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Sigmund Bloom

4(102) Jordan Cameron, TE, Cleveland

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Honestly, I'm more intrigued by Gary Barnidge if I had to take a flier on one TE on this team. Just not too impressed with Cameron.

He was signed because of his blocking and special teams play. Competition likely coming for cameron in the draft, but probably of the day three sort. Opportunity is his for the taking. And he is the only one to care about.
Barnridge was always considered a receiving option who needed to work on blocking. When did he become a blocking expert that lacks receiving skills? How does that even happen?

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/historical/522814

Just piggy backing the team and media comments about him. I really don't know anything about him.

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Honestly, I'm more intrigued by Gary Barnidge if I had to take a flier on one TE on this team. Just not too impressed with Cameron.

He was signed because of his blocking and special teams play. Competition likely coming for cameron in the draft, but probably of the day three sort. Opportunity is his for the taking. And he is the only one to care about.
Barnridge was always considered a receiving option who needed to work on blocking. When did he become a blocking expert that lacks receiving skills? How does that even happen?

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/historical/522814

He became a much better blocker and his receiving skills are good so he's a solid all-around TE. However, Cameron is a far better athlete.

I wouldn't say that he's a far better athlete, Barnidge has some good speed as well(4.61 40 yard time). Chudzinski brought him over from CAR as well so he's worth keeping an eye on in very deep leagues as well.

I haven't seen Barnidge play but looking at their measurements Cameron is bigger, faster, more explosive and more agile:

Barnidge - 6056, 243, 4.61, 22 reps, 31" vertical, 9-09 broad, 4.32 SS, 6.92 3 cone

Cameron - 6052, 254, 4.53, 23 reps, 37.5" vertical, 9-11 broad, 4.03 SS, 6.82 3 cone

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Honestly, I'm more intrigued by Gary Barnidge if I had to take a flier on one TE on this team. Just not too impressed with Cameron.

He was signed because of his blocking and special teams play. Competition likely coming for cameron in the draft, but probably of the day three sort. Opportunity is his for the taking. And he is the only one to care about.
Barnridge was always considered a receiving option who needed to work on blocking. When did he become a blocking expert that lacks receiving skills? How does that even happen?

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/historical/522814

Just piggy backing the team and media comments about him. I really don't know anything about him.
Do you typically post about guys you don't know about and state it as fact? Guess that is how group think spreads from one erroneous opinion...likely rotoworld I'm guessing Edited by loose circuits

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When was the last time a 28 yo TE with 18 career catches became a relevant fantasy player? Shiancoe?

Edited by cstu

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When was the last time a 28 yo TE with 18 career catches became a relevant fantasy player? Shiancoe?

They discussed this in Delanie Walker thread, actually more than you would think. I'm not saying Barnridge will join the list

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When was the last time a 28 yo TE with 18 career catches became a relevant fantasy player? Shiancoe?

They discussed this in Delanie Walker thread, actually more than you would think. I'm not saying Barnridge will join the list
Neither am I, just saying that he was worth keeping an eye on in deep formats. I'm not high on any of CLE's TE's.

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When was the last time a 28 yo TE with 18 career catches became a relevant fantasy player? Shiancoe?

They discussed this in Delanie Walker thread, actually more than you would think. I'm not saying Barnridge will join the list
Clark - 121 catches through age 27Pollard - 74 catches through age 27Chamberlain - 18 catches through age 27Carswell - 58 catches through age 27Walls - 11 catches through age 27Looks like Chamberlain and Walls fit the profile.

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When was the last time a 28 yo TE with 18 career catches became a relevant fantasy player? Shiancoe?

They discussed this in Delanie Walker thread, actually more than you would think. I'm not saying Barnridge will join the list
Neither am I, just saying that he was worth keeping an eye on in deep formats. I'm not high on any of CLE's TE's.
Chud and Norv like to use them so there is some upside. If I had to bet, would be on Cameron, but you never know

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When was the last time a 28 yo TE with 18 career catches became a relevant fantasy player? Shiancoe?

They discussed this in Delanie Walker thread, actually more than you would think. I'm not saying Barnridge will join the list
Neither am I, just saying that he was worth keeping an eye on in deep formats. I'm not high on any of CLE's TE's.
Chud and Norv like to use them so there is some upside. If I had to bet, would be on Cameron, but you never know
I expect the TE's to be heavily utilized one way or another. 2011 was the only season with Chud that a TE didn't put up high TE1 numbers and Olsen/Shockey combined for 82/995/9.

