid of Jar Jar. Sometimes we just feel morally compelled to do these things.

I’m looking forward to hearing what you all think. Keep an eye out for a new episode every week (just like in real life), and let’s cross our fingers and hope the folks at ABC are kind enough to let this run its course. Because that’s what the fans really deserve.

Namaste.

LINK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lost Revised - without the Alt/Purgatory.

About this project

A lot of people invested a lot of time and energy in following Lost over the years. I was one of those people. A lot of people were satisfied with the way the series ended. I was not one of those people.

At first, the introduction of the “sideways” world in Season 6 was extremely intriguing. It presented an alternate reality, presumably the result of the atomic-bomb blast at the end of Season 5, in which the characters had seemingly never crashed on the island.

It opened up a lot of possibilities as to where the show was going and where it would end up, and given the history of Lost, we were led to expect that the ultimate connection and reveal would be as original, creative, and satisfying as the rest of the series.

As it turned out, it was none of those things. The entire conceit of the sideways world was to bring all of our heroes together again in the afterlife - one of the most cliched storytelling devices there is. Sure, there was a spin on it, but the whole idea that “there is no now” in the afterlife came across more as a cheat than a genuinely interesting twist.

For one thing, it enabled the creators to conveniently bring all the characters together again at the end of the show, even though not all of them had died by the end of the series. Of course, if they had only featured the already-dead castaways in the sideways world, people would have figured out what it was straight off the bat.

The ultimate reveal bothered me for a lot of reasons, the previously noted “there is no now” concept and general cliche of it among them. But more than that, I felt like the whole creation of the sideways reality cheapened the weight of the characters’ actual deaths (after all, it’s not so bad if they get to reunite happily in the afterlife, right?). More than that, it also cheapened the remainder of the survivors’ lives.

Claire, Kate, Sawyer, Hurley, Desmond, Ben, and others survived the final result of the battle for the island, and all had a good part of their lives left to live. Really, we should have been left wondering what would happen to them next. Instead, we skip ahead to the afterlife, where they’re all already dead. That jump, to me at least, took away from any real anticipation about where these characters are going next.

Ultimately, the sideways world was a gimmick. It was a way to give a happy ending to characters who didn’t actually get a happy ending. It was a way to give an emotional sendoff to the series by tugging at our heartstrings, rather than addressing the numerous hanging threads left over by the plot.

At this point, I’m content to let those threads hang. However, I sincerely believe the show would have been better off without ever introducing the sideways world/afterlife in the first place, and the point of this experiment is to prove that. Or at least try to.

What I’m doing here is simple. I’m re-editing Season 6 of Lost to remove the existence of the sideways world.

If you were a fan of the ultimate resolution of the show, then this experiment isn’t for you. If however, like me, you felt betrayed by the schmaltzy wrap-up and reveal, perhaps this will provide the resolution you need.

I firmly believe this edit will be an improvement over the original, and will be much more satisfying to fans who stuck with the core mythology of the show. Maybe I’m right, maybe I’m wrong. Chances are people will say both.

For me, this is just what I need to do to finally lay the series to rest. Kind of like that guy who re-edited Phantom Menace to get rid of Jar Jar. Sometimes we just feel morally compelled to do these things.

I’m looking forward to hearing what you all think. Keep an eye out for a new episode every week (just like in real life), and let’s cross our fingers and hope the folks at ABC are kind enough to let this run its course. Because that’s what the fans really deserve.

Namaste.

You know, before I answer any more questions there's something I wanted to say. Having received all your letters over the years, and I've spoken to many of you, and some of you have traveled... y'know... hundreds of miles to be here, I'd just like to say... GET A LIFE, will you people? I mean, for crying out loud, it's just a TV show! I mean, look at you, look at the way you're dressed! You've turned an enjoyable little job, that I did as a lark for a few years, into a COLOSSAL WASTE OF TIME!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I mean, how old are you people? What have you done with yourselves? [ to "Dharma guy" ] You, you must be almost 30... have you ever kissed a girl? [ "Dharma guy" hangs his head ] I didn't think so! There's a whole world out there! When I was your age, I didn't watch television! I LIVED! So... move out of your parent's basements! And get your own apartments and GROW THE HELL UP! I mean, it's just a TV show dammit, IT'S JUST A TV SHOW!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.