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I would suggest that anyone who wants the mythical do-it-all bike go with a steel 1X gravel bike. No, it can't do it all, but in general, depending on the type, it can do 95% of what we want/need it to do.

Kona Rove ST (what I have) and Surly Straggler come to mind as somewhat affordable, excellent optios

:shrug:

 

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1 hour ago, the moops said:

I would suggest that anyone who wants the mythical do-it-all bike go with a steel 1X gravel bike. No, it can't do it all, but in general, depending on the type, it can do 95% of what we want/need it to do.

Kona Rove ST (what I have) and Surly Straggler come to mind as somewhat affordable, excellent optios

:shrug:

 

Didn’t mean to come off as wanting a magical bike. I fully understand I will need to make sacrifices and in an ideal world with unlimited money and storage space, I would have a bike for each occasion. I’m on a budget (wife is a teacher who got laid off due to proposed cuts to education, and business has been really difficult for me with the SIP) so I’d like to check the right boxes rather than checking all of them.

*turns in FBG card*

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Posted (edited)

This is my second BD bike and I've had good experiences both times.  I went to the local bike stores both times and couldn't find anything close to comparable to what i was getting on BD.  Setup wasn't that bad, first bike was an aluminum frame, no issues.  Most recent purchase was carbon and I was very careful to not overtighten.  I figure I should know how to maintain my bike anyway because if I break down on the road I'll need to know how to fix it.

Edited by lumpy19
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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, Dickies said:

Yea, when I look at bikes there seem to be a lot more varieties than the last time I shopped for a bike.  I've always bought used bikes, but looked around at the new ones to get an idea of what I want.  The choices are overwhelming and I'm probably overthinking it.  About half of my rides are with my kids, so I'm also concerned that something that is way easier to ride around town will give me absolutely no workout when I ride with the kids.  

The Trek FX would be great for this. The choices out there now are overwhelming with a type of bike available for seemingly every specific ride. It's stupid. Don't sell a ride with the kids short. It probably won't get your heart racing and you won't be climbing monster hills but you'll get some work in and be spending time with the kids. 

14 hours ago, Sand said:

My comment:  I want one.

Second comment:  Wife would kill me if I showed up at home with one.

:lmao: You too? I keep hearing about the gravel revolution but I don't get it. Maybe you can help me understand. I have 3 bikes now, all Trek. A Domane, a FX Sport and a Marlin. All have their place but I look at a gravel bike and think, if I slap some wider tires on the FX, WALA! Gravel bike! What am I missing?

12 hours ago, lumpy19 said:

I bought this gravel bike a month or 2 ago

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/motobecane/carbon-disc-brake-road-bikes/immortal-disc-pro-discbrake-carbon-road-bikes.htm

Very happy with it, the wider tires really help out on the terrible roads around here.  Find the position on the bike to be quite comfortable.  I've put about 100 miles on it so far and no issues.

Guy in the cube next to me is a rider and he buys all his stuff from BD, loves them. Some assembly required though so if you aren't mechanically inclined, might be a challenge but overall i think they are pretty straightforward. All three of my bikes have required some assembly and it's not been a problem although they didn't come from BD, I assume they are similar.

Edited by beer 30
Check out the video in the link above, this is the level of assembly required and the same thing I had to do with my bikes.

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Based on my internet research, BD and specifically Motobecane bikes, are good quality and you can save a lot of money if you know what components to look for and have an ability set up the bike.  Savings on their lower level stuff might not be worth what you're giving up by buying elsewhere, but it sounds like you can save a lot of coin on their mid to higher end stuff.  Some have given testimony that they take the bike to their LBS to have set up and the technicians are impressed by the result.  

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On 6/5/2020 at 8:07 AM, beer 30 said:

 

:lmao: You too? I keep hearing about the gravel revolution but I don't get it. Maybe you can help me understand. I have 3 bikes now, all Trek. A Domane, a FX Sport and a Marlin. All have their place but I look at a gravel bike and think, if I slap some wider tires on the FX, WALA! Gravel bike! What am I missing?

