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DeSean Jackson

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On paper, Vick-Jackson-Decker-Hill looks like a dangerous combo.

They can always add a RB cheap, say Blount, if not satisfied with the current picture.

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The timing of this whole scenario makes me think this was not planned; rather some shizz went down very recently that either pissed Chip off or made Howie nervous about holdouts or both. Waiting until all WR-desperate teams have filled their voids through FA, then letting it get that you are looking to trade DJax makes absolutely no sense. Leaking out that you will potentially cut him if no trade offers come through makes even less sense. Can't see the mindset behind this situation.

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The timing of this whole scenario makes me think this was not planned; rather some shizz went down very recently that either pissed Chip off or made Howie nervous about holdouts or both. Waiting until all WR-desperate teams have filled their voids through FA, then letting it get that you are looking to trade DJax makes absolutely no sense. Leaking out that you will potentially cut him if no trade offers come through makes even less sense. Can't see the mindset behind this situation.

Exactly. If it comes out that this was just about money and not sonething he did, then it brings the competence of Howie and Chip into question.

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The timing of this whole scenario makes me think this was not planned; rather some shizz went down very recently that either pissed Chip off or made Howie nervous about holdouts or both. Waiting until all WR-desperate teams have filled their voids through FA, then letting it get that you are looking to trade DJax makes absolutely no sense. Leaking out that you will potentially cut him if no trade offers come through makes even less sense. Can't see the mindset behind this situation.

Exactly. If it comes out that this was just about money and not sonething he did, then it brings the competence of Howie and Chip into question.

I'm going to judge the competence of Kelly and Roseman by the results on the field. More than a few people thought the sky would fall if Foles was the Eagles QB this time last year. I will trust Kelly until I see a reason not to.

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The timing of this whole scenario makes me think this was not planned; rather some shizz went down very recently that either pissed Chip off or made Howie nervous about holdouts or both. Waiting until all WR-desperate teams have filled their voids through FA, then letting it get that you are looking to trade DJax makes absolutely no sense. Leaking out that you will potentially cut him if no trade offers come through makes even less sense. Can't see the mindset behind this situation.

Exactly. If it comes out that this was just about money and not sonething he did, then it brings the competence of Howie and Chip into question.

I'm going to judge the competence of Kelly and Roseman by the results on the field. More than a few people thought the sky would fall if Foles was the Eagles QB this time last year. I will trust Kelly until I see a reason not to.

:goodposting: :goodposting:

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The timing of this whole scenario makes me think this was not planned; rather some shizz went down very recently that either pissed Chip off or made Howie nervous about holdouts or both. Waiting until all WR-desperate teams have filled their voids through FA, then letting it get that you are looking to trade DJax makes absolutely no sense. Leaking out that you will potentially cut him if no trade offers come through makes even less sense. Can't see the mindset behind this situation.

Exactly. If it comes out that this was just about money and not sonething he did, then it brings the competence of Howie and Chip into question.

I'm going to judge the competence of Kelly and Roseman by the results on the field. More than a few people thought the sky would fall if Foles was the Eagles QB this time last year. I will trust Kelly until I see a reason not to.

Even if they don't skip a beat on the field, the way this was handled if it was all over money has been very poor. They could have made a trade well before free agency ended when the market was there. If they outright release him over wanting to renegotiate, then it most certainly brings their competence into question.

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If they outright release him over wanting to renegotiate, then it most certainly brings their competence into question.

That's a pretty big IF. I would not assume that there is nothing to the situation besides wanting to renegotiate - I imagine more info will come out, probably should wait for that before we start throwing out questions of competence.

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If they outright release him over wanting to renegotiate, then it most certainly brings their competence into question.

That's a pretty big IF. I would not assume that there is nothing to the situation besides wanting to renegotiate - I imagine more info will come out, probably should wait for that before we start throwing out questions of competence.

I mentioned this in the Eagles thread but apparently Jackson also may have gang ties to either the Bloods or Crips.

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If they outright release him over wanting to renegotiate, then it most certainly brings their competence into question.

That's a pretty big IF. I would not assume that there is nothing to the situation besides wanting to renegotiate - I imagine more info will come out, probably should wait for that before we start throwing out questions of competence.

I mentioned this in the Eagles thread but apparently Jackson also may have gang ties to either the Bloods or Crips.

IF that is true, that would actually make the most sense of why they want to get rid of him.

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If they outright release him over wanting to renegotiate, then it most certainly brings their competence into question.

That's a pretty big IF. I would not assume that there is nothing to the situation besides wanting to renegotiate - I imagine more info will come out, probably should wait for that before we start throwing out questions of competence.

I mentioned this in the Eagles thread but apparently Jackson also may have gang ties to either the Bloods or Crips.

and they are just finding this out this deep into his career?? And no one has bothered to mention this during his time at Philly?

Okay.

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The timing of this whole scenario makes me think this was not planned; rather some shizz went down very recently that either pissed Chip off or made Howie nervous about holdouts or both. Waiting until all WR-desperate teams have filled their voids through FA, then letting it get that you are looking to trade DJax makes absolutely no sense. Leaking out that you will potentially cut him if no trade offers come through makes even less sense. Can't see the mindset behind this situation.

Exactly. If it comes out that this was just about money and not sonething he did, then it brings the competence of Howie and Chip into question.

I'm going to judge the competence of Kelly and Roseman by the results on the field. More than a few people thought the sky would fall if Foles was the Eagles QB this time last year. I will trust Kelly until I see a reason not to.

Agree with Chip but not with Roseman. His goal, if they want to get rid of desean, should be to get the absolute most for him. The way in which this has been handled seems botched IMO.

Say, for instance, that there are legit rumblings of gang ties and the FO gets skittish after the whole ahern thing so they want to get him out of eagles green. That shouldn't preclude them from still maximizing his value, right?

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If they outright release him over wanting to renegotiate, then it most certainly brings their competence into question.

That's a pretty big IF. I would not assume that there is nothing to the situation besides wanting to renegotiate - I imagine more info will come out, probably should wait for that before we start throwing out questions of competence.

I mentioned this in the Eagles thread but apparently Jackson also may have gang ties to either the Bloods or Crips.

and they are just finding this out this deep into his career?? And no one has bothered to mention this during his time at Philly?

Okay.

After Herandez nothing would surprise me with these players.anymore.

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If they outright release him over wanting to renegotiate, then it most certainly brings their competence into question.

That's a pretty big IF. I would not assume that there is nothing to the situation besides wanting to renegotiate - I imagine more info will come out, probably should wait for that before we start throwing out questions of competence.
I mentioned this in the Eagles thread but apparently Jackson also may have gang ties to either the Bloods or Crips.

and they are just finding this out this deep into his career?? And no one has bothered to mention this during his time at Philly?

Okay.

After Herandez nothing would surprise me with these players.anymore.

