Hipple, Long, Ware, & Peete

marijuana winning big at the polls. CO/MASS/wash pass

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Massachusetts Becomes 18th State to Legalize Medical Marijuana

by Erik Altieri, NORML Communications Director

November 6, 2012

With a current vote total of 63% in favor and 37% opposed (with 40% of the vote tallied), NORML projects that Massachuetts is set to become the eighteenth state to allow for the physician supervised use of marijuana. Massachusetts now joins its fellow Northeastern states of Connecticut, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Maine in recognizing and allowing for the medical use of cannabis.

When implemented, this law would eliminate state criminal and civil penalties for the medical use of marijuana by qualifying patients. To qualify, a patient must have been diagnosed with a debilitating medical condition, such as cancer, glaucoma, HIV-positive status or AIDS, hepatitis C, Crohn’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, ALS, or multiple sclerosis.

It will also allow patients to possess up to a 60-day supply of marijuana for their personal medical use, the amount of which will be determined by the Department of Public Health. A patient could designate a personal caregiver, at least 21 years old, who could assist with the patient’s medical use of marijuana but would be prohibited from consuming that marijuana. Patients and caregivers would have to register with DPH by submitting the physician’s certification. It will also allow for the approval of up to 35 non-profit medical marijuana treatment centers to grow, process and provide marijuana to patients or their caregivers.

NORML will have more information as this issue progresses. Stay tuned to norml.org for the latest and keep watching our live election coverage to see if our reform measures pass in other states.

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Colorado Has Legalized Marijuana

by Erik Altieri, NORML Communications Director

November 7, 2012

In a historic vote that will reverberate around the nation, the Denver NBC affiliated has projected that Colorado will pass Amendment 64 and will legalize marijuana. By a vote of 53% to 47% (with 38% of the vote tallied) news networks have begun to confirm that Colorado’s Amendment 64 has been passed by voters.

This marks the first time in history that a state has moved to legalize marijuana outright for adult consumers. This vote shows that, like alcohol prohibition before it, cannabis prohibition is a failed, unpopular policy that largely relies on state and local enforcement. Alcohol prohibition came to an end when a sufficient number of states enacted legislation repealing the state’s alcohol prohibition laws. With states no longer doing the federal government’s bidding to enforce an unpopular law, the Feds eventually had no choice but to abandon the policy altogether. History is now repeating itself.

Until now, no state law has defined cannabis as a legal commodity. Some state laws do provide for a legal exception that allows for certain qualified patients to possess specific amounts of cannabis as needed. But, until this evening, no state in modern history has classified cannabis itself as a legal product that may be lawfully possessed and consumed by adults. Thanks to the support from their voters, Colorado has no taken that brave first step.

Stay tuned for more information on this monumentous event, as we’ll be writing much, much more about it in the coming days. Also, continue watching NORML’s live election coverage here to see if Washington and Oregon will follow Colorado’s lead.

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tate]: YES to NO (percent tallied)

Oregon (Polls CLOSED): 57% to 43%(9% of the vote)

Washington (Polls CLOSED): 55% YES to 45% NO (49% of the vote)

Colorado (Polls CLOSED): 53% to 47% (36% of the vote) NORML PROJECTS VICTORY

Massachusetts (Polls CLOSED): 63% to 37% (82% of the vote) - NORML PROJECTS VICTORY

Arkansas (Polls CLOSED): 48% YES to 52% NO (60% counted)

Montana (Polls CLOSED): --

Michigan (Polls CLOSED): -- DETROIT PROPOSAL M (Decrim) 65% YES 35% NO (1% of the vote)

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The more important thing is do Porn Stars have to wear condoms in California?

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Arkansas vote was only for medicinal purposes. Oregon, Washington, and Colorado were the only states voting for recreational use.

