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I'm a big fan of doing both Roth and traditional, if you can. This will give you a lot of flexibility come retirement time.

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6 minutes ago, Doctor Detroit said:

Because you can't predict future tax rates, so you play the game for what it is now.  Why would I pay 5% more in taxes now if I don't have to?  Also the whole thing with :tinfoilhat: people thinking the Roth exemption will eventually be stripped when the government needs money, and they tax you twice.  It's the whole bird in the hand is better analogy. 

I was just talking about you saying you were fighting off a tax bracket change as if that was a bad thing in and of itself.   If that's not what you were saying, then never mind.  

Edited by NutterButter

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5 minutes ago, eoMMan said:

I'm a big fan of doing both Roth and traditional, if you can. This will give you a lot of flexibility come retirement time.

I would think this would make the most sense.  You can draw a lower tax bracket amount out of the traditional, then use the Roth if you need extra funds. 

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My plan is to hedge my bet on both scenarios as I don't know what to expect in the future.  I'm 37 years old and have $225K in a traditional 401(k).  Last year I started putting my 13% (including employeer) into roth 401(k).  My plan is to build that up to about the same amount and then re-evaluate my scenario.  My $.0000002.

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18 minutes ago, rascal said:

My plan is to hedge my bet on both scenarios as I don't know what to expect in the future.  I'm 37 years old and have $225K in a traditional 401(k).  Last year I started putting my 13% (including employeer) into roth 401(k).  My plan is to build that up to about the same amount and then re-evaluate my scenario.  My $.0000002.

 

Sounds great!  I think the roth max is $5.5K/yr though isn't it?  If so, you can max out your regular 401K and then move to your Roth IRA.  

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54 minutes ago, Doctor Detroit said:

This is where the rubber meets the road.  A few folks I know have asked my for advice recently and they prefer Roth, but their situation dictates traditional because they are teetering on the tax rate border.  What people need to do is understand that they should contribute just enough to traditional to stay in their current tax bracket, not got all Roth 401k because it'll be tax free upon withdrawal.  The gubment is going to get your taxes, today or tomorrow and for those of us with ascending careers and many years left of earning, it usually is beneficial to use the traditional and pay the taxes later.  If you are loaded now or are going to receive a substantial windfall via family down the road, then Roth makes sense.  Makes sense if you are under 30 and so far away from retirement that you have no idea what tax bracket you might be in. 

I'm fighting off a tax bracket change myself, but know that I'll be in this tax bracket or lower when I retire.  So I put it all in traditional, although I still fund my Roth IRA (have been since it was created).  :2cents:

Yeah my pension payments will be all taxable ordinary income, so I'm building Roth to split the difference down the road as if I end up a lifer at my company (I'll 10 times out of 10 concede jumping for promotions just to keep my current benefits), just the pension ordinary income will take me through brackets replacing ~60% of my income. I think the point here is every situation is different, so plan as best you can. No one has a magic wand and can call it exactly, do what fits you best and is effectively a hedge. Do you. 

ETA: Also consider in retirement any opportunity to be in a tax bracket with favorable capital gains tax treatment/rates is :moneybag:

 

Edited by mquinnjr
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2 hours ago, Binky The Doormat said:

Her money is already there and not taxable.  We aren't talking about saving strategies.  

What I wouldn't give to have most of my money in Roth accounts and not have to pay taxes on it when I get it out.  

If you end up being able to you can transfer traditional to Roth at no or very low tax rates.  This is superior to simply having the Roth (if you can transfer enough to get to where you want to go).  So all is not lost here.  I have everything in traditional or a 401k.  Not sweating it.

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49 minutes ago, NutterButter said:

I was just talking about you saying you were fighting off a tax bracket change as if that was a bad thing in and of itself.   If that's not what you were saying, then never mind.  

No it's not a bad thing in the big picture, but I'm not wanting to pay a penny more in taxes than I already do.  If I can offset that by deferring taxes, I will. 

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On 3/6/2017 at 9:38 AM, ZenMaster said:

We're meeting with a planner next week and the fee is $1200. The initial meeting will be a full financial review - assets, liabilities, life insurance, will (we have one), retirement plan. It does not include asset management but we have access to him for a year to review plan, etc.