Probably nothing.  But I'm a roadie.  My S5 will literally take a max of 24mms tires.  Designed to be narrow.  My TT bike ain't gonna do it, either.

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calf injuries have kept me from running as much so switched over to my bike that I had used off and on.  Used to be much more on trails and things...an old Trek 4900.  Well, old enough the tires were worn pretty good.  Replaced the old mountain bike knobby tires with more of a hybrid/road tire since I pretty much just ride on the roads around here now for fitness.  Gave it a good cleaning and relubed everything last week and things much smoother now.  Need to do some work on the rear derailleur as it isn't as smooth as Id like it.

Thought about just selling and finding a bike more suitable for my needs...but always liked the fit of this bike and hard to get the right value selling and then turning around to buy another.

Son is still not quite tall enough to need a bike that size...though, may see how he fits on it...could be his next bike (moving on from his old BMX style) and then Id change what I have.  But for now...it rides well and fits me well.  Id hate to see it go.

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Good luck getting a bike right now. Virtually no stock anywhere. It’s crazy. Lots of the major manufacturers are basically sold out completely of their 2020 line and scrambling to try to get their 2021 line in earlier than they had planned. Even then you’re looking at having to pre-order for delivery in August or September.

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On 6/5/2020 at 10:01 AM, Captain Cranks said:

Based on my internet research, BD and specifically Motobecane bikes, are good quality and you can save a lot of money if you know what components to look for and have an ability set up the bike.  Savings on their lower level stuff might not be worth what you're giving up by buying elsewhere, but it sounds like you can save a lot of coin on their mid to higher end stuff.  Some have given testimony that they take the bike to their LBS to have set up and the technicians are impressed by the result.  

I've got a few bikes from BD, mostly beach cruisers, but they have held up well.  I do have a Motobecane hybrid that is probably 15 years old at this point that is still great.

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Meh, like all things that people panic buy, good chance the fatties will be putting their bikes up on eBay for half price in 4-6 months after they sit in a garage collecting dust.

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1 hour ago, GroveDiesel said:

Good luck getting a bike right now. Virtually no stock anywhere. It’s crazy. Lots of the major manufacturers are basically sold out completely of their 2020 line and scrambling to try to get their 2021 line in earlier than they had planned. Even then you’re looking at having to pre-order for delivery in August or September.

Yep.  That's forced some of us to hit the used market.  Most are aware of the market conditions and you're seeing offers for used bikes at new bike prices.  Occasionally you'll find someone asleep at the switch and offering at bicycle blue book value.  

The other day an old lady offered a trek hybrid with bbb of $175 for $195.  I hit her up within 15 minutes of posting and it was already spoken for.  A couple hours later it was back on the market by the new owner for $325.  

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On 6/4/2020 at 11:00 PM, Dickies said:

Curious about them too. Are they really that good of a deal compared to some of the other brands?  I’m out of the loop as far as what components to look for

I've purchased 2 MTBs from BikesDirect.  Both were easy to hook up... anything you don't know how to do is something you should learn anyway, and Youtube knows everything.

I did some good research on components last fall before buying my son a new MTB.  I'll refresh myself then post here.

On 6/4/2020 at 7:41 PM, Captain Cranks said:

The lockdown has sent me into the biking world for the first time.  At first I thought I needed a hybrid for neighborhood biking, but a quick, but tough detour through a construction site with my wife's hybrid made me realize I need something with more off-road capability.  Thus I started going down the cyclocross world.  Then my friend said he wants to get back into MTB, so I began researching mountain biking.  

