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London calling: NFL wants UK team, and soon

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Not going to be a lot of west coast viewers for that one.

holy smokes! that's looking like an 18 hour day of football. I'll be in the doghouse for sure.

This is a 3:30 pm GMT start.

The idea being, let's see what kind of ticket demand we can get in the stands as opposed to the later start (because if a franchise moves there they can't have every game be a night game) and let's see how the tv ratings play out back home under this scenario.

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Not going to be a lot of west coast viewers for that one.

holy smokes! that's looking like an 18 hour day of football. I'll be in the doghouse for sure.

This is a 3:30 pm GMT start.

The idea being, let's see what kind of ticket demand we can get in the stands as opposed to the later start (because if a franchise moves there they can't have every game be a night game) and let's see how the tv ratings play out back home under this scenario.

Football at 9:30 in the morning is like Black Friday sales on Thanksgiving night: just because something is good does not mean that more of that thing is better.

Now I have to hope that both teams are 1-6 that week, so that this thing will draw a 2 rating and Goodell will stop trying to #### the goose laying the golden eggs.

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Rotoworld:

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell remains "excited" about the possibility of a team permanently playing in London, but "doesn't care" if Los Angeles or London gets a team first.

In other words, it appears the league is still hellbent on placing a team across the pond. The league's now-annual London fixtures have proven a moderate hit in the Queen's Country, but it's still entirely unclear if there's sufficient appetite for a full-time club. The league's sense of manifest destiny seems misplaced with the concussion crisis still far from settled, but dollar signs trump all. There's a good chance London gets a team within the next 10 years.

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so will the league be renamed to the International or World American Football League. And will the conference they get placed in be renamed as well?

Edited by KellysHeroes

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If they put a team in Londo, I may be done with the NFL. What in the world is the point of that? Why would players from here, want to play on the London team? Be that far away from their families all season long? How would the logistics of that work? It's a 6hr time difference. Would they always play at night over there? Or would they play games early in the morning here? Goodell is probably the most money hungry commish in all of sports. He's not interested in the good of the game. He's interested in the good of the owners' wallets.

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If they put a team in Londo, I may be done with the NFL. What in the world is the point of that? Why would players from here, want to play on the London team? Be that far away from their families all season long? How would the logistics of that work? It's a 6hr time difference. Would they always play at night over there? Or would they play games early in the morning here? Goodell is probably the most money hungry commish in all of sports. He's not interested in the good of the game. He's interested in the good of the owners' wallets.

until the fans do something about it he/they are going to keep making these changes based on $$. But it would be insane... nevermind FAs or rookies declining to go to the team, what about when they simply call in a guy or group for workouts and lookies; just crazy to make them travel 8 hrs for nothing.

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If they put a team in Londo, I may be done with the NFL. What in the world is the point of that? Why would players from here, want to play on the London team? Be that far away from their families all season long? How would the logistics of that work? It's a 6hr time difference. Would they always play at night over there? Or would they play games early in the morning here? Goodell is probably the most money hungry commish in all of sports. He's not interested in the good of the game. He's interested in the good of the owners' wallets.

until the fans do something about it he/they are going to keep making these changes based on $$. But it would be insane... nevermind FAs or rookies declining to go to the team, what about when they simply call in a guy or group for workouts and lookies; just crazy to make them travel 8 hrs for nothing.

That's a good point too. I just don't see how putting a team there would work long-term. It just makes no sense at all. And say for some reason, London works. What's next? A team in Germany? China? Japan? The Moon?

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Most UK fans already follow a team. While sure they'd take interest in a franchise based over here I doubt everyone would drop their allegiances and follow an expansion team.

this is different than american cities that gained nfl teams? i guess people in carolina, jax and tennessee had no nfl loyalties prior to those expansions.