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When was the last time a 28 yo TE with 18 career catches became a relevant fantasy player? Shiancoe?

They discussed this in Delanie Walker thread, actually more than you would think. I'm not saying Barnridge will join the list
Neither am I, just saying that he was worth keeping an eye on in deep formats. I'm not high on any of CLE's TE's.
Chud and Norv like to use them so there is some upside. If I had to bet, would be on Cameron, but you never know
I expect the TE's to be heavily utilized one way or another. 2011 was the only season with Chud that a TE didn't put up high TE1 numbers and Olsen/Shockey combined for 82/995/9.
:goodposting: Howevery, I could see multiple Te's being used and them cutting into each other's numbers. If any of these guys ends up being the clear cut starter then they'll definitely make for a nice sleeper.

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When was the last time a 28 yo TE with 18 career catches became a relevant fantasy player? Shiancoe?

They discussed this in Delanie Walker thread, actually more than you would think. I'm not saying Barnridge will join the list
Neither am I, just saying that he was worth keeping an eye on in deep formats. I'm not high on any of CLE's TE's.
Chud and Norv like to use them so there is some upside. If I had to bet, would be on Cameron, but you never know
I expect the TE's to be heavily utilized one way or another. 2011 was the only season with Chud that a TE didn't put up high TE1 numbers and Olsen/Shockey combined for 82/995/9.
:goodposting: Howevery, I could see multiple Te's being used and them cutting into each other's numbers. If any of these guys ends up being the clear cut starter then they'll definitely make for a nice sleeper.
Agreed, and 2011 was a frustrating year for Olsen owners since he ended up #18 and Shockey #23.

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Honestly, I'm more intrigued by Gary Barnidge if I had to take a flier on one TE on this team. Just not too impressed with Cameron.

He was signed because of his blocking and special teams play. Competition likely coming for cameron in the draft, but probably of the day three sort. Opportunity is his for the taking. And he is the only one to care about.
Barnridge was always considered a receiving option who needed to work on blocking. When did he become a blocking expert that lacks receiving skills? How does that even happen?

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/historical/522814

Just piggy backing the team and media comments about him. I really don't know anything about him.
Do you typically post about guys you don't know about and state it as fact? Guess that is how group think spreads from one erroneous opinion...likely rotoworld I'm guessing
When it comes to the Browns? Yes. Others? No, not usually. This is the information given to the media from his past and current/future coach. Seems relevant.

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(Rotoworld)The Akron Beacon-Journal reports that the Browns consider Jordan Cameron "the favorite to start" at tight end this season.Analysis: This is the first we've seen it worded so strongly. All coach Rob Chudzinski and OC Norv Turner have said publicly is that they "like" Cameron. The Browns signed Kellen Davis and Gary Barnidge in free agency, but they are role-player tight ends. As long as Cleveland doesn't draft a tight end early or sign Fred Davis, 6-foot-5, 245-pound former basketball player Cameron will enter training camp as the starter. His sleeper train has been gaining steam.

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Honestly, I'm more intrigued by Gary Barnidge if I had to take a flier on one TE on this team. Just not too impressed with Cameron.

He was signed because of his blocking and special teams play. Competition likely coming for cameron in the draft, but probably of the day three sort. Opportunity is his for the taking. And he is the only one to care about.
Barnridge was always considered a receiving option who needed to work on blocking. When did he become a blocking expert that lacks receiving skills? How does that even happen?

http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/historical/522814

Just piggy backing the team and media comments about him. I really don't know anything about him.
Do you typically post about guys you don't know about and state it as fact? Guess that is how group think spreads from one erroneous opinion...likely rotoworld I'm guessing
When it comes to the Browns? Yes. Others? No, not usually. This is the information given to the media from his past and current/future coach. Seems relevant.
so chud came out and said Barnridge was signed to block and play specials? I must have missed that press conference

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Apparently.

http://www.clevelandbrowns.com/news/article-1/Browns-agree-to-terms-with-Barnidge/acf8f7c6-4f25-4bb9-96ca-dea2a655d793

Says here hes worked hard to develop as BOTH a blocker and receiver. Also mentions specials, but I'm still confused on how that means hes limited to blocking role. Is there something else I am missing somewhere?