Maybe a New England homer could weight in--was it known he was a gang member as well? I don't recall hearing about it until he started shooting people.

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If they outright release him over wanting to renegotiate, then it most certainly brings their competence into question.

That's a pretty big IF. I would not assume that there is nothing to the situation besides wanting to renegotiate - I imagine more info will come out, probably should wait for that before we start throwing out questions of competence.
I mentioned this in the Eagles thread but apparently Jackson also may have gang ties to either the Bloods or Crips.

and they are just finding this out this deep into his career?? And no one has bothered to mention this during his time at Philly?

Okay.

It may be that Kelly knew or was less tolerable then the previous HC.

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The timing of this whole scenario makes me think this was not planned; rather some shizz went down very recently that either pissed Chip off or made Howie nervous about holdouts or both. Waiting until all WR-desperate teams have filled their voids through FA, then letting it get that you are looking to trade DJax makes absolutely no sense. Leaking out that you will potentially cut him if no trade offers come through makes even less sense. Can't see the mindset behind this situation.

Exactly. If it comes out that this was just about money and not sonething he did, then it brings the competence of Howie and Chip into question.

I'm going to judge the competence of Kelly and Roseman by the results on the field. More than a few people thought the sky would fall if Foles was the Eagles QB this time last year. I will trust Kelly until I see a reason not to.

Agree with Chip but not with Roseman. His goal, if they want to get rid of desean, should be to get the absolute most for him. The way in which this has been handled seems botched IMO.

Say, for instance, that there are legit rumblings of gang ties and the FO gets skittish after the whole ahern thing so they want to get him out of eagles green. That shouldn't preclude them from still maximizing his value, right?

The thing is, we have no idea what went down or when. All we know is started to complain about his contract. Everything else is speculation. Keep winning, keep improving and I'm happy.

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If they outright release him over wanting to renegotiate, then it most certainly brings their competence into question.

That's a pretty big IF. I would not assume that there is nothing to the situation besides wanting to renegotiate - I imagine more info will come out, probably should wait for that before we start throwing out questions of competence.
I mentioned this in the Eagles thread but apparently Jackson also may have gang ties to either the Bloods or Crips.

IF that is true, that would actually make the most sense of why they want to get rid of him.

And why he won't be a patriot.

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If they outright release him over wanting to renegotiate, then it most certainly brings their competence into question.

That's a pretty big IF. I would not assume that there is nothing to the situation besides wanting to renegotiate - I imagine more info will come out, probably should wait for that before we start throwing out questions of competence.
I mentioned this in the Eagles thread but apparently Jackson also may have gang ties to either the Bloods or Crips.

and they are just finding this out this deep into his career?? And no one has bothered to mention this during his time at Philly?

Okay.

After Herandez nothing would surprise me with these players.anymore.

Maybe a New England homer could weight in--was it known he was a gang member as well? I don't recall hearing about it until he started shooting people.

well, I live in CT and pretty much 90% pf the football fans I know are Pats... and I can tell you that even the season ticket holders that I know had no idea about him (the Commander at my base is a ticket holder and pretty dialed in). He had a little bit of a rap in college but everybody thought he cleaned up in the pros. So when those charges came out and the gang stuff they were just as shocked as the rest of us.

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Okay.


Maybe a New England homer could weight in--was it known he was a gang member as well? I don't recall hearing about it until he started shooting people.

As a New England fan I long had suspicions based on his tats. But never officially heard of anything in particular. But I also work in Law Enforcement and see gangs tats regularly.... I was just hoping I was wrong or he was a wanna be. But I was wrong

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The timing of this whole scenario makes me think this was not planned; rather some shizz went down very recently that either pissed Chip off or made Howie nervous about holdouts or both. Waiting until all WR-desperate teams have filled their voids through FA, then letting it get that you are looking to trade DJax makes absolutely no sense. Leaking out that you will potentially cut him if no trade offers come through makes even less sense. Can't see the mindset behind this situation.

Exactly. If it comes out that this was just about money and not sonething he did, then it brings the competence of Howie and Chip into question.

I'm going to judge the competence of Kelly and Roseman by the results on the field. More than a few people thought the sky would fall if Foles was the Eagles QB this time last year. I will trust Kelly until I see a reason not to.

Even if they don't skip a beat on the field, the way this was handled if it was all over money has been very poor. They could have made a trade well before free agency ended when the market was there. If they outright release him over wanting to renegotiate, then it most certainly brings their competence into question.

Just stop with the "if it's about the money" bs. Quitting on the team 2 yrs ago, gang signs, house getting robbed, fighting with a coach on the sidelines, having to run him on the 3rd team during OTAs for motivation, complaining about his contract 2 days after a playoff loss when scheduled to make $10.25mil next year and in no danger of being cut. Deal with facts son, not guesses.
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The timing of this whole scenario makes me think this was not planned; rather some shizz went down very recently that either pissed Chip off or made Howie nervous about holdouts or both. Waiting until all WR-desperate teams have filled their voids through FA, then letting it get that you are looking to trade DJax makes absolutely no sense. Leaking out that you will potentially cut him if no trade offers come through makes even less sense. Can't see the mindset behind this situation.

Exactly. If it comes out that this was just about money and not sonething he did, then it brings the competence of Howie and Chip into question.

I'm going to judge the competence of Kelly and Roseman by the results on the field. More than a few people thought the sky would fall if Foles was the Eagles QB this time last year. I will trust Kelly until I see a reason not to.
Even if they don't skip a beat on the field, the way this was handled if it was all over money has been very poor. They could have made a trade well before free agency ended when the market was there. If they outright release him over wanting to renegotiate, then it most certainly brings their competence into question.
Just stop with the "if it's about the money" bs. Quitting on the team 2 yrs ago, gang signs, house getting robbed, fighting with a coach on the sidelines, having to run him on the 3rd team during OTAs for motivation, complaining about his contract 2 days after a playoff loss when scheduled to make $10.25mil next year and in no danger of being cut. Deal with facts son, not guesses.

Then hey genius, why wait till after the free agent market is dried up? If you have this overwhelming amount of evidence since the end of the season that you don't want him, then why do you waste the inherent value of a 1300 yd 9 td pro bowl season to the point that you are now willing to cut him.

No all that crap was either ok or it was not well before this point. So either a) they knew he was gone after his comments from the Saints game and botched his departure or b) they were fine with that minor stuff and he did something really bad in the last 3 weeks to really piss them off.

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I may be in the minority, but I think the NFL as a whole should do all it can to distance itself from any and every player who maintains gang affiliations. If Philly has to drop him for nothing, so be it. It SHOULD be hard, if not impossible, to move a player like that.

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You guys called me crazy back in JANUARY.

http://forums.footballguys.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=674940&page=88#entry16372904

Don't forget this is a business. Follow the money. There is just no room to pay three WRs starter money in todays NFL. DeSean is under a 3 year contract for a team with no cap issues. Players have way less leverage in these situations than you guys think. He would be really stupid to turn this into a Kenny Britt like situation and not show up or get benched for his conduct. What's the going rate for small WRs who don't get on the field anyway? He was dumb for even mentioning his contract.