Since I don't think I can find a 'do it all' bike, I'm looking to buy a cyclocross bike and a full suspension MTB.  The cyclocross bike seems relatively straight-forward in terms of determining what I need.  However, I'm completely lost in the MTB world.  There are so many different frame designs, shocks, and other components that may or may not be tailored for the kind of riding I'd be doing.  Where should I start in determining the kind of bike I need?  Here's an example of a riding park near me to give a sense of my needs.  Balm Boyette 

 

IMO a full suspension MTB is overkill.  It's more complex (more parts to fail) and more expensive, and I don't see the advantage.  A buddy and I bought MTBs at the same time.  He bought a full suspension, I bought a hardtail.  On the trails near us (very nice singletracks, but not many rocky or dropoff spots), he had no advantage and wished he hadn't spent the money.  We took a couple of trips up to Copper Harbor (silver level ride center), which was very rocky with notable dropoffs, and by the end he was just more annoyed at his purchase since our hardtails did perfectly fine.  Maybe if you live in Colorado or are quite overweight and worried about saddle soreness, I could see it, but for most, it just doesn't seem to offer any real advantages to get full suspension.

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On 6/5/2020 at 10:01 AM, Captain Cranks said:

Based on my internet research, BD and specifically Motobecane bikes, are good quality and you can save a lot of money if you know what components to look for and have an ability set up the bike.  Savings on their lower level stuff might not be worth what you're giving up by buying elsewhere, but it sounds like you can save a lot of coin on their mid to higher end stuff.  Some have given testimony that they take the bike to their LBS to have set up and the technicians are impressed by the result.  

Motobecane and Gravity have been good in my experience, I've never tried Windsor.

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2 hours ago, Captain Cranks said:

Yep.  That's forced some of us to hit the used market.  Most are aware of the market conditions and you're seeing offers for used bikes at new bike prices.  Occasionally you'll find someone asleep at the switch and offering at bicycle blue book value.  

The other day an old lady offered a trek hybrid with bbb of $175 for $195.  I hit her up within 15 minutes of posting and it was already spoken for.  A couple hours later it was back on the market by the new owner for $325.  

I’ve got a buddy who has a nice little side gig buying and selling bikes. Some he fixes up, some he manages to flip with a nice profit within hours or days of buying. I imagine he’s cleaning up right now.

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Posted (edited)

Some stuff I found last fall when buying a bike for my son...

Overall guides I thought were worth bookmarking:

Components I found to be significant: derailleurs, shocks, brakes.  Most other components seem to be all above some minimum level of quality that matters to me, so I chose based on those components.

Derailleurs:  Rough map by manufacturer.  Format is Shimano number, Shimano name, SRAM name.

  • 700 - Tourney - x
  • 800 - Tourney - x
  • 2000 - Altus - x
  • 3000 - Acera 8/9 - X3/X4
  • 5000 - Alivio - X5
  • 6000 - Deore - X7
  • 7000 - XT - NX
  • 8000 - SLX - x

I've accepted some communal wisdom that says your ideal state is to get above the Shimano A names, so Deore or X7 are the level I really wanted to get.  Rear derailleur is much more important than front derailleur.

Shocks:  Rough map by manufacturer.  Format is RST model - Suntour model - RockShox model.

  • x - XCT - XC28
  • Blaze - XCM - x
  • Saturn - XCR - XC30
  • x - Raidon - XC32
  • x - x - Recon

I wasn't able to come up with a consensus dividing line here, so I was just looking for the best I could get, and this chart helped me compare across manufacturers.

Brakes: Get hydraulic disc brakes, not mechanical.  I have mechanical, and every time I ride someone's hydraulic disc bike I'm impressed and envious.  Rough map by manufacturer.  Format is Shimano # - Shimano name - Tektro model - SRAM model (I think SRAM bought Tektro, but both lines still existed last fall).

  • 800 - Tourney - Aquila - x
  • 2000 - Altus - Novela - x
  • 3000 - Acera - Draco - Level
  • 4000 - Alivio - Aurigo M290 (chart is unclear here)
  • 6000 - Deore - HDC300 - Level T
  • 7000 - SLX/Shado+ - x - Level TL
  • x - x - x - Guide R

For number of gears, I looked at http://gears.mtbcrosscountry.com/#26/2.25I1123I342, found the gear ratio for the gears I actually use 99% of the time, and found that it was a gear ratio of 0.75 to 3.18.  Based on that, I ended up getting my son a 1x10 SRAM shifter system that covered almost all of that range (0.79 to 3.02) without the complexity of a front derailleur.

