Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

EBF

[DYNASTY] 2010 Top 20 Rookies

Recommended Posts

A couple notes:

- These are early rankings that are subject to change dramatically over the next 3-4 months.

- I don't spend much time on QBs, so what you'll get here is pretty much the company line that you'll find anywhere.

- These rankings are for PPR leagues.

- The NFL comparisons are meant to provide a rough example of a player with a similar skill set. Nothing more.

First Tier

1. WR Dez Bryant, Oklahoma State

Elite WR prospect with few glaring flaws. Smooth athlete with a big frame and excellent playmaking skills. Routinely makes highlight reel catches. Not a burner, but plenty fast considering his size and playing style. Will occasionally drop an easy pass. Otherwise there's not much to nitpick. He has been ready for the NFL since his sophomore season.

NFL Comparison: better Dwayne Bowe

Bottom line: The only can't-miss skill player in this draft. Should become a perennial 1000+ yard WR in the NFL.

2. RB Jonathan Dwyer, Georgia Tech

Big back with surprising long speed. Not very elusive behind the line of scrimmage, but has adequate agility and can make people miss in the open field (can make nice cuts at full speed). Good power. Can run inside effectively. Not quite as sturdy as listed build would indicate. Runs a bit long-legged and looks vulnerable in the calves/ankles. Though not as dynamic as Best and Spiller, Dwyer gets the nod as the RB1 in this class because the success rate of these fast, squatty 220 pound RBs in the NFL is excellent. I expect Dwyer to continue that trend.

NFL Comparison: Ronnie Brown

Bottom line: Should be a quality starter when healthy.

3. RB CJ Spiller, Clemson

Enigmatic prospect with a lot of upside. Great explosiveness and speed. Routinely breaks big plays in several facets of the game (rushing, receiving, and returns). Has the "wow" level athletic ability of the great NFL backs. However, not a slam dunk for pro stardom. Marginal power. Though explosive, not always a fluid cutter. Suspect inside running skills. Will need to prove that he can consistently get the tough yards in addition to his big plays. Hit-or-miss rusher.

NFL Comparison: none

Bottom line: Should contribute due to his elite athletic gifts, but may never become a true franchise back.

4. RB Ryan Mathews, Fresno State

North-south runner with a very good size/speed combo. Explosive athlete who should test well at the combine. Good, not great speed. Excellent production and instincts. Can change directions well behind the line of scrimmage, but is not quite as elusive in the second level. Decent power. Runs a bit tall, which adversely affects his ability to make sharp cuts across his body and results in him taking quite a few big hits. Just a little bit stiff in the hips.

NFL Comparison: better Ryan Grant

Bottom line: Not an exceptionally nifty runner, but a gifted athlete who should become a three down starter at the next level.

5. RB Jahvid Best, Cal

Great athlete with excellent quickness and elusiveness. Probably the best lateral cutter in this class. Changes directions effortlessly. Very good speed. Catches the ball well out of the backfield and offers good potential in the passing game. Should be an effective NFL runner. Size could limit his upside. Thin frame. Built more like a CB than a RB. Limited power and does not break tackles. Durability has been a problem. Probably best used in a committee.

NFL Comparison: Warrick Dunn

Bottom line: A dynamic athlete and an excellent player, but his diminutive frame adds an element of risk.

6. WR Demaryius Thomas, Georgia Tech

Big, strong target with a knack for making big plays. A power receiver who shares more than a few qualities with Dez Bryant. Very fluid for his size. Runs well in a straight line and looks like he will develop into a competent route runner. An elite athlete with the upside to become one of the top 10 WRs in the NFL. Raw talent who will probably need a little bit of time to learn the nuances of the position. Will drop some easy passes, but also make difficult circus grabs.

NFL Comparison: Brandon Marshall

Bottom line: The easy choice at WR2 due to his elite physical gifts and upside. Should eventually become a WR1 in the NFL.

Second Tier

7. WR Mardy Gilyard, Cincinnati

Great football player who impacts the game in a variety of ways. Dangerous return man. Also possess all of the inherent skills you look for in a WR. Very reliable hands. Excellent body control. Good burst and quickness. Precise route runner. Main question marks are size and speed. He's a bit on the slender side. That won't matter if he runs a fast 40 time, but his lack of strength and power could become a problem if he can't break 4.5.

NFL Comparison: Santonio Holmes

Bottom line: Assuming that he can run something in the 4.3-4.4 range, Gilyard projects as a quality NFL WR2 who could put up nice statistics in a downfield passing game like the one used by the Colts.

8. WR Damian Williams, USC

Productive WR with a compelling combination of size, speed, and skill. Emerged as the star of USC's offense. Pretty good speed. Generally a reliable target who will make all of the necessary catches. Above average height and wingspan. Runs a bit goofy and isn't always the most fluid lateral cutter. Fast, but lacks blazing speed. Not quite a power WR and not quite a burner. How will he earn his keep in the NFL?

NFL Comparison: Greg Jennings

Bottom line: A well-rounded WR prospect who offers starting potential at the next level. I wouldn't go as far as saying he's can't-miss, but he consistently produced in college and seemingly has enough physical talent to make the jump.

9. QB Sam Bradford, Oklahoma

A classic pocket passer with pinpoint accuracy and staggering production. Has good size and adequate arm strength to make all of the necessary throws. Dominated his competition and lead his team to a national championship despite a mediocre supporting cast on offense. Seemingly has the mental skills and intangibles of the great pro passers. Very poor mobility. A statue in the pocket. Suspect durability after shoulder problems plagued his junior season.

NFL Comparison: Kurt Warner

Bottom line: Not a flashy athlete, but has a nice upside due to his pure passing skills.

10. QB Jimmy Clausen, Notre Dame

Top high school prospect who improved every season throughout his college career. Good accuracy and pretty good arm strength. Can make all the throws, but will sometimes float the deep ball. Can throw on the run and escape the pass rush. Scrappy competitor, but his fiery personality borders on obnoxious at times.

NFL Comparison: Aaron Rodgers

Bottom line: Seemingly has all of the skills and intangibles to become a franchise quarterback.

11. WR Brandon LaFell, LSU

Tall, thin possession WR with pretty good mobility for his height. Runs better than expected and has a burst off the line of scrimmage. Solid prospect with few glaring weaknesses, but not a dynamic threat after the catch and lacks special qualities. Many of these tall, stringy WR prospects have disappointed in recent seasons (Malcolm Kelly, Dwayne Jarrett, etc).