IDRC what set he claims or any of the other TMZ drama. My real question is where is he going?

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http://larrybrownsports.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/desean-jackson-crips.jpg

just do a google search and you will see a few different photos of him doing crip gang signs.

Serena did a crip walk when she won Wimbledon. Doesn't make her a crip. Then again, I don't know the situation, and even throwing up signs to even impute gang affiliations are disturbing things to do. Unless you're, like, a totally white ASU cheerleader or something like that.

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http://larrybrownsports.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/desean-jackson-crips.jpg

just do a google search and you will see a few different photos of him doing crip gang signs.

Based on this, I'd say 87% of the sorority girls my sister goes to college with are Crips.

I hear a couple days each month they become Bloods. <rimshot>

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DeSean no longer fit mold for Eagles receiver

Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist

Posted: Monday, March 24, 2014, 3:01 AM

Let's begin with an assumption that becomes more and more reasonable as each day passes and more sources reveal more information and insight: The Eagles are preparing to give DeSean Jackson the full Pontius Pilate treatment.

That the Eagles will either trade or release Jackson appears a fait accompli, and whenever an NFL team is considering washing its hands of a wide receiver as prolific and talented as Jackson - and in the prime of his career, no less - questions follow. Jackson is 27, and he's coming off what was statistically his best season: 82 catches, 1,332 yards, nine touchdowns. So why get rid of him?

Is this about the Eagles' freeing themselves from the $12.75 million salary-cap hit attached to Jackson's contract this year? Is this about Jackson's waiting less than 48 hours after the Eagles' season ended to announce his belief that he deserved a new contract and more money? Is this about his tete-a-tete on the Metrodome sideline with wide receivers coach Bob Bicknell, or his always-interesting Twitter and Instagram accounts?

At the risk of ducking a juicy, gossipy column angle, I'd suggest that even if Jackson weren't weighed down by all of this baggage, the Eagles would still be trying to rid themselves of him - and they'd be right to. If nothing else, Chip Kelly looks ahead. He searches for trends, pays attention to them, tries to exploit them to his and his team's advantage. And Jackson, for all his skill and speed and accomplishments, doesn't fit where the NFL is going.

Here's why: the Seattle Seahawks.

Ahead of this year's Super Bowl, the Wall Street Journal published two stories that testified to the proactive nature of the Seahawks' success on defense. The first story pointed out that the Seahawks, as an integral facet of their defensive scheme, led the NFL in pass-interference penalties. The second noted that Seattle had four defensive backs who had been wide receivers earlier in their football careers - Richard Sherman among them. No other team had as many.

Taken together, the two articles laid bare the Seahawks' innovative approach in building their secondary: They sought out bigger cornerbacks and safeties who, because of their backgrounds as receivers, might cover better because they could understand and anticipate opponents' route combinations. More, these defensive backs could manhandle opposing receivers, in effect daring officials to call pass interference or defensive holding on every play and banking that the officials wouldn't. Ask Peyton Manning whether this approach worked.

On Feb. 20, less than three weeks after the Seahawks crushed Manning and the Denver Broncos, 43-8, in Super Bowl XLVIII, Eagles general manager Howie Roseman was inside Lucas Oil Stadium during the NFL combine, going gaga over this year's draft class of wide receivers. In retrospect, one needed only to listen to Roseman that day, then peruse the heights and weights of several wide receiver prospects, to know that the Eagles have been thinking about jettisoning the 5-foot-10, 175-pound Jackson for a while.

Clemson's Sammy Watkins: 6-1, 211 pounds.

Texas A&M's Mike Evans: 6-5, 231 pounds.

Florida State's Kelvin Benjamin: 6-5, 240 pounds.

Penn State's Allen Robinson: 6-2, 220 pounds.

If Jackson departs, the Eagles' smallest starting wide receiver or tight end would be Jeremy Maclin, who is 6-0 and 195 pounds. Riley Cooper is 6-3, 222. Zach Ertz is 6-5, 250. Brent Celek is 6-4, 255. The common thread is clear. Kelly will take his chances having wee little LeSean McCoy or Darren Sproles match up against a slower linebacker, but on the outside, it's different. On the outside, size matters.

Remember, too, the development of the Eagles' offense under Kelly. Once Nick Foles earned the starting quarterback job, the dimension that Vick - or any mobile quarterback, for that matter - might bring to the system was gone.

Foles can't break down a defense's coverage assignments by running the read-option or escaping a pass rush. His strengths lie in his ability to throw with accuracy and timing into tiny windows of space. It's no wonder, then, that Jackson's production fell off once Foles became the starter. Jackson may have been the NFL's most dangerous deep threat once Vick got outside the pocket, but with Foles as the Eagles' triggerman, he struggled more often to get open.

The traits that held Jackson back aren't changing, either. He's neither tall enough nor physical enough to counteract the Seahawks' strategy - a strategy that other teams are likely to copy - so it doesn't make much sense to devote so many resources, financial or otherwise, to him.

This isn't just about demanding a new contract or arguing with a coach or being a "distraction." This is about where the NFL is heading. Chip Kelly is trying to get there first, and when he does, DeSean Jackson will be somewhere else.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/sports/20140324_DeSean_no_longer_fit_mold_for_Eagles_receiver.html#GF7xTRQp6SyA8F09.99

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DeSean no longer fit mold for Eagles receiver

Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist

Posted: Monday, March 24, 2014, 3:01 AM

Let's begin with an assumption that becomes more and more reasonable as each day passes and more sources reveal more information and insight: The Eagles are preparing to give DeSean Jackson the full Pontius Pilate treatment.

That the Eagles will either trade or release Jackson appears a fait accompli, and whenever an NFL team is considering washing its hands of a wide receiver as prolific and talented as Jackson - and in the prime of his career, no less - questions follow. Jackson is 27, and he's coming off what was statistically his best season: 82 catches, 1,332 yards, nine touchdowns. So why get rid of him?

Is this about the Eagles' freeing themselves from the $12.75 million salary-cap hit attached to Jackson's contract this year? Is this about Jackson's waiting less than 48 hours after the Eagles' season ended to announce his belief that he deserved a new contract and more money? Is this about his tete-a-tete on the Metrodome sideline with wide receivers coach Bob Bicknell, or his always-interesting Twitter and Instagram accounts?

At the risk of ducking a juicy, gossipy column angle, I'd suggest that even if Jackson weren't weighed down by all of this baggage, the Eagles would still be trying to rid themselves of him - and they'd be right to. If nothing else, Chip Kelly looks ahead. He searches for trends, pays attention to them, tries to exploit them to his and his team's advantage. And Jackson, for all his skill and speed and accomplishments, doesn't fit where the NFL is going.