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I'm liking his talent and situation right now. I'm buying and/or drafting where I can

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I'm liking his talent and situation right now. I'm buying and/or drafting where I can

As a Browns fan, I was pretty sad we didnt get a good TE in free agency or draft a good one.

Chud does well with TEs, but I don't trust Cameron very much to succeed.

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Chudzinski: Jordan Cameron "has the skill set that fits"
Tuesday, May 7, 2013 - 12:03pm
ESPN Cleveland - [Full Article]

Browns HC Rob Chudzinski, a former college tight end and Browns tight ends coach, and OC Norv Turner, intend to develop Jordan Cameron into the next tight end to make plays, not just catches.

Chudzinski’s tight end prodigies in nine NFL seasons as a position coach and coordinator include Kellen Winslow Jr. (Cleveland), Antonio Gates (San Diego) and Greg Olsen (Carolina).

Turner’s in 28 NFL years include Jay Novacek (Dallas), Vernon Davis in his rookie year (San Francisco) and Gates (San Diego).

“This is an offense that has featured tight ends and tight ends have always been a big part of it,” Chudzinski said of Cameron. “He has the skill set that fits.”

Fantasy Impact:

It's only May, and the Jordan Cameron hype train ia already barreling down the tracks. Cameron is definitely a breakout candidate in Turner's offense and would be a fine TE2 (with upside) on draft day.

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This is looking better, from RW:

According to the Cleveland Plain Dealer, the Browns plan to throw to TE Jordan Cameron "a lot," and targeted him on "plenty of deep balls" in OTAs.
It's the Rod Chudzinski recipe at tight end, and reason for legitimate excitement over Cameron's 2013 fantasy prospects. Cameron can seal his status as a high-upside TE1 candidate with a strong camp and preseason. He has the talent to take advantage of his golden opportunity

http://www.rotoworld.com/player/nfl/6572/jordan-cameron

I don't know what people think about following coordinators and coaches over players themselves (with obvious exceptions) but is it possible just possible that Norv Turner (and to some extent Chud as well as Cam Cameron I guess) made Antonio Gates as much as Gates made himself into a great TE?

I'm sure he had otehr offers but Norv chose to come to Cleveland, maybe this is one of the reasons why.

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I expected all offseason for us to replace Watson with a younger TE, leaving Cameron battling for 2nd fiddle, but for as many guys as the Browns talked to their actions speak loudest. He's going to get every opportunity to be the guy, whether he does it or not? We'll see. If you own him and you don't believe just wait until August then sell. Hype train is going to be through the roof. Unless I can bundle him to upgrade RB I'm going to wait it out and see. Already sold him in my other dyno earlier in the offseason when I expected the Browns to upgrade the position though.

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This is looking better, from RW:

According to the Cleveland Plain Dealer, the Browns plan to throw to TE Jordan Cameron "a lot," and targeted him on "plenty of deep balls" in OTAs.
It's the Rod Chudzinski recipe at tight end, and reason for legitimate excitement over Cameron's 2013 fantasy prospects. Cameron can seal his status as a high-upside TE1 candidate with a strong camp and preseason. He has the talent to take advantage of his golden opportunity

http://www.rotoworld.com/player/nfl/6572/jordan-cameron

I don't know what people think about following coordinators and coaches over players themselves (with obvious exceptions) but is it possible just possible that Norv Turner (and to some extent Chud as well as Cam Cameron I guess) made Antonio Gates as much as Gates made himself into a great TE?

I'm sure he had otehr offers but Norv chose to come to Cleveland, maybe this is one of the reasons why.

I think it's reasonable to follow co-ordinators over players assuming there's a strong trend, sure. It wasn't just Gates that was successful with these guys. It was also Winslow (2 seasons in CLE) and Olsen (2012 / best season of career).

In fact, the TE sees about 20% of the team's targets in this offense that Chud/Turner have run. There are very few TEs who see that volume. If that continues here in '13, it could lead to some solid production.

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In two of my rookie drafts that he was in, he went in the early 2nd (after Eifert and before Kelce.)

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In two of my rookie drafts that he was in, he went in the early 2nd (after Eifert and before Kelce.)

