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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.

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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.
Can we agree to get rid of this type of argument forever? Looking at things from the viewpoint of a parent who's child was wronged is extremely biased and not where we should be coming from when forming opinions about how to run things.

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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.
Can we agree to get rid of this type of argument forever? Looking at things from the viewpoint of a parent who's child was wronged is extremely biased and not where we should be coming from when forming opinions about how to run things.
Fine with me, just pointing out that if you're going to use that argument, you should look at it both ways.

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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.
Who are the convicted murderers that have been released in the absence of exonerating evidence? Edited by Chaka

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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.
Who are the convicted murderers that have been released in the absence of exonerating evidence?
Do you think all convicted murderers spend the rest of their lives in prison?

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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.
Can we agree to get rid of this type of argument forever? Looking at things from the viewpoint of a parent who's child was wronged is extremely biased and not where we should be coming from when forming opinions about how to run things.
Then we should likewise get rid of the "if we execute one innocent person" argument since there hasn't been one proven case of an innocent person being executed. Edited by StrikeS2k

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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.
Who are the convicted murderers that have been released in the absence of exonerating evidence?
Really? A short list I found from a quick search:http://www.wesleylowe.com/repoff.html

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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.
Can we agree to get rid of this type of argument forever? Looking at things from the viewpoint of a parent who's child was wronged is extremely biased and not where we should be coming from when forming opinions about how to run things.
Then we should likewise get rid of the "if we execute one innocent person" argument since there hasn't been one proven case of an innocent person being executed.
:lmao:
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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.
Can we agree to get rid of this type of argument forever? Looking at things from the viewpoint of a parent who's child was wronged is extremely biased and not where we should be coming from when forming opinions about how to run things.
Then we should likewise get rid of the "if we execute one innocent person" argument since there hasn't been one proven case of an innocent person being executed.
:lmao:
Well, that's proof right there. :thumbup:

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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.
Can we agree to get rid of this type of argument forever? Looking at things from the viewpoint of a parent who's child was wronged is extremely biased and not where we should be coming from when forming opinions about how to run things.
Then we should likewise get rid of the "if we execute one innocent person" argument since there hasn't been one proven case of an innocent person being executed.
:lmao:
Well, that's proof right there. :thumbup:
You go ahead and keep your head in the sand. :thumbup:

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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.
Can we agree to get rid of this type of argument forever? Looking at things from the viewpoint of a parent who's child was wronged is extremely biased and not where we should be coming from when forming opinions about how to run things.
Then we should likewise get rid of the "if we execute one innocent person" argument since there hasn't been one proven case of an innocent person being executed.
:lmao:
Well, that's proof right there. :thumbup:
You go ahead and keep your head in the sand. :thumbup:
You can't prove my head is in the sand either. I bet you have no clue about my feelings about death penalty, including whether or not I believe anyone innocent has been executed. It doesn't change the FACT that there's never been a proven case of that happening and it's just a talking point for death penalty opponents.

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Authorities in Platte County, Mo., say the bodies of two women were found in a field after officials interrogated a suspect in their disappearance. The bodies have been identified as Britny Haarup and Ashley Key. Haarup, 19, and Key, 22, were reported missing, July 13, 2012, from Haarup's Edgerton home. The Kansas City Star reported on July 15 that the bodies were found near Trimble, Mo., in Clinton County. Authorities "were led" to the area by the suspect in case, Clifford B. Miller. The Trimble, Mo. man was charged Monday with two counts of first-degree murder. Miller, 31, told investigators he had smoked methamphetamine before he killed the two sisters in the northwest Missouri home.

Textbook case displaying the need and correct use of the death penalty. What will happen? He will be locked up for life and we will pay for it. What should be the price of a bullet to the back of the head will end up being over $1 milllion.

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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.
Can we agree to get rid of this type of argument forever? Looking at things from the viewpoint of a parent who's child was wronged is extremely biased and not where we should be coming from when forming opinions about how to run things.
Then we should likewise get rid of the "if we execute one innocent person" argument since there hasn't been one proven case of an innocent person being executed.
:lmao:
Well, that's proof right there. :thumbup:
You go ahead and keep your head in the sand. :thumbup:
You can't prove my head is in the sand either. I bet you have no clue about my feelings about death penalty, including whether or not I believe anyone innocent has been executed. It doesn't change the FACT that there's never been a proven case of that happening and it's just a talking point for death penalty opponents.
Carlos deluna down?