Here's why: the Seattle Seahawks.

Ahead of this year's Super Bowl, the Wall Street Journal published two stories that testified to the proactive nature of the Seahawks' success on defense. The first story pointed out that the Seahawks, as an integral facet of their defensive scheme, led the NFL in pass-interference penalties. The second noted that Seattle had four defensive backs who had been wide receivers earlier in their football careers - Richard Sherman among them. No other team had as many.

Taken together, the two articles laid bare the Seahawks' innovative approach in building their secondary: They sought out bigger cornerbacks and safeties who, because of their backgrounds as receivers, might cover better because they could understand and anticipate opponents' route combinations. More, these defensive backs could manhandle opposing receivers, in effect daring officials to call pass interference or defensive holding on every play and banking that the officials wouldn't. Ask Peyton Manning whether this approach worked.

On Feb. 20, less than three weeks after the Seahawks crushed Manning and the Denver Broncos, 43-8, in Super Bowl XLVIII, Eagles general manager Howie Roseman was inside Lucas Oil Stadium during the NFL combine, going gaga over this year's draft class of wide receivers. In retrospect, one needed only to listen to Roseman that day, then peruse the heights and weights of several wide receiver prospects, to know that the Eagles have been thinking about jettisoning the 5-foot-10, 175-pound Jackson for a while.

Clemson's Sammy Watkins: 6-1, 211 pounds.

Texas A&M's Mike Evans: 6-5, 231 pounds.

Florida State's Kelvin Benjamin: 6-5, 240 pounds.

Penn State's Allen Robinson: 6-2, 220 pounds.

If Jackson departs, the Eagles' smallest starting wide receiver or tight end would be Jeremy Maclin, who is 6-0 and 195 pounds. Riley Cooper is 6-3, 222. Zach Ertz is 6-5, 250. Brent Celek is 6-4, 255. The common thread is clear. Kelly will take his chances having wee little LeSean McCoy or Darren Sproles match up against a slower linebacker, but on the outside, it's different. On the outside, size matters.

Remember, too, the development of the Eagles' offense under Kelly. Once Nick Foles earned the starting quarterback job, the dimension that Vick - or any mobile quarterback, for that matter - might bring to the system was gone.

Foles can't break down a defense's coverage assignments by running the read-option or escaping a pass rush. His strengths lie in his ability to throw with accuracy and timing into tiny windows of space. It's no wonder, then, that Jackson's production fell off once Foles became the starter. Jackson may have been the NFL's most dangerous deep threat once Vick got outside the pocket, but with Foles as the Eagles' triggerman, he struggled more often to get open.

The traits that held Jackson back aren't changing, either. He's neither tall enough nor physical enough to counteract the Seahawks' strategy - a strategy that other teams are likely to copy - so it doesn't make much sense to devote so many resources, financial or otherwise, to him.

This isn't just about demanding a new contract or arguing with a coach or being a "distraction." This is about where the NFL is heading. Chip Kelly is trying to get there first, and when he does, DeSean Jackson will be somewhere else.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/sports/20140324_DeSean_no_longer_fit_mold_for_Eagles_receiver.html#GF7xTRQp6SyA8F09.99

Well written and thought out stuff. This I can get behind.

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DeSean no longer fit mold for Eagles receiver

Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist

Posted: Monday, March 24, 2014, 3:01 AM

Let's begin with an assumption that becomes more and more reasonable as each day passes and more sources reveal more information and insight: The Eagles are preparing to give DeSean Jackson the full Pontius Pilate treatment.

That the Eagles will either trade or release Jackson appears a fait accompli, and whenever an NFL team is considering washing its hands of a wide receiver as prolific and talented as Jackson - and in the prime of his career, no less - questions follow. Jackson is 27, and he's coming off what was statistically his best season: 82 catches, 1,332 yards, nine touchdowns. So why get rid of him?

Is this about the Eagles' freeing themselves from the $12.75 million salary-cap hit attached to Jackson's contract this year? Is this about Jackson's waiting less than 48 hours after the Eagles' season ended to announce his belief that he deserved a new contract and more money? Is this about his tete-a-tete on the Metrodome sideline with wide receivers coach Bob Bicknell, or his always-interesting Twitter and Instagram accounts?

At the risk of ducking a juicy, gossipy column angle, I'd suggest that even if Jackson weren't weighed down by all of this baggage, the Eagles would still be trying to rid themselves of him - and they'd be right to. If nothing else, Chip Kelly looks ahead. He searches for trends, pays attention to them, tries to exploit them to his and his team's advantage. And Jackson, for all his skill and speed and accomplishments, doesn't fit where the NFL is going.

Here's why: the Seattle Seahawks.

Ahead of this year's Super Bowl, the Wall Street Journal published two stories that testified to the proactive nature of the Seahawks' success on defense. The first story pointed out that the Seahawks, as an integral facet of their defensive scheme, led the NFL in pass-interference penalties. The second noted that Seattle had four defensive backs who had been wide receivers earlier in their football careers - Richard Sherman among them. No other team had as many.

Taken together, the two articles laid bare the Seahawks' innovative approach in building their secondary: They sought out bigger cornerbacks and safeties who, because of their backgrounds as receivers, might cover better because they could understand and anticipate opponents' route combinations. More, these defensive backs could manhandle opposing receivers, in effect daring officials to call pass interference or defensive holding on every play and banking that the officials wouldn't. Ask Peyton Manning whether this approach worked.

On Feb. 20, less than three weeks after the Seahawks crushed Manning and the Denver Broncos, 43-8, in Super Bowl XLVIII, Eagles general manager Howie Roseman was inside Lucas Oil Stadium during the NFL combine, going gaga over this year's draft class of wide receivers. In retrospect, one needed only to listen to Roseman that day, then peruse the heights and weights of several wide receiver prospects, to know that the Eagles have been thinking about jettisoning the 5-foot-10, 175-pound Jackson for a while.

Clemson's Sammy Watkins: 6-1, 211 pounds.

Texas A&M's Mike Evans: 6-5, 231 pounds.

Florida State's Kelvin Benjamin: 6-5, 240 pounds.

Penn State's Allen Robinson: 6-2, 220 pounds.

If Jackson departs, the Eagles' smallest starting wide receiver or tight end would be Jeremy Maclin, who is 6-0 and 195 pounds. Riley Cooper is 6-3, 222. Zach Ertz is 6-5, 250. Brent Celek is 6-4, 255. The common thread is clear. Kelly will take his chances having wee little LeSean McCoy or Darren Sproles match up against a slower linebacker, but on the outside, it's different. On the outside, size matters.

Remember, too, the development of the Eagles' offense under Kelly. Once Nick Foles earned the starting quarterback job, the dimension that Vick - or any mobile quarterback, for that matter - might bring to the system was gone.