Since we're planning to retire early - hopefully in two years - we thought it would be a good idea to have an independent observer look at our plans to make sure we didn't miss anything or if there was something we didn't think about.

So I reached out to another financial planner in our area.  Fee only, all of the same certifications (CFA, NAPFA, etc), $175 an hour to create the plan.  Here is what they offer and below are the answers to my questions:

 

  • Fee-Only Investment Advisor
  • Customized Financial Plans
  • Portfolio Rebalancing and Tax Efficiency
  • Dimensional Fund Advisors (DFA):  No-Load, Evidence-Based Mutual Funds
  • Non-Markup Personalized Bond Portfolios
  • Investment philosophy based on the Nobel Prize-winning Modern Portfolio Theory of Eugene Fama

Thank you for your inquiry about our investment management and financial planning services.  I will try to answer your questions as you listed them in your email.

1.       Depending upon the complexity of your financial situation, the average plan takes about 4-6 hours to create.  This includes discovery, research, and development.

2.      I am good either way: Mgmt. fee or hourly.   Most clients prefer to pay me a management fee because it ends up being less compared to hourly over time.  The management fee option includes unlimited financial planning assistance.

3.      The Boglehead approach is good and I use some Vanguard funds in my portfolio; however, I am also a big fan of DFA (dimensional funds) which research shows will outperform Vanguard over the long run.  Basically, it is Vanguard on steroids.  The additional risk premium you receive more than offsets my management fee in the long run.

 

Thoughts on the above? 4-6 hours would be on the light side of anything I heard re financial plan time and cost.  I'm going to find out fee on #2 but I bet it's similar to the .5% number I've heard from others.  And I know nothing about Dimensional Funds.

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Everyone should have a will. Also a trust if you have any assets at all (a good idea on how much would be your states laws on limits to avoid probate). Whether you hire someone to do it for you or do it yourself really depends on how much assets you have and the complexity of your wishes. The trust can do a lot of things but it's real value is protecting your loved ones from Uncle Sam getting it's share (again) simply because the money you already paid taxes on is being handed down to your loved ones without one. Coupled with a will- not only is it protecting against taxation and delivering your wishes but it protects your family from itself in a bad time as well by limiting bickering and guesses on what you would want or who should get what etc or probate court where the court who never knew you decides. 

If you are getting those written up because you have enough assets to not screw it up by doing it yourself- then get POA's for you and your spouse (assuming your trust each other), medical POA and living wills while you are at it. You can afford it and the nightmare scenarios these things can avoid is well worth your investment. 

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Trump prefers a "pee only" advisor.

da-dump-dump :mellow:

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1 minute ago, Chadstroma said:

Everyone should have a will. Also a trust if you have any assets at all (a good idea on how much would be your states laws on limits to avoid probate). Whether you hire someone to do it for you or do it yourself really depends on how much assets you have and the complexity of your wishes. The trust can do a lot of things but it's real value is protecting your loved ones from Uncle Sam getting it's share (again) simply because the money you already paid taxes on is being handed down to your loved ones without one. Coupled with a will- not only is it protecting against taxation and delivering your wishes but it protects your family from itself in a bad time as well by limiting bickering and guesses on what you would want or who should get what etc or probate court where the court who never knew you decides. 

If you are getting those written up because you have enough assets to not screw it up by doing it yourself- then get POA's for you and your spouse (assuming your trust each other), medical POA and living wills while you are at it. You can afford it and the nightmare scenarios these things can avoid is well worth your investment. 

Agree, my will is like 15 years old and I need to update.  That said all my financial assets have survivor benefit clauses that I keep updated, but in the end...in my case, it could lead to litigation.  I don't want that at all. 

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1 minute ago, Doctor Detroit said:

Agree, my will is like 15 years old and I need to update.  That said all my financial assets have survivor benefit clauses that I keep updated, but in the end...in my case, it could lead to litigation.  I don't want that at all. 