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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.
Can we agree to get rid of this type of argument forever? Looking at things from the viewpoint of a parent who's child was wronged is extremely biased and not where we should be coming from when forming opinions about how to run things.
Then we should likewise get rid of the "if we execute one innocent person" argument since there hasn't been one proven case of an innocent person being executed.
:lmao:
Well, that's proof right there. :thumbup:
Yeah no innocents were ever killed despite the fact that over 140 people have been exonerated so far by DNA. I am sure that before modern times we never jailed or executed any innocent men.

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The death penalty has never failed. That person is dead. They won't be coming back. Used correctly, the death penalty is the perfect deterrent. Kill? ok, you die too. Not next year, Not next decade. How about tomorrow.

States with the death penalty have higher rates of death penalty crimes than even states they share a border with. It doesn't work and it doesn't matter how fast you throw the switch. Texas never runs out of people to execute.

To that point - after such a great night last night - a sad day today:

Link

The planned execution of a 52-year-old woman has reignited a debate over the use of the death penalty. Texas has killed far more inmates than any other state.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Texas has executed nearly five times as many people as the next closest state
  • Inmate killed retired college professor in 1997
  • 500th execution stirs debate, both pro and con

HUNTSVILLE, Texas — Texas, the nation's most prolific executioner of criminals, is about to put its 500th inmate to death since the mid-1970s.

Barring a last-minute reprieve, Kimberly McCarthy, a 52-year-old former Black Panther wife, will be given a lethal injection of pentobarbital at around 6:10 p.m. Wednesday for the murder of a 70-year-old Dallas County woman during a 1997 robbery.

And while McCarthy's crime was a notorious one — she used a butcher knife and candelabra to beat and fatally stab a retired college professor — her death is likely to bring even more attention than her crime. The grim milestone of 500 executions here has reignited debate on both sides of the death penalty issue.

Texas is by far the most fatal of the nation's 34 death penalty states. Virginia places a distant second with 110 executions since the death penalty was federally reinstated in 1976, followed by Oklahoma with 104 and Florida with 77, according to the Death Penalty Information Center, a Washington-based group that advocates against the death penalty.

Executions do little to deter future criminals, said Kristin Houlé, executive director of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty. There have been 12 death row exonerations in Texas since 1976, she said. At least five executed offenders were "strongly suspected" of being innocent, she said.

"The system is rife with doubt and failures," Houlé said. "This is a punishment that can't be reversed."

Dudley Sharp, a Houston-based death penalty and victims advocate, said the death penalty absolutely deters some segment of the criminal population and, more important, brings fair justice to the families of victims. "Executed murders don't harm or murder again," he said.

Most Texans agree with Sharp. A University of Texas/Texas Tribune poll conducted last year showed nearly two-thirds of respondents remain overwhelmingly in support of the death penalty.

"Here in Texas, we tell people that if you commit really bad crimes, we're going to look to putting you to death," said Jim Willett, a former warden and current director of the Texas Prison Museum in Huntsville. "And we're going to follow through with it."

Executions sometimes draw throngs of protesters or advocates outside the red-brick death chamber in Huntsville, known as "The Walls Unit" for the soaring 20-foot-high walls that engulf the compound.

Despite Hollywood lore, offenders are given whatever the prison kitchen cooks up as a last meal, said John Hurt, a spokesman with the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, which oversees executions. Many respectfully decline dinner. "Most of them will tell you they don't have much of an appetite," he said.

Texas has been executing its murderers since the 1920s, most famously with an electric chair nicknamed "Old Sparky" by inmates, according to the Texas Prison Museum. In all, 361 men died in the electric chair until the Supreme Court declared the death penalty "cruel and unusual punishment" in 1972.

It was reinstated four years later. Texas has executed 499 offenders since, using lethal injection.

McCarthy, who is linked to two other slayings, already has had her execution date pushed back twice this year. Evidence showed McCarthy, a former nursing home therapist, used a butcher knife to sever her victim's finger to steal her wedding ring.

McCarthy's attorney, Maurie Levin, is trying to halt her execution again, contending black jurors improperly were excluded from her trial by Dallas County prosecutors.

Levin said there has been a "pervasive influence of race in administration of the death penalty and the inadequacy of counsel — a long-standing issue here."

Edited by whoknew

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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.

Can we agree to get rid of this type of argument forever? Looking at things from the viewpoint of a parent who's child was wronged is extremely biased and not where we should be coming from when forming opinions about how to run things.

Then we should likewise get rid of the "if we execute one innocent person" argument since there hasn't been one proven case of an innocent person being executed.