When the Cardinals left St. Louis, I adopted two teams. Green Bay (pre - Favre) and the Giants (loved me some Lawrence Taylor). When the Rams arrived, I was immediately a fan. The marketing of the NFL is genius. They will work the local sports reporters into a frenzy which will be passed on to the general population. It won't take long at all for someone who roots for the Jets to switch teams to the London squad or at the very least have two teams until finally just roots for the London teams.

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If they put a team in Londo, I may be done with the NFL. What in the world is the point of that? Why would players from here, want to play on the London team? Be that far away from their families all season long? How would the logistics of that work? It's a 6hr time difference. Would they always play at night over there? Or would they play games early in the morning here? Goodell is probably the most money hungry commish in all of sports. He's not interested in the good of the game. He's interested in the good of the owners' wallets.

until the fans do something about it he/they are going to keep making these changes based on $$. But it would be insane... nevermind FAs or rookies declining to go to the team, what about when they simply call in a guy or group for workouts and lookies; just crazy to make them travel 8 hrs for nothing.

That's a good point too. I just don't see how putting a team there would work long-term. It just makes no sense at all. And say for some reason, London works. What's next? A team in Germany? China? Japan? The Moon?

Send them the Jags.

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If they put a team in Londo, I may be done with the NFL. What in the world is the point of that? Why would players from here, want to play on the London team? Be that far away from their families all season long? How would the logistics of that work? It's a 6hr time difference. Would they always play at night over there? Or would they play games early in the morning here? Goodell is probably the most money hungry commish in all of sports. He's not interested in the good of the game. He's interested in the good of the owners' wallets.

until the fans do something about it he/they are going to keep making these changes based on $$. But it would be insane... nevermind FAs or rookies declining to go to the team, what about when they simply call in a guy or group for workouts and lookies; just crazy to make them travel 8 hrs for nothing.

That's a good point too. I just don't see how putting a team there would work long-term. It just makes no sense at all. And say for some reason, London works. What's next? A team in Germany? China? Japan? The Moon?

Send them the Jags.

Why?

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Most UK fans already follow a team. While sure they'd take interest in a franchise based over here I doubt everyone would drop their allegiances and follow an expansion team.

this is different than american cities that gained nfl teams? i guess people in carolina, jax and tennessee had no nfl loyalties prior to those expansions.

When the Cardinals left St. Louis, I adopted two teams. Green Bay (pre - Favre) and the Giants (loved me some Lawrence Taylor). When the Rams arrived, I was immediately a fan. The marketing of the NFL is genius. They will work the local sports reporters into a frenzy which will be passed on to the general population. It won't take long at all for someone who roots for the Jets to switch teams to the London squad or at the very least have two teams until finally just roots for the London teams.

Well, I think sports reporters reflect popular opinion more than drive it but you're right about the NFL's marketing expertise. The league might be the greatest marketing entity in the world. We've bought what it's selling hook, line and sinker.

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If they put a team in Londo, I may be done with the NFL. What in the world is the point of that? Why would players from here, want to play on the London team? Be that far away from their families all season long? How would the logistics of that work? It's a 6hr time difference. Would they always play at night over there? Or would they play games early in the morning here? Goodell is probably the most money hungry commish in all of sports. He's not interested in the good of the game. He's interested in the good of the owners' wallets.

until the fans do something about it he/they are going to keep making these changes based on $$. But it would be insane... nevermind FAs or rookies declining to go to the team, what about when they simply call in a guy or group for workouts and lookies; just crazy to make them travel 8 hrs for nothing.

That's a good point too. I just don't see how putting a team there would work long-term. It just makes no sense at all. And say for some reason, London works. What's next? A team in Germany? China? Japan? The Moon?

Send them the Jags.

Better yet just send them Goodell and let him start another European league and leave our beloved league alone.

In a perfect world we could have this clown put on some pads and play Bull in the Ring with guys like James Harrison. He'd probably have Jeff Tripplette officiate and issue fines for dirty looks.