NFL Comparison: Justin Gage

Bottome line: A good prospect who should help an NFL team, but seemingly lacks the special qualities to become a star.

12. RB Noel Devine, West Virginia

Undersized back with electric moves. Excellent production throughout his college career. Can cut on a dime and is a constant big play threat due to his elusiveness. More powerful than you might suspect due to good thigh strength. Resembles Chris Johnson in body type and playing style, but lacks the world class speed. Listed at a very small 5'8" 176. Even in a time when Chris Johnson and Jamaal Charles are tearing up the league, Devine might simply be too small to be anything more than a change of pace back in the NFL. Nevertheless, his dynamic qualities make him an intriguing candidate once the elite backs are off the board.

NFL Comparison: lesser Chris Johnson

Bottom line: Talented player who may be relegated to a niche role in the NFL, but could surprise.

13. RB Stafon Johnson, USC

Versatile back who excels in every facet of the game. Pretty good size and power at 5'11" 220. Quick feet. Changes directions well. Good instincts and vision. Decent speed, but will get caught from behind. Was ranked as an elite prospect in high school and probably would've been a star in college if he had been given the opportunity to carry the ball more, but languished in obscurity due to the RBBC at USC. A bit of a sleeper at this point. Will not be a very high draft pick pending a late move up the boards and will need to prove that he's 100% recovered from the September weightlifting accident that almost killed him. This is a speculative ranking based on personal opinions. Most people won't have him nearly this high.

NFL Comparison: Pierre Thomas

Bottom line: Sleeper whose versatile skill set gives him sneaky upside for the next level.

Third Tier

14. WR Arrelious Benn, Illinois

Top high school recruit who broke out in 2008 before regressing in 2009. A power WR with a big, sturdy frame. Has decent quickness and speed, but looks indecisive to me and lacks sheer explosiveness. I think he has been overrated because of his high school reputation (he was considered the top player in the country by some), but he does have decent physical tools and the NFL scouts are allegedly still high on his potential despite his inconsistent college career. I rank him here mainly on the strength of his reputation. I don't find him that impressive.

NFL Comparison: poor man's Anquan Boldin

Bottom line: Raw physical talent with spotty production.

15. RB Anthony Dixon, Mississippi State

Productive SEC rusher who peaked in his final season. Has a good combination of weight and mobility. Nice first step quickness and can cut pretty well for a bigger back. Good power, toughness, and instincts. Weight distribution isn't ideal (a little too heavy in the midsection) and he lacks the "wow" factor of an elite prospect.

NFL Comparison: Ladell Betts

Bottom line: Fringe starter talent who should be a quality backup at worst.

16. RB Toby Gerhart, Stanford

College superstar whose NFL prospects will be fiercely debated. Big back with excellent lower body strength and leg drive. Routinely bounces off tackles, keeps his legs churning, and gains a lot of yards after contact. Adequate speed and acceleration. Not explosive, but more nimble than you might expect. He can change directions fairly well behind the line of scrimmage and make subtle footwork adjustments to gain extra yards in the open field. Limited value as a receiver. Not very elusive in the open field.

NFL Comparison: lesser Jamal Lewis

Bottom line: An old fashioned north-south runner who could thrive behind a good line on a team that wants to run power, but may lack the explosive athletic qualities needed to become a pro starter.

17. RB Joe McKnight, USC

Classic scat back with above average speed, quickness, and receiving skills. Inconsistent throughout his first two seasons, but stepped up as a junior. Ran with more toughness and decisiveness. Thin frame with marginal power. Not quite as explosive as the other undersized backs in this draft. Probably nothing more than a third down back in the NFL. I only rank him this high because he could be a pretty high pick and you simply can't ignore what the pro scouts think.

NFL Comparison: Maurice Morris

Bottom line: Decent talent who seemingly lacks the bulk needed to become more than a niche player on Sundays.

18. WR Golden Tate, Notre Dame

Hugely productive WR who topped the 1000 yard mark each of the past two seasons. Tough player who makes a lot of highlight reel grabs and gains lots of yards after the catch. Will be a high draft pick, but looks like a bust to me. He's both short and slow. Poor burst off the line of scrimmage. Will not win footraces against NFL DBs. I think he's pretty overrated. The only thing that could potentially change my mind would be a great 40 time at the combine.

NFL Comparison: Josh Reed

Bottom line: College superstar who lacks the physical gifts to make the jump.

19. WR Eric Decker, Minnesota

Productive WR with modest athletic ability. Efficient player who catches everything. Good size at 6'2" 215. Reasonably fast, but certainly not a burner. What you see is what you get: a good football player with mediocre measurables.

NFL Comparison: Austin Collie

Bottom line: Should become a contributor at the next level, but doesn't have a great deal of upside.

20. TE Aaron Hernandez, Florida

Good athlete. Runs well in the open field and is a threat after the catch. Stepped up this season with 68 catches for 850 yards. A versatile talent who can be moved around the field and split out wide.

NFL Comparison: lesser Dustin Keller

Bottom line: Gets the nod at TE1 over McCoy and Gresham because of his superior upside as a pure receiver.

OTHERS:

QB Tim Tebow, Florida - College superstar with suspect pro potential. Slow release. Raw passer.

QB Colt McCoy, Texas - Same story as Tebow. Mid round pick who will have to prove that he's a pro caliber passer.

RB James Starks, Buffalo - Thin and tall with good speed. Productive. Similar to Kevin Smith, but faster.

RB Montario Hardesty, Tennessee - Big back with good power and adequate mobility. Lacks special qualities. Probably an NFL backup.

RB Ben Tate, Auburn - Squatty back with mediocre mobility. Late round pick.

RB Derrick Washington, Missouri - Good frame and production. Might be a step slow for the NFL.

WR Jeremy Williams, Tulane - Decent in every facet of the game. Exceptional at nothing.

WR Dexter McCluster, Ole Miss - Dynamite talent who lacks a true position at the next level (listed at 5'8" 165).

WR Danario Alexander, Missouri - Rail thin long strider with limited lateral movement.

WR Dezmon Briscoe, Kansas - Good receiving skills. Odd frame. Not a very fluid or explosive runner.