I dealt him for 2.11 in an attempt to basically swap him for Kelce straight up (also had 2.10) and he went at 2.8 in a 12 teamer with an extra first round pick @ 1.13 that goes to the toilet bowl winner.

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In two of my rookie drafts that he was in, he went in the early 2nd (after Eifert and before Kelce.)

I dealt him for 2.11 in an attempt to basically swap him for Kelce straight up (also had 2.10) and he went at 2.8 in a 12 teamer with an extra first round pick @ 1.13 that goes to the toilet bowl winner.

Why do you prefer Kelce? How do they compare from an ability and refinement standpoint?

Thanks?

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In two of my rookie drafts that he was in, he went in the early 2nd (after Eifert and before Kelce.)

I dealt him for 2.11 in an attempt to basically swap him for Kelce straight up (also had 2.10) and he went at 2.8 in a 12 teamer with an extra first round pick @ 1.13 that goes to the toilet bowl winner.

Why do you prefer Kelce? How do they compare from an ability and refinement standpoint?

Thanks?

Just see a higher ceiling - Kelce is stronger and more rugged/physical, just as athletic/fast (faster?), and a much much much better blocker. On the whole, I see Cameron maybe having a higher ceiling re: receptions, but Kelce bigger re: TDs/big plays. Cameron has better natural ball skills/hands from his basketball background. Both have fallen into pretty good situations re: coach/use of TE.

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Just to add context, I just picked Cameron in our rookie/vet FA draft at pick 2.05 (17 overall). He would have gone at pick 18 if I didn't pick him.

12 team 1/2 PPR for WR/TE only

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Brandon Weeden, Cleveland Browns' offense poised to surprise

Jordan Cameron Excerpt:

4) Jordan Cameron is the X-factor to the Browns' offensive success.

For all of the attention that is given to running backs and receivers in Turner's scheme, the presence of a dangerous tight end in the middle of the field could take the Browns' offense to another level. This is an aspect of Turner's scheme that goes largely unnoticed, despite the illustrious careers of Jay Novacek (in Dallas) and Antonio Gates (in San Diego) under Turner's direction.

With his unique combination of athleticism and ball skills, Cameron could assume the role of between-the-hashes difference-maker in Cleveland. As a former collegiate basketball player (Cameron played basketball at BYU before transferring to USC to play football), he has a knack for using his body to create separation from defenders. Additionally, he is a terrific pass catcher with a penchant for pulling down tough grabs in crowds. This should be a huge asset to Weeden, because it will give him a safe, dependable receiver to target in the middle of the field.

With defenses forced to decide between using eight-man fronts to stop Richardson or some form of two-deep coverage to defend Little and Gordon, the area between the hashes should be vulnerable to frequent tosses to Cameron. Based on his impressive physical tools, that could lead to more big plays from the Browns' passing game.

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QuoteAs a former collegiate basketball player (Cameron played basketball at BYU before transferring to USC to play football), he has a knack for using his body to create separation from defenders.

They really need to stop with the 'former collegiate basketball player' label. His entire career of college basketball consisted of 1 whole rebound. I'm not sure how that is at all meaningful.

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QuoteAs a former collegiate basketball player (Cameron played basketball at BYU before transferring to USC to play football), he has a knack for using his body to create separation from defenders.

They really need to stop with the 'former collegiate basketball player' label. His entire career of college basketball consisted of 1 whole rebound. I'm not sure how that is at all meaningful.

He was good enough to get a college scholarship to play basketball. It's not like Tony Gonzalez was Lebron in college either.

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QuoteAs a former collegiate basketball player (Cameron played basketball at BYU before transferring to USC to play football), he has a knack for using his body to create separation from defenders.

They really need to stop with the 'former collegiate basketball player' label. His entire career of college basketball consisted of 1 whole rebound. I'm not sure how that is at all meaningful.

He was good enough to get a college scholarship to play basketball. It's not like Tony Gonzalez was Lebron in college either.

Tony Gonzalez played a key role on a Sweet 16 team, averaging 6.8 points and 4.5 rebounds per game. He held Tim Thomas to 1 point in the second round of the tournament. If he didn't focus on football until December (he played in the Aloha Bowl on Christmas Day that year) he could have been a regular college starter and possibly good enough to make an NBA roster as a reserve. He was a legit basketball player.

