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Hernandez convicted of first-degree murder; found deceased in his cell.

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Aaron Hernandez was in constant fear that someone wanted him dead ... and that's why he stocked up on firearms ... sources close to the former New England Patriots star tell TMZ.

We're told ... the stories about Aaron's connections to gang members in Connecticut are real -- because the 23-year-old had joined one back when he was a teenager.

Sources connected to Aaron tell us ... he had been trying to move away from the gangster life ever since he signed his fat $40 million contract with the Patriots back in 2012, but it's not as easy as it sounds.

In fact, we're told Aaron believed people in the gangster world felt Aaron owed them something ... but it wasn't all about money -- they wanted his time and respect.

Sources say ... in the months leading up to the death of Odin Lloyd, Hernandez became paranoid that people from his "old lifestyle" were trying to kill him. It's unclear if Aaron feared scorned friends ... or rivals.

http://www.tmz.com/2013/06/27/aaron-hernandez-gang-murder-firearms-kill-me/

Yeah, of course sources close to Hernandez would make him sound like a victim.

Don't totally dis-credit the idea, I know the picture being painted is that the kid was living the double life of gang banging and NFL star but when I read a report like that it always brings back to Sean Taylor. A lot of these kids come from troubled places and when they get some cash a lot of people fell that their owed some of it just because their from the same "hood."

Not saying AHern is a victim, clearly if something like this set him down this spiral it could of been handled much differently. I'm sure other, rival gangs or even people in his old gang that were jealous wanted to hurt him and possibly kill him but a lot of players go though this; once he got the big contract he should of hired a body guard.

There is no comparison between Sean Taylor and Aaron Hernandez, and its insulting frankly to put them in the same sentence. Sean Taylor was a troubled young man who grew with the Redskins under Gibbs, and truly turned his life around with the birth of his daughter. He took responsibility for his actions and was deep into the process of becoming the man he wanted to be the night that he died protecting his family. He was rubbed by wanna-be thugs who knew him in passing and knew he had a nice house to loot, but he didn't embrace that life and bring it upon himself, no matter what Wilbon might have you believe.

Hernandez is scum. He seems to have murdered 1-3 people in cold blood, and bringing another life into this world did nothing to curtail his thugish activities and lifestyle.

No comparison.

Edited by ConnSKINS26

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Assuming Hernandez is found guilty of murder, I'm willing to bet there are plenty of people who will still think Michael Vick is the bigger NFL villain. :loco:

Depends on how much we learn about Hernandez and the victim(s); was the victim(s) associated with gangs? or were they good innocent people that just had a bad moment with the wrong person?

But what Vick was part of is pure evil, forcing animals to fight each other to the death for entertainment is disgusting. Not going to get into the agrument of human life vs animal life but what gave Vick and his business partners the right to torture and kill hundreds of dogs? Plus Vick got less than 2 yrs in federal prison were he was allowed to train for his NFL comeback, and then got to sign a huge contract... no justice what so ever.

Because Ahern is getting whats coming to him and Vick got a minor inconvenience I find Vick as bigger "villain"

Careful. Some people on this board think it's wrong to question the integrity of the deceased.

I'm not one of them.

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Aaron Hernandez was in constant fear that someone wanted him dead ... and that's why he stocked up on firearms ... sources close to the former New England Patriots star tell TMZ.

We're told ... the stories about Aaron's connections to gang members in Connecticut are real -- because the 23-year-old had joined one back when he was a teenager.

Sources connected to Aaron tell us ... he had been trying to move away from the gangster life ever since he signed his fat $40 million contract with the Patriots back in 2012, but it's not as easy as it sounds.

In fact, we're told Aaron believed people in the gangster world felt Aaron owed them something ... but it wasn't all about money -- they wanted his time and respect.

Sources say ... in the months leading up to the death of Odin Lloyd, Hernandez became paranoid that people from his "old lifestyle" were trying to kill him. It's unclear if Aaron feared scorned friends ... or rivals.

http://www.tmz.com/2013/06/27/aaron-hernandez-gang-murder-firearms-kill-me/

Yeah, of course sources close to Hernandez would make him sound like a victim.

Don't totally dis-credit the idea, I know the picture being painted is that the kid was living the double life of gang banging and NFL star but when I read a report like that it always brings back to Sean Taylor. A lot of these kids come from troubled places and when they get some cash a lot of people fell that their owed some of it just because their from the same "hood."

Not saying AHern is a victim, clearly if something like this set him down this spiral it could of been handled much differently. I'm sure other, rival gangs or even people in his old gang that were jealous wanted to hurt him and possibly kill him but a lot of players go though this; once he got the big contract he should of hired a body guard.

There is no comparison between Sean Taylor and Aaron Hernandez, and its insulting frankly to put them in the same sentence. Sean Taylor was a troubled young man who grew with the Redskins under Gibbs, and truly turned his life around with the birth of his daughter. He took responsibility for his actions and was deep into the process of becoming the man he wanted to be the night that he died protecting his family. He was rubbed by wanna-be thugs who knew him in passing and knew he had a nice house to loot, but he didn't embrace that life and bring it upon himself, no matter what Wilbon might have you believe.

Hernandez is scum. He seems to have murdered 1-3 people in cold blood, and bringing another life into this world did nothing to curtail his thugish activities and lifestyle.

No comparison.

Just said the situation above sounded like Taylor, I also said that AHern is anything but a victim. Thank you

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Aaron Hernandez was in constant fear that someone wanted him dead ... and that's why he stocked up on firearms ... sources close to the former New England Patriots star tell TMZ.

We're told ... the stories about Aaron's connections to gang members in Connecticut are real -- because the 23-year-old had joined one back when he was a teenager.

Sources connected to Aaron tell us ... he had been trying to move away from the gangster life ever since he signed his fat $40 million contract with the Patriots back in 2012, but it's not as easy as it sounds.

In fact, we're told Aaron believed people in the gangster world felt Aaron owed them something ... but it wasn't all about money -- they wanted his time and respect.