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Colorado Has Legalized Marijuanaby Erik Altieri, NORML Communications DirectorNovember 7, 2012In a historic vote that will reverberate around the nation, the Denver NBC affiliated has projected that Colorado will pass Amendment 64 and will legalize marijuana. By a vote of 53% to 47% (with 38% of the vote tallied) news networks have begun to confirm that Colorado's Amendment 64 has been passed by voters.This marks the first time in history that a state has moved to legalize marijuana outright for adult consumers. This vote shows that, like alcohol prohibition before it, cannabis prohibition is a failed, unpopular policy that largely relies on state and local enforcement. Alcohol prohibition came to an end when a sufficient number of states enacted legislation repealing the state's alcohol prohibition laws. With states no longer doing the federal government's bidding to enforce an unpopular law, the Feds eventually had no choice but to abandon the policy altogether. History is now repeating itself.Until now, no state law has defined cannabis as a legal commodity. Some state laws do provide for a legal exception that allows for certain qualified patients to possess specific amounts of cannabis as needed. But, until this evening, no state in modern history has classified cannabis itself as a legal product that may be lawfully possessed and consumed by adults. Thanks to the support from their voters, Colorado has no taken that brave first step.Stay tuned for more information on this monumentous event, as we'll be writing much, much more about it in the coming days. Also, continue watching NORML's live election coverage here to see if Washington and Oregon will follow Colorado's lead.

Packing my bags as we speak

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Holdup Oregon...

Washington votes to legalize marijuana, Oregon does not

By The Associated Press

Updated: 9 minutes ago

SEATTLE, WA (AP) - Washington voters have made their state the first in the nation to legalize recreational pot use, setting up a showdown with a federal government that backs the drug's prohibition.

A similar initiative in Oregon, Measure 80, failed Tuesday night, according to Fox 12 political analyst Tim Hibbitts.

The Washington measure sets up a system of state-licensed marijuana growers, processors and retail stores, where adults over 21 can buy up to an ounce. It also establishes a standard blood test limit for driving under the influence.

Estimates have showed pot taxes could bring in hundreds of millions of dollars a year, but the sales won't start until state officials make rules to govern the legal weed industry.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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As someone who lives in Colorado, it will be very interesting to see how this shakes out with respect to the federal gov...

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Arkansas vote was only for medicinal purposes. Oregon, Washington, and Colorado were the only states voting for recreational use.

Same thing. Who doesn't suffer from stress/anxiety. But I like to see the straight up legalization efforts winning too.

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Interesting

http://www.annarbor.com/news/ypsilanti/ypsilanti-charter/?cmpid=RSS_link_ypsilanti

Early numbers show 79 percent of Ypsilanti registered voters are in favor of the proposal to redirect police efforts away from enforcing laws against marijuana use in the city of Ypsilanti. Early numbers also show that the city charter revision that would effectively eliminate partisan elections is close with 50 percent in favor and 49 percent against it.

Forty-five percent of the votes have been counted so far, with five precincts reporting.

Ypsilanti City Hall

Tom Perkins | AnnArbor.com

Ypsilanti residents voted on the following question:

"Shall the Ypsilanti City Charter be amended such that the use and/or consumption of one ounce or less of usable marijuana by adults 21 years or older is the lowest priority of law enforcement personnel?"

The marijuana initiative was organized by the Eastern Michigan University student organization Students for Sensible Drug Policy and the Ypsilanti Lowest Law Enforcement Priority initiative.

In May, the groups announced their efforts to secure enough votes for the initiative. Chuck Ream, political director of the LLEP, provided most of the funding for the campaign to secure votes.

Other cities such as Seattle, San Francisco and Kalamazoo all passed LLEP initiatives, Ream said in November 2011, Kalamazoo voters by a nearly 2-1 margin voted to make the crime of the possession of less than one ounce of cannabis by adults the lowest priority of law enforcement employees.

City Charter revision

Ypsilanti voters decided on the city charter revision that has a variety of changes. Some said those changes were not clearly explained on the ballot, including a switch from the heavily democratic city’s elections from partisan to non-partisan.

The ballot question was:

"Shall the City of Ypsilanti Home Rule Charter, proposed by the Ypsilanti Charter Revision Commission be adopted?"

Other proposed changes include:

Addition of a provision prohibiting council from increasing its compensation by more than the rate of inflation.

Elimination of a provision placing a charter revision question in front of voters every 16 years.

Requiring the city clerk to report to the city manager instead of city council.

The revision also included other changes that officials described as housekeeping items and updates to the language.