Yea, 15 years is way past time to update. Depending on major life changes and complexity of your assets an annual review may be in order. I think most people are good every 5 years though. But 15? Geesh... top 10 songs of 2002 for perspective.....

1 Nickelback How You Remind Me
2 Ashanti Foolish
3 Nelly Hot in Herre
4 Nelly feat. Kelly Rowland Dilemma
5 Calling Wherever You Will Go
6 Vanessa Carlton A Thousand Miles
7 Linkin Park In the End
8 Fat Joe feat. Ashanti What's Luv?
9 Usher U Got it Bad
10 Puddle Of Mudd Blurry
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I'm about as big a bogleheads shill as you will find, and I definitely would consider DFA

 

i prefer hourly charge over percentage though - to me an advisor's worth would be the initial setup, and if I have a big life change I can always revisit it (via hourly charge). A leach is a leach on my nest egg, even if it's a small one 

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6 hours ago, eoMMan said:

I'm a big fan of doing both Roth and traditional, if you can. This will give you a lot of flexibility come retirement time.

Agreed, the question is the ideal breakdown.  Which is really hard to know and depends on the individual. 

42 minutes ago, wilked said:

I'm about as big a bogleheads shill as you will find, and I definitely would consider DFA

 

i prefer hourly charge over percentage though - to me an advisor's worth would be the initial setup, and if I have a big life change I can always revisit it (via hourly charge). A leach is a leach on my nest egg, even if it's a small one 

Agreed on checking out dimensional.  Lesser known doesn't make it bad but it's hard to beat vanguard.  

As the investor who doesn't need someone else to do everything for him,  I'd go with the hourly rate.  As the advisor I want the long term income of taking a percentage of your assets over time. 

I'm meeting with a local fee only planner later this week to gain some insight on the business. It will be interesting to see if he tries to sell me on using his services as I pursue a CFP. 

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6 hours ago, Binky The Doormat said:

Sounds great!  I think the roth max is $5.5K/yr though isn't it?  If so, you can max out your regular 401K and then move to your Roth IRA.  

Roth IRAs are limited to $5,500 but Roth 401ks can have contributions up to $18,000 of your own money (same as a traditional 401k).

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And people should be aware that if your employer matches on your Roth 401k, that match portion is not considered Roth.

You will need to convert it yourself and pay the taxes on the conversion.

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8 hours ago, Chadstroma said:

Yea, 15 years is way past time to update. Depending on major life changes and complexity of your assets an annual review may be in order. I think most people are good every 5 years though. But 15? Geesh... top 10 songs of 2002 for perspective.....

1 Nickelback How You Remind Me
2 Ashanti Foolish
3 Nelly Hot in Herre
4 Nelly feat. Kelly Rowland Dilemma
5 Calling Wherever You Will Go
6 Vanessa Carlton A Thousand Miles
7 Linkin Park In the End
8 Fat Joe feat. Ashanti What's Luv?
9 Usher U Got it Bad
10 Puddle Of Mudd Blurry

Man, 2002..  in my first year of dental practice,  24 years old, was in fantastic shape, was banging my 19 year old assistant with the most perfect D breasts on a 105 pound frame, and was living from friday night happy hour to friday night happy hour.    I was awesome then.

Didn't have or need a will then,  sorely need one now.

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recently made large payments to cover my car and last bit of student loans - each monthly payment was ~ 300 so that frees up 600 each month. Feels good!

now we just have my wife's graduate loans (substantial, but not back breaking due to her salary)

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6 hours ago, xulf said:

Roth IRAs are limited to $5,500 but Roth 401ks can have contributions up to $18,000 of your own money (same as a traditional 401k).

Did not know that.  

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1 minute ago, Binky The Doormat said:

Did not know that.  

 

6 hours ago, xulf said:

Roth IRAs are limited to $5,500 but Roth 401ks can have contributions up to $18,000 of your own money (same as a traditional 401k).

It is $5500 total for IRA for any combination of Roth or not.