Foles can't break down a defense's coverage assignments by running the read-option or escaping a pass rush. His strengths lie in his ability to throw with accuracy and timing into tiny windows of space. It's no wonder, then, that Jackson's production fell off once Foles became the starter. Jackson may have been the NFL's most dangerous deep threat once Vick got outside the pocket, but with Foles as the Eagles' triggerman, he struggled more often to get open.

The traits that held Jackson back aren't changing, either. He's neither tall enough nor physical enough to counteract the Seahawks' strategy - a strategy that other teams are likely to copy - so it doesn't make much sense to devote so many resources, financial or otherwise, to him.

This isn't just about demanding a new contract or arguing with a coach or being a "distraction." This is about where the NFL is heading. Chip Kelly is trying to get there first, and when he does, DeSean Jackson will be somewhere else.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/sports/20140324_DeSean_no_longer_fit_mold_for_Eagles_receiver.html#GF7xTRQp6SyA8F09.99

Well written and thought out stuff. This I can get behind.

Even if everything he said is true, why move Jackson now. The 2014 Eagles are a better team with Jackson on it and having him on the roster doesn't prevent them from making any of the moves they could make if they trade him. The Eagles STILL have 17M in cap space, they have major question marks with the other WRs on the roster and Jackson is still one of the best punt returners in the league so he can help them in other facets. If you want to move on from Jackson, draft a replacement this year, let the rookie learn the offense and move him or cut him next offseason. The cost is $4M in cap space in 2015.

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DeSean no longer fit mold for Eagles receiver

Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist

Posted: Monday, March 24, 2014, 3:01 AM

Let's begin with an assumption that becomes more and more reasonable as each day passes and more sources reveal more information and insight: The Eagles are preparing to give DeSean Jackson the full Pontius Pilate treatment.

That the Eagles will either trade or release Jackson appears a fait accompli, and whenever an NFL team is considering washing its hands of a wide receiver as prolific and talented as Jackson - and in the prime of his career, no less - questions follow. Jackson is 27, and he's coming off what was statistically his best season: 82 catches, 1,332 yards, nine touchdowns. So why get rid of him?

Is this about the Eagles' freeing themselves from the $12.75 million salary-cap hit attached to Jackson's contract this year? Is this about Jackson's waiting less than 48 hours after the Eagles' season ended to announce his belief that he deserved a new contract and more money? Is this about his tete-a-tete on the Metrodome sideline with wide receivers coach Bob Bicknell, or his always-interesting Twitter and Instagram accounts?

At the risk of ducking a juicy, gossipy column angle, I'd suggest that even if Jackson weren't weighed down by all of this baggage, the Eagles would still be trying to rid themselves of him - and they'd be right to. If nothing else, Chip Kelly looks ahead. He searches for trends, pays attention to them, tries to exploit them to his and his team's advantage. And Jackson, for all his skill and speed and accomplishments, doesn't fit where the NFL is going.

Here's why: the Seattle Seahawks.

Ahead of this year's Super Bowl, the Wall Street Journal published two stories that testified to the proactive nature of the Seahawks' success on defense. The first story pointed out that the Seahawks, as an integral facet of their defensive scheme, led the NFL in pass-interference penalties. The second noted that Seattle had four defensive backs who had been wide receivers earlier in their football careers - Richard Sherman among them. No other team had as many.

Taken together, the two articles laid bare the Seahawks' innovative approach in building their secondary: They sought out bigger cornerbacks and safeties who, because of their backgrounds as receivers, might cover better because they could understand and anticipate opponents' route combinations. More, these defensive backs could manhandle opposing receivers, in effect daring officials to call pass interference or defensive holding on every play and banking that the officials wouldn't. Ask Peyton Manning whether this approach worked.

On Feb. 20, less than three weeks after the Seahawks crushed Manning and the Denver Broncos, 43-8, in Super Bowl XLVIII, Eagles general manager Howie Roseman was inside Lucas Oil Stadium during the NFL combine, going gaga over this year's draft class of wide receivers. In retrospect, one needed only to listen to Roseman that day, then peruse the heights and weights of several wide receiver prospects, to know that the Eagles have been thinking about jettisoning the 5-foot-10, 175-pound Jackson for a while.

Clemson's Sammy Watkins: 6-1, 211 pounds.

Texas A&M's Mike Evans: 6-5, 231 pounds.

Florida State's Kelvin Benjamin: 6-5, 240 pounds.

Penn State's Allen Robinson: 6-2, 220 pounds.

If Jackson departs, the Eagles' smallest starting wide receiver or tight end would be Jeremy Maclin, who is 6-0 and 195 pounds. Riley Cooper is 6-3, 222. Zach Ertz is 6-5, 250. Brent Celek is 6-4, 255. The common thread is clear. Kelly will take his chances having wee little LeSean McCoy or Darren Sproles match up against a slower linebacker, but on the outside, it's different. On the outside, size matters.

Remember, too, the development of the Eagles' offense under Kelly. Once Nick Foles earned the starting quarterback job, the dimension that Vick - or any mobile quarterback, for that matter - might bring to the system was gone.

Foles can't break down a defense's coverage assignments by running the read-option or escaping a pass rush. His strengths lie in his ability to throw with accuracy and timing into tiny windows of space. It's no wonder, then, that Jackson's production fell off once Foles became the starter. Jackson may have been the NFL's most dangerous deep threat once Vick got outside the pocket, but with Foles as the Eagles' triggerman, he struggled more often to get open.

The traits that held Jackson back aren't changing, either. He's neither tall enough nor physical enough to counteract the Seahawks' strategy - a strategy that other teams are likely to copy - so it doesn't make much sense to devote so many resources, financial or otherwise, to him.

This isn't just about demanding a new contract or arguing with a coach or being a "distraction." This is about where the NFL is heading. Chip Kelly is trying to get there first, and when he does, DeSean Jackson will be somewhere else.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/sports/20140324_DeSean_no_longer_fit_mold_for_Eagles_receiver.html#GF7xTRQp6SyA8F09.99

Well written and thought out stuff. This I can get behind.

Even if everything he said is true, why move Jackson now. The 2014 Eagles are a better team with Jackson on it and having him on the roster doesn't prevent them from making any of the moves they could make if they trade him. The Eagles STILL have 17M in cap space, they have major question marks with the other WRs on the roster and Jackson is still one of the best punt returners in the league so he can help them in other facets. If you want to move on from Jackson, draft a replacement this year, let the rookie learn the offense and move him or cut him next offseason. The cost is $4M in cap space in 2015.

:mellow: Not anymore. He is still living off that NYG punt return. He was #62 last year with an avg of 5.1 and long of 32.

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One team having big cornerbacks doesn't make DeSean irrelevant.

Nice article, interesting idea, but I don't think it is correct.