Sources say ... in the months leading up to the death of Odin Lloyd, Hernandez became paranoid that people from his "old lifestyle" were trying to kill him. It's unclear if Aaron feared scorned friends ... or rivals.

http://www.tmz.com/2013/06/27/aaron-hernandez-gang-murder-firearms-kill-me/

Yeah, of course sources close to Hernandez would make him sound like a victim.

Don't totally dis-credit the idea, I know the picture being painted is that the kid was living the double life of gang banging and NFL star but when I read a report like that it always brings back to Sean Taylor. A lot of these kids come from troubled places and when they get some cash a lot of people fell that their owed some of it just because their from the same "hood."

Not saying AHern is a victim, clearly if something like this set him down this spiral it could of been handled much differently. I'm sure other, rival gangs or even people in his old gang that were jealous wanted to hurt him and possibly kill him but a lot of players go though this; once he got the big contract he should of hired a body guard.

There is no comparison between Sean Taylor and Aaron Hernandez, and its insulting frankly to put them in the same sentence. Sean Taylor was a troubled young man who grew with the Redskins under Gibbs, and truly turned his life around with the birth of his daughter. He took responsibility for his actions and was deep into the process of becoming the man he wanted to be the night that he died protecting his family. He was rubbed by wanna-be thugs who knew him in passing and knew he had a nice house to loot, but he didn't embrace that life and bring it upon himself, no matter what Wilbon might have you believe.

Hernandez is scum. He seems to have murdered 1-3 people in cold blood, and bringing another life into this world did nothing to curtail his thugish activities and lifestyle.

No comparison.

Just said the situation above sounded like Taylor, I also said that AHern is anything but a victim. Thank you

That's the thing--it doesn't, at all. Hernandez actively lived this thug life, and no matter how much you speculate on the reasons why, the reality is that he still did. He left his fiance and child at home and went out with a couple other thugs and murdered a man less than a mile from his family, in cold blood. He's going away for it and while he might not have been able to escape his gang affiliations even if he wanted to, he obviously wasn't putting much effort into it. A man with a $41 million contract has a lot of options. He chose to stick with being a thug. That's not even including the other two murders he might have been involved in or the FL shooting.

Taylor did the opposite. He grew up. He left that life behind and became absorbed in his work and most importantly in his family. Which he was murdered protecting from thugs like Hernandez. If anything the thugs who robbed Taylor's home and unfortunately brought a gun, and then used it whether they had intended to or not, are a better comparison to Hernandez and the thug life he allegedly couldn't escape. Taylor himself is on the opposite end of that spectrum.

The only parallel between the two is their origins, in a way. But how they each chose to handle their lives and their struggles defines them as human beings, defines their legacy--and they were hugely different men, by that measure.

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OK, so I am AH. I know what I did. I see the evidence piling up. It is becoming clear to me that I will likely never be a free man again. I don't think the death penalty is in play.

At what point do you say, "Forget the lawyers and the drawn out court case and the appeals and ALL of that.". I'll salvage whatever money I can to try to give my kid at least ONE advantage in life. I'm not saying fire the lawyer, I'm saying instruct him to work out whatever quickest easiest terms he can. MAYBE, after all of the suits are settled there might be a little left for the kid. Maybe.

Do you think ANYONE is suggesting this to the guy at this point?

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OK, so I am AH. I know what I did. I see the evidence piling up. It is becoming clear to me that I will likely never be a free man again. I don't think the death penalty is in play.

At what point do you say, "Forget the lawyers and the drawn out court case and the appeals and ALL of that.". I'll salvage whatever money I can to try to give my kid at least ONE advantage in life. I'm not saying fire the lawyer, I'm saying instruct him to work out whatever quickest easiest terms he can. MAYBE, after all of the suits are settled there might be a little left for the kid. Maybe.

Do you think ANYONE is suggesting this to the guy at this point?

I don't think someone who had a child and yet still engages in activities like murder less than a mile from where that child is sleeping particularly cares. He's either a sociopath or he's just so arrogant that he really thought he'd just get away with it all. Either way it doesn't seem logical to think he'd start thinking about his family and their future NOW, after his horrible actions put it all into question in the first place. This obviously isn't a family-first guy. I'd be surprised if he turned into one now.

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OK, so I am AH. I know what I did. I see the evidence piling up. It is becoming clear to me that I will likely never be a free man again. I don't think the death penalty is in play.

At what point do you say, "Forget the lawyers and the drawn out court case and the appeals and ALL of that.". I'll salvage whatever money I can to try to give my kid at least ONE advantage in life. I'm not saying fire the lawyer, I'm saying instruct him to work out whatever quickest easiest terms he can. MAYBE, after all of the suits are settled there might be a little left for the kid. Maybe.

Do you think ANYONE is suggesting this to the guy at this point?

I don't think someone who had a child and yet still engages in activities like murder less than a mile from where that child is sleeping particularly cares. He's either a sociopath or he's just so arrogant that he really thought he'd just get away with it all. Either way it doesn't seem logical to think he'd start thinking about his family and their future NOW, after his horrible actions put it all into question in the first place. This obviously isn't a family-first guy. I'd be surprised if he turned into one now.

doesn't matter, hes going to be facing a lot of lawsuits... unless he had money in a trust fund for that kid there won't be a dime left :( so sad

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OK, so I am AH. I know what I did. I see the evidence piling up. It is becoming clear to me that I will likely never be a free man again. I don't think the death penalty is in play.

At what point do you say, "Forget the lawyers and the drawn out court case and the appeals and ALL of that.". I'll salvage whatever money I can to try to give my kid at least ONE advantage in life. I'm not saying fire the lawyer, I'm saying instruct him to work out whatever quickest easiest terms he can. MAYBE, after all of the suits are settled there might be a little left for the kid. Maybe.

Do you think ANYONE is suggesting this to the guy at this point?

That is rationale thinking. Even if someone suggested it to him, I would be surprised if he would agree.

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OK, so I am AH. I know what I did. I see the evidence piling up. It is becoming clear to me that I will likely never be a free man again. I don't think the death penalty is in play.