I ended up getting him a BikesDirect Gravity HD 1x10 with Suntour XCT, X7 rear derailleur, and M365 hydraulic brakes for $499.  I really like his bike.

I'll try pasting what else I found at various places - it might not look great, but maybe it's useful.  The first dozen or so are Bikesdirect, the rest were from other spots I could find.

Cost / Model / Forks / FD / RD / Brakes

  • 399 / Gravity HD Comp / Sun XCT / TX800 / TX800 / M365
  • 399 / Windsor Trail FS29 / Sun SF14 / TY700 / Acera / Novela
  • 399 / Moto Fantom29 Sport / Sun XCT / Sun 8-XCC202 / Acera / Novela
  • 349 / Gravity HD Trail  / Sun ??? / TY500 / TY300 / T M285
  • 399 / Moto Fantom29 X4 / Sun XCT / SRAM 3.0 / SRAM x4 / Draco
  • 499 / Gravity HD Elite / Sun XCT / TX800 / Altus / M365
  • 599 / Gravity HD Pro / RS XC30 / TX800 / Acera / M365
  • 599 / Moto Fantom29 Trail / Sun XCM / Acera / Deore / Tektro ?
  • 699 / Moto Fantom29 Comp / RS XC30 / Deore / SLX / Guide R
  • 599 / Gravity HD 1x10 / Sun XCT / None / X7 / M365
  • 499 / Gravity HD 1x10 / Sun XCT / None / X7 / M365

 

  • 500 / Specialized Pitch / Sun XCT / TX800 / TX800 / Radius M
  • 550 / Specialized Rockhopper / Sun XCT / Altus / TX800 / Altus
  • 710 / Spec Rockhopper Sport / Sun XCT / Altus / Acera / Altus
  • 725 / Spec Pitch Comp / Sun XCM / Altus / Acera / Altus
  • 810 / Spec Rockhopper Comp / Sun XCM / microshift 2 / Acera / Altus
  • 1010 / Spec Rockhopper Expert / Sun XCR / microshift 2 / Deore / 
Edited by Tick
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Posted (edited)

After you get the bike, though, you'll need a bunch of gear.  Make sure you budget for that.  Needed:

  • Helmet
  • Water bottle (Camelbak Podium is my favorite, this is actually good.
  • Saddlebag (I like this one, I need the space for T1 diabetes supplies)
  • Clip shoes and pedals (Son likes these, I like my Crank Bros pedals and Shimano shoes)
  • Multitool (Topeak Alien2 is huge but has everything, Crank Bros is good)
  • A spare rear derailleur hanger - these are a bear to match up, so get one from wherever you get the bike at the time you buy it.  It's a part designed to break, like a shear pin kind of... so always have a spare.
  • I really like having a real biking jersey with pockets in back to put my phone in.  Here's an inexpensive one.
  • Not required, but a bike stand and tool kit are really nice to have if you're planning to maintain your own bike.  I have this bike stand and bought tools piecemeal, but a kit would be a good idea if you're starting fresh and planning ahead.

For me, Nashbar and Amazon have been the best place to buy these accessories.  I really like Wirecutter for guides, but their bike guides are somewhat commuter-focused.  They do have guides to saddlebags and multitools, though.

Edited by Tick
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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Tick said:

I've purchased 2 MTBs from BikesDirect.  Both were easy to hook up... anything you don't know how to do is something you should learn anyway, and Youtube knows everything.

I did some good research on components last fall before buying my son a new MTB.  I'll refresh myself then post here.