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You guys called me crazy back in JANUARY.

http://forums.footballguys.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=674940&page=88#entry16372904

Don't forget this is a business. Follow the money. There is just no room to pay three WRs starter money in todays NFL. DeSean is under a 3 year contract for a team with no cap issues. Players have way less leverage in these situations than you guys think. He would be really stupid to turn this into a Kenny Britt like situation and not show up or get benched for his conduct. What's the going rate for small WRs who don't get on the field anyway? He was dumb for even mentioning his contract.

IDRC what set he claims or any of the other TMZ drama. My real question is where is he going?

I think given the time frame that this happened and how its happened the money isnt the issue, if it so it's a slight issue. If that were the case a team wouldnt pay him 6 million to go play somewhere else.

The bigger reason is here:

DeSean no longer fit mold for Eagles receiver

Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist

Posted: Monday, March 24, 2014, 3:01 AM

Let's begin with an assumption that becomes more and more reasonable as each day passes and more sources reveal more information and insight: The Eagles are preparing to give DeSean Jackson the full Pontius Pilate treatment.

That the Eagles will either trade or release Jackson appears a fait accompli, and whenever an NFL team is considering washing its hands of a wide receiver as prolific and talented as Jackson - and in the prime of his career, no less - questions follow. Jackson is 27, and he's coming off what was statistically his best season: 82 catches, 1,332 yards, nine touchdowns. So why get rid of him?

Is this about the Eagles' freeing themselves from the $12.75 million salary-cap hit attached to Jackson's contract this year? Is this about Jackson's waiting less than 48 hours after the Eagles' season ended to announce his belief that he deserved a new contract and more money? Is this about his tete-a-tete on the Metrodome sideline with wide receivers coach Bob Bicknell, or his always-interesting Twitter and Instagram accounts?

At the risk of ducking a juicy, gossipy column angle, I'd suggest that even if Jackson weren't weighed down by all of this baggage, the Eagles would still be trying to rid themselves of him - and they'd be right to. If nothing else, Chip Kelly looks ahead. He searches for trends, pays attention to them, tries to exploit them to his and his team's advantage. And Jackson, for all his skill and speed and accomplishments, doesn't fit where the NFL is going.

Here's why: the Seattle Seahawks.

Ahead of this year's Super Bowl, the Wall Street Journal published two stories that testified to the proactive nature of the Seahawks' success on defense. The first story pointed out that the Seahawks, as an integral facet of their defensive scheme, led the NFL in pass-interference penalties. The second noted that Seattle had four defensive backs who had been wide receivers earlier in their football careers - Richard Sherman among them. No other team had as many.

Taken together, the two articles laid bare the Seahawks' innovative approach in building their secondary: They sought out bigger cornerbacks and safeties who, because of their backgrounds as receivers, might cover better because they could understand and anticipate opponents' route combinations. More, these defensive backs could manhandle opposing receivers, in effect daring officials to call pass interference or defensive holding on every play and banking that the officials wouldn't. Ask Peyton Manning whether this approach worked.

On Feb. 20, less than three weeks after the Seahawks crushed Manning and the Denver Broncos, 43-8, in Super Bowl XLVIII, Eagles general manager Howie Roseman was inside Lucas Oil Stadium during the NFL combine, going gaga over this year's draft class of wide receivers. In retrospect, one needed only to listen to Roseman that day, then peruse the heights and weights of several wide receiver prospects, to know that the Eagles have been thinking about jettisoning the 5-foot-10, 175-pound Jackson for a while.

Clemson's Sammy Watkins: 6-1, 211 pounds.

Texas A&M's Mike Evans: 6-5, 231 pounds.

Florida State's Kelvin Benjamin: 6-5, 240 pounds.

Penn State's Allen Robinson: 6-2, 220 pounds.

If Jackson departs, the Eagles' smallest starting wide receiver or tight end would be Jeremy Maclin, who is 6-0 and 195 pounds. Riley Cooper is 6-3, 222. Zach Ertz is 6-5, 250. Brent Celek is 6-4, 255. The common thread is clear. Kelly will take his chances having wee little LeSean McCoy or Darren Sproles match up against a slower linebacker, but on the outside, it's different. On the outside, size matters.

Remember, too, the development of the Eagles' offense under Kelly. Once Nick Foles earned the starting quarterback job, the dimension that Vick - or any mobile quarterback, for that matter - might bring to the system was gone.

Foles can't break down a defense's coverage assignments by running the read-option or escaping a pass rush. His strengths lie in his ability to throw with accuracy and timing into tiny windows of space. It's no wonder, then, that Jackson's production fell off once Foles became the starter. Jackson may have been the NFL's most dangerous deep threat once Vick got outside the pocket, but with Foles as the Eagles' triggerman, he struggled more often to get open.

The traits that held Jackson back aren't changing, either. He's neither tall enough nor physical enough to counteract the Seahawks' strategy - a strategy that other teams are likely to copy - so it doesn't make much sense to devote so many resources, financial or otherwise, to him.

This isn't just about demanding a new contract or arguing with a coach or being a "distraction." This is about where the NFL is heading. Chip Kelly is trying to get there first, and when he does, DeSean Jackson will be somewhere else.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/sports/20140324_DeSean_no_longer_fit_mold_for_Eagles_receiver.html#GF7xTRQp6SyA8F09.99

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One team having big cornerbacks doesn't make DeSean irrelevant.

Nice article, interesting idea, but I don't think it is correct.

I rthink its a combo of things but that is definitely a portion IMO.

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DeSean no longer fit mold for Eagles receiver

Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist

Posted: Monday, March 24, 2014, 3:01 AM

Let's begin with an assumption that becomes more and more reasonable as each day passes and more sources reveal more information and insight: The Eagles are preparing to give DeSean Jackson the full Pontius Pilate treatment.

That the Eagles will either trade or release Jackson appears a fait accompli, and whenever an NFL team is considering washing its hands of a wide receiver as prolific and talented as Jackson - and in the prime of his career, no less - questions follow. Jackson is 27, and he's coming off what was statistically his best season: 82 catches, 1,332 yards, nine touchdowns. So why get rid of him?

Is this about the Eagles' freeing themselves from the $12.75 million salary-cap hit attached to Jackson's contract this year? Is this about Jackson's waiting less than 48 hours after the Eagles' season ended to announce his belief that he deserved a new contract and more money? Is this about his tete-a-tete on the Metrodome sideline with wide receivers coach Bob Bicknell, or his always-interesting Twitter and Instagram accounts?

At the risk of ducking a juicy, gossipy column angle, I'd suggest that even if Jackson weren't weighed down by all of this baggage, the Eagles would still be trying to rid themselves of him - and they'd be right to. If nothing else, Chip Kelly looks ahead. He searches for trends, pays attention to them, tries to exploit them to his and his team's advantage. And Jackson, for all his skill and speed and accomplishments, doesn't fit where the NFL is going.

Here's why: the Seattle Seahawks.