Yet, the most controversial portion of the revision is the change of Ypsilanti’s elections from partisan to non-partisan. Ypsilanti is estimated to be more than two-thirds Democratic and currently has partisan elections and primaries.

The commission, who proposed the revision, was comprised of four Republicans, four Democrats and an Independent.

Independent former Mayor Cheryl Farmer, who helped craft the current charter, and Democrat John Gawlas were the lone votes against the proposed change on the provision.

Democrat William Fennel was not present at the last vote. Democrats Robert Doyle and former Ypsilanti Public Schools Superintendent James Hawkins joined Republicans Karen Quinlan-Valvo, James Fink, long time local activist Peter Fletcher and Chair Kim Porter-Hoppe in voting for proposing non-partisan elections.

Katrease Stafford covers Ypsilanti for AnnArbor.com. Reach her at 734-623-2548 or KatreaseStafford@annarbor.com. You can also follow her on Twitter @KatreaseS

Edited by Hipple, Long, Ware, & Peete

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So will people be selling it tomorrow? I'm serious, a week's vacation in CO or one of these other states is looking fantastic.

Southwest Airlines would be wise to start as many flights as they can into these states.

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http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20121106/METRO01/211060450/1409/METRO/Detroit-proposal-decriminalize-marijuana-winning-early-returns

VEMBER 6, 2012 AT 11:25 PM

Detroit proposal to decriminalize marijuana winning in early returns

BY DARREN A. NICHOLS THE DETROIT NEWS 1 COMMENTS

Detroit — A controversial city proposal that would allow residents to have small amounts of marijuana at home was winning in early voting returns Tuesday.

With just over 1 percent of the city's precincts reporting, Proposal M was leading 65-35 percent.

The measure would allow adults over 21 to possess less than an ounce of marijuana on personal property without criminal prosecution. The measure has divided residents over how it would affect a city struggling with high crime in shrinking resources.

Proponents say Detroit, a city that's among the most violent in the country and is in the midst of a financial crisis, no longer has the police resources to go after people smoking small amounts of marijuana at home.

Tim Beck, chairman of the Coalition for a Safer Detroit, is optimistic about the chances of the measure passing. Beck pointed to a good voter turnout, particularly among young people in Detroit. He also cited people paying attention to slates handed out by the Fannie Lou Hamer Political Action Committee and the East Side Slate.

"When you have a high turnout, people are not as up on the issues. What that means is that they are going to pay more attention to those slates," Beck said. "Most voters are pretty hard-core one way or another.

"This issue is on the cutting edge of political and social evolution. This prohibition of marijuana and having an unregulated system being criminal is a terrible situation. It needs to be dealt with through the democratic process. This drug thing is over the top and we really need to change it."

But Lawrence Kenyatta of a Partnership for a Drug Free Detroit disagrees and says more homework needed to be done to ensure residents know the harm marijuana does.

.

"Either way, our job is going to continue," said Kenyatta, 56, who is no relation to Detroit City Councilman Kwame Kenyatta. He wishes opposition groups had more time to fight against the campaign.

"Our goal is to see Detroit educated about marijuana and the harmful effects. It looks like we still have a lot of work to go. Marijuana will continue to be a gateway drug. We think it will be very harmful when you look at around right now at the illiteracy rate in Detroit and poor school performance."

Proposal M was one of six on Tuesday's ballot in Detroit. Voters also had to decide whether to continue a tax levy of 18 mills over 10 years for Detroit Public Schools. The proposal would raise $80.9 million in the first year for the district.

All of the other proposals are leading. They are:

Proposal C: Amends the city charter to clarify the role of the city's top lawyer, or corporation counsel. It gives the corporation counsel the authority to file lawsuits to enforce the city charter. It is leading by 68 percent to 31 percent

Proposal E: Sets minimum and maximum signatures required to seek elected offices. Requires 500 to 1,000 signatures for nominating petitions for mayoral, city clerk and at-large City Council positions. Requires 300 to 650 signatures for council district seats and the Board of Police Commissioners. It is ahead with 72-28 percent.

Proposal G: Amends the charter to allow for officials and workers to accept gifts and gratuities. It is leading by 57-42 percent.