It is $18000 total for 401k for any combination of Roth or not

 

If you are over 50, you can contribute additional catch-up amounts, $1000 for IRA and $6000 for 401K

 

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11 hours ago, wilked said:

I'm about as big a bogleheads shill as you will find, and I definitely would consider DFA

 

i prefer hourly charge over percentage though - to me an advisor's worth would be the initial setup, and if I have a big life change I can always revisit it (via hourly charge). A leach is a leach on my nest egg, even if it's a small one 

I think that's the gig though.  If I do a straight financial plan I can do hourly.  I can then do Vanguard if I want on my own.  If I want DFA, I'd have to go the percentage route, as individual investors can't buy it - must be through their preferred CFP's.

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6 hours ago, dino259 said:

 

It is $5500 total for IRA for any combination of Roth or not.

It is $18000 total for 401k for any combination of Roth or not

 

If you are over 50, you can contribute additional catch-up amounts, $1000 for IRA and $6000 for 401K

 

 

Thanks Dino, Sand made it seem like you could contribute more than the $5.5K to a Roth IRA.  

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19 hours ago, Chadstroma said:

Everyone should have a will. Also a trust if you have any assets at all (a good idea on how much would be your states laws on limits to avoid probate). Whether you hire someone to do it for you or do it yourself really depends on how much assets you have and the complexity of your wishes. The trust can do a lot of things but it's real value is protecting your loved ones from Uncle Sam getting it's share (again) simply because the money you already paid taxes on is being handed down to your loved ones without one. Coupled with a will- not only is it protecting against taxation and delivering your wishes but it protects your family from itself in a bad time as well by limiting bickering and guesses on what you would want or who should get what etc or probate court where the court who never knew you decides. 

If you are getting those written up because you have enough assets to not screw it up by doing it yourself- then get POA's for you and your spouse (assuming your trust each other), medical POA and living wills while you are at it. You can afford it and the nightmare scenarios these things can avoid is well worth your investment. 

I don't really disagree with the theory behind this, but there's really no way in hell I'd consider trying to do my own will or trust.  You don't need to go to a mega-bigtime attorney, but there are plenty of reasonable attorneys who can handle this paperwork at a reasonable price.  I don't provide legal advice to my clients - why would I try to be my own lawyer on something like this?  I understand there are websites that walk you through this, but still.

I'm all in favor of saving a few bucks here or there, but after seeing plenty of family drama and financial planning nightmares in my job, and having a very basic understanding of the complexities of estate and trust tax law....the peace of mind of having an attorney draft and vet the will and trust is well worth the cost, IMO.  Just my two cents.

Edited by Steve Tasker
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26 minutes ago, Steve Tasker said:

I don't really disagree with the theory behind this, but there's really no way in hell I'd consider trying to do my own will or trust.  You don't need to go to a mega-bigtime attorney, but there are plenty of reasonable attorneys who can handle this paperwork at a reasonable price.  I don't provide legal advice to my clients - why would I try to be my own lawyer on something like this?  I understand there are websites that walk you through this, but still.

I'm all in favor of saving a few bucks here or there, but after seeing plenty of family drama and financial planning nightmares in my job, and having a very basic understanding of the complexities of estate and trust tax law....the peace of mind of having an attorney draft and vet the will and trust is well worth the cost, IMO.  Just my two cents.

Regarding wills, it depends on how complicated the situation is. Legal Zoom or the equivalent is fine for something straightforward. A lot of attorneys aren't going to do anything more than copy and paste names into a standard form in that situation, which is what an online service will do. For trusts or a more complicated will, I'd hire an attorney without question. 

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13 hours ago, Binky The Doormat said:

Thanks Dino, Sand made it seem like you could contribute more than the $5.5K to a Roth IRA.  

Just move money from a tax-deferred account into a Roth (and pony up the taxes). I've never understood the rationale of a 5.5K max contribution when you could just dump funds in from other sources.

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On 3/8/2017 at 6:20 PM, Steve Tasker said:

I don't really disagree with the theory behind this, but there's really no way in hell I'd consider trying to do my own will or trust.  You don't need to go to a mega-bigtime attorney, but there are plenty of reasonable attorneys who can handle this paperwork at a reasonable price.  I don't provide legal advice to my clients - why would I try to be my own lawyer on something like this?  I understand there are websites that walk you through this, but still.