IMO a full suspension MTB is overkill.  It's more complex (more parts to fail) and more expensive, and I don't see the advantage.  A buddy and I bought MTBs at the same time.  He bought a full suspension, I bought a hardtail.  On the trails near us (very nice singletracks, but not many rocky or dropoff spots), he had no advantage and wished he hadn't spent the money.  We took a couple of trips up to Copper Harbor (silver level ride center), which was very rocky with notable dropoffs, and by the end he was just more annoyed at his purchase since our hardtails did perfectly fine.  Maybe if you live in Colorado or are quite overweight and worried about saddle soreness, I could see it, but for most, it just doesn't seem to offer any real advantages to get full suspension.

Thanks a ton.  This is very helpful.  Wish I could give you more likes.  😁

Edited by Captain Cranks

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Tick said:

Derailleurs:  Rough map by manufacturer.  Format is Shimano number, Shimano name, SRAM name.

  • 700 - Tourney - x
  • 800 - Tourney - x
  • 2000 - Altus - x
  • 3000 - Acera 8/9 - X3/X4
  • 5000 - Alivio - X5
  • 6000 - Deore - X7
  • 7000 - XT - NX
  • 8000 - SLX - x

I've accepted some communal wisdom that says your ideal state is to get above the Shimano A names, so Deore or X7 are the level I really wanted to get.  Rear derailleur is much more important than front derailleur.

 

To piggyback on this topic, here's a good article that differentiates the groupsets.  MTB groupsets

Edited by Captain Cranks

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I went with the shimano xt 1x11 groupset a couple years back.    One of the best decisions I've ever made with my mtb.   

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12 minutes ago, NutterButter said:

I went with the shimano xt 1x11 groupset a couple years back.    One of the best decisions I've ever made with my mtb.   

Can you expand upon why that is?

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41 minutes ago, Captain Cranks said:
54 minutes ago, NutterButter said:

I went with the shimano xt 1x11 groupset a couple years back.    One of the best decisions I've ever made with my mtb.   

Can you expand upon why that is?

Both my bikes are 1x11. I see no reason to have a double chainring up front. The 1x11 has nearly as wide of gear range and is plenty wide enough for 99% of riders. The simplicity is nice.

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On 6/5/2020 at 8:07 AM, beer 30 said:

 

:lmao: You too? I keep hearing about the gravel revolution but I don't get it. Maybe you can help me understand. I have 3 bikes now, all Trek. A Domane, a FX Sport and a Marlin. All have their place but I look at a gravel bike and think, if I slap some wider tires on the FX, WALA! Gravel bike! What am I missing?

I think you can only get a max tire of 38mm on that bike though, right?

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1 hour ago, the moops said:

Both my bikes are 1x11. I see no reason to have a double chainring up front. The 1x11 has nearly as wide of gear range and is plenty wide enough for 99% of riders. The simplicity is nice.

Exactly.    It makes things so much simpler without any real loss in capability.    No more having to coordinate between the two derailleurs.   I see no reason not to go this route. 

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Posted (edited)
On 6/4/2020 at 11:16 PM, the moops said:

Kona Rove ST (what I have) and Surly Straggler come to mind as somewhat affordable, excellent optios

This is what was recommended to me by a friend's brother who works at a local-ish bike shop. I definitely want to support that local shop anyway, so nice to see his recommendation being endorsed by you as well.

Edited by Northern Voice
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44 minutes ago, Northern Voice said:

This is what was recommended to me by a friend's brother who works at a local-ish bike shop. I definitely want to support that local shop anyway, so nice to see his recommendation being endorsed by you as well.

It comes in a sweet purple color too

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2 hours ago, the moops said:

I think you can only get a max tire of 38mm on that bike though, right?

38 or 39, not sure which and can’t seem to find info for it online for some reason

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7 minutes ago, beer 30 said:
3 hours ago, the moops said:

I think you can only get a max tire of 38mm on that bike though, right?

38 or 39, not sure which and can’t seem to find info for it online for some reason

Larger tire size is a big draw of the gravel bike. 38/39 doesn't really cut it for some offraoding stuff

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52 minutes ago, the moops said:

Larger tire size is a big draw of the gravel bike. 38/39 doesn't really cut it for some offraoding stuff

Thanks, I’m lost when it comes to sizing bike tires. I’d like to put bigger/wider tires on the FX since I’m still riding on the road slicks it came on. Want something with some tread on them for rain and the rough roads around here. Just have no idea how to size it so I don’t buy something that has no hope of fitting the existing rims.