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If they put a team in Londo, I may be done with the NFL. What in the world is the point of that? Why would players from here, want to play on the London team? Be that far away from their families all season long? How would the logistics of that work? It's a 6hr time difference. Would they always play at night over there? Or would they play games early in the morning here? Goodell is probably the most money hungry commish in all of sports. He's not interested in the good of the game. He's interested in the good of the owners' wallets.

until the fans do something about it he/they are going to keep making these changes based on $$. But it would be insane... nevermind FAs or rookies declining to go to the team, what about when they simply call in a guy or group for workouts and lookies; just crazy to make them travel 8 hrs for nothing.

That's a good point too. I just don't see how putting a team there would work long-term. It just makes no sense at all. And say for some reason, London works. What's next? A team in Germany? China? Japan? The Moon?

Send them the Jags.

Why?

because theres 3 teams in Florida and the JJ's are terrible

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If they put a team in Londo, I may be done with the NFL. What in the world is the point of that? Why would players from here, want to play on the London team? Be that far away from their families all season long? How would the logistics of that work? It's a 6hr time difference. Would they always play at night over there? Or would they play games early in the morning here? Goodell is probably the most money hungry commish in all of sports. He's not interested in the good of the game. He's interested in the good of the owners' wallets.

until the fans do something about it he/they are going to keep making these changes based on $$. But it would be insane... nevermind FAs or rookies declining to go to the team, what about when they simply call in a guy or group for workouts and lookies; just crazy to make them travel 8 hrs for nothing.

That's a good point too. I just don't see how putting a team there would work long-term. It just makes no sense at all. And say for some reason, London works. What's next? A team in Germany? China? Japan? The Moon?

Send them the Jags.

Why?

because theres 3 teams in Florida and the JJ's are terrible

The Raiders and Bills meet that criteria also.

ETA: And so do the Bucs.

Edited by JaxBill

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Eight in the Box: Cities that should get to host a Super Bowl

Excerpt:

1. London:

Argue if you must about a London Super Bowl violating the sanctity of an American sport, but of all the spots on our list this might be the most likely future host. Roger Goodell has expanded the league’s footprint overseas by taking multiple regular-season games per season to Wembley Stadium. He’s talked openly about possibly placing a team in London eventually. Wembley seats approximately 90,000, and the city obviously could handle a massive event.

Again, we’d have to talk about the weather: cold and rainy, particularly in February, when average temperatures sit around 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Wembley does come with a retractable roof, but it does not cover the entire field, so its effects on the temperature would be minimal at best.

That said, the NFL is constantly seeking its next spectacle. A Super Bowl across the pond would qualify.

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Again, London is 8 hours time difference from the West Coast.

This year's Super Bowl will start at 11:30 PM London time.

Can't imagine the NFL and the host network would give up broadcasting the Super Bowl during prime time in the USA.

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If anywhere true, the above, the NFL has only one option to keep things fresh and interesting and competitive. That will be to make two leagues, an A and B league with the possibilities of relegation. Two 18-team leagues when everyone plays each team in that league (17 weeks) and a playoff consisting of the top 8 teams in each league. The top 4 in the B league move up, the bottom 4 move down (could have a separate toilet bowl as well involving 6 teams).

Bottom line, 36 is way too many teams.

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Just had a great chat tonight with a Bronco fan from London. He flew in to Denver to watch the game with friends. Talk got around to a team in London and how I didn't think it was a good idea, having talked to my sister's boyfriend who lived in London. This particular fan had some interesting points as to why a team wouldn't work in London:

  • The British media hates America football. It would trash the NFL at every opportunity.
  • When he went to a Broncos game that was in London a few years ago, he said everyone treated it as a novelty. It was an "event" - not an "NFL Game".
  • While at the game, he noticed that hardly anyone had on gear (shirts, hats, etc) of the actual teams that were playing. He had on a Bronco shirt, but he said most of the people there had on shirts of their favorite NFL teams - teams that they already pull for. He stressed to me that those few NFL fans in the U.K. who already pull for an NFL team are not going to want to drop their lifelong loyalties and start spending thousands on the "London MeatPies", or whatever they'll be called.
  • When he wants to watch a Broncos game he struggles to find anyone who will go watch with him. At his house, at the bar, etc. He said there are bars you can watch games at, and at those bars are about the only place you'll find NFL Fans. He said soccer is 10 times more popular in America than the NFL is in London. You'd literally struggle to find anyone walking down the street who could even name a team in the NFL, much less a star player or the rules of the game.