WR Antonio Brown, Central Michigan - Deon Butler smurf type who could be a 3rd-4th round pick.

WR Mike Williams, Syracuse - Talented player with severe character issues. Second day sleeper.

TE Anthony McCoy, USC - Like Martellus Bennett. Big frame. Good coordination. Modest speed.

TE Jermaine Gresham, Oklahoma - Good strength and straight line speed. Not very explosive or agile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about QB's like Tony Pike, Dan Lafevour, Max Hall's NFL chances.

BTW: Great writeup. Need an IDP one just like this also :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about QB's like Tony Pike, Dan Lafevour, Max Hall's NFL chances.BTW: Great writeup. Need an IDP one just like this also :)

Pike - Not high on him. He's tall and he will occasionally make a "wow" type of throw, but I just don't think he has the goods. The Florida game really exposed him. Poor pocket sense and no confidence. He looked like a deer in headlights. That's not something you ever want to see from a QB. Only seen bits and pieces of LeFevour. Don't have anything to add about him.Haven't seen much of Hall either. Watched some of the bowl game against Oregon State, but was actually paying more attention to Sean Canfield (another 3rd-5th round QB prospect). In general, I don't worry much about QBs. I might focus on 1-2 of them if they catch my eye at some point in their college careers, but I usually just go by what the scouting reports and draft position tell me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're completely missing the boat on Gresham. I've heard from others that he may quite possibly the best player at his particular skill position in this draft. What I've seen from him, he's phenomenal.

I also think Danario Alexander needs to be on that list. Mostly from watching him play more than others but the guy jumps off the screen. INSANE measureables. His upside alone based on that should vault him higher than a couple of the WRs you have listed, IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

agreed on everything you pretty much listed. I do see Dwyer right now as the best RB available and I would even slot Mathews 2nd. I just think they have the pro style skills needed at the next lvl with that size/speed combo and inside running ability. Also I do think Stafon Johnson could be a starting NFL RB and surprise a lot of people.... guy is really shifty and to me when i seen him showed me the best fluid in the hips... he has the size and squatty build for the next lvl as well. He's the one guy i am for sure targeting with all my later picks in a draft.... his situation reminds me eerily similar for Frank Gore's years ago when he tore up his knees and McGahee went on to stardom. Gore slid in the draft as well......

on a side note I do think Jimmy Clausen is an excellent QB prospect, theres way too many people in here casting judgement on the kid that isnt warranted even if he has an obnoxious attitude.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about QB's like Tony Pike, Dan Lafevour, Max Hall's NFL chances.BTW: Great writeup. Need an IDP one just like this also :rolleyes:

Mid round guys with different warts. Think Pike or LaFevour could be overdrafted if someone thinks they can "fix" the issue or wait or develop. A very good post season could make serios money for the first two listed by Crippler. Pike- Does not have a great frame..arm seems okay. Despite production does not jump out at you.LaFevour- Really is a smaller school Tebow with better release, but still pretty raw (did not play QB until Sr year in high school). Hall- Nothing interesting physically, but productive. smells like a career back-up in Detmer, Volek range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're completely missing the boat on Gresham. I've heard from others that he may quite possibly the best player at his particular skill position in this draft. What I've seen from him, he's phenomenal.

He barely missed the list. He was one of the last 1-2 cuts.

I've never been a huge fan of his game. He was successful in college because he was able to overpower the smaller DBs and linebackers, but he's not very explosive. I'm not sure if his game will translate to the NFL level. I don't think he's on the Gonzo/Shockey/Winslow/Davis plane athletically. He's bigger and slower. About the only dominant pro with a similar playing style is Antonio Gates. I don't really expect him to reach that level and since TEs carry marginal value in most leagues, I don't see any strong reason to take him over QB/WR/RB prospects who offer starting potential.

I also think Danario Alexander needs to be on that list. Mostly from watching him play more than others but the guy jumps off the screen. INSANE measureables. His upside alone based on that should vault him higher than a couple of the WRs you have listed, IMO.

I'm mildly intrigued by him, but highly skeptical. He's very tall and slender with suspect lateral agility. I don't see any similar WRs having success in the NFL. There actually aren't many tall/thin guys doing well right now. Randy Moss and Sidney Rice are probably the only ones. I don't see Alexander as being on the same plane as them athletically. He's too straight line, IMO. A loping runner with a high center of gravity.

I like his speed and his production, but I don't see how he's going to separate from NFL DBs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

agreed on everything you pretty much listed. I do see Dwyer right now as the best RB available and I would even slot Mathews 2nd. I just think they have the pro style skills needed at the next lvl with that size/speed combo and inside running ability. Also I do think Stafon Johnson could be a starting NFL RB and surprise a lot of people.... guy is really shifty and to me when i seen him showed me the best fluid in the hips... he has the size and squatty build for the next lvl as well. He's the one guy i am for sure targeting with all my later picks in a draft.... his situation reminds me eerily similar for Frank Gore's years ago when he tore up his knees and McGahee went on to stardom. Gore slid in the draft as well...... on a side note I do think Jimmy Clausen is an excellent QB prospect, theres way too many people in here casting judgement on the kid that isnt warranted even if he has an obnoxious attitude.

I definitely considered Mathews for the RB2 slot for the reasons you mentioned. He's a more conventional three down back than Spiller. The reason I gave CJ the edge is because of his high first round reputation and his elite burst/speed. He's definitely more boom-or-bust than Mathews though. Mathews should be pretty decent. I'm with you on Stafon Johnson. On paper he fits the mold of a productive pro back. Good size, power, and mobility. Stocky frame. Good production when given carries. Excellent footwork and hips. When I sat down and watched all of these guys again, it was actually a pretty easy decision ranking him ahead of Dixon and Gerhart. We'll see how he does at the Senior Bowl and combine. His draft stock seems to have taken a massive hit after the throat injury, but he has a chance to reverse some of the damage. Let's just hope there are no setbacks with his health.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stafon Johnson- You have seen him more than me, but when I saw him he looked average at everything, not above average. I am hoping you are right here as I have him as a college draftee in a league.

Gerhart- if he can show the ability to be a 3 down back versus power part of a committee in the off-season could be the guy jumps into the top 5 overall.