:lmao:

Well, that's proof right there. :thumbup:

You go ahead and keep your head in the sand. :thumbup:

You can't prove my head is in the sand either. I bet you have no clue about my feelings about death penalty, including whether or not I believe anyone innocent has been executed. It doesn't change the FACT that there's never been a proven case of that happening and it's just a talking point for death penalty opponents.

http://www.innocenceproject.org/Content/Cameron_Todd_Willingham_Wrongfully_Convicted_and_Executed_in_Texas.php

plenty more like this :shrug:

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Another sad day for Texas -

Texas to execute man convicted of 2002 murder during robbery
Reuters News
Monday, July 15, 2013


By Karen Brooks

AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) - Texas is scheduled to execute inmate John Manuel Quintanilla Jr. on Tuesday for the 2002 murder of a man during the robbery of a gaming room.

Quintanilla, 36, is scheduled to die by lethal injection after 6 p.m. local time (CST) in Huntsville, Texas.

Quintanilla, a habitual criminal with six burglary convictions on his record, was sentenced to die for the shooting death of Victor Billings in Victoria, Texas, about 120 miles southwest of Houston, in November 2002.

On the night of the deadly attack, Billings was with his wife at a game room when Quintanilla and another man entered the establishment carrying rifles and wearing masks made from pantyhose, according to a report by the Texas Attorney General's Office.

Quintanilla pointed the rifle at Billings' wife and an employee of the game room and demanded money, the report said.

When Billings, a retired sheriff's deputy, approached his wife, Quintanilla shot him twice in the torso, the report said.

Billings tried to disarm the gunman by grabbing the rifle, but Quintanilla shot him a third time as Billings was on his knees, the report said.

He and the other man escaped with $2,000, the report said. The other suspect, Jeffrey Bibb, is serving 60 years on the murder charge.

Quintanilla declined to allow his attorneys to present mitigating evidence in his defense during the trial's punishment phase and was sentenced to death in 2004, according to the attorney general's report.

If the execution is carried out, it will be the 19th in the U.S. and the 9th in Texas this year, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

Two inmates are scheduled for execution this week in Texas. The state has executed 500 inmates since 1982, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

Texas has executed more inmates than any other state since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976. A third Texas inmate is due to be executed in late July.

Edited by whoknew

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Somehow I think if that one life, which is a ridiculously low number given the number of people who are on death row that have been released, was your child you'd think that rate was a little too high.

It's not just one. And we'll get back to you to get your thoughts after you've been wrongfully convicted. You might have a different opinion on that point.

Likewise, you'd probably be singing a different tune if your child was killed by a convicted murderer who was released. Goes both ways.

Can we agree to get rid of this type of argument forever? Looking at things from the viewpoint of a parent who's child was wronged is extremely biased and not where we should be coming from when forming opinions about how to run things.

Then we should likewise get rid of the "if we execute one innocent person" argument since there hasn't been one proven case of an innocent person being executed.

:lmao:

Well, that's proof right there. :thumbup:

You go ahead and keep your head in the sand. :thumbup:

You can't prove my head is in the sand either. I bet you have no clue about my feelings about death penalty, including whether or not I believe anyone innocent has been executed. It doesn't change the FACT that there's never been a proven case of that happening and it's just a talking point for death penalty opponents.

http://www.innocenceproject.org/Content/Cameron_Todd_Willingham_Wrongfully_Convicted_and_Executed_in_Texas.php

plenty more like this :shrug:

:lmao:

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Another sad day for Texas -

Texas to execute man convicted of 2002 murder during robbery

Reuters News

Monday, July 15, 2013

By Karen Brooks

AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) - Texas is scheduled to execute inmate John Manuel Quintanilla Jr. on Tuesday for the 2002 murder of a man during the robbery of a gaming room.

Quintanilla, 36, is scheduled to die by lethal injection after 6 p.m. local time (CST) in Huntsville, Texas.

Quintanilla, a habitual criminal with six burglary convictions on his record, was sentenced to die for the shooting death of Victor Billings in Victoria, Texas, about 120 miles southwest of Houston, in November 2002.

On the night of the deadly attack, Billings was with his wife at a game room when Quintanilla and another man entered the establishment carrying rifles and wearing masks made from pantyhose, according to a report by the Texas Attorney General's Office.

Quintanilla pointed the rifle at Billings' wife and an employee of the game room and demanded money, the report said.

When Billings, a retired sheriff's deputy, approached his wife, Quintanilla shot him twice in the torso, the report said.

Billings tried to disarm the gunman by grabbing the rifle, but Quintanilla shot him a third time as Billings was on his knees, the report said.

He and the other man escaped with $2,000, the report said. The other suspect, Jeffrey Bibb, is serving 60 years on the murder charge.