I'm all in favor of saving a few bucks here or there, but after seeing plenty of family drama and financial planning nightmares in my job, and having a very basic understanding of the complexities of estate and trust tax law....the peace of mind of having an attorney draft and vet the will and trust is well worth the cost, IMO.  Just my two cents.

I wouldn't trust myself with my own will and trust (and other legal instruments) and I didn't. I really do not have much in way of assets either as the Great Recession hit us hard and we are still trying to climb out of that hole. I was lucky that one of my first 'real' jobs back in the workforce back in 2012 was with a company that offered free legal services via Hyatt legal plans. It was about a year into our first child with our second on the way. So, it was great timing. Our assets at that time was almost non-existent other than a new home and retirement accounts. But we took advantage of it and had everything done. Once done, I asked the lawyer how much it would have all cost and the figure was around $2,500 (that is a trust, will, living will, POA, and medical POA each for my wife and myself). At that time- there is no way that I would have had $2,500 to drop on this. It would have been hard for me to come up with $250 at that time. If I did not have that opportunity, I would have looked into some DIY services for these things as a poor alternative (pun intended). If you have enough 'assets' that you have a computer and internet access and it is not paid for by your parents- then you need a will. A simple one will do and I don't think it costs much on these DIY options. If you have a few bucks and/or kids, then a trust starts to become needed as well. The more money the more this is needed and the more you need a pro to do it for you. If you have the money to spend on these things- then absolutely, don't skimp and save a few bucks to do it yourself. But if it you don't have the bucks- then at least get a will put together to get your affairs in order and make things much easier on loved ones in the event you pass. 

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Question: I have maxed my 401k this year up to the $18k plus a 4% employee match. Back in 2012 I opened IRA's through an adviser for my wife and myself. These accounts are doing well, but I have not contributed to them since opening. The adviser charges a 5% fee. He then takes the IRA (income level is not eligible for a Roth) and then converts the IRA to a Roth in something that some of you may be familiar with, called a back door Roth. I have not contributed since 2012, because I do not like paying the 5% fee and the funds (American Funds) are decent, but not as low fee as some of the Vanguard index funds. I guess my question is what do people who invest on their own do.

Does anyone convert an IRA to a Roth for the tax benefits? IF so, is it easy to do on your own?

If I were to go with the Vanguard index funds, do most choose one or several? I thought the allure of index funds is that it is diverse and that generally outperforms managed funds, not sure which index funds to pick (there are so many).

If you pick index funds, do you constantly change them each year or just let them ride?

Any and all input is appreciated!

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35 minutes ago, southeastjerome said:

Question: I have maxed my 401k this year up to the $18k plus a 4% employee match. Back in 2012 I opened IRA's through an adviser for my wife and myself. These accounts are doing well, but I have not contributed to them since opening. The adviser charges a 5% fee. He then takes the IRA (income level is not eligible for a Roth) and then converts the IRA to a Roth in something that some of you may be familiar with, called a back door Roth. I have not contributed since 2012, because I do not like paying the 5% fee and the funds (American Funds) are decent, but not as low fee as some of the Vanguard index funds. I guess my question is what do people who invest on their own do.

Does anyone convert an IRA to a Roth for the tax benefits? IF so, is it easy to do on your own?

If I were to go with the Vanguard index funds, do most choose one or several? I thought the allure of index funds is that it is diverse and that generally outperforms managed funds, not sure which index funds to pick (there are so many).

If you pick index funds, do you constantly change them each year or just let them ride?

Any and all input is appreciated!

5% fee?  That can't possibly be right.   And then he places you in American Funds?  Nothing wrong with American Funds but if you are paying an advisor to manage your money they should not just be placing your money in open ended mutual funds(individual stocks, low cost etfs etc.)  

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Yes, he said 5.75% is the one time sales charge for contributions. Since I have an existing American Funds account, he said it would only be 5%. Not on the total value, but only of what I contribute. That seem high? This is my only experience with an advisor and seems legit (has had articles in the Boston Globe, good reviews, etc).