Needless to say, he thought the idea was dumb, and he's actually one of the London citizens who would spend money on a ticket. He just thinks it would flop horribly, and hurt the NFL more than it helped it.

He said it would give the NFL a "reality check".

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Just had a great chat tonight with a Bronco fan from London. He flew in to Denver to watch the game with friends. Talk got around to a team in London and how I didn't think it was a good idea, having talked to my sister's boyfriend who lived in London. This particular fan had some interesting points as to why a team wouldn't work in London:

  • The British media hates America football. It would trash the NFL at every opportunity.
  • When he went to a Broncos game that was in London a few years ago, he said everyone treated it as a novelty. It was an "event" - not an "NFL Game".
  • While at the game, he noticed that hardly anyone had on gear (shirts, hats, etc) of the actual teams that were playing. He had on a Bronco shirt, but he said most of the people there had on shirts of their favorite NFL teams - teams that they already pull for. He stressed to me that those few NFL fans in the U.K. who already pull for an NFL team are not going to want to drop their lifelong loyalties and start spending thousands on the "London MeatPies", or whatever they'll be called.
  • When he wants to watch a Broncos game he struggles to find anyone who will go watch with him. At his house, at the bar, etc. He said there are bars you can watch games at, and at those bars are about the only place you'll find NFL Fans. He said soccer is 10 times more popular in America than the NFL is in London. You'd literally struggle to find anyone walking down the street who could even name a team in the NFL, much less a star player or the rules of the game.

Needless to say, he thought the idea was dumb, and he's actually one of the London citizens who would spend money on a ticket. He just thinks it would flop horribly, and hurt the NFL more than it helped it.

He said it would give the NFL a "reality check".

Goodell, hell any owner of any company ever, would say you have to stay aggressive and test your limits, not live in a world of "I can't". There was a million reasons that Starbucks Coffee could have failed as a nationwide franchise. You could argue they should have stayed as a local or regional northwest brand. But they didn't. And it worked.

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Roger Goodell, the National Football League commissioner, disclosed last night that London was 'further down the road' to securing the first gridiron franchise outside the United States after all three regular-season games at Wembley this autumn were confirmed as sell-outs.

In his annual state-of-the-league address at the Lincoln Centre in Manhattan, amid unparalleled hoopla ahead of New York’s maiden Super Bowl tomorrow, Goodell gave his strongest suggestion yet that a sequence of 11 straight sold-out London games since 2007 could persuade the NFL to base a team permanently in the capital.

“I believe that the response to the third game in the UK, and the way that the fans have embraced that and sold it out in such a short period of time, is just another sign that the more we give the fans there, the more they want. That’s a great tribute to their passion.”

With Sunday night’s face-off between the Denver Broncos and Seattle Seahawks poised to become the most lucrative event in US television history, Goodell indicated that the NFL was ready to invest more aggressively in the British market, having tripled its Wembley offering in the past two years. The league is poised to generate an astonishing $25 billion (£15.2 billion) by 2027 and is understood to regard London and Los Angeles, without a team since 1995, as ripe for franchise-building within five years.

In an intriguing twist Stan Kroenke, Arsenal’s majority shareholder and owner of the St Louis Rams, is being linked to a potential Los Angeles project after it emerged this week that he had bought a 60-acre development plot in the city’s Inglewood suburb.

In London, the NFL’s international committee has already explored the possibility of bringing a team – potentially Fulham owner Shahid Khan’s Jacksonville Jaguars – to the Olympic Stadium as early as 2017.