At what point do you say, "Forget the lawyers and the drawn out court case and the appeals and ALL of that.". I'll salvage whatever money I can to try to give my kid at least ONE advantage in life. I'm not saying fire the lawyer, I'm saying instruct him to work out whatever quickest easiest terms he can. MAYBE, after all of the suits are settled there might be a little left for the kid. Maybe.

Do you think ANYONE is suggesting this to the guy at this point?

That is rationale thinking. Even if someone suggested it to him, I would be surprised if he would agree.

It certainly wouldn't be his lawyers advice.

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OK, so I am AH. I know what I did. I see the evidence piling up. It is becoming clear to me that I will likely never be a free man again. I don't think the death penalty is in play.

At what point do you say, "Forget the lawyers and the drawn out court case and the appeals and ALL of that.". I'll salvage whatever money I can to try to give my kid at least ONE advantage in life. I'm not saying fire the lawyer, I'm saying instruct him to work out whatever quickest easiest terms he can. MAYBE, after all of the suits are settled there might be a little left for the kid. Maybe.

Do you think ANYONE is suggesting this to the guy at this point?

I don't think someone who had a child and yet still engages in activities like murder less than a mile from where that child is sleeping particularly cares. He's either a sociopath or he's just so arrogant that he really thought he'd just get away with it all. Either way it doesn't seem logical to think he'd start thinking about his family and their future NOW, after his horrible actions put it all into question in the first place. This obviously isn't a family-first guy. I'd be surprised if he turned into one now.

doesn't matter, hes going to be facing a lot of lawsuits... unless he had money in a trust fund for that kid there won't be a dime left :( so sad

He should file bankruptcy, between homestead exemption, and child support claim, kid should have something

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OK, so I am AH. I know what I did. I see the evidence piling up. It is becoming clear to me that I will likely never be a free man again. I don't think the death penalty is in play.

At what point do you say, "Forget the lawyers and the drawn out court case and the appeals and ALL of that.". I'll salvage whatever money I can to try to give my kid at least ONE advantage in life. I'm not saying fire the lawyer, I'm saying instruct him to work out whatever quickest easiest terms he can. MAYBE, after all of the suits are settled there might be a little left for the kid. Maybe.

Do you think ANYONE is suggesting this to the guy at this point?

That is rationale thinking. Even if someone suggested it to him, I would be surprised if he would agree.

O

It certainly wouldn't be his lawyers advice.

No such thing as a lawyer that will minimize cost.....they will milk him for every penny.

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So AH goes back in front of the judge for another bail hearing today. Will prosecution be allowed to site this new double murder investigation as a reason to deny bail? Or is it mute, since no charges have been filed in that case.

You misspelled "Sight" and "Moote". Hope this helps. :thumbup:

;)

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So AH goes back in front of the judge for another bail hearing today. Will prosecution be allowed to site this new double murder investigation as a reason to deny bail? Or is it mute, since no charges have been filed in that case.

You misspelled "Sight" and "Moote". Hope this helps. :thumbup:

;)

Actually you misspelled sight as well. The way it is used in my sentence, it should be "cite"

Glass house people. ;)

English language is dumb anyway, but that's for another thread.

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The prosecution somehow knew about a conversation in the car on the way to the alleged murder. The second suspect wasn't arrested until yesterday, and they're still looking for the third. So, how did they find out about the conversation? Think Lloyd was recording the conversation on his phone which was on his body. Not far fetched to think he may have been planning to blackmail AH or turn him in for the previous murder. Or, could AH have been dumb enough to tell his gf about the whole thing and she told the police? All speculation of course, but the fact that the other suspect was arrested after AH makes it seem unlikely that he was the source.

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The prosecution somehow knew about a conversation in the car on the way to the alleged murder. The second suspect wasn't arrested until yesterday, and they're still looking for the third. So, how did they find out about the conversation? Think Lloyd was recording the conversation on his phone which was on his body. Not far fetched to think he may have been planning to blackmail AH or turn him in for the previous murder. Or, could AH have been dumb enough to tell his gf about the whole thing and she told the police? All speculation of course, but the fact that the other suspect was arrested after AH makes it seem unlikely that he was the source.

You can cooperate with the authorities and still be arrested. It seems like they have one of the two other guys talking to the police, whether it be the one that got arrested or the other one remains to be seen.

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The person they're looking for is not necessarily the third person in the car, just an accessory after the fact if I recall correctly.

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So AH goes back in front of the judge for another bail hearing today. Will prosecution be allowed to site this new double murder investigation as a reason to deny bail? Or is it mute, since no charges have been filed in that case.

You misspelled "Sight" and "Moote". Hope this helps. :thumbup:

;)

You misspelled "cite" and "moot." Hope this helps. :lol:

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The person they're looking for is not necessarily the third person in the car, just an accessory after the fact if I recall correctly.

Agreed. It could be the third person in the car, or it could be someone who disposed of the .45 or something else to assist in the crime but who wasn't in the car.

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http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000215028/article/aaron-hernandez-murder-charge-chilling-lesson-for-nfl-rookies

AURORA, Ohio -- Alone in a makeshift gym that normally serves as a hotel ballroom, San Francisco 49ers rookie running back Marcus Lattimore had found his place on an elliptical machine shortly after arriving at the NFC's portion of the NFL Rookie Symposium.

The lectures hadn't started. The breakout sessions, yet to begin. But in this room, where the only noise came from the dull humming of Lattimore's elliptical machine, a chilling lesson was already on display across six large televisions mounted on the wall.

It was Aaron Hernandez's face. It was live coverage of his arraignment. It was the moment when Hernandez's identity took a sharp turn from football star to murder suspect; when the dreams of his youth were curtailed by the reality of his situation.

The rookie symposium here in suburban Cleveland is a place where the NFL tells its newest crop of players how to keep dreams on track -- and so there could be no more symbolic way for NFC attendees to arrive than this.

"Hopefully, the NFC guys that are here, the guys that just came in, it's going to mean that much more," said Chris Draft, an NFL transition coach. "All the stories that they hear, all the experiences, are now going to be that much more impacting.