Tate- think he is more Hines Ward/Steve Smith (giants) than Reed in the range of "slow" Wrs...Not thinking he is as slow you project. Does come off as an immediate know, either good or bad.

D. Thomas- will down grade a bit just because of his rawness, not physical skill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll start by saying you do a Great job in all your write ups. But please explain what you and others see in:

9. QB Sam Bradford, Oklahoma.

?, I'll say it again. Weak arm and too small to play in the NFL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're completely missing the boat on Gresham. I've heard from others that he may quite possibly the best player at his particular skill position in this draft. What I've seen from him, he's phenomenal.

He barely missed the list. He was one of the last 1-2 cuts.

I've never been a huge fan of his game. He was successful in college because he was able to overpower the smaller DBs and linebackers, but he's not very explosive. I'm not sure if his game will translate to the NFL level. I don't think he's on the Gonzo/Shockey/Winslow/Davis plane athletically. He's bigger and slower. About the only dominant pro with a similar playing style is Antonio Gates. I don't really expect him to reach that level and since TEs carry marginal value in most leagues, I don't see any strong reason to take him over QB/WR/RB prospects who offer starting potential.

I also think Danario Alexander needs to be on that list. Mostly from watching him play more than others but the guy jumps off the screen. INSANE measureables. His upside alone based on that should vault him higher than a couple of the WRs you have listed, IMO.

I'm mildly intrigued by him, but highly skeptical. He's very tall and slender with suspect lateral agility. I don't see any similar WRs having success in the NFL. There actually aren't many tall/thin guys doing well right now. Randy Moss and Sidney Rice are probably the only ones. I don't see Alexander as being on the same plane as them athletically. He's too straight line, IMO. A loping runner with a high center of gravity.

I like his speed and his production, but I don't see how he's going to separate from NFL DBs.

He may not be as fluid as Randy or Rice, but the guy is 6'4" -6'5" with a reported 47 inch vertical. Oh, and he runs at 4.5 speed. This guy would be a redzone nightmare. If he's able to add even a little bulk and can refine his skills even somewhat, he could be stellar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're completely missing the boat on Gresham. I've heard from others that he may quite possibly the best player at his particular skill position in this draft. What I've seen from him, he's phenomenal.

He barely missed the list. He was one of the last 1-2 cuts.

I've never been a huge fan of his game. He was successful in college because he was able to overpower the smaller DBs and linebackers, but he's not very explosive. I'm not sure if his game will translate to the NFL level. I don't think he's on the Gonzo/Shockey/Winslow/Davis plane athletically. He's bigger and slower. About the only dominant pro with a similar playing style is Antonio Gates. I don't really expect him to reach that level and since TEs carry marginal value in most leagues, I don't see any strong reason to take him over QB/WR/RB prospects who offer starting potential.

I also think Danario Alexander needs to be on that list. Mostly from watching him play more than others but the guy jumps off the screen. INSANE measureables. His upside alone based on that should vault him higher than a couple of the WRs you have listed, IMO.

I'm mildly intrigued by him, but highly skeptical. He's very tall and slender with suspect lateral agility. I don't see any similar WRs having success in the NFL. There actually aren't many tall/thin guys doing well right now. Randy Moss and Sidney Rice are probably the only ones. I don't see Alexander as being on the same plane as them athletically. He's too straight line, IMO. A loping runner with a high center of gravity.

I like his speed and his production, but I don't see how he's going to separate from NFL DBs.

As for Gresham, I've seen him described as a young Tony Gonzalez and the best TE prospect to come out in years. Watching him I completely agree. I don't see how you don't think he's athletic or explosive enough. It's surprising to me that you view him that way since he may be the one true "lock" to come out at any position this year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stafon Johnson- You have seen him more than me, but when I saw him he looked average at everything, not above average. I am hoping you are right here as I have him as a college draftee in a league.

I've talked in the past about the difference between freaky good and sneaky good. Johnson is not a flashy talent who jumps off the screen at you with highlight reel runs, but he's very sneaky good. 5'11" 220. Allegedly runs a 4.4 in the 40. What stands out to me the most about him is his ability to put his foot in the ground and change directions immediately.

I think he's pretty impressive here:

How many 220 pound backs have the vision and quickness to play punt returner (on a team loaded with athletes)?

Bear in mind that this is a guy who was ranked among the very elite RBs in the nation coming out of high school.

http://footballrecruiting.rivals.com/viewr...6&Year=2006

His college career was underwhelming, but much of that was beyond his control. He never got many opportunities. A back like him probably should have been getting 15-20 carries a game. That didn't happen. The USC coaching staff had a weird fascination with Joe McKnight and tried to please all of the backs on the roster by spreading out the carries.

I wouldn't say Stafon is a lock for NFL success, but I think he's a good sleeper.

Gerhart- if he can show the ability to be a 3 down back versus power part of a committee in the off-season could be the guy jumps into the top 5 overall.

I think it will be hard for him to jump quite that high unless he absolutely destroys the combine. What's happening to him right now is the same thing that happened to him when he was coming out of high school as the all-time leading rusher in the state of California. People are questioning his athleticism. Is he a fluke? Is he too slow?

I've seen him play in person three times in the last two years. The guy is a horse. He probably has the strongest lower body of any prospect in the draft. His results speak for themselves, but there's still that question of whether or not a pure power back with modest elusiveness and speed will be able to thrive in the NFL, where every defender on the other team is as good as the best guys you played against in college.

I'll be rooting for him. I think he's a fun player to watch.

Tate- think he is more Hines Ward than Reed in the range of "slow" Wrs...Not thinking he is as slow you project. Does come off as an immediate know, either good or bad.

I've seen that comparison. He doesn't look as good as Ward to me.

D. Thomas- will down grade a bit just because of his rawness, not physical skill.

I don't think any of the players ranked below him here can match his talent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're completely missing the boat on Gresham. I've heard from others that he may quite possibly the best player at his particular skill position in this draft. What I've seen from him, he's phenomenal.

He barely missed the list. He was one of the last 1-2 cuts.

I've never been a huge fan of his game. He was successful in college because he was able to overpower the smaller DBs and linebackers, but he's not very explosive. I'm not sure if his game will translate to the NFL level. I don't think he's on the Gonzo/Shockey/Winslow/Davis plane athletically. He's bigger and slower. About the only dominant pro with a similar playing style is Antonio Gates. I don't really expect him to reach that level and since TEs carry marginal value in most leagues, I don't see any strong reason to take him over QB/WR/RB prospects who offer starting potential.