“Our next step [in London] is something we’re going to have to evaluate,” Goodell said. “When I go over to London I am continually amazed at the breadth of knowledge of our game and the experience that is provided at Wembley.

“We will be continuing to invest in that marketplace and find ways to engage those fans even more deeply. I’m optimistic that they will respond positively.”

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THE ROAR (cheerleaders) of the Jaguars are going to London Wednesday afternoon to celebrate Super Bowl XLVIII with U.K. fans this weekend.

THE ROAR of the Jaguars are heading to London tomorrow afternoon to help U.K. NFL fans celebrate Super Bowl XLVIII this weekend. Twelve squad members are flying to London to perform at the official NFL U.K. Super Bowl party – The Super Bash – being held at Indigo2 at the O2 Arena.

“We’re thrilled to be returning to London to represent the Jaguars and to entertain NFL fans,” said Christy Stechman Zynda, the Jaguars’ senior manager, cheerleading, promotions and programs. “Our cheerleaders are at home there and we appreciate the warm welcome we have always received.”

More than 2,000 NFL fans will congregate at the iconic London venue to celebrate the pinnacle of the NFL season as the Seattle Seahawks take on the Denver Broncos. Three Jaguars players – guard Will Rackley, tackle Cam Bradfield and defensive lineman Brandon Deaderick – will also be at the party. More than 35,000 ticket requests to attend the party were made by U.K. fans in less than 72 hours, and there’s no doubt that this is the hottest ticket in town for NFL fans on this side of the pond.

While the cheerleaders are in the capital, they will also be attending several media events – including live national television performances – as the game continues to grow in popularity in the U.K. THE ROAR will also be visiting a couple of London schools, going bowling with some ‘Union Jax’ competition winners, performing at the U.S. Embassy and hosting a Junior ROAR Academy, all in what will be another action-packed trip to the Jaguars’ second home.

One lucky U.K. Jaguars fan has also won the opportunity to feel like an NFL star for the day as he runs out for his local rugby team this weekend. Dom Shabbo from Rosslyn Park Rugby Club – who play in the third division of English rugby – won the chance to have THE ROAR cheer on him and his teammates as they take on their local rivals, Blackheath RFC, on Saturday afternoon. The ‘Support my Team’ competition invited Jaguars fans from across the U.K. to win the NFL cheerleaders for the day.

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Sounds like Goodell is moving along with setting up London as the next boogeyman. He must know a team is ready to announce a move to LA within the next three/four years and he'll need a new host city for other teams to use as a threat to extort more taxpayer dollars and stadium deals from wherever they are now.

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Just had a great chat tonight with a Bronco fan from London. He flew in to Denver to watch the game with friends. Talk got around to a team in London and how I didn't think it was a good idea, having talked to my sister's boyfriend who lived in London. This particular fan had some interesting points as to why a team wouldn't work in London:

  • The British media hates America football. It would trash the NFL at every opportunity.
  • When he went to a Broncos game that was in London a few years ago, he said everyone treated it as a novelty. It was an "event" - not an "NFL Game".
  • While at the game, he noticed that hardly anyone had on gear (shirts, hats, etc) of the actual teams that were playing. He had on a Bronco shirt, but he said most of the people there had on shirts of their favorite NFL teams - teams that they already pull for. He stressed to me that those few NFL fans in the U.K. who already pull for an NFL team are not going to want to drop their lifelong loyalties and start spending thousands on the "London MeatPies", or whatever they'll be called.
  • When he wants to watch a Broncos game he struggles to find anyone who will go watch with him. At his house, at the bar, etc. He said there are bars you can watch games at, and at those bars are about the only place you'll find NFL Fans. He said soccer is 10 times more popular in America than the NFL is in London. You'd literally struggle to find anyone walking down the street who could even name a team in the NFL, much less a star player or the rules of the game.

Needless to say, he thought the idea was dumb, and he's actually one of the London citizens who would spend money on a ticket. He just thinks it would flop horribly, and hurt the NFL more than it helped it.