Proposal P: Removes the one-year ban on former employees coming back to work for the city under special contracts. It is passing 60-40 percent.

dnichols@detnews.com

(313) 222-2073

Edited by Hipple, Long, Ware, & Peete

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http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2012/nov/06/medical-marijuana-going-down-in-flames-in/

Arkansas voters appeared to be snuffing out medical marijuana Tuesday, and a judge made a former Harlem Globetrotter the new state representative for Crittenden and Cross counties.

Votes were still being tallied and it was unclear whether the GOP would take over one or both chambers of the state legislature.

Green Party candidate and former Harlem Globetrotter Fred Smith won the state House 50 race in East Arkansas after Judge Mary McGowan Tuesday ordered votes not to be counted for his opponent, former Democratic Rep. Hudson Hallum.

Smith is the second Green Party member to be elected to the state legislature. Hallum resigned in September after pleading guilty to an election fraud conspiracy charge. Smith had given up the seat in 2011 after a theft conviction, but became eligible for the seat when his conviction was set aside.

"With a felony conviction, Hudson Hallum is not qualified to be a candidate for State Representative of District 50," McGowan wrote. "Arkansas citizens have a right to expect that individuals ineligible for candidacy cannot be elected to public office."

McGowan's decision came late Tuesday afternoon, just hours before polls were to close in Arkansas. It made Smith the only eligible candidate for the seat. No Republican was running.

If votes were counted for Hallum and he were the top vote-getter, it could have created a vacancy in office that would have triggered a special election.

With 44 percent of the vote counted, the medical marijuana initiative was failing, 48 percent for to 52 percent against.

The marijuana initiative would have allowed people with certain medical conditions to buy marijuana at nonprofit dispensaries statewide, or grow their own if they don't live near a dispensing location. If the initiative had passed, Arkansas would have become the first southern state to allow sales of medical marijuana. Marijuana cultivation and possession would still have remained illegal under federal law.

Although they were on the ballot, two initiatives to authorize casinos at various locations in Arkansas didn't mean anything. The state Supreme Court directed that no votes be counted on them due to various flaws in their development.

As polls closed, both parties looked to results from 73 state House and Senate races that would determine whether Republicans take control of the legislature for the first time since Reconstruction ended here in 1874. The GOP was favored in congressional matchups around the state, riding on Mitt Romney's coattails.

Democrats relied on popular Gov. Mike Beebe in their bid to keep a majority in the state House and Senate.

© 2012 Memphis Commercial Appeal. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Edited by Hipple, Long, Ware, & Peete

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So will people be selling it tomorrow? I'm serious, a week's vacation in CO or one of these other states is looking fantastic.Southwest Airlines would be wise to start as many flights as they can into these states.

It will take awhile before they start selling it in stores.

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So will people be selling it tomorrow? I'm serious, a week's vacation in CO or one of these other states is looking fantastic.Southwest Airlines would be wise to start as many flights as they can into these states.

It will take awhile before they start selling it in stores.
2014 for the store openings.

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So will people be selling it tomorrow? I'm serious, a week's vacation in CO or one of these other states is looking fantastic.Southwest Airlines would be wise to start as many flights as they can into these states.

It will take awhile before they start selling it in stores.
Have read a year before stores will be around. Will take that long to get all of the regulations sorted. Have heard on the news, that 30 days before the local/state police lose the ability to really do anything about <1 oz. I don't personally use but think that this is a great step in the right direction.

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So will people be selling it tomorrow? I'm serious, a week's vacation in CO or one of these other states is looking fantastic.Southwest Airlines would be wise to start as many flights as they can into these states.

About 30 days for possession to be legal. Longer for it to appear in stores.

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So will people be selling it tomorrow? I'm serious, a week's vacation in CO or one of these other states is looking fantastic.Southwest Airlines would be wise to start as many flights as they can into these states.

It will take awhile before they start selling it in stores.
Have read a year before stores will be around. Will take that long to get all of the regulations sorted. Have heard on the news, that 30 days before the local/state police lose the ability to really do anything about <1 oz. I don't personally use but think that this is a great step in the right direction.
Yeah, they need to take it slow to implement it correctly and minimize concerns from the feds.