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QuoteAs a former collegiate basketball player (Cameron played basketball at BYU before transferring to USC to play football), he has a knack for using his body to create separation from defenders.

They really need to stop with the 'former collegiate basketball player' label. His entire career of college basketball consisted of 1 whole rebound. I'm not sure how that is at all meaningful.

I feel ya.

I was always unsure about how much a basketball history meant for a TE in terms of 'boxing out' anyway. I think I am more likely to like the idea that the player may be more athletic than your average TE, rather than some low post background allows them to fend off defenders.

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Quote

As a former collegiate basketball player (Cameron played basketball at BYU before transferring to USC to play football), he has a knack for using his body to create separation from defenders.

They really need to stop with the 'former collegiate basketball player' label. His entire career of college basketball consisted of 1 whole rebound. I'm not sure how that is at all meaningful.
I feel ya.

I was always unsure about how much a basketball history meant for a TE in terms of 'boxing out' anyway. I think I am more likely to like the idea that the player may be more athletic than your average TE, rather than some low post background allows them to fend off defenders.

I especially liked the FBGs view from the email a couple of days ago:

Source: The Cleveland Plain Dealer - Mary Kay Cabot

The Cleveland Browns are taking a cautious approach with TE Jordan Cameron (groin) while he deals with a groin injury because they see him as their starting tight end this season.

[ [ [ [ [ [ [ [ [ [ FOOTBALLGUYS VIEW ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ]

Groin injuries can linger. It's important for the Browns to be cautious here. Cameron has good upside as a starter as the former USC basketball star is extremely athletic and causes mismatches on the field.

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Hype train at full steam. Just saw him go TE8 in the 9th round of a startup. Eifert went almost a full round later.

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QuoteAs a former collegiate basketball player (Cameron played basketball at BYU before transferring to USC to play football), he has a knack for using his body to create separation from defenders.

They really need to stop with the 'former collegiate basketball player' label. His entire career of college basketball consisted of 1 whole rebound. I'm not sure how that is at all meaningful.
the key is the reps in practice. I'm a former college wrestler and the dudes who warmed the bench still went through the same process. I'm sure the bench guys still work their tail off in BB

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QuoteAs a former collegiate basketball player (Cameron played basketball at BYU before transferring to USC to play football), he has a knack for using his body to create separation from defenders.

They really need to stop with the 'former collegiate basketball player' label. His entire career of college basketball consisted of 1 whole rebound. I'm not sure how that is at all meaningful.
the key is the reps in practice. I'm a former college wrestler and the dudes who warmed the bench still went through the same process. I'm sure the bench guys still work their tail off in BB
I don't really think it matters. When hyping a former basketball player, the focus should be on their rebounding and/or shot blocking ability. Those are the skills that translate to the NFL for a TE. He clearly didn't excel at those skills in college. To call him a "former star" is a joke. There are roughly 4500 division 1 basketball scholarships available. Having one of them says absolutely nothing about your football ability.

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Rotoworld:

Jordan Cameron expects the Browns' receiver talent and new vertical attack to clear more space for tight ends underneath.

"They’re making an opening for the tight end," Cameron said. "They’re running deep routes, and it makes it easier for the tight ends to work the middle a little bit, and we stretch the field as well, so there’s a lot of guys running deep, vertical routes." It's the way things worked under new OC Norval Turner in San Diego, though Josh Gordon's two-game suspension means the full offense may not be implemented until Week 3. We're still bullish on Cameron as a potential breakout player.

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A thorough look at Cleveland tight end Jordan Cameron's projected fantasy production.

Too much to cut-and-paste so go to the link, its worth the click if you have an interest in trying to determine Cameron's fantasy production.

http://sportsjerks.net/2013/06/24/projecting-jordan-camerons-fantasy-football-production/

Projecting Jordan Cameron’s Fantasy Football Production
By C.D. Carter
Published on June 24, 2013 1:14 pm

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Making the Leap: No. 37 Browns TE Jordan Cameron

Click on the link above to see the video clips in the article below:

By Marc Sessler

Around the League Writer

Around The League will profile the top 40 players we see Making a Leap in 2013.

No. 37. Jordan CameronWhy he's on the list

Tight end Jordan Cameron's fledgling NFL career took a sunny turn when the Cleveland Browns hired coach Rob Chudzinski. The former Panthers offensive coordinator is well known for leaning hard on his tight ends in the passing game, and Cameron has been cast for a leading role in 2013.