"And the AFC guys that just left, everything they were told here about the details, about a dream, about dream-killers of sorts, all of those things will mean that much more."

This is not to suggest Hernandez's latest saga will serve as an empathetic scenario for each of the 254 rookies who will attend this week's symposium. This is rare. But the overall message is nonetheless quite pointed: A life can change in a day. A dream can be thwarted in a moment. Regardless of the final verdict in Hernandez's eventual trial, this situation has changed his daily existence in an incomprehensible way. It is the NFL's hope to teach these rookies to comprehend it only enough to avoid it.

That's why the NFL brings Adam Jones here to speak. That's why Tank Johnson, Maurice Clarett and former basketball star Chris Herren are also here to tell a roomful of fresh faces about their own misguided careers. None of those men have ever been charged with murder -- but each of those men at times did indeed become his own worst enemy.

And each shares his story in an effort to create the type of lasting impressions -- the type of critical lessons -- that could be learned Wednesday by watching Hernandez stand handcuffed in a court room.

"We're not here to make them better football players -- coaches do that," said Irving Fryar, a panelist at this week's symposium. "We are trying to make them aware of things around them -- of the people around them -- to make them better people."

This week, when Tank Johnson spoke to the AFC's players, the former defensive tackle who was often in trouble with the law didn't simply try to tell players what not to do. He also tried to teach them a tangible lesson: The NFL makes resources available. The help exists. It's up to the players to utilize that help.

At one point in his career, Johnson said, he was banned from owning a gun by the league because of previous weapons charges. Yet one day, after he caught thieves breaking into his car, he went to the store to buy a gun. While in line to pay, he decided to call NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

"Don't do it," Goodell told him. "Don't buy the gun. Instead, I'll have security outside your house every morning and every night for the rest of the summer."

By the time Johnson got home, a security guard was on the premisis to protect his house.

"The resources exist," Johnson said. "I learned it too late. You need to use those resources."

The NFL will do everything possible this week to drive home these points. They'll have Jones tell stories to players about blowing $100,000 to rent out the top of the Caesars Palace in Las Vegas for his family -- and the ensuing loneliness he later felt during his one-year suspension. They'll have Clarett talk about his 3 1/2-year prison sentence -- and they'll have him explain how his actions ruined his chances for a football career.

The NFL will even hold panels with successful former players like Chad Pennington, LaVar Arrington and Patrick Kerney. This isn't just about how dreams go bad -- it's also about how to dream even bigger.

But as this year's rookie symposium runs its course, there is a very sad reality that still exists: "You can't help everybody," Kerney said. "People need to want to help themselves."

Maybe that explains the strange, surreal feelings at the symposium Wednesday. As much as the league can use Hernandez as a prime example of how an identity can be altered in a day, the tale of his detoured dream also shows that its efforts don't always pay off.

But as Lattimore continued to work out on that elliptical Wednesday, as he stared at those televisions, it was also a reminder of another reality: It is indeed possible that some rookie will leave this symposium with a lesson, that some rookie will realize the fragility of his dreams and make the proper decisions to keep them intact.

"Unfortunately, sometimes bad things happen," Draft said. "The rookie symposium is about wisdom, about how to learn from the mistakes of others. When something like this is happening at the same time, it can make it that much more important that they are listening."

So, are they listening? Are these rookies really learning how to avoid life's pitfalls?

Hopefully, we won't find out in a courtroom.

I had never much liked Goodall. The bolded statement above changes my opinion quite a bit. Even if he is just trying to protect the shield (as everyone is quick to point out), his actions there go above and beyond what any employee could ever expect. Well done.

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http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000215028/article/aaron-hernandez-murder-charge-chilling-lesson-for-nfl-rookies

AURORA, Ohio -- Alone in a makeshift gym that normally serves as a hotel ballroom, San Francisco 49ers rookie running back Marcus Lattimore had found his place on an elliptical machine shortly after arriving at the NFC's portion of the NFL Rookie Symposium.

The lectures hadn't started. The breakout sessions, yet to begin. But in this room, where the only noise came from the dull humming of Lattimore's elliptical machine, a chilling lesson was already on display across six large televisions mounted on the wall.

It was Aaron Hernandez's face. It was live coverage of his arraignment. It was the moment when Hernandez's identity took a sharp turn from football star to murder suspect; when the dreams of his youth were curtailed by the reality of his situation.

The rookie symposium here in suburban Cleveland is a place where the NFL tells its newest crop of players how to keep dreams on track -- and so there could be no more symbolic way for NFC attendees to arrive than this.

"Hopefully, the NFC guys that are here, the guys that just came in, it's going to mean that much more," said Chris Draft, an NFL transition coach. "All the stories that they hear, all the experiences, are now going to be that much more impacting.

"And the AFC guys that just left, everything they were told here about the details, about a dream, about dream-killers of sorts, all of those things will mean that much more."

This is not to suggest Hernandez's latest saga will serve as an empathetic scenario for each of the 254 rookies who will attend this week's symposium. This is rare. But the overall message is nonetheless quite pointed: A life can change in a day. A dream can be thwarted in a moment. Regardless of the final verdict in Hernandez's eventual trial, this situation has changed his daily existence in an incomprehensible way. It is the NFL's hope to teach these rookies to comprehend it only enough to avoid it.

That's why the NFL brings Adam Jones here to speak. That's why Tank Johnson, Maurice Clarett and former basketball star Chris Herren are also here to tell a roomful of fresh faces about their own misguided careers. None of those men have ever been charged with murder -- but each of those men at times did indeed become his own worst enemy.

And each shares his story in an effort to create the type of lasting impressions -- the type of critical lessons -- that could be learned Wednesday by watching Hernandez stand handcuffed in a court room.

"We're not here to make them better football players -- coaches do that," said Irving Fryar, a panelist at this week's symposium. "We are trying to make them aware of things around them -- of the people around them -- to make them better people."

This week, when Tank Johnson spoke to the AFC's players, the former defensive tackle who was often in trouble with the law didn't simply try to tell players what not to do. He also tried to teach them a tangible lesson: The NFL makes resources available. The help exists. It's up to the players to utilize that help.