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Still not enough to make me want me to live in CO.

Yeah its a terrible place, you probably wouldn't like it.

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Colorado and Washington state, meanwhile, became the first states to legalize the production, sale and possession of recreational marijuana. Other states have legalized medical marijuana.But Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) sounded a cautionary note Tuesday, warning Colorado voters that federal law still prohibits marijuana use.“The voters have spoken and we have to respect their will,” Hickenlooper said in a statement. “This will be a complicated process, but we intend to follow through. That said, federal law still says marijuana is an illegal drug, so don’t break out the Cheetos or gold fish too quickly.”

Hot cheetos and taka? Edited by Hipple, Long, Ware, & Peete

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Solid. Ski in Vail, come off the slopes and grab some beers and some high grade. Mmmm.

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Still not enough to make me want me to live in CO.

Yeah its a terrible place, you probably wouldn't like it.
Never said it was terrible, just that I still wouldn't want to live there. I hate cold winters more than anything in the history of the universe. Legal pot doesn't change that. I can smoke it here just as easily, its pretty easy to do without going jail. And employers can still refuse to hire people who use, so yeah.

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Not passing in Oregon. Surprising, but whatever. It's still easier to get here than herpes.

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Still not enough to make me want me to live in CO.

Yeah its a terrible place, you probably wouldn't like it.
Never said it was terrible, just that I still wouldn't want to live there. I hate cold winters more than anything in the history of the universe. Legal pot doesn't change that. I can smoke it here just as easily, its pretty easy to do without going jail. And employers can still refuse to hire people who use, so yeah.
Fair enough. If you don't like some snow you probably don't want to live here. Legal pot doesn't really change much for me either, but I do like the fact that CO is leading the charge on that front, as I see little real value in the current laws. I do think it is going to be pretty sticky around here for awhile figuring out all of the regulations. I know my wife's company, which is very large and with a strict drug policy, will be spending some time/money on how to proceed. In any case, if you don't like the winters, try coming out for a spring/summer/fall sometime.

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Hick saying he was against it but that he will honor the people and decriminalize it in the state...doesn't mean the Feds don't come in and make their own arrests, he looked stressed, maybe he should try a joint.

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Still not enough to make me want me to live in CO.

Yeah its a terrible place, you probably wouldn't like it.
Never said it was terrible, just that I still wouldn't want to live there. I hate cold winters more than anything in the history of the universe. Legal pot doesn't change that. I can smoke it here just as easily, its pretty easy to do without going jail. And employers can still refuse to hire people who use, so yeah.
Fair enough. If you don't like some snow you probably don't want to live here. Legal pot doesn't really change much for me either, but I do like the fact that CO is leading the charge on that front, as I see little real value in the current laws.

I do think it is going to be pretty sticky around here for awhile figuring out all of the regulations. I know my wife's company, which is very large and with a strict drug policy, will be spending some time/money on how to proceed.

In any case, if you don't like the winters, try coming out for a spring/summer/fall sometime.

I agree. Its nice to see the first domino...here's hoping more start to fall.

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"When you have a high turnout, people are not as up on the issues. What that means is that they are going to pay more attention to those slates," Beck said. "Most voters are pretty hard-core one way or another.

totally man :thumbup:

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I want to see the RNC get behind the "states rights" movement with this MaryJane Movement.

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Hick saying he was against it but that he will honor the people and decriminalize it in the state...doesn't mean the Feds don't come in and make their own arrests, he looked stressed, maybe he should try a joint.

Feds don't really have the resources. They won't be arresting the little guy. They have stated their concerns on medical marijuana was organized crime, making sure the medical marijuana places weren't fronts for major distribution and keeping them away from schools.

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Not passing in Oregon. Surprising, but whatever. It's still easier to get here than herpes.

Why do you think it didn't pass, GM? Was it the way it was worded? Were there some funky caveats?I'm shocked it failed there. I thought Oregon would be the first.

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The Feds could try to shut it down before it starts with an injunction based on a preemption argument. But I really don't see that happening. The Dems need this demographic on their side.

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