Quintanilla declined to allow his attorneys to present mitigating evidence in his defense during the trial's punishment phase and was sentenced to death in 2004, according to the attorney general's report.

If the execution is carried out, it will be the 19th in the U.S. and the 9th in Texas this year, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

Two inmates are scheduled for execution this week in Texas. The state has executed 500 inmates since 1982, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.

Texas has executed more inmates than any other state since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976. A third Texas inmate is due to be executed in late July.

I got no problem executing this loser just for the 6 burglaries. Exactly what would the point be in keeping him around. He's a proven loser at life.

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A National Academy of Sciences study estimates that 4 percent of the people sentenced to death are innocent. The study calls this estimate "conservative."

I'm more concerned with the percentage of innocent people actually executed than I am the percentage that are convicted. Because the conviction is separate from the sentencing. So every person in this study would still have been convicted. That doesn't really tell us anything. No one has ever suggested that our system doesn't convict innocent people. What we don't know is how many innocent people have actually been executed.

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A National Academy of Sciences study estimates that 4 percent of the people sentenced to death are innocent. The study calls this estimate "conservative."

I'm more concerned with the percentage of innocent people actually executed than I am the percentage that are convicted. Because the conviction is separate from the sentencing. So every person in this study would still have been convicted. That doesn't really tell us anything. No one has ever suggested that our system doesn't convict innocent people. What we don't know is how many innocent people have actually been executed.

I think it's quite useful to know how many innocent people are convicted. Being convicted is a real drag. It's difficult to evaluate how many innocent people are convicted and receive life sentences, but the NAS study sheds light on the subject by looking only at death penalty cases, which are easier to evaluate (because post-conviction exonerating evidence is more likely to be allowed), and probably have a similar error rate.

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A National Academy of Sciences study estimates that 4 percent of the people sentenced to death are innocent. The study calls this estimate "conservative."

I'm more concerned with the percentage of innocent people actually executed than I am the percentage that are convicted. Because the conviction is separate from the sentencing. So every person in this study would still have been convicted. That doesn't really tell us anything. No one has ever suggested that our system doesn't convict innocent people. What we don't know is how many innocent people have actually been executed.

I think it's quite useful to know how many innocent people are convicted. Being convicted is a real drag. It's difficult to evaluate how many innocent people are convicted and receive life sentences, but the NAS study sheds light on the subject by looking only at death penalty cases, which are easier to evaluate (because post-conviction exonerating evidence is more likely to be allowed), and probably have a similar error rate.

I agree that being wrongly convicted is a drag. My point is this really doesn't tell us anything with regard to the death penalty debate. It just tells us people are wrongly convicted. And we already knew that.

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A National Academy of Sciences study estimates that 4 percent of the people sentenced to death are innocent. The study calls this estimate "conservative."

I'm more concerned with the percentage of innocent people actually executed than I am the percentage that are convicted. Because the conviction is separate from the sentencing. So every person in this study would still have been convicted. That doesn't really tell us anything. No one has ever suggested that our system doesn't convict innocent people. What we don't know is how many innocent people have actually been executed.

I think it's quite useful to know how many innocent people are convicted. Being convicted is a real drag. It's difficult to evaluate how many innocent people are convicted and receive life sentences, but the NAS study sheds light on the subject by looking only at death penalty cases, which are easier to evaluate (because post-conviction exonerating evidence is more likely to be allowed), and probably have a similar error rate.

I agree that being wrongly convicted is a drag. My point is this really doesn't tell us anything with regard to the death penalty debate. It just tells us people are wrongly convicted. And we already knew that.

And we know wrongfully convicted people have been released from death row. Your insistence that no innocent person has been executed really comes off as wishful thinking and grasping for straws.

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A National Academy of Sciences study estimates that 4 percent of the people sentenced to death are innocent. The study calls this estimate "conservative."

I'm more concerned with the percentage of innocent people actually executed than I am the percentage that are convicted. Because the conviction is separate from the sentencing. So every person in this study would still have been convicted. That doesn't really tell us anything. No one has ever suggested that our system doesn't convict innocent people. What we don't know is how many innocent people have actually been executed.

I think it's quite useful to know how many innocent people are convicted. Being convicted is a real drag. It's difficult to evaluate how many innocent people are convicted and receive life sentences, but the NAS study sheds light on the subject by looking only at death penalty cases, which are easier to evaluate (because post-conviction exonerating evidence is more likely to be allowed), and probably have a similar error rate.

I agree that being wrongly convicted is a drag. My point is this really doesn't tell us anything with regard to the death penalty debate. It just tells us people are wrongly convicted. And we already knew that.