At one point in his career, Johnson said, he was banned from owning a gun by the league because of previous weapons charges. Yet one day, after he caught thieves breaking into his car, he went to the store to buy a gun. While in line to pay, he decided to call NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

"Don't do it," Goodell told him. "Don't buy the gun. Instead, I'll have security outside your house every morning and every night for the rest of the summer."

By the time Johnson got home, a security guard was on the premisis to protect his house.

"The resources exist," Johnson said. "I learned it too late. You need to use those resources."

The NFL will do everything possible this week to drive home these points. They'll have Jones tell stories to players about blowing $100,000 to rent out the top of the Caesars Palace in Las Vegas for his family -- and the ensuing loneliness he later felt during his one-year suspension. They'll have Clarett talk about his 3 1/2-year prison sentence -- and they'll have him explain how his actions ruined his chances for a football career.

The NFL will even hold panels with successful former players like Chad Pennington, LaVar Arrington and Patrick Kerney. This isn't just about how dreams go bad -- it's also about how to dream even bigger.

But as this year's rookie symposium runs its course, there is a very sad reality that still exists: "You can't help everybody," Kerney said. "People need to want to help themselves."

Maybe that explains the strange, surreal feelings at the symposium Wednesday. As much as the league can use Hernandez as a prime example of how an identity can be altered in a day, the tale of his detoured dream also shows that its efforts don't always pay off.

But as Lattimore continued to work out on that elliptical Wednesday, as he stared at those televisions, it was also a reminder of another reality: It is indeed possible that some rookie will leave this symposium with a lesson, that some rookie will realize the fragility of his dreams and make the proper decisions to keep them intact.

"Unfortunately, sometimes bad things happen," Draft said. "The rookie symposium is about wisdom, about how to learn from the mistakes of others. When something like this is happening at the same time, it can make it that much more important that they are listening."

So, are they listening? Are these rookies really learning how to avoid life's pitfalls?

Hopefully, we won't find out in a courtroom.

I had never much liked Goodall. The bolded statement above changes my opinion quite a bit. Even if he is just trying to protect the shield (as everyone is quick to point out), his actions there go above and beyond what any employee could ever expect. Well done.

Goodell is misunderstood. I'm in the minority, but I think he's doing a pretty solid job. It's not your daddy's NFL anymore.

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http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000215028/article/aaron-hernandez-murder-charge-chilling-lesson-for-nfl-rookies

AURORA, Ohio -- Alone in a makeshift gym that normally serves as a hotel ballroom, San Francisco 49ers rookie running back Marcus Lattimore had found his place on an elliptical machine shortly after arriving at the NFC's portion of the NFL Rookie Symposium.

The lectures hadn't started. The breakout sessions, yet to begin. But in this room, where the only noise came from the dull humming of Lattimore's elliptical machine, a chilling lesson was already on display across six large televisions mounted on the wall.

It was Aaron Hernandez's face. It was live coverage of his arraignment. It was the moment when Hernandez's identity took a sharp turn from football star to murder suspect; when the dreams of his youth were curtailed by the reality of his situation.

The rookie symposium here in suburban Cleveland is a place where the NFL tells its newest crop of players how to keep dreams on track -- and so there could be no more symbolic way for NFC attendees to arrive than this.

"Hopefully, the NFC guys that are here, the guys that just came in, it's going to mean that much more," said Chris Draft, an NFL transition coach. "All the stories that they hear, all the experiences, are now going to be that much more impacting.

"And the AFC guys that just left, everything they were told here about the details, about a dream, about dream-killers of sorts, all of those things will mean that much more."

This is not to suggest Hernandez's latest saga will serve as an empathetic scenario for each of the 254 rookies who will attend this week's symposium. This is rare. But the overall message is nonetheless quite pointed: A life can change in a day. A dream can be thwarted in a moment. Regardless of the final verdict in Hernandez's eventual trial, this situation has changed his daily existence in an incomprehensible way. It is the NFL's hope to teach these rookies to comprehend it only enough to avoid it.

That's why the NFL brings Adam Jones here to speak. That's why Tank Johnson, Maurice Clarett and former basketball star Chris Herren are also here to tell a roomful of fresh faces about their own misguided careers. None of those men have ever been charged with murder -- but each of those men at times did indeed become his own worst enemy.

And each shares his story in an effort to create the type of lasting impressions -- the type of critical lessons -- that could be learned Wednesday by watching Hernandez stand handcuffed in a court room.

"We're not here to make them better football players -- coaches do that," said Irving Fryar, a panelist at this week's symposium. "We are trying to make them aware of things around them -- of the people around them -- to make them better people."

This week, when Tank Johnson spoke to the AFC's players, the former defensive tackle who was often in trouble with the law didn't simply try to tell players what not to do. He also tried to teach them a tangible lesson: The NFL makes resources available. The help exists. It's up to the players to utilize that help.

At one point in his career, Johnson said, he was banned from owning a gun by the league because of previous weapons charges. Yet one day, after he caught thieves breaking into his car, he went to the store to buy a gun. While in line to pay, he decided to call NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

"Don't do it," Goodell told him. "Don't buy the gun. Instead, I'll have security outside your house every morning and every night for the rest of the summer."

By the time Johnson got home, a security guard was on the premisis to protect his house.

"The resources exist," Johnson said. "I learned it too late. You need to use those resources."

The NFL will do everything possible this week to drive home these points. They'll have Jones tell stories to players about blowing $100,000 to rent out the top of the Caesars Palace in Las Vegas for his family -- and the ensuing loneliness he later felt during his one-year suspension. They'll have Clarett talk about his 3 1/2-year prison sentence -- and they'll have him explain how his actions ruined his chances for a football career.

The NFL will even hold panels with successful former players like Chad Pennington, LaVar Arrington and Patrick Kerney. This isn't just about how dreams go bad -- it's also about how to dream even bigger.

But as this year's rookie symposium runs its course, there is a very sad reality that still exists: "You can't help everybody," Kerney said. "People need to want to help themselves."