He said it would give the NFL a "reality check".

Goodell, hell any owner of any company ever, would say you have to stay aggressive and test your limits, not live in a world of "I can't". There was a million reasons that Starbucks Coffee could have failed as a nationwide franchise. You could argue they should have stayed as a local or regional northwest brand. But they didn't. And it worked.

I'm just passing along the message. This is his strong opinion, and he knows much more than I.

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Inside Slant: Inevitability of NFL London

By Kevin Seifert | ESPN.com

The momentum seemed clear back in September, as the NFL geared up for its first doubleheader of regular-season games in London. "It's quite likely," wrote ESPN.com's Greg Garber, "that there soon will be an NFL team in London."

Events of the ensuing 5 1/2 months have fortified that assessment. The NFL quickly sold out all three London-based games for the 2014 season, an accomplishment notably lauded by NFL commissioner Roger Goodell. Most recently, one of the league's most influential and revenue-hungry owners has thrust his full support behind the idea.

Speaking in a radio interview last week, Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones said: "I think that's very possible. Yes, I'm very much for it. I think there's a good chance, and these games will be a good indication of the kind of support we can have there. And London is one of the few cities outside of the United States that would be a great city internationally for the NFL."

As with any major corporation, the best approach to observing the modern NFL is to follow the money. If a venture can generate significant new revenues, without debilitating logistical roadblocks or obvious brand-tarnishing repercussions, you can bet it will get a long look. Increasingly, it's clear that the semantics of a London franchise -- while significant -- probably won't scare off the NFL.

"The response to the third game in the UK and the way that the fans have embraced that -- sold that out in such a short period of time -- is just another indication that the more we give fans in the UK of NFL football, the more they want," Goodell said last month. "That's a great tribute to the fans there and their passion. And I believe you are further down the road because you are now three games into it. What our next step is, I don't know. That's something we're going to have to evaluate. We believe that we will continue to grow there and that's going to take work. We're going to have to continue to invest in that marketplace and find ways to engage those fans even more deeply. I'm optimistic that they'll respond favorably, as they already have."

Informal discussions have already provided a framework for how the most significant logistical issues with a London franchise would be addressed. Let's run through most of them.

The team likely would have a stateside training facility, where it could base itself during two- or three-game "road trips" that would cut down on travel.

Four trans-Atlantic flights to the East Coast for a London team would add up to roughly 28,000 miles in a season -- about 6,000 fewer than the San Francisco 49ers traveled in 2013. A London team would tack on additional miles for Midwest or West Coast games, but in the end, its travel would be only incrementally more than what the NFL's most frequent fliers have already done. Meanwhile, teams who visit London could be ensured a bye afterward.

Tax issues and cost of living discrepancies could be addressed in collective bargaining with the NFL Players Association. Or, the NFL could point to the differences that already exist stateside, where cost of living varies considerably and some teams are based in cities with no state income tax.

Some have suggested free agents might not want to sign with a London team, whether for displacement reasons or what will be perceived to be a hectic travel schedule. That might be the case, but would it truly be debilitating to the franchise? The majority of NFL players are assigned teams via the draft or waivers, and the best players never reach free agency. Regardless, the track record of teams that spend big to sign players -- see the 2013 Miami Dolphins, for one -- is spotty.

And what's the worst-case scenario? A London-based team can't compete. Quite frankly, that has happened for long stretches of the NFL's stateside history, be it in Detroit, Oakland, Cleveland or elsewhere. Collectively, those franchises still have contributed to the NFL's financial growth, as would a London team, regardless of its success on the field.

Generally speaking, it's difficult to see the NFL passing on the presumed revenue bonanza of a London franchise for logistical reasons. There is always a way.

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A London based team would prolly be pretty good at home and horrible on the road.......Its a bad idea. It's too far away, period!

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If this is serious, someone needs to get their head examined.