I also think Danario Alexander needs to be on that list. Mostly from watching him play more than others but the guy jumps off the screen. INSANE measureables. His upside alone based on that should vault him higher than a couple of the WRs you have listed, IMO.

I'm mildly intrigued by him, but highly skeptical. He's very tall and slender with suspect lateral agility. I don't see any similar WRs having success in the NFL. There actually aren't many tall/thin guys doing well right now. Randy Moss and Sidney Rice are probably the only ones. I don't see Alexander as being on the same plane as them athletically. He's too straight line, IMO. A loping runner with a high center of gravity.

I like his speed and his production, but I don't see how he's going to separate from NFL DBs.

He may not be as fluid as Randy or Rice, but the guy is 6'4" -6'5" with a reported 47 inch vertical. Oh, and he runs at 4.5 speed. This guy would be a redzone nightmare. If he's able to add even a little bulk and can refine his skills even somewhat, he could be stellar.

He moves worse than James Hardy and has to gear down everytime he cuts. He's got a knee injury history too right?

I don't see him getting open with how he telegraphs his movement against NFL DBs. He can get up high though, can't take that away from him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll start by saying you do a Great job in all your write ups. But please explain what you and others see in:9. QB Sam Bradford, Oklahoma.?, I'll say it again. Weak arm and too small to play in the NFL.

Small? You must be kidding. He's listed at 6'4" 223.As for why people like him, look at what he did in his first two seasons:68.5 % completions, 9.54 yards per attempt, 86 TDs, 16 INTs. Those are absurd stats. His mobility is poor and he's an unimpressive athlete, but the same is true of Peyton Manning and Kurt Warner. Putting up stats as an NFL QB is first and foremost about your pure passing ability. Bradford appears to have a lot of potential in this department. Put him behind a good offensive line with some weapons in the passing game and he could light up the scoreboard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll start by saying you do a Great job in all your write ups. But please explain what you and others see in:9. QB Sam Bradford, Oklahoma.?, I'll say it again. Weak arm and too small to play in the NFL.

Small? You must be kidding. He's listed at 6'4" 223.As for why people like him, look at what he did in his first two seasons:68.5 % completions, 9.54 yards per attempt, 86 TDs, 16 INTs. Those are absurd stats. His mobility is poor and he's an unimpressive athlete, but the same is true of Peyton Manning and Kurt Warner. Putting up stats as an NFL QB is first and foremost about your pure passing ability. Bradford appears to have a lot of potential in this department. Put him behind a good offensive line with some weapons in the passing game and he could light up the scoreboard.
Ok Thanks, I guess time will tell.I say he's more like 6'2 7/8" and 214. But he can't and won't make all the throws at the next level. He's more on the lines of Joe Kapp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He may not be as fluid as Randy or Rice, but the guy is 6'4" -6'5" with a reported 47 inch vertical. Oh, and he runs at 4.5 speed. This guy would be a redzone nightmare. If he's able to add even a little bulk and can refine his skills even somewhat, he could be stellar.

I'm just not feeling it with Alexander. I like agile WRs who can change directions well. I think Alexander is the opposite of that. He's tall and athletic with good straight line speed, but the thin frame and high center of gravity are a killer. I think he will struggle mightily at the next level against corners who will be able to shadow his every movement. He's not quick enough to separate from them and not strong enough to overpower them. He's another Clarence Moore.

Gresham is someone I've taken a contrarian stance on from the beginning. For whatever reason, I just don't find him as impressive as most people do. Maybe my expectations are too high. Few TEs really have ideal athletic ability for the position. Those perfect prospects like Gonzalez and Winslow just don't come around very often. I'll take another look at Gresham before it's all said and done, but right now I don't see him as clearly being the best player at his position (let alone the best skill player in the draft).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He may not be as fluid as Randy or Rice, but the guy is 6'4" -6'5" with a reported 47 inch vertical. Oh, and he runs at 4.5 speed. This guy would be a redzone nightmare. If he's able to add even a little bulk and can refine his skills even somewhat, he could be stellar.

I'm just not feeling it with Alexander. I like agile WRs who can change directions well. I think Alexander is the opposite of that. He's tall and athletic with good straight line speed, but the thin frame and high center of gravity are a killer. I think he will struggle mightily at the next level against corners who will be able to shadow his every movement. He's not quick enough to separate from them and not strong enough to overpower them. He's another Clarence Moore.

Gresham is someone I've taken a contrarian stance on from the beginning. For whatever reason, I just don't find him as impressive as most people do. Maybe my expectations are too high. Few TEs really have ideal athletic ability for the position. Those perfect prospects like Gonzalez and Winslow just don't come around very often. I'll take another look at Gresham before it's all said and done, but right now I don't see him as clearly being the best player at his position (let alone the best skill player in the draft).

:popcorn:

Still a good read and makes me want to pay attention to a few guys I didn't consider as highly as you do at this time. Overall good stuff and appreciate the other side from what I stated above.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stafon Johnson- You have seen him more than me, but when I saw him he looked average at everything, not above average. I am hoping you are right here as I have him as a college draftee in a league.

I've talked in the past about the difference between freaky good and sneaky good. Johnson is not a flashy talent who jumps off the screen at you with highlight reel runs, but he's very sneaky good. 5'11" 220. Allegedly runs a 4.4 in the 40. What stands out to me the most about him is his ability to put his foot in the ground and change directions immediately.

I think he's pretty impressive here:

How many 220 pound backs have the vision and quickness to play punt returner (on a team loaded with athletes)?

Bear in mind that this is a guy who was ranked among the very elite RBs in the nation coming out of high school.

http://footballrecruiting.rivals.com/viewr...6&Year=2006

His college career was underwhelming, but much of that was beyond his control. He never got many opportunities. A back like him probably should have been getting 15-20 carries a game. That didn't happen. The USC coaching staff had a weird fascination with Joe McKnight and tried to please all of the backs on the roster by spreading out the carries.

I wouldn't say Stafon is a lock for NFL success, but I think he's a good sleeper.

Gerhart- if he can show the ability to be a 3 down back versus power part of a committee in the off-season could be the guy jumps into the top 5 overall.