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Any advice from Bike Guys on Child Seats?  I have a Trek mountain bike with street tires, which i'll be riding with my wife and her hybrid around neighborhoods, light trails.  

I like the idea of the front mount...vs the back mount...just not sure of stability, impact on pedaling, etc.

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:blackdot:

 

We're transitioning from NYC to Boise and they've got a lot of trails as well as riverside paths. I'm looking forward to going through this thread and finding the right bikes for the two of us.

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1 hour ago, jamny said:

:blackdot:

 

We're transitioning from NYC to Boise and they've got a lot of trails as well as riverside paths. I'm looking forward to going through this thread and finding the right bikes for the two of us.

I have inlaws in Boise... I looked into the trails there, and they're incredible.  Gold-level Ride Center per IMBA.

https://www.singletracks.com/mtb-trails/imbas-new-ride-centers-from-1-to-6-gold-level-centers/

https://swimba.org/ has information, but I'm not finding a good narrative guide... it seems to me that mtbproject and Facebook have made it much more difficult to learn about a set of trails in an area.

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13 minutes ago, Tick said:

I have inlaws in Boise... I looked into the trails there, and they're incredible.  Gold-level Ride Center per IMBA.

https://www.singletracks.com/mtb-trails/imbas-new-ride-centers-from-1-to-6-gold-level-centers/

https://swimba.org/ has information, but I'm not finding a good narrative guide... it seems to me that mtbproject and Facebook have made it much more difficult to learn about a set of trails in an area.

Thanks and I appreciate your input on this page alone. We've driven around the foothills and the trails look incredible.  I've never really done much trail riding but its definitely going to be my exercise of choice. My wife is a gym rat and likes running too but is deathly afraid of snakes so that will take a little longer for her...lol

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picked up an old Puch Cavalier at an estate sale. Has some swapped out parts like maybe the handlebars and definitely the saddle. Still rides pretty nice, though. 

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17 hours ago, jamny said:

We're transitioning from NYC to Boise and they've got a lot of trails as well as riverside paths. I'm looking forward to going through this thread and finding the right bikes for the two of us.

Looks pretty badass https://boisetrails.com/

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19 hours ago, gump said:

Any advice from Bike Guys on Child Seats?  I have a Trek mountain bike with street tires, which i'll be riding with my wife and her hybrid around neighborhoods, light trails.  

I like the idea of the front mount...vs the back mount...just not sure of stability, impact on pedaling, etc.

How old is the kid? I like the front ones, but once they get a certain size, it is impossible to pedal. Wouldn't worry too much about the handling. So if you have the cash, you may want the front one now, then sell it and get a rear one once the kid gets to a certain size

 

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36 minutes ago, the moops said:

How old is the kid? I like the front ones, but once they get a certain size, it is impossible to pedal. Wouldn't worry too much about the handling. So if you have the cash, you may want the front one now, then sell it and get a rear one once the kid gets to a certain size

 

2.5 yr old...weighs about 30 pounds.  The front mount option i linked says ages 2-6 and up to 110 pounds.  Any idea how big/old you can use to?

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8 minutes ago, gump said:

2.5 yr old...weighs about 30 pounds.  The front mount option i linked says ages 2-6 and up to 110 pounds.  Any idea how big/old you can use to?

110 pounds! That is one giant 6 year old. Holy #### :lmao:

I stopped using the front seat at aboutage 4 I think. My kids are small though

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21 hours ago, gump said:

Any advice from Bike Guys on Child Seats?  I have a Trek mountain bike with street tires, which i'll be riding with my wife and her hybrid around neighborhoods, light trails.  

I like the idea of the front mount...vs the back mount...just not sure of stability, impact on pedaling, etc.

These ones rock.  If your kid can't hold on and falls off - you know, Rule 5.  