Aside from the logistics mentioned (that LON/SF ought to produce some really high quality football), the cost of living London is almost 20% higher than the highest US cities, income taxes there are 6% higher on the top earners, and the national insurance tax of 12% is significantly greater than payroll taxes. Sales taxes (VATs) for nonessentials is 20%.

In other words, an equivalent salary goes a lot farther in the US, even in the most expensive venues, by a factor of roughly 50% by my rough estimate once you consider all government reductions and then the differences in cost of living on the remaining expendable income.

Given the logistics and the pay inequality, how exactly does the NFL plan to allow a London team to compete on an equal basis? Move their cap number up substantially? There's a can of worms - it costs a hell of a lot less to live in GB than in CHI or NY. So are they going to put in a sliding scale in the US too? There's a disaster for their incredibly successful business model. If salary caps are equal London will lose out on a lot of FAs because of how much more it costs to live there and how much more the UK takes in taxes.

I'd be interested to see how the NFL plans on working that out. There's a lot more to moving a team than, "Hey, there's a big city where we don't have a team. Let's crack that market!"

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If this is serious, someone needs to get their head examined.

Aside from the logistics mentioned (that LON/SF ought to produce some really high quality football), the cost of living London is almost 20% higher than the highest US cities, income taxes there are 6% higher on the top earners, and the national insurance tax of 12% is significantly greater than payroll taxes. Sales taxes (VATs) for nonessentials is 20%.

In other words, an equivalent salary goes a lot farther in the US, even in the most expensive venues, by a factor of roughly 50% by my rough estimate once you consider all government reductions and then the differences in cost of living on the remaining expendable income.

Given the logistics and the pay inequality, how exactly does the NFL plan to allow a London team to compete on an equal basis? Move their cap number up substantially? There's a can of worms - it costs a hell of a lot less to live in GB than in CHI or NY. So are they going to put in a sliding scale in the US too? There's a disaster for their incredibly successful business model. If salary caps are equal London will lose out on a lot of FAs because of how much more it costs to live there and how much more the UK takes in taxes.

I'd be interested to see how the NFL plans on working that out. There's a lot more to moving a team than, "Hey, there's a big city where we don't have a team. Let's crack that market!"

what is the cost of living comparison between New York and St. Louis? Guess we'll get rid of the Jets and Giants too.

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If this is serious, someone needs to get their head examined.

Aside from the logistics mentioned (that LON/SF ought to produce some really high quality football), the cost of living London is almost 20% higher than the highest US cities, income taxes there are 6% higher on the top earners, and the national insurance tax of 12% is significantly greater than payroll taxes. Sales taxes (VATs) for nonessentials is 20%.

In other words, an equivalent salary goes a lot farther in the US, even in the most expensive venues, by a factor of roughly 50% by my rough estimate once you consider all government reductions and then the differences in cost of living on the remaining expendable income.

Given the logistics and the pay inequality, how exactly does the NFL plan to allow a London team to compete on an equal basis? Move their cap number up substantially? There's a can of worms - it costs a hell of a lot less to live in GB than in CHI or NY. So are they going to put in a sliding scale in the US too? There's a disaster for their incredibly successful business model. If salary caps are equal London will lose out on a lot of FAs because of how much more it costs to live there and how much more the UK takes in taxes.

I'd be interested to see how the NFL plans on working that out. There's a lot more to moving a team than, "Hey, there's a big city where we don't have a team. Let's crack that market!"

Regarding taxes, people in the UK don't have to pay state tax so in a high rate state like New York (12.6%) taxes are actually lower than the UK.

London is not much more expensive to live in than NYC. Link

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Aside from the logistics mentioned (that LON/SF ought to produce some really high quality football)

They aren't likely to be making that trip without a bye. The schedule makers will probably give have them play 2-3 games on the road in the U.S. before giving them 2-3 home games. They wouldn't need to make more than 5 trans-Atlantic flights during the season. I'd also expect them to set up a second home in the U.S. while they're here for games.