Ahead of this year's Super Bowl, the Wall Street Journal published two stories that testified to the proactive nature of the Seahawks' success on defense. The first story pointed out that the Seahawks, as an integral facet of their defensive scheme, led the NFL in pass-interference penalties. The second noted that Seattle had four defensive backs who had been wide receivers earlier in their football careers - Richard Sherman among them. No other team had as many.

Taken together, the two articles laid bare the Seahawks' innovative approach in building their secondary: They sought out bigger cornerbacks and safeties who, because of their backgrounds as receivers, might cover better because they could understand and anticipate opponents' route combinations. More, these defensive backs could manhandle opposing receivers, in effect daring officials to call pass interference or defensive holding on every play and banking that the officials wouldn't. Ask Peyton Manning whether this approach worked.

On Feb. 20, less than three weeks after the Seahawks crushed Manning and the Denver Broncos, 43-8, in Super Bowl XLVIII, Eagles general manager Howie Roseman was inside Lucas Oil Stadium during the NFL combine, going gaga over this year's draft class of wide receivers. In retrospect, one needed only to listen to Roseman that day, then peruse the heights and weights of several wide receiver prospects, to know that the Eagles have been thinking about jettisoning the 5-foot-10, 175-pound Jackson for a while.

Clemson's Sammy Watkins: 6-1, 211 pounds.

Texas A&M's Mike Evans: 6-5, 231 pounds.

Florida State's Kelvin Benjamin: 6-5, 240 pounds.

Penn State's Allen Robinson: 6-2, 220 pounds.

If Jackson departs, the Eagles' smallest starting wide receiver or tight end would be Jeremy Maclin, who is 6-0 and 195 pounds. Riley Cooper is 6-3, 222. Zach Ertz is 6-5, 250. Brent Celek is 6-4, 255. The common thread is clear. Kelly will take his chances having wee little LeSean McCoy or Darren Sproles match up against a slower linebacker, but on the outside, it's different. On the outside, size matters.

Remember, too, the development of the Eagles' offense under Kelly. Once Nick Foles earned the starting quarterback job, the dimension that Vick - or any mobile quarterback, for that matter - might bring to the system was gone.

Foles can't break down a defense's coverage assignments by running the read-option or escaping a pass rush. His strengths lie in his ability to throw with accuracy and timing into tiny windows of space. It's no wonder, then, that Jackson's production fell off once Foles became the starter. Jackson may have been the NFL's most dangerous deep threat once Vick got outside the pocket, but with Foles as the Eagles' triggerman, he struggled more often to get open.

The traits that held Jackson back aren't changing, either. He's neither tall enough nor physical enough to counteract the Seahawks' strategy - a strategy that other teams are likely to copy - so it doesn't make much sense to devote so many resources, financial or otherwise, to him.

This isn't just about demanding a new contract or arguing with a coach or being a "distraction." This is about where the NFL is heading. Chip Kelly is trying to get there first, and when he does, DeSean Jackson will be somewhere else.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/sports/20140324_DeSean_no_longer_fit_mold_for_Eagles_receiver.html#GF7xTRQp6SyA8F09.99

Well written and thought out stuff. This I can get behind.

Even if everything he said is true, why move Jackson now. The 2014 Eagles are a better team with Jackson on it and having him on the roster doesn't prevent them from making any of the moves they could make if they trade him. The Eagles STILL have 17M in cap space, they have major question marks with the other WRs on the roster and Jackson is still one of the best punt returners in the league so he can help them in other facets. If you want to move on from Jackson, draft a replacement this year, let the rookie learn the offense and move him or cut him next offseason. The cost is $4M in cap space in 2015.

:mellow: Not anymore. He is still living off that NYG punt return. He was #62 last year with an avg of 5.1 and long of 32.

That's because they only used him in certain situations. Use him as an all the time PR and his numbers go up.

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One team having big cornerbacks doesn't make DeSean irrelevant.

Nice article, interesting idea, but I don't think it is correct.

I think what the article was getting at is that more teams will be looking to do the same.

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You guys called me crazy back in JANUARY.http://forums.footballguys.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=674940&page=88#entry16372904

Don't forget this is a business. Follow the money. There is just no room to pay three WRs starter money in todays NFL. DeSean is under a 3 year contract for a team with no cap issues. Players have way less leverage in these situations than you guys think. He would be really stupid to turn this into a Kenny Britt like situation and not show up or get benched for his conduct. What's the going rate for small WRs who don't get on the field anyway? He was dumb for even mentioning his contract.

IDRC what set he claims or any of the other TMZ drama. My real question is where is he going?

I think given the time frame that this happened and how its happened the money isnt the issue, if it so it's a slight issue. If that were the case a team wouldnt pay him 6 million to go play somewhere else.

The bigger reason is here:

DeSean no longer fit mold for Eagles receiver

Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist

Posted: Monday, March 24, 2014, 3:01 AM

Let's begin with an assumption that becomes more and more reasonable as each day passes and more sources reveal more information and insight: The Eagles are preparing to give DeSean Jackson the full Pontius Pilate treatment.

That the Eagles will either trade or release Jackson appears a fait accompli, and whenever an NFL team is considering washing its hands of a wide receiver as prolific and talented as Jackson - and in the prime of his career, no less - questions follow. Jackson is 27, and he's coming off what was statistically his best season: 82 catches, 1,332 yards, nine touchdowns. So why get rid of him?

Is this about the Eagles' freeing themselves from the $12.75 million salary-cap hit attached to Jackson's contract this year? Is this about Jackson's waiting less than 48 hours after the Eagles' season ended to announce his belief that he deserved a new contract and more money? Is this about his tete-a-tete on the Metrodome sideline with wide receivers coach Bob Bicknell, or his always-interesting Twitter and Instagram accounts?

At the risk of ducking a juicy, gossipy column angle, I'd suggest that even if Jackson weren't weighed down by all of this baggage, the Eagles would still be trying to rid themselves of him - and they'd be right to. If nothing else, Chip Kelly looks ahead. He searches for trends, pays attention to them, tries to exploit them to his and his team's advantage. And Jackson, for all his skill and speed and accomplishments, doesn't fit where the NFL is going.

Here's why: the Seattle Seahawks.

Ahead of this year's Super Bowl, the Wall Street Journal published two stories that testified to the proactive nature of the Seahawks' success on defense. The first story pointed out that the Seahawks, as an integral facet of their defensive scheme, led the NFL in pass-interference penalties. The second noted that Seattle had four defensive backs who had been wide receivers earlier in their football careers - Richard Sherman among them. No other team had as many.

Taken together, the two articles laid bare the Seahawks' innovative approach in building their secondary: They sought out bigger cornerbacks and safeties who, because of their backgrounds as receivers, might cover better because they could understand and anticipate opponents' route combinations. More, these defensive backs could manhandle opposing receivers, in effect daring officials to call pass interference or defensive holding on every play and banking that the officials wouldn't. Ask Peyton Manning whether this approach worked.