Had a blast with my kids with that thing.  Nothing like the kid telling you to go faster up a 9% hill and then telling you how much he helped pedal up.  Also I'll never tell the wife the speeds I hit with the kid on that thing.  

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4 minutes ago, Sand said:

These ones rock.  If your kid can't hold on and falls off - you know, Rule 5.  

Had a blast with my kids with that thing.  Nothing like the kid telling you to go faster up a 9% hill and then telling you how much he helped pedal up.  Also I'll never tell the wife the speeds I hit with the kid on that thing.  

I was looking at those...glad to hear...i think that's Stage 2, like Moops says, when he gets older.

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5 minutes ago, gump said:
10 minutes ago, Sand said:

These ones rock.  If your kid can't hold on and falls off - you know, Rule 5.  

Had a blast with my kids with that thing.  Nothing like the kid telling you to go faster up a 9% hill and then telling you how much he helped pedal up.  Also I'll never tell the wife the speeds I hit with the kid on that thing.  

I was looking at those...glad to hear...i think that's Stage 2, like Moops says, when he gets older.

Our boys are two years apart. I have managed some werid ### configurations getting them on my bike.

youngest in front seat,  oldest in rear seat. 

oldest in front seat, youngest in Burley.

oldest on tag along, youngest front seat.

youngest in Burley, oldest on tagalong attached to Burley.

And crazily enough, oldest on tagalong, youngest on another tagalong attached to first tagalong (do not recommend)

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My front derailleur was misbehaving so I pulled it off all together.  I do like the simplicity of one derailleur now, so my next bike I think that is the route I will go.

Side note for any of you who want to do your own maintenance check out Seth’s Bike Hacks on the tube.

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21 hours ago, jamny said:

:blackdot:

 

We're transitioning from NYC to Boise and they've got a lot of trails as well as riverside paths. I'm looking forward to going through this thread and finding the right bikes for the two of us.

What the Clearview Expressway isn't sufficient for you...

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4 minutes ago, ragincajun said:

My front derailleur was misbehaving so I pulled it off all together.  I do like the simplicity of one derailleur now, so my next bike I think that is the route I will go.

Might want to grab a narrow wide chainring if you are gonna stay with the 1x setup

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1 hour ago, Redwes25 said:

What the Clearview Expressway isn't sufficient for you...

I prefer the Interboro for all the curves.

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22 hours ago, the moops said:

Might want to grab a narrow wide chainring if you are gonna stay with the 1x setup

Good to know.  Thanks.

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12 minutes ago, ragincajun said:

Good to know.  Thanks.

You can find a Race Face one for 25 bucks or so. Can get some sick colors too

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On 6/15/2020 at 1:20 PM, ragincajun said:

My front derailleur was misbehaving so I pulled it off all together.  I do like the simplicity of one derailleur now, so my next bike I think that is the route I will go.

Side note for any of you who want to do your own maintenance check out Seth’s Bike Hacks on the tube.

Help me understand why you would do this or the benefit from this other than not having to worry about going from the big ring to the small one? I would have never even considered this before. Is this kinda common or no?

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2 hours ago, beer 30 said:

Help me understand why you would do this or the benefit from this other than not having to worry about going from the big ring to the small one? I would have never even considered this before. Is this kinda common or no?

Most people find that they rarely use their front derailleur. An deven if they do, the new wide range 11 speed cassetes give you nearly the same gear range without having to worry about shifting two derailleurs. It's not a huge deal, I get that, but simplicity is a good thing. Same reason why you rarely see triple fronts anymore. Kind of a natural progression. 

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Getting rid of the front derailleur saves weight, reduces the mechanical issues that can go wrong, and eliminates a shifter on the handlebars.  I bought a new Kona this winter and it came with a 1x12, and I haven't missed my front derailleur one bit.  I also have a hydraulic seat dropper post and the lever is mounted where the front derailleur shifter used to be.  The dropper post is a HUGE advancement that you don't appreciate until you ride with it.  It's a game changer.

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