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If this is serious, someone needs to get their head examined.

Aside from the logistics mentioned (that LON/SF ought to produce some really high quality football), the cost of living London is almost 20% higher than the highest US cities, income taxes there are 6% higher on the top earners, and the national insurance tax of 12% is significantly greater than payroll taxes. Sales taxes (VATs) for nonessentials is 20%.

In other words, an equivalent salary goes a lot farther in the US, even in the most expensive venues, by a factor of roughly 50% by my rough estimate once you consider all government reductions and then the differences in cost of living on the remaining expendable income.

Given the logistics and the pay inequality, how exactly does the NFL plan to allow a London team to compete on an equal basis? Move their cap number up substantially? There's a can of worms - it costs a hell of a lot less to live in GB than in CHI or NY. So are they going to put in a sliding scale in the US too? There's a disaster for their incredibly successful business model. If salary caps are equal London will lose out on a lot of FAs because of how much more it costs to live there and how much more the UK takes in taxes.

I'd be interested to see how the NFL plans on working that out. There's a lot more to moving a team than, "Hey, there's a big city where we don't have a team. Let's crack that market!"

Regarding taxes, people in the UK don't have to pay state tax so in a high rate state like New York (12.6%) taxes are actually lower than the UK.

London is not much more expensive to live in than NYC. Link

The state taxes are factored in. The differential is substantial. National Insurance of 12% of revenue and the VAT put it well over the top, beyond the income tax being higher. Then compound that with the additional COL.

Use the amalgam of drain on revenue. If you use just one factor and one city you can obviously diminish the impact.

Edited by Bronco Billy

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If this is serious, someone needs to get their head examined.

Aside from the logistics mentioned (that LON/SF ought to produce some really high quality football), the cost of living London is almost 20% higher than the highest US cities, income taxes there are 6% higher on the top earners, and the national insurance tax of 12% is significantly greater than payroll taxes. Sales taxes (VATs) for nonessentials is 20%.

In other words, an equivalent salary goes a lot farther in the US, even in the most expensive venues, by a factor of roughly 50% by my rough estimate once you consider all government reductions and then the differences in cost of living on the remaining expendable income.

Given the logistics and the pay inequality, how exactly does the NFL plan to allow a London team to compete on an equal basis? Move their cap number up substantially? There's a can of worms - it costs a hell of a lot less to live in GB than in CHI or NY. So are they going to put in a sliding scale in the US too? There's a disaster for their incredibly successful business model. If salary caps are equal London will lose out on a lot of FAs because of how much more it costs to live there and how much more the UK takes in taxes.

I'd be interested to see how the NFL plans on working that out. There's a lot more to moving a team than, "Hey, there's a big city where we don't have a team. Let's crack that market!"

what is the cost of living comparison between New York and St. Louis? Guess we'll get rid of the Jets and Giants too.

I thought I covered that - though I used an even greater extreme with GB instead of STL in the example. Edited by Bronco Billy

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NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, currently under fire for his handling of a domestic abuse case involving Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, is thought to be a strong backer of a potential London team as he seeks to build a lasting legacy and a global footprint for American football. His plans for a London franchise are said to include basing it in the USA for most of the year, with the team crossing the Atlantic to play two or three home games at a time.

I can't see this building public interest in UK. "We don't really want to live here but come support us 8 times a year."

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NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, currently under fire for his handling of a domestic abuse case involving Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice, is thought to be a strong backer of a potential London team as he seeks to build a lasting legacy and a global footprint for American football. His plans for a London franchise are said to include basing it in the USA for most of the year, with the team crossing the Atlantic to play two or three home games at a time.

I can't see this building public interest in UK. "We don't really want to live here but come support us 8 times a year."

Hahaha... Oh Roger.

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You thought the Patriots got the officiating calls .. LOL. Just wait till the NFL can command all of England to watch the Super Bowl. We'll see early 90s NBA-level riggage.

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