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1 minute ago, southeastjerome said:

Yes, he said 5.75% is the one time sales charge for contributions. Since I have an existing American Funds account, he said it would only be 5%. Not on the total value, but only of what I contribute. That seem high? This is my only experience with an advisor and seems legit (has had articles in the Boston Globe, good reviews, etc).

There are many more posters much more knowledgeable than I am but you are crazy to be paying someone a 5% fee to do your investing. 

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11 minutes ago, southeastjerome said:

Yes, he said 5.75% is the one time sales charge for contributions. Since I have an existing American Funds account, he said it would only be 5%. Not on the total value, but only of what I contribute. That seem high? This is my only experience with an advisor and seems legit (has had articles in the Boston Globe, good reviews, etc).

Ok, this makes more sense.  He is selling you an "A" share mutual fund with a front end sales charge of normally 5.75% but it is reduced to 5% because of a discount that you already own some American Funds.  It is a one time fee up front and not charged annually.  However,  the annual expense ratio will be around .65% each year.  

I personally do not like buying A share funds because the upfront sales charge is so high.  You are better off buying some Vanguard index funds which carry an expense ratio of .07% and no upfront sales charges.

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You can do a backdoor Roth on your own with just a little help from Vanguard etc.

The 5% fee invokes more involvement of your backdoor, but not in a very comfortable way. 

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@Dentist

IIRC, you were pretty knowledgeable on all things dividends?  What are you doing in that realm these days?

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On 3/29/2017 at 8:32 AM, southeastjerome said:

Question: I have maxed my 401k this year up to the $18k plus a 4% employee match. Back in 2012 I opened IRA's through an adviser for my wife and myself. These accounts are doing well, but I have not contributed to them since opening. The adviser charges a 5% fee. He then takes the IRA (income level is not eligible for a Roth) and then converts the IRA to a Roth in something that some of you may be familiar with, called a back door Roth. I have not contributed since 2012, because I do not like paying the 5% fee and the funds (American Funds) are decent, but not as low fee as some of the Vanguard index funds. I guess my question is what do people who invest on their own do.

Does anyone convert an IRA to a Roth for the tax benefits? IF so, is it easy to do on your own?

If I were to go with the Vanguard index funds, do most choose one or several? I thought the allure of index funds is that it is diverse and that generally outperforms managed funds, not sure which index funds to pick (there are so many).

If you pick index funds, do you constantly change them each year or just let them ride?

Any and all input is appreciated!

the fee was already addressed, but for the index fund, one of the keys is to not chase past results.  For sure you want a good fund but I pick my ETFs and ride.  FWIW, I probably need to rebalance soon.

 

I lost my asset allocation speadsheet :bag:  only had it on my work computer which was wiped.  (yeah, that was dumb of me) so I'm looking for a good prefab sheet that I can input my own funds, target allocation and have it automatically update.  I can probably put one together myself but it's so much easier to edit one already made.  I've searched on google but haven't found a new one I like enough yet. 

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55 minutes ago, -OZ- said:

the fee was already addressed, but for the index fund, one of the keys is to not chase past results.  For sure you want a good fund but I pick my ETFs and ride.  FWIW, I probably need to rebalance soon.

 

I lost my asset allocation speadsheet :bag:  only had it on my work computer which was wiped.  (yeah, that was dumb of me) so I'm looking for a good prefab sheet that I can input my own funds, target allocation and have it automatically update.  I can probably put one together myself but it's so much easier to edit one already made.  I've searched on google but haven't found a new one I like enough yet. 

 

If you trust them to hold your account logins (like Mint), you could try FutureAdvisor.com

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4 minutes ago, Walking Boot said:

 

If you trust them to hold your account logins (like Mint), you could try FutureAdvisor.com

Would you trust it?  I don't know much about the site. 

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On 3/8/2017 at 0:22 AM, Judge Smails said:

Hmmm.  More than I ever wanted to know about DFA.  The chart comparisons to Vanguard are very compelling..

https://www.ifa.com/articles/dimensional_fund_advisors_deeper_look_performance/

"Dimensional’s ability to better target the driving forces behind stock returns allows them to have outperformed other index funds."