And we know wrongfully convicted people have been released from death row. Your insistence that no innocent person has been executed really comes off as wishful thinking and grasping for straws.

I have NEVER said this. But, since you know my stance so well, please do me a favor and outline the reforms I've proposed re: the death penalty. TIA.

Edited by StrikeS2k

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At that point, witnesses said, things began to go awry. Mr. Lockett’s body moved, his foot shook, and he mumbled, witnesses said.

At 6 :37, he tried to rise and exhaled loudly.

Mr. Lockett was convicted of shooting a 19-year-old woman in 1999 and having her buried alive.

Seems like it went fine.

Without effective sedation, the second two drugs are known to cause agonizing suffocation and pain. :thumbup:

Edited by lod01

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Is receiving life in prison without parole even though you are innocent better than being executed? (Ignoring the case of Andy Dufrense of course)

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Is receiving life in prison without parole even though you are innocent better than being executed?

Pretty much everyone convicted of a capital crime seems to think so.

Did you ask them or is this speculation?

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Is receiving life in prison without parole even though you are innocent better than being executed?

Pretty much everyone convicted of a capital crime seems to think so.

Did you ask them or is this speculation?

Neither.

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At that point, witnesses said, things began to go awry. Mr. Lockett’s body moved, his foot shook, and he mumbled, witnesses said.

At 6 :37, he tried to rise and exhaled loudly.

Mr. Lockett was convicted of shooting a 19-year-old woman in 1999 and having her buried alive.

Seems like it went fine.

Without effective sedation, the second two drugs are known to cause agonizing suffocation and pain. :thumbup:

Probably still more humane then how he killed his victim.

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Is receiving life in prison without parole even though you are innocent better than being executed?

Pretty much everyone convicted of a capital crime seems to think so.

Did you ask them or is this speculation?

Neither.

Link then?

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Is receiving life in prison without parole even though you are innocent better than being executed?

Pretty much everyone convicted of a capital crime seems to think so.

Did you ask them or is this speculation?

Neither.

Link then?

I know I'm being a little argumentative, but if you were innocent and you had to choose between a life of max security prison, dying there vs. an execution after a year or so, personally I'd choose execution.

I think the reason most would choose life in prison is for the CHANCE that you could get out someday. That maybe you could be exonerated and released. I guess I'm just wondering what kind of life being in prison would be like if you knew you were never getting out. Isn't a big reason for people not wanting the death penalty tied to the hope of life outside again?

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Is receiving life in prison without parole even though you are innocent better than being executed?

Pretty much everyone convicted of a capital crime seems to think so.

Did you ask them or is this speculation?

Neither.

Link then?

I know I'm being a little argumentative, but if you were innocent and you had to choose between a life of max security prison, dying there vs. an execution after a year or so, personally I'd choose execution.

I think the reason most would choose life in prison is for the CHANCE that you could get out someday. That maybe you could be exonerated and released. I guess I'm just wondering what kind of life being in prison would be like if you knew you were never getting out. Isn't a big reason for people not wanting the death penalty tied to the hope of life outside again?

Survival is the strongest instinct we have. It's easy to say you'd choose death in a hypothetical situation. I'm guessing you'd sing a different tune walking toward the electric chair.

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The end result is all that matters. Like winning a game ugly.

Why do they fool around with these concoctions anyway? A hefty overdose of heroin will do the same in a more pleasant manner.

Edited by Da Guru

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The simplest way to do this would be to use an anestheia drug to knock the person out. You could reasonably get a medical tech to do this and not involve a MD. Then, you gas them with Nitrogen delivered by a mask. It's not toxic to the people standing around and doesn't have the stigma of the holocaust surrounding it.

The reason you would knock them out first is that in the CA gas chamber they found that few of the inmates ever actually inhaled the HCn they were using. They were basically committing suicide by holding their breath instead.

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I think the way to go is the electric chair with a dry sponge like in The Green Mile. :football:

I am not against stoning by the victims family.

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So why can't we just od them on morphine. The LD is pretty low and you can get it easily.

Why bring me into this?

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The simplest way to do this would be to use an anestheia drug to knock the person out. You could reasonably get a medical tech to do this and not involve a MD. Then, you gas them with Nitrogen delivered by a mask. It's not toxic to the people standing around and doesn't have the stigma of the holocaust surrounding it.

The reason you would knock them out first is that in the CA gas chamber they found that few of the inmates ever actually inhaled the HCn they were using. They were basically committing suicide by holding their breath instead.

Simplest way is to cut their head off.

Edited by Sinn Fein

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