Maybe that explains the strange, surreal feelings at the symposium Wednesday. As much as the league can use Hernandez as a prime example of how an identity can be altered in a day, the tale of his detoured dream also shows that its efforts don't always pay off.

But as Lattimore continued to work out on that elliptical Wednesday, as he stared at those televisions, it was also a reminder of another reality: It is indeed possible that some rookie will leave this symposium with a lesson, that some rookie will realize the fragility of his dreams and make the proper decisions to keep them intact.

"Unfortunately, sometimes bad things happen," Draft said. "The rookie symposium is about wisdom, about how to learn from the mistakes of others. When something like this is happening at the same time, it can make it that much more important that they are listening."

So, are they listening? Are these rookies really learning how to avoid life's pitfalls?

Hopefully, we won't find out in a courtroom.

I had never much liked Goodall. The bolded statement above changes my opinion quite a bit. Even if he is just trying to protect the shield (as everyone is quick to point out), his actions there go above and beyond what any employee could ever expect. Well done.

Agreed.

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Officials examining Aaron Hernandez's tattoos for gang ties

By Ryan Wilson | CBSSports.com

June 28, 2013 10:33 am ET

On Thursday, former Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez was denied bail after being charged with first-degree murder in the shooting death of Odin Lloyd the day before. This means Hernandez will remain behind bars until his case goes to trial.

In the meantime, authorities are examining Hernandez's many tattoos for symbols that might suggest a link to gangs.

“We'll be looking at his tattoos to see if there are any symbols that affiliate with gangs,” Bristol County Sheriff Thomas Hodgson said via the Boston Herald. “We have to always be vigilant around security and not place him somewhere where there are rival gang members.”

Jorja Leap, an adjunct professor of social welfare at UCLA who is also an expert on Los Angeles gangs, told the Herald that the former Patriots tight end could be in danger if he does have gang ink.

“Hernandez could be a very appealing target for someone who wants to make a reputation for himself. The sheriff needs to be extra careful with someone like Hernandez.”

Leap says she's studied the tattoos on Hernandez's arms and they appear decorative, but the tattoos she hasn't seen may be different.

Seventy-two hours ago, Hernandez was a free man, a year removed from a new $40 million contract extension with the Patriots, and living in a sprawling home in upscale North Attleboro, Mass. Now he's facing a murder charge and if convicted, could spend the rest of his life behind bars.

Not surprisingly, Hodgson says Hernandez is undergoing "an adjustment" to being confined to a 7-by-10-foot cell.

Edited by Faust

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Police searching for third suspect with ties to Odin Lloyd murder

By John Breech | CBSSports.com
June 28, 2013 1:30 am ET

(wanted poster in the linked article)

The ongoing investigation into the June 17 murder of Odin Lloyd has led police to a third suspect. The North Attleboro Police Department issued a 'Wanted' alert for Ernest Wallace on Thursday evening.

The 41-year-old Wallace is wanted for being an 'accessory after the fact of murder' in relation to Lloyd's death. According to authorities, Wallace -- who's considered armed and dangerous -- was last seen driving a silver/gray Chrysler 300 with Rhode Island license plates.

Wallace is the third suspect with ties to Lloyd's murder. Aaron Hernandez was arrested on Tuesday and is currently being held without bail on six charges, including one first-degree murder charge.

A second suspect with ties to the case, Carlos Ortiz, was apprehended in Connecticut on Wednesday and is awaiting extradition to Massachusetts. Ortiz was arrested on a fugitive from justice charge for illegally possessing a firearm and has admitted to having a gun in Massachusetts on the morning of June 17, according to WFXT-TV in Boston.

Authorities know that Hernandez and Lloyd were with at least two other people on the night of the murder, however, officials haven't confirmed that Ortiz or Wallace are either of those two people, only that they are involved.

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7-by-10 foot cell. With Hernandez being 6'2 and an arm length of 32", he can lay on the floor in the middle of his cell and touch both walls.

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Seventy-two hours ago, Hernandez was a free man, a year removed from a new $40 million contract extension with the Patriots, and living in a sprawling home in upscale North Attleboro, Mass. Now he's facing a murder charge and if convicted, could spend the rest of his life behind bars.

Not surprisingly, Hodgson says Hernandez is undergoing "an adjustment" to being confined to a 7-by-10-foot cell.

How do you adjust from liberty, forgetting about the sprawling mansion for a minute to a 7-by-10 foot cell? On lockdown 23 hours a day? He's gotta be suicidal.

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Seventy-two hours ago, Hernandez was a free man, a year removed from a new $40 million contract extension with the Patriots, and living in a sprawling home in upscale North Attleboro, Mass. Now he's facing a murder charge and if convicted, could spend the rest of his life behind bars.

Not surprisingly, Hodgson says Hernandez is undergoing "an adjustment" to being confined to a 7-by-10-foot cell.

How do you adjust from liberty, forgetting about the sprawling mansion for a minute to a 7-by-10 foot cell? On lockdown 23 hours a day? He's gotta be suicidal.

I still can't wrap my mind around this. It is so far beyond mind blowing that someone in his situation would throw away 40 million, a mansion, and women for a cold cell and dick. Crazy.

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They should run a rookie symposium tour. First stop AH's house, second stop the 7x10 cell. Not much else would need to be said.

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Seventy-two hours ago, Hernandez was a free man, a year removed from a new $40 million contract extension with the Patriots, and living in a sprawling home in upscale North Attleboro, Mass. Now he's facing a murder charge and if convicted, could spend the rest of his life behind bars.

Not surprisingly, Hodgson says Hernandez is undergoing "an adjustment" to being confined to a 7-by-10-foot cell.

How do you adjust from liberty, forgetting about the sprawling mansion for a minute to a 7-by-10 foot cell? On lockdown 23 hours a day? He's gotta be suicidal.

I still can't wrap my mind around this. It is so far beyond mind blowing that someone in his situation would throw away 40 million, a mansion, and women for a cold cell and dick. Crazy.

How do you know his cellmates name?