Carolina's Greg Olsen enjoyed a career year under Chud last season, and Browns fans haven't forgotten the switch he flipped with Kellen Winslow as Cleveland's offensive coordinator back in 2007. Then there's Norv Turner, who will call plays for the Browns and harbors a deep fascination with field-stretching tight ends. It's crazy talk to tab Cameron as the next Antonio Gates, but Chud sees promise: "Jordan can run, he's a good athlete, has good hands," he told WKRK-FM, "so from a receiver standpoint, I think there's a lot to work with."

Cameron was kept in bubble wrap during Pat Shurmur's tenure, but with Ben Watson out of the picture, The Plain Dealer reported Jordan saw "plenty of deep balls" during offseason team activities. Targeted just 40 times last season, Cameron's sneaky elusiveness on this 18-yard reception against the Buffalo Bills is something we'll see more of in Turner's aggressive vertical passing attack.

"They're making an opening for the tight end," Cameron told the Browns' official site. "They're running deep routes, and it makes it easier for the tight ends to work the middle a little bit, and we stretch the field as well."

There isn't a ton of film on Cameron, but his ability to slip through coverage stands out, as exampled by this 23-yard grab against the Cincinnati Bengals in Week 6. He stumbles early on his route but recovers to burn Chris Crocker on the second effort. Don't be surprised to see Cameron split out wide and used all over the formation come September.

Obstacles

Cameron lacks a track record. The former basketball player had a grand total of 16 receptions at USC, and he's accounted for just 26 during his two years in Cleveland. To be fair, the Browns are gambling here. Cameron's still developing as a blocker, and durability is a slight concern. ESPNCleveland noted he was sidelined by two muscle pulls during spring practice. Not the end of the world, but it came in noncontact work. Can Cameron play through the rigors of a 16-game campaign?

2013 Expectations

When the Browns called Cameron after making him their fourth-round pick in 2011, Cleveland's brain trust dialed up the wrong cat.

"Uh, yeah, this is Cameron Jordan, but the Saints already picked me," the newly minted New Orleans defensive end told the Browns, according to SI's Peter King. "I think you mean Jordan Cameron. You're looking for Jordan Cameron."

A sad beginning, but three seasons later, Jordan Cameron is the Browns' only viable pass-catching tight end. Kellen Davis was a disaster as a receiver with the Chicago Bears, and Gary Barnidge is a project. In a perfect world, Cameron will double his 20-catch season from a year ago. Browns fans, of course, have a right to remain leery.

Follow Marc Sessler on Twitter @MarcSesslerNFL.

Edited by Faust

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Most Improved for 2013: Tight end Jordan Cameron will bust out

By Bucky Brooks

Analyst, NFL.com and NFL Network

(Click on the linked article above to view the video clips)

Excerpt:

Most Improved Tight End for 2013: Jordan Cameron

Cameron's backstory: Selected with the 102nd overall pick of the 2011 NFL Draft, Cameron gave the Cleveland Browns a young, athletic tight end to mold for a prominent role down the road. The team instituted a slow development plan for Cameron by placing him behind a pair of wily veterans, Alex Smith and Benjamin Watson, to learn and master the nuances of the position, given his limited experience as a collegian. (Cameron played basketball at BYU in 2006-07 before transferring to USC for football, starting at wide receiver and eventually moving to tight end.) Although he played sparingly during his first two seasons as a pro, Cameron displayed promising flashes, leading many to declare him ready for a bigger role on offense.

Why he will improve in 2013: The arrivals of head coach Rob Chudzinski and offensive coordinator Norv Turner ensure the tight end will be featured prominently in the Browns' passing game. As disciples of Ernie Zampese -- who was greatly influenced by Don Coryell -- Chudzinski and Turner both boast distinguished reputations for transforming developmental tight ends into premier playmakers.