I think it will be hard for him to jump quite that high unless he absolutely destroys the combine. What's happening to him right now is the same thing that happened to him when he was coming out of high school as the all-time leading rusher in the state of California. People are questioning his athleticism. Is he a fluke? Is he too slow?

I've seen him play in person three times in the last two years. The guy is a horse. He probably has the strongest lower body of any prospect in the draft. His results speak for themselves, but there's still that question of whether or not a pure power back with modest elusiveness and speed will be able to thrive in the NFL, where every defender on the other team is as good as the best guys you played against in college.

I'll be rooting for him. I think he's a fun player to watch.

Tate- think he is more Hines Ward than Reed in the range of "slow" Wrs...Not thinking he is as slow you project. Does come off as an immediate know, either good or bad.

I've seen that comparison. He doesn't look as good as Ward to me.

D. Thomas- will down grade a bit just because of his rawness, not physical skill.

I don't think any of the players ranked below him here can match his talent.
Gerhart- We are basically dancing around that fact that the questions about him have to do with skin color more than anything.

Thomas- Don't doubt you, but time until impact matters in dynasty leagues. Sydney Rice and Robert Mechaam could have been had for relative nothing before the season and Devin thomas before his late season game or two was another disappointment stuck on many benches and taxi squads. The quicker I know what I have in a dynasty league the better. Even if he is 6th most talented player tough for me to draft him there when at the moment (we really don't know until he is on a roster), it looks like a couple of years before his worth is really known.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll start by saying you do a Great job in all your write ups. But please explain what you and others see in:9. QB Sam Bradford, Oklahoma.?, I'll say it again. Weak arm and too small to play in the NFL.

Small? You must be kidding. He's listed at 6'4" 223.As for why people like him, look at what he did in his first two seasons:68.5 % completions, 9.54 yards per attempt, 86 TDs, 16 INTs. Those are absurd stats. His mobility is poor and he's an unimpressive athlete, but the same is true of Peyton Manning and Kurt Warner. Putting up stats as an NFL QB is first and foremost about your pure passing ability. Bradford appears to have a lot of potential in this department. Put him behind a good offensive line with some weapons in the passing game and he could light up the scoreboard.
Ok Thanks, I guess time will tell.I say he's more like 6'2 7/8" and 214. But he can't and won't make all the throws at the next level. He's more on the lines of Joe Kapp.
Bradford reminds me more of Matt Shaub/Matt Hasselbeck in that the measurements don't look like the build and the arm strength is enough, but not outstanding. At points both of them had questions about durability, although when given time and talent around them, each has put up quality fantasy football numbers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gerhart- We basically dancing around that fact that the questions about him have to do with skin color more than anything.

I don't think that's the issue. There are legitimate questions about his burst, agility, and speed.

Thomas- Don't doubt you, but time until impact matters in dynasty leagues. Sydney Rice and Robert Mechaam could have been had for relative nothing before the season and Devin thomas before his late season game or two was another disappointment stuck on many benches and taxi squads. The quicker I know what I have in a dynasty league the better. Even if he is 6th most talented player tough for me to draft him there when at the moment (we really don't know until he is on a roster), it looks like a couple of years before his worth is really known.

My rankings don't put a lot of emphasis on short term fluctuations in player values. Sure, someone like Devine or Gerhart might be worth more than Thomas if they come out of the gate hot while Thomas struggles to learn the ropes, but if he's the better talent then he'll eventually be worth more than them (in the same way that Sidney Rice is now worth a lot more than Brandon Jackson, Kenny Irons, and Brian Leonard).

My rankings assume that you want the best player available regardless of how long it takes him to develop (within reason).

I think Thomas is right about where he belongs. He's simply a beast athletically.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gerhart- We basically dancing around that fact that the questions about him have to do with skin color more than anything.

I don't think that's the issue. There are legitimate questions about his burst, agility, and speed.

Thomas- Don't doubt you, but time until impact matters in dynasty leagues. Sydney Rice and Robert Mechaam could have been had for relative nothing before the season and Devin thomas before his late season game or two was another disappointment stuck on many benches and taxi squads. The quicker I know what I have in a dynasty league the better. Even if he is 6th most talented player tough for me to draft him there when at the moment (we really don't know until he is on a roster), it looks like a couple of years before his worth is really known.

My rankings don't put a lot of emphasis on short term fluctuations in player values. Sure, someone like Devine or Gerhart might be worth more than Thomas if they come out of the gate hot while Thomas struggles to learn the ropes, but if he's the better talent then he'll eventually be worth more than them (in the same way that Sidney Rice is now worth a lot more than Brandon Jackson, Kenny Irons, and Brian Leonard).

My rankings assume that you want the best player available regardless of how long it takes him to develop (within reason).

I think Thomas is right about where he belongs. He's simply a beast athletically.

I trust that you specifically are not considering the race stuff, but broadly it is a real consideration.

On the pure talent versus spot thing, that is a philosophical difference that I am not sure I want to taint your thread with hashing out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

agreed on everything you pretty much listed. I do see Dwyer right now as the best RB available and I would even slot Mathews 2nd. I just think they have the pro style skills needed at the next lvl with that size/speed combo and inside running ability. Also I do think Stafon Johnson could be a starting NFL RB and surprise a lot of people.... guy is really shifty and to me when i seen him showed me the best fluid in the hips... he has the size and squatty build for the next lvl as well. He's the one guy i am for sure targeting with all my later picks in a draft.... his situation reminds me eerily similar for Frank Gore's years ago when he tore up his knees and McGahee went on to stardom. Gore slid in the draft as well...... on a side note I do think Jimmy Clausen is an excellent QB prospect, theres way too many people in here casting judgement on the kid that isnt warranted even if he has an obnoxious attitude.