So are dimensional funds basically looking at index funds and categorizing the investments within them and determining which of those categories are the biggest factors in the returns?  And then the dimensional funds isolate those subsets of investments that are the highest-performing and makes a fund out of them?

also, aren't a lot of those charts suggesting that the difference in the dimensional fund performance is not statistically significant (with t stats under 2)?

 

 

Edited by Long Ball Larry

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38 minutes ago, Long Ball Larry said:

"Dimensional’s ability to better target the driving forces behind stock returns allows them to have outperformed other index funds."

So are dimensional funds basically looking at index funds and categorizing the investments within them and determining which of those categories are the biggest factors in the returns?  And then the dimensional funds isolate those subsets of investments that are the highest-performing and makes a fund out of them?

also, aren't a lot of those charts suggesting that the difference in the dimensional fund performance is not statistically significant (with t stats under 2)?

 

 

These are just factor funds, aka "smart beta."  Or "dumb alpha" as I like to call them. They poo-poo active management but these factor funds are just a different form of active management. There was a study recently published by tOSU researchers that basically said these factors are basically BS p-hacking and almost all are statistically insignificant; the ones that aren't don't have nearly the benefit promised.  This includes everyone's favorite "value stock" factor. 

If you're going to index, then index. If you want active, fine, just research in depth and minimize fees as much as possible. Don't fall for the BS dumb alpha circle jerk. 

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7 hours ago, Tiger Fan said:

@Dentist

IIRC, you were pretty knowledgeable on all things dividends?  What are you doing in that realm these days?

I still follow the yield hunters website and buy what he buys, mostly preferred stocks and exchange traded debt.  I don't buy much, most of my cash went towards a real estate transaction recently so I've been a bit out of the game.

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15 hours ago, Dentist said:

I still follow the yield hunters website and buy what he buys, mostly preferred stocks and exchange traded debt.  I don't buy much, most of my cash went towards a real estate transaction recently so I've been a bit out of the game.

thx

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16 hours ago, Dentist said:

I still follow the yield hunters website and buy what he buys, mostly preferred stocks and exchange traded debt.  I don't buy much, most of my cash went towards a real estate transaction recently so I've been a bit out of the game.

rental property?  I'm still trying to figure out whether buying a rental home in a beach community we like makes sense long term.  We're in no rush so hopefully there will be a downturn in that market in the next couple years, a buying opportunity.  But the current debate I'm having with the wife is whether to build a large cabin (I've mentioned this in other threads) on land we own, but the rental community isn't big so I doubt we'd rent it out.  But the cabin would be close enough to use a few times each month.  It's the whole investment vs. use discussion.  

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7 hours ago, -OZ- said:

rental property?  I'm still trying to figure out whether buying a rental home in a beach community we like makes sense long term.  We're in no rush so hopefully there will be a downturn in that market in the next couple years, a buying opportunity.  But the current debate I'm having with the wife is whether to build a large cabin (I've mentioned this in other threads) on land we own, but the rental community isn't big so I doubt we'd rent it out.  But the cabin would be close enough to use a few times each month.  It's the whole investment vs. use discussion.  

no i just bought a new nicer home, furniture, etc, total waste of cash

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27 minutes ago, Dentist said:

no i just bought a new nicer home, furniture, etc, total waste of cash

Do you really feel this way?  

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46 minutes ago, -OZ- said:

Do you really feel this way?  

definitely.  Everything is a waste outside of basic food, water, basic level shelter, basic transportation to your employment, retirement savings, health care, and elite level reconstructive and cosmetic dental work.

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1 hour ago, Dentist said:

definitely.  Everything is a waste outside of basic food, water, basic level shelter, basic transportation to your employment, retirement savings, health care, and elite level reconstructive and cosmetic dental work.

What do you charge per toof on veneers?

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My wife and I each double max out our 401k, we each do an IRA, we live in a shack, and we both have completed Invisalign treatment with regular cleanings 3x per year.

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