Chudzinski, a long-time NFL tight ends coach, has tutored some of the finest tight ends in the NFL to the most productive seasons in their respective careers. In Antonio Gates' four seasons under Chudzinski's direction (2005-06; 2009-10), the perennial Pro Bowler averaged 72.3 receptions for 991 receiving yards and 9.3 touchdowns. In Gates' six years without Chudzinski, those averages drop to 58.8 caches for 726.1 yards and 7.7 touchdowns. Kellen Winslow enjoyed the best season of his career with Chudzinski's help in 2007, tallying 82 receptions for 1,106 yards and five touchdowns. Most recently, Greg Olsen posted career bests in receptions (69) and receiving yards (843) under Chudzinski's guidance last season.

Factoring in Turner's experience coaching the likes of Jay Novacek, Vernon Davis and Gates, it's easy to envision an athletic tight end like Cameron playing a major part in the Browns' offensive attack.

Checking in at 6-foot-5, 245 pounds with an extensive basketball background, Cameron is an explosive athlete with strong hands and ball skills. He excels at working the deep middle on skinny post routes and digs, utilizing his speed and quickness to run away from defenders out of breaks. The 18-yard gain in the video above showcases Cameron's ability to stretch the defense with his speed on a vertical route.

Cameron's athleticism and versatility will encourage Cleveland's new coaching staff to deploy the tight end in a variety of alignments to take advantage of mismatches in the secondary. For instance, Cameron can flourish as a traditional tight end in one- and two-TE sets, or play as a slot receiver in certain packages. Additionally, he can line up outside as a receiver -- like he does in the video clip on your right -- to exploit man coverage from a linebacker or safety in space.

With Chudzinski and Turner adept at creating opportunities for tight ends in the passing game, Cameron could rise from obscurity to become a difference maker in 2013.

Impact on the team: The emergence of a dominant playmaker between the hashes will open up the field for the rest of Cleveland's young, athletic playmakers. While that might not be enough to help the Browns take the AFC North, it should make them a competitive bunch that vies for a winning record this season.

Projected 2013 stat line: 55 receptions for 750 receiving yards and nine touchdowns.

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Projected 2013 stat line: 55 receptions for 750 receiving yards and nine touchdowns.

The receptions and yards projections appear reasonable but I'd be shocked if he wound up with nine touchdowns. Five seems more reasonable to me.

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Brooks has a point saying that Cameron is in a great situation with the new offense being installed. My question has to do with Cameron. Can he actually get separation? Is he a good route runner? Can he shield defenders from the ball with his body? Those are all aspects he needs to possess to be as successful as they are predicting, particularly in the red zone. He's not going to suddenly turn into a young Antonio Gates just because he's in the same offense now. Gates is a flawless route runner with great hands.

Does no one else see the massive red flag that he just hasn't caught a lot of balls including college? You can either get open or you can't.

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Brooks has a point saying that Cameron is in a great situation with the new offense being installed. My question has to do with Cameron. Can he actually get separation? Is he a good route runner? Can he shield defenders from the ball with his body? Those are all aspects he needs to possess to be as successful as they are predicting, particularly in the red zone. He's not going to suddenly turn into a young Antonio Gates just because he's in the same offense now. Gates is a flawless route runner with great hands.

Does no one else see the massive red flag that he just hasn't caught a lot of balls including college? You can either get open or you can't.

He was mainly a basketball player in college, just like Jimmy Graham. He was able to create separation last year with route running, and he is a fluid athlete for a big man. He has natural basketball ball skills (think rebounders blocking out). Gates had ZERO big-time football experience when he came into the league as a UDFA. Gates didn't suddenly turn into Gates either, he didn't break out until year 2, like Graham.

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Brooks has a point saying that Cameron is in a great situation with the new offense being installed. My question has to do with Cameron. Can he actually get separation? Is he a good route runner? Can he shield defenders from the ball with his body? Those are all aspects he needs to possess to be as successful as they are predicting, particularly in the red zone. He's not going to suddenly turn into a young Antonio Gates just because he's in the same offense now. Gates is a flawless route runner with great hands.

Does no one else see the massive red flag that he just hasn't caught a lot of balls including college? You can either get open or you can't.

He was mainly a basketball player in college, just like Jimmy Graham. He was able to create separation last year with route running, and he is a fluid athlete for a big man. He has natural basketball ball skills (think rebounders blocking out). Gates had ZERO big-time football experience when he came into the league as a UDFA. Gates didn't suddenly turn into Gates either, he didn't break out until year 2, like Graham.