I definitely considered Mathews for the RB2 slot for the reasons you mentioned. He's a more conventional three down back than Spiller. The reason I gave CJ the edge is because of his high first round reputation and his elite burst/speed. He's definitely more boom-or-bust than Mathews though. Mathews should be pretty decent. I'm with you on Stafon Johnson. On paper he fits the mold of a productive pro back. Good size, power, and mobility. Stocky frame. Good production when given carries. Excellent footwork and hips. When I sat down and watched all of these guys again, it was actually a pretty easy decision ranking him ahead of Dixon and Gerhart. We'll see how he does at the Senior Bowl and combine. His draft stock seems to have taken a massive hit after the throat injury, but he has a chance to reverse some of the damage. Let's just hope there are no setbacks with his health.
Here's an interesting scenario that's sure to get some rotation in the media circles. Pete Carroll takes one of Joe McKnight or Stafon Johnson in the mid rounds as his back of the future. Didn't Jimmy Johnson do the same with The Playmaker?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a Buffalo homer I love seeing Starks being mentioned. I think if he didnt get hurt this year he'd be getting alot of attention. Good talented back who deserves a shot to show it. Hopefully gets in invite to the combine and does decent. Was projected maybe round 2 or 3, and fell to about 5 to 6 range because he missed this year. And he's not even the biggest playmaker on the team... look out for WR Namaan Roosevelt, he might turn some heads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RB James Starks, Buffalo - Thin and tall with good speed. Productive. Similar to Kevin Smith, but faster.

Nice write up.Love the mention of James Starks. A lot of people might not know who he is but if he didn't get injured before this last season then he would be much more well known. He tore it up two seasons ago as a JR (after being brought on initially to play QB and then WR) and got better and better as the season wore on. He unfortunatelty got hurt right before the season started and the UB season pretty much went down with him. At one point I heard Kiper mention that Starks could be a possible first day pick (along with his teammate Roosevelt, WR). If he can show that he's recovered and still has his speed then I could see a team taking a chance on him and getting rewarded. He is a great kid and and a very hard worker. I hope he is able to show what he can do at the NFL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a Buffalo homer I love seeing Starks being mentioned. I think if he didnt get hurt this year he'd be getting alot of attention. Good talented back who deserves a shot to show it. Hopefully gets in invite to the combine and does decent. Was projected maybe round 2 or 3, and fell to about 5 to 6 range because he missed this year. And he's not even the biggest playmaker on the team... look out for WR Namaan Roosevelt, he might turn some heads.

OK, did you not see me posting? :) We pretty much said the same thing. I should've posted before you got home or not have walked away for a bit while I was typing that up... ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where is the love for Chalres Scott? I thought he was pretty much a first round lock for any 12 team fantasy draft.

Did I miss somthing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where is the love for Chalres Scott? I thought he was pretty much a first round lock for any 12 team fantasy draft.Did I miss somthing?

He kind of fell off the map this year with a quiet season. I don't think he has great pro potential, but he could figure into the mix along with the other RBs I listed outside my top 20.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great list EBF.

Only quibbles are that I think Golden Tate should be the #3 WR behind Thomas, and that you whiffed on Charles Scott. Unless he runs something like a 4.63+ (possible) he should be a solid NFL starter for a few years - in the mold of a smarter Travis Henry or smaller Lamont Jordan.

And great call on Derrick Washington. If his measurables are anything close to what's listed (225, 4.54) he's flying way too far under the radar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there any other TE's out there beside the top 3, than could be mentioned for TE friendly leagues. Same reason I asked about QB for 2 QB leagues.

Ed Dickson

Graham Garrett

Rob Gronkowski(not sure if he came out or not)

or any others

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What are everyone's thoughts on Carlton Mitchell WR USF? 6'4 220 with supposed 4.3 speed. He has phenomenal potential. Obviously he isn't a top 20 prospect, but i was just wondering what you guys think of him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So in other words I should be glad that I traded away my dynasty rookie picks for players already in the league?

Not a very exciting bunch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the right up EBF, I would argue I'm sure if I had watched more college ball this season but it just didn't happen this year. Hopefully there will be a clear cut #1 RB in a non PPR league by the time the rookie drafts roll around since I acquired that pick and gave up Beanie Wells for that pick. Time will tell if that trade was a mistake by me, I have a plethora of borderline RB 1/RB 2's on my team and am looking for a clear cut #1 uberstud and didn't see Wells as anything better/worse than about 4-5 other backs on my team.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't sleep on Jordan Shipley, WR Texas.

Kid was one of three finalists for the Biletnikoff award this year and is a 6-year senior, so he's mature at 24 yrs old.

Shipley runs great routes, has a very high football IQ, and is deceptively fast.

He has Hines Ward + Wes Welker love-child potential.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll start by saying you do a Great job in all your write ups. But please explain what you and others see in:9. QB Sam Bradford, Oklahoma.?, I'll say it again. Weak arm and too small to play in the NFL.

You no idea what you are talking about. He is 6ft 4, 220 lbs. He has a strong arm. Weak arm? huh? He is also a fine athlete. Scratch golfer and was a great basketball player in hs as well. Do you just type random thoughts that you think are true? Do your homework.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bear in mind that this is a guy who was ranked among the very elite RBs in the nation coming out of high school.

http://footballrecruiting.rivals.com/viewr...6&Year=2006

I like Stafon as a sleeper too but be very careful putting too much faith in Rivals high school rankings. There are a lot more 5 star RB recruits that never pan out in the NFL than ones that become even average NFL RB's let alone stars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll start by saying you do a Great job in all your write ups. But please explain what you and others see in:9. QB Sam Bradford, Oklahoma.?, I'll say it again. Weak arm and too small to play in the NFL.

You no idea what you are talking about. He is 6ft 4, 220 lbs. He has a strong arm. Weak arm? huh? He is also a fine athlete. Scratch golfer and was a great basketball player in hs as well. Do you just type random thoughts that you think are true? Do your homework.
A little harsh don't you think? I don't think Bradford has a Pennington weak arm.....but I don't think he has a Matt Stafford strong arm either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll start by saying you do a Great job in all your write ups. But please explain what you and others see in:9. QB Sam Bradford, Oklahoma.?, I'll say it again. Weak arm and too small to play in the NFL.