On Feb. 20, less than three weeks after the Seahawks crushed Manning and the Denver Broncos, 43-8, in Super Bowl XLVIII, Eagles general manager Howie Roseman was inside Lucas Oil Stadium during the NFL combine, going gaga over this year's draft class of wide receivers. In retrospect, one needed only to listen to Roseman that day, then peruse the heights and weights of several wide receiver prospects, to know that the Eagles have been thinking about jettisoning the 5-foot-10, 175-pound Jackson for a while.

Clemson's Sammy Watkins: 6-1, 211 pounds.

Texas A&M's Mike Evans: 6-5, 231 pounds.

Florida State's Kelvin Benjamin: 6-5, 240 pounds.

Penn State's Allen Robinson: 6-2, 220 pounds.

If Jackson departs, the Eagles' smallest starting wide receiver or tight end would be Jeremy Maclin, who is 6-0 and 195 pounds. Riley Cooper is 6-3, 222. Zach Ertz is 6-5, 250. Brent Celek is 6-4, 255. The common thread is clear. Kelly will take his chances having wee little LeSean McCoy or Darren Sproles match up against a slower linebacker, but on the outside, it's different. On the outside, size matters.

Remember, too, the development of the Eagles' offense under Kelly. Once Nick Foles earned the starting quarterback job, the dimension that Vick - or any mobile quarterback, for that matter - might bring to the system was gone.

Foles can't break down a defense's coverage assignments by running the read-option or escaping a pass rush. His strengths lie in his ability to throw with accuracy and timing into tiny windows of space. It's no wonder, then, that Jackson's production fell off once Foles became the starter. Jackson may have been the NFL's most dangerous deep threat once Vick got outside the pocket, but with Foles as the Eagles' triggerman, he struggled more often to get open.

The traits that held Jackson back aren't changing, either. He's neither tall enough nor physical enough to counteract the Seahawks' strategy - a strategy that other teams are likely to copy - so it doesn't make much sense to devote so many resources, financial or otherwise, to him.

This isn't just about demanding a new contract or arguing with a coach or being a "distraction." This is about where the NFL is heading. Chip Kelly is trying to get there first, and when he does, DeSean Jackson will be somewhere else.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/sports/20140324_DeSean_no_longer_fit_mold_for_Eagles_receiver.html#GF7xTRQp6SyA8F09.99

They're not paying him 6mil to play for someone else. His contract is not guaranteed. 6mil would be the accelerated cap hit if they cut or traded him.

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They're not paying him 6mil to play for someone else. His contract is not guaranteed. 6mil would be the accelerated cap hit if they cut or traded him.

Potato-Patahto

You're only going to take a cap hit like that if someone is a problem is my point.

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And how does this go when Philly makes its calls?

'Hey Joe, you interested in acquiring DeSean?'

'Why in the heck are you trading DeSean?'

'Well, he's too expensive, thankless, attention seeking, disruptive, we suspect gang ties, and he only breaks coverage when the QB's outside containment.'

[silence]

'So ... how about a third?'

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I'm starting to smell a little 'Josh McDaniels' type of arrogance from Kelly (ie. the scuttling of Cutler and Marshall). Maybe he's beginning to think he doesn't need NFL talent to win if he's calling the offense.... Josh used to think that too.

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One team having big cornerbacks doesn't make DeSean irrelevant.

Nice article, interesting idea, but I don't think it is correct.

I think what the article was getting at is that more teams will be looking to do the same.

I am sure every team wishes all their cornerbacks were 6'2, 215. There's a reason there's not a ton of them in the NFL. Tall corners generally have less chance of direction skills that smaller guys.

Even if that is the trend, that will take time. Justifying getting rid of DeSean because teams MAY be looking for bigger corners just seems silly to me.

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One team having big cornerbacks doesn't make DeSean irrelevant.

Nice article, interesting idea, but I don't think it is correct.

I think what the article was getting at is that more teams will be looking to do the same.

I am sure every team wishes all their cornerbacks were 6'2, 215. There's a reason there's not a ton of them in the NFL. Tall corners generally have less chance of direction skills that smaller guys.

Even if that is the trend, that will take time. Justifying getting rid of DeSean because teams MAY be looking for bigger corners just seems silly to me.

I agree this trend being the only reason is pretty silly, given the success he's had at his size. I think the article kind of dances around the other issues, or "baggage" as they put it, but do mention this trend being another reason, not the only one. Overall it makes alot of sense to me.

I actually think Maclin can be just as good in the same role. While he does have his risk with injury, he was a playmaker coming out of Mizzou and if he can return to form I think he could do what Jackson did and more.

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However, the Eagles decided to move on from Jackson well over a month ago, and possibly earlier. It is absolutely not something they decided to do over the last week or two. That of course, should not come as a surprise, but it is something we can confirm via a source close to the team.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/sports/eagles/Eagles-notes-Birds-decided-to-move-on-from-DeSean-Jackson-over-a-month-ago.html#yPzCM8TTuEpUIClr.99

That would come as a big surprise I think.

Edited by unckeyherb
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I apologize if this has been posted already. This makes things even more cryptic IMO:

By Brandon Lee Gowton  @BrandonGowton on Mar 25 2014, 2:32a

The most confusing part of this DeSean Jackson saga has been the question no one has been able to definitively answer: why would the Eagles want to move on from such a talented player?
Many have attempted to address that question, but it doesn't seem like there has ever been a good answer. When it comes to on the field performance, there's no way that the loss of Jackson benefits the Eagles. He was an extremely productive player last season. He had the best year of his career! The numbers don't lie: 82 receptions for 1332 yards (16.2 y/r), and 9 TD is some high quality production.
So it seems like the reason why the Eagles would want to get rid of Jackson is because of some off the field issue(s). According to Jeff McLane of the Philadelphia Inquirer, that seems to be the case. Look what McLane had to say in a recent column:
NFL sources have indicated that the Eagles decided to move on from Jackson after his South Philadelphia home was burglarized in early January.
OK. The timeline here seems to make some sense. Jimmy Kempski, who originally brought up the possibility of a Jackson trade, recently reported that the Eagles' decision to part with Jackson was not one made recently.
But... how does Jackson's house being robbed make the Eagles decide they want to move on from him? Was there more to the robbery than what's being reported? McLane's column doesn't seem to suggest that's the case.
There were no signs of forced entry, police said, though security cameras in the house had been tampered with. Police said they have nothing pointing toward Jackson's doing anything wrong or that he filed a fraudulent report.
"We have no indication of any type of foul play or misrepresentation on his part," said Lt. John Stanford, a department spokesman. "We are treating this as a burglary, and there is no indication that it's anything different."
And so one answer leaves us with a thousand more questions. Meanwhile, the saga rolls on.

http://www.bleedinggreennation.com/2014/3/25/5545096/desean-jackson-eagles-rumors-home-robbery

Edited by identikit

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