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Assuming Hernandez is found guilty of murder, I'm willing to bet there are plenty of people who will still think Michael Vick is the bigger NFL villain. :loco:

Depends on how much we learn about Hernandez and the victim(s); was the victim(s) associated with gangs? or were they good innocent people that just had a bad moment with the wrong person?

But what Vick was part of is pure evil, forcing animals to fight each other to the death for entertainment is disgusting. Not going to get into the agrument of human life vs animal life but what gave Vick and his business partners the right to torture and kill hundreds of dogs? Plus Vick got less than 2 yrs in federal prison were he was allowed to train for his NFL comeback, and then got to sign a huge contract... no justice what so ever.

Because Ahern is getting whats coming to him and Vick got a minor inconvenience I find Vick as bigger "villain"

I'm probably reading this wrong, but are you saying what Vick did was worse than what Hernandez did?

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They should run a rookie symposium tour. First stop AH's house, second stop the 7x10 cell. Not much else would need to be said.

NFL version of "scared straight".

I want to go to the rookie symposium once. I can just imagine how worthless it really is.

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So AH goes back in front of the judge for another bail hearing today. Will prosecution be allowed to site this new double murder investigation as a reason to deny bail? Or is it mute, since no charges have been filed in that case.

You misspelled "Sight" and "Moote". Hope this helps. :thumbup:

;)

You misspelled "cite" and "moot." Hope this helps. :lol:

*WOOSH*

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OK, so I am AH. I know what I did. I see the evidence piling up. It is becoming clear to me that I will likely never be a free man again. I don't think the death penalty is in play.

At what point do you say, "Forget the lawyers and the drawn out court case and the appeals and ALL of that.". I'll salvage whatever money I can to try to give my kid at least ONE advantage in life. I'm not saying fire the lawyer, I'm saying instruct him to work out whatever quickest easiest terms he can. MAYBE, after all of the suits are settled there might be a little left for the kid. Maybe.

Do you think ANYONE is suggesting this to the guy at this point?

I don't think someone who had a child and yet still engages in activities like murder less than a mile from where that child is sleeping particularly cares. He's either a sociopath or he's just so arrogant that he really thought he'd just get away with it all. Either way it doesn't seem logical to think he'd start thinking about his family and their future NOW, after his horrible actions put it all into question in the first place. This obviously isn't a family-first guy. I'd be surprised if he turned into one now.

doesn't matter, hes going to be facing a lot of lawsuits... unless he had money in a trust fund for that kid there won't be a dime left :( so sad

He should file bankruptcy, between homestead exemption, and child support claim, kid should have something

He didn't marry the woman he had the child with, so I guess she can also sue him and get something for her and the kid, is that right?

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So AH goes back in front of the judge for another bail hearing today. Will prosecution be allowed to site this new double murder investigation as a reason to deny bail? Or is it mute, since no charges have been filed in that case.

You misspelled "Sight" and "Moote". Hope this helps. :thumbup:

;)

You misspelled "cite" and "moot." Hope this helps. :lol:

*WOOSH*

*WHOOSH*

Fixt.

-QG

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Articles are stating that AH's bail denial yesterday means that he will remain in jail until the trial starts. (which may be a year from now) I thought I heard the DA make a statement to the effect of denying bail until his next court appearance. Which is in late July.

Does anyone know if he can appeal the bail decision each time he appears in court?

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I've probably missed this but I'm trying to understand how they found a shell casing in the car but no blood stains. Any theories?

He wasn't in the car when he was shot?

-QG

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I've probably missed this but I'm trying to understand how they found a shell casing in the car but no blood stains. Any theories?

If it was a semi auto pistol. Shell casings eject and fly in different directions. It could have landed in a piece of clothing and then fell off after they got back in the car.

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I've probably missed this but I'm trying to understand how they found a shell casing in the car but no blood stains. Any theories?

He shot the guy outside of his car. The bullet goes where the gun is pointed and the casings eject up and to the right. He then picked up the casings and left one in the car next to his blue Bubbalicious Cotton Candy wrapper.

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Articles are stating that AH's bail denial yesterday means that he will remain in jail until the trial starts. (which may be a year from now) I thought I heard the DA make a statement to the effect of denying bail until his next court appearance. Which is in late July.

Does anyone know if he can appeal the bail decision each time he appears in court?

Didn't it take Jodi Arias 4 years to go to court on a murder charge?

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@PriscoCBStwitter_bird.png

Wes Welker should feel lucky. Maybe Hernandez wasn't kidding that day

And that is just one reported case. I wonder how often Tom Brady gave him an earful for running the wrong route etc.

Never...unless his linemen we're between him and thuggy.

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"In addition, text messages from Lloyd to his sister indicated that he knew he was in peril, McCauley said.

He texted his sister reminding her of who he was with -- "I just want you to know," he wrote."

If I need to text this, I know about the double murder - I'm jumping out the damn car.

I'm not getting into the car in the first place.

Again we don't really know all the details. What if they had a gun to his back saying get in the car... at that point you do it, cause you never know there's a chance they won't kill you. Or maybe he said he would let him live if he came with him (reminds me of the movie Mystic River)... or maybe he said he was going to kill his wife/sister/family/whatever as well as him if he didn't co operate, or maybe they said they were going to beat him up and he went 'willingly' rather then being shot on the spot or risking being killed... which he probably knew AH wasn't afraid to do. Unfortunately we may never know why the guy willingly got into that car. He was probably in shock too.

One theory I have is that they did not hold a gun to him and coerce him into the vehicle. They simply stated that they needed gas and were intending on buying the crew a pack of Bubblicious.

Who the &^%$ would pass up an offer like that?!

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@AdamSchefter: Boston PD has located red SUV w RI plates it was looking for in July 2012 homicide. Hernandez rented it

I thought it was silver or grey?

Probably had it re-painted to match his Blood colors.

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@AdamSchefter: Boston PD has located red SUV w RI plates it was looking for in July 2012 homicide. Hernandez rented it

I thought it was silver or grey?

Probably had it re-painted to match his Blood colors.