You no idea what you are talking about. He is 6ft 4, 220 lbs. He has a strong arm. Weak arm? huh? He is also a fine athlete. Scratch golfer and was a great basketball player in hs as well. Do you just type random thoughts that you think are true? Do your homework.
A little harsh don't you think? I don't think Bradford has a Pennington weak arm.....but I don't think he has a Matt Stafford strong arm either.
Not trying to be harsh. I just don't like it when someone that is not informed just guesses at stuff and post inaccurate information. If you want a good breakdown of Sam Bradford here you go:Sam Bradford6'4, 218 pounds | Quarterback | Oklahoma Accuracy: Can put the ball into tight windows, even though he doesn't have the best zip on his passes. Bradford showed elite accuracy as a sophomore when he won the Heisman Trophy in 2008. Completed 67.6 percent of his passes during his career completing 604 of 893 attempts. His accuracy is best when he's not under pressure and he can step into his throws.Arm strength: Bradford's arm strength is good enough. He can't bomb passes like JaMarcus Russell, but it's good enough to complete deep outs. Bradford's arm is probably best suited for a West Coast scheme, but that's not to say he should exclusively play in that scheme. Puts a really nice touch on the ball. Athleticism: The mobility Bradford has is adequate. He won't blow you away on film, but he does have a little bit of elusiveness. Is smart enough to know when he should pull the ball down and run for a first down.Decision making: Elite decision maker. Rarely threw the ball into bad coverage. Does a really nice job anticipating routes and throwing it in the receiver's stride. Field vision: Bradford made his name by being able to read defenses and check down to his second and third target. Plays intelligently before the snap, reading the defense. Showed the ability to pump his shoulder to move the safety over. The question here is whether Bradford will be able to make his pre-snap adjustments while dropping back.Mechanics: Delivery is slightly similar to that of Philip Rivers. It's a little higher, but Bradford looks like he pushes the ball. It's a three-quarters delivery that might get him in trouble at the next level. Played almost exclusively out of the shotgun and will have learn how to play from under center.Pocket awareness: Does a nice job of feeling the blitz coming in on him. Tends to keep his feet planted and doesn't dance around in the pocket. The issue here is that Bradford had a phenomenal offensive line as a sophomore and rarely saw pressure.Size: Has optimum height and looks to have large enough hands. One of Bradford's biggest negatives is his lack of bulk. It was an issue coming into his junior season and could be the reason he got his shoulder injured in the BYU game. Bradford needs to add at least 15 pounds of strength to his frame. This will make him more durable and maybe even strengthen his arm.Final word: Bradford's draft stock is going to ride on how well he tests during workouts. He was widely considered coming into the 2009 season the best draft-eligible player in the nation.He received that recognition because of his football intelligence, accuracy and leadership ability.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll start by saying you do a Great job in all your write ups. But please explain what you and others see in:9. QB Sam Bradford, Oklahoma.?, I'll say it again. Weak arm and too small to play in the NFL.

You no idea what you are talking about. He is 6ft 4, 220 lbs. He has a strong arm. Weak arm? huh? He is also a fine athlete. Scratch golfer and was a great basketball player in hs as well. Do you just type random thoughts that you think are true? Do your homework.
A little harsh don't you think? I don't think Bradford has a Pennington weak arm.....but I don't think he has a Matt Stafford strong arm either.
Not trying to be harsh. I just don't like it when someone that is not informed just guesses at stuff and post inaccurate information. If you want a good breakdown of Sam Bradford here you go:Sam Bradford6'4, 218 pounds | Quarterback | Oklahoma Accuracy: Can put the ball into tight windows, even though he doesn't have the best zip on his passes. Bradford showed elite accuracy as a sophomore when he won the Heisman Trophy in 2008. Completed 67.6 percent of his passes during his career completing 604 of 893 attempts. His accuracy is best when he's not under pressure and he can step into his throws.Arm strength: Bradford's arm strength is good enough. He can't bomb passes like JaMarcus Russell, but it's good enough to complete deep outs. Bradford's arm is probably best suited for a West Coast scheme, but that's not to say he should exclusively play in that scheme. Puts a really nice touch on the ball. Athleticism: The mobility Bradford has is adequate. He won't blow you away on film, but he does have a little bit of elusiveness. Is smart enough to know when he should pull the ball down and run for a first down.Decision making: Elite decision maker. Rarely threw the ball into bad coverage. Does a really nice job anticipating routes and throwing it in the receiver's stride. Field vision: Bradford made his name by being able to read defenses and check down to his second and third target. Plays intelligently before the snap, reading the defense. Showed the ability to pump his shoulder to move the safety over. The question here is whether Bradford will be able to make his pre-snap adjustments while dropping back.Mechanics: Delivery is slightly similar to that of Philip Rivers. It's a little higher, but Bradford looks like he pushes the ball. It's a three-quarters delivery that might get him in trouble at the next level. Played almost exclusively out of the shotgun and will have learn how to play from under center.Pocket awareness: Does a nice job of feeling the blitz coming in on him. Tends to keep his feet planted and doesn't dance around in the pocket. The issue here is that Bradford had a phenomenal offensive line as a sophomore and rarely saw pressure.Size: Has optimum height and looks to have large enough hands. One of Bradford's biggest negatives is his lack of bulk. It was an issue coming into his junior season and could be the reason he got his shoulder injured in the BYU game. Bradford needs to add at least 15 pounds of strength to his frame. This will make him more durable and maybe even strengthen his arm.Final word: Bradford's draft stock is going to ride on how well he tests during workouts. He was widely considered coming into the 2009 season the best draft-eligible player in the nation.He received that recognition because of his football intelligence, accuracy and leadership ability.
This was discussed in-depth in the 2010 rookie prospects thread. however, how well Bradford comes back from injury is huge here. What if his arm isn't as strong from the multiple shoulder injuries? He is accurate and smart with good vision. However he had lots of weapons at Oklahoma.Bradford has some question marks thats for sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great list EBF.Only quibbles are that I think Golden Tate should be the #3 WR behind Thomas, and that you whiffed on Charles Scott. Unless he runs something like a 4.63+ (possible) he should be a solid NFL starter for a few years - in the mold of a smarter Travis Henry or smaller Lamont Jordan.And great call on Derrick Washington. If his measurables are anything close to what's listed (225, 4.54) he's flying way too far under the radar.

Obviously I am pretty skeptical of Tate. Most people have him ranked a lot higher. I don't think his game will translate to the next level, but I'll keep an open mind if he puts up encouraging numbers at the combine. Right now I think he's just way too slow to be that small. I haven't paid much attention to Scott this season, but I have seen him play in years past. I don't think he's as good as the guys you compared him to. He could figure into that rounds 3-4 mix of the NFL draft though, which would make him a strong candidate for a spot somewhere on this list. I agree on Washington. We'll see what the pro scouts think in a few months.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.