Yea, but this is year 3 for Cameron. Plus Gates had ZERO football playing time in college. Cameron at least was practicing and playing, #### he was even lining up at WR in college. So even if you factor in 1 year for college development, he's coming into his 4th year of development now and he really hasn't done anything at any level of competition.

Edit: Just looking at these two plays that NFL.com highlighted

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000215144/article/making-the-leap-no-37-browns-te-jordan-cameron

He's left uncovered in the first one and in the second one he falls down and is left uncovered again. Not exactly showing much in terms of getting separation in either play. Even his lone TD, the LB missed the bump at the line of scrimmage letting him get to the sideline for an easy TD.

He has a chance to break out, but I wouldn't fall over myself trying to acquire him.

Edited by Beerguzzler

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Brooks has a point saying that Cameron is in a great situation with the new offense being installed. My question has to do with Cameron. Can he actually get separation? Is he a good route runner? Can he shield defenders from the ball with his body? Those are all aspects he needs to possess to be as successful as they are predicting, particularly in the red zone. He's not going to suddenly turn into a young Antonio Gates just because he's in the same offense now. Gates is a flawless route runner with great hands.

Does no one else see the massive red flag that he just hasn't caught a lot of balls including college? You can either get open or you can't.

He was mainly a basketball player in college, just like Jimmy Graham. He was able to create separation last year with route running, and he is a fluid athlete for a big man. He has natural basketball ball skills (think rebounders blocking out). Gates had ZERO big-time football experience when he came into the league as a UDFA. Gates didn't suddenly turn into Gates either, he didn't break out until year 2, like Graham.

Cameron wasn't anything like Graham in college. Unlike Graham, he had exactly 1 rebound in his entire college basketball career. Both Gates and Graham actually played and excelled at college basketball. There isn't any evidence that Cameron has any better rebounding skills than any other football player who played high school basketball. The difference is that he also has very little football experience.

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Brooks has a point saying that Cameron is in a great situation with the new offense being installed. My question has to do with Cameron. Can he actually get separation? Is he a good route runner? Can he shield defenders from the ball with his body? Those are all aspects he needs to possess to be as successful as they are predicting, particularly in the red zone. He's not going to suddenly turn into a young Antonio Gates just because he's in the same offense now. Gates is a flawless route runner with great hands.

Does no one else see the massive red flag that he just hasn't caught a lot of balls including college? You can either get open or you can't.

He was mainly a basketball player in college, just like Jimmy Graham. He was able to create separation last year with route running, and he is a fluid athlete for a big man. He has natural basketball ball skills (think rebounders blocking out). Gates had ZERO big-time football experience when he came into the league as a UDFA. Gates didn't suddenly turn into Gates either, he didn't break out until year 2, like Graham.

For what it's worth Graham came on in the 2nd half of his rookie year, he scored like 4 TD's the last 3 games. Gates was doing pretty well the last 3 or so games of his rookie year too. Here's something they both had in common in their early years: they both played with Drew Brees. What's also worth noting is that by the beginning of their 2nd seasons both had already taken off.

Then again, put Cameron with the Saints and Graham with the Browns and maybe the roles are reversed... The key being that Turner and Chud are in town together now.

I think it's the frame of these bball types, Gates, 6'4-260, Graham 6'7-260, Cameron 6'5-254. Of course Graham and Gates are hellacious receivers and runners after the catch. How is Cameron at either?

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This is a year to watch Cameron. The old regime really did not get things going and the talent level is at its best since Cameron has been on the team. The two guysrunning the offense know how to use the TE and will give Cameron a real shot this year.

Cameron is a TE2 that you take the gamble on and see what he has to offer.

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I want my TE to be physical and to stiff arm the mess out if any oncoming DB that thinks he will make the tackle. The great TEs all have this trait. Does Cameron? I haven't seen it. I think he is closer to Tony Scheffler than these other guys. Not worth the price to acquire him.

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Rotoworld:

Browns QB Brandon Weeden referred to third-year TE Jordan Cameron as "one of the most athletic big guys I’ve ever been around in any sport."

"He’s a basketball player that has all of the athletic ability in the world and has great hands, great route runner," Weeden said. "He creates mismatches ... he’s going to be a great player for us. This offense fits him extremely well." With a current ADP in the 14th round, Cameron is shaping up as a likely fantasy steal. He should be in the mix for top 7-10 tight end production.

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