Not sure what color the Van Buren Boys wear

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http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000215028/article/aaron-hernandez-murder-charge-chilling-lesson-for-nfl-rookies

AURORA, Ohio -- Alone in a makeshift gym that normally serves as a hotel ballroom, San Francisco 49ers rookie running back Marcus Lattimore had found his place on an elliptical machine shortly after arriving at the NFC's portion of the NFL Rookie Symposium.

The lectures hadn't started. The breakout sessions, yet to begin. But in this room, where the only noise came from the dull humming of Lattimore's elliptical machine, a chilling lesson was already on display across six large televisions mounted on the wall.

It was Aaron Hernandez's face. It was live coverage of his arraignment. It was the moment when Hernandez's identity took a sharp turn from football star to murder suspect; when the dreams of his youth were curtailed by the reality of his situation.

The rookie symposium here in suburban Cleveland is a place where the NFL tells its newest crop of players how to keep dreams on track -- and so there could be no more symbolic way for NFC attendees to arrive than this.

"Hopefully, the NFC guys that are here, the guys that just came in, it's going to mean that much more," said Chris Draft, an NFL transition coach. "All the stories that they hear, all the experiences, are now going to be that much more impacting.

"And the AFC guys that just left, everything they were told here about the details, about a dream, about dream-killers of sorts, all of those things will mean that much more."

This is not to suggest Hernandez's latest saga will serve as an empathetic scenario for each of the 254 rookies who will attend this week's symposium. This is rare. But the overall message is nonetheless quite pointed: A life can change in a day. A dream can be thwarted in a moment. Regardless of the final verdict in Hernandez's eventual trial, this situation has changed his daily existence in an incomprehensible way. It is the NFL's hope to teach these rookies to comprehend it only enough to avoid it.

That's why the NFL brings Adam Jones here to speak. That's why Tank Johnson, Maurice Clarett and former basketball star Chris Herren are also here to tell a roomful of fresh faces about their own misguided careers. None of those men have ever been charged with murder -- but each of those men at times did indeed become his own worst enemy.

And each shares his story in an effort to create the type of lasting impressions -- the type of critical lessons -- that could be learned Wednesday by watching Hernandez stand handcuffed in a court room.

"We're not here to make them better football players -- coaches do that," said Irving Fryar, a panelist at this week's symposium. "We are trying to make them aware of things around them -- of the people around them -- to make them better people."

This week, when Tank Johnson spoke to the AFC's players, the former defensive tackle who was often in trouble with the law didn't simply try to tell players what not to do. He also tried to teach them a tangible lesson: The NFL makes resources available. The help exists. It's up to the players to utilize that help.

At one point in his career, Johnson said, he was banned from owning a gun by the league because of previous weapons charges. Yet one day, after he caught thieves breaking into his car, he went to the store to buy a gun. While in line to pay, he decided to call NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

"Don't do it," Goodell told him. "Don't buy the gun. Instead, I'll have security outside your house every morning and every night for the rest of the summer."

By the time Johnson got home, a security guard was on the premisis to protect his house.

"The resources exist," Johnson said. "I learned it too late. You need to use those resources."

The NFL will do everything possible this week to drive home these points. They'll have Jones tell stories to players about blowing $100,000 to rent out the top of the Caesars Palace in Las Vegas for his family -- and the ensuing loneliness he later felt during his one-year suspension. They'll have Clarett talk about his 3 1/2-year prison sentence -- and they'll have him explain how his actions ruined his chances for a football career.

The NFL will even hold panels with successful former players like Chad Pennington, LaVar Arrington and Patrick Kerney. This isn't just about how dreams go bad -- it's also about how to dream even bigger.

But as this year's rookie symposium runs its course, there is a very sad reality that still exists: "You can't help everybody," Kerney said. "People need to want to help themselves."

Maybe that explains the strange, surreal feelings at the symposium Wednesday. As much as the league can use Hernandez as a prime example of how an identity can be altered in a day, the tale of his detoured dream also shows that its efforts don't always pay off.

But as Lattimore continued to work out on that elliptical Wednesday, as he stared at those televisions, it was also a reminder of another reality: It is indeed possible that some rookie will leave this symposium with a lesson, that some rookie will realize the fragility of his dreams and make the proper decisions to keep them intact.

"Unfortunately, sometimes bad things happen," Draft said. "The rookie symposium is about wisdom, about how to learn from the mistakes of others. When something like this is happening at the same time, it can make it that much more important that they are listening."

So, are they listening? Are these rookies really learning how to avoid life's pitfalls?

Hopefully, we won't find out in a courtroom.

I had never much liked Goodall. The bolded statement above changes my opinion quite a bit. Even if he is just trying to protect the shield (as everyone is quick to point out), his actions there go above and beyond what any employee could ever expect. Well done.

Goodell is misunderstood. I'm in the minority, but I think he's doing a pretty solid job. It's not your daddy's NFL anymore.

Not saying he's been perfect but much of Goodell's heavy handed actions are to protect the league as best as possible from the on field liability that is coming to light regarding head injuries. Not sure how he can be faulted for that.

Edited by JetMaxx

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Assuming Hernandez is found guilty of murder, I'm willing to bet there are plenty of people who will still think Michael Vick is the bigger NFL villain. :loco:

True.

There are those who feel more empathy for dogs than guys who hang out with thugs and end up dead. Now, Lloyd could have just been a victim of circumstance - i.e., thuggy and he dated sisters...so they inevitably ran in similar crowds. However, maybe Lloyd was more like thuggy and that's how he met the sister. The details will soon come out.

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7-by-10 foot cell. With Hernandez being 6'2 and an arm length of 32", he can lay on the floor in the middle of his cell and touch both walls.

The NFL should add a drill to the combine replicating a prison cell.

Maybe as an in-your-face reminder of how these guys lives could play out if they do stupid things.

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Wonder if Hernandez paid attention to how quickly the Boston Police solved the bombing case? Maybe he thought he had a week before he needed to find a boat to hide in.

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Wonder if Hernandez paid attention to how quickly the Boston Police solved the bombing case? Maybe he thought he had a week before he needed to find a boat to hide in.

Either way, he's on a sinking ship....with no Bubbalicious

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