Faust

Dynasty: QB Teddy Bridgewater, NY Jets

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So I'm sure this is just a technicality but Teddy announced he's going pro today.

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I could see Manziel or Bortles or Bridgewater going to the Texans. One of these three will be and it probably comes down to personal choice between all three. I think each should thrive on the Texans. The question in my mind is how the others will do on Jax or Oak or Minny. I feel like wherever Bridgewater lands he will be okay. I see his floor as the lowest of the rookie QBs. He might have the lowest ceiling too though I could also see him being a top NFL and fantasy QB one day too.

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I'm not sure why there is a debate. I'm nowhere near a professional scout and I don't get to interview him and see what his personal life is like but Bridgewater big time passes the eyeball test. He's a prototype in size, arm and accuracy. Whenever I watch him play he looks like a black Peyton Manning.

Edited by Bojang0301

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I'm not sure why there is a debate. I'm nowhere near a professional scout and I don't get to interview him and see what his personal life is like but Bridgewater big time passes the eyeball test. He's a prototype in size, arm and accuracy. Whenever I watch him play he looks like a black Peyton Manning.

I wouldn't go as far as calling him a black Peyton, but he seems like the head and shoulders best QB to me.

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I'm not sure why there is a debate. I'm nowhere near a professional scout and I don't get to interview him and see what his personal life is like but Bridgewater big time passes the eyeball test. He's a prototype in size, arm and accuracy. Whenever I watch him play he looks like a black Peyton Manning.

I wouldn't go as far as calling him a black Peyton, but he seems like the head and shoulders best QB to me.

Agree, that's taking it to far, but he appears by far to be the most pro ready QB in the draft. In a win now league, O'Brien only has so much time - Needs the guy who he can put in week 1 next year.

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Film Room: Teddy Bridgewater primed to be next great NFL QB

By Bucky Brooks NFL.com

NFL Media analyst

The term "franchise quarterback" is loosely applied in the football world, but there are only a few signal callers that fit the criteria when scouts break down their games. These quarterback prospects are transcendent stars who exhibit the critical traits required to lead a franchise to the winner's circle -- arm talent, leadership skills, football IQ and clutch factor.

In the current media landscape, we tab any quarterback with a hint of potential as a franchise guy, but scouts hold quarterbacks to a higher standard, with an emphasis on performance in big games used as the predictor of performance at the next level. That's why scouts make it a point to watch quarterbacks perform in rivalry games, conference championships and bowl games to see how they play when the pressure and intensity mirrors an NFL game.

After watching Teddy Bridgewater -- who declared he intends to enter the 2014 NFL Draft on New Year's Day -- close out his career in superb fashion in the Russell Athletic Bowl, I'm not only convinced that he is a franchise player, but he is the crown jewel of the 2014 quarterback class. While I know that several anonymous scouts have reportedly voiced opinions counter to that assessment, I believe Bridgewater will be the next great quarterback to enter the NFL. Here's why:

Athleticism

The speed and explosiveness of defenders in the NFL make it imperative for a quarterback to display enough agility and elusiveness to escape pressure in the pocket. Although the elite quarterbacks aren't expected to be dynamic or explosive runners, the ability to extend plays with their feet or pick up first downs on timely scrambles gives the offense an added dimension.

Bridgewater is a classic pocket passer with underrated athleticism and movement skills. He capably flees the pocket when protection breaks it down and can improvise throws down field. Against Miami, Bridgewater exhibited outstanding athleticism in making plays outside of the pocket. He executed a few read-option and bootleg plays to pick up first downs with his legs. Additionally, he tormented the Hurricanes with a spectacular scramble toss to Damian Copeland that showcased his elusiveness and agility. From avoiding multiple defenders in the backfield by reversing field multiple times to tossing a superb touch pass over Copeland's shoulder, the Houdini-like exhibition confirmed Bridgewater's athleticism and movement skills. Most important, he showed the football world that he is far more dynamic than some suggest when discussing his game.

Arm talent

Franchise quarterbacks are capable of making every throw in the book with zip and velocity. Although extraordinary arm strength isn't required, elite players at the position have the ability to throw a fastball through tight coverage. Additionally, they have a variety of pitches in their repertoire that allow them to throw with touch when required.

Looking at Bridgewater's performance against Miami, I saw a franchise quarterback capable of making every throw in the book. He repeatedly threw darts to Davante Parker on "Bang-8's" (skinny post), while also showing excellent touch on post-corners to Michaelee Harris. Additionally, he connected on a handful of throws on vertical routes that showcased his arm strength and range. While a few of his deep ball tosses were slightly underthrown, Bridgewater made enough accurate throws to dispel any concerns about his arm strength. If he tightens up his footwork and consistently incorporates his lower body into his throws, Bridgewater's arm strength can improve at the next level.

Pocket presence

The greatness of a quarterback is revealed in his ability to thrive in a chaotic pocket. Franchise players exhibit quiet feet with pass rushers in close proximity to deliver accurate throws to receivers all over the field.

Watching Bridgewater play throughout his career and in the Russell Athletic Bowl, I've always been impressed with his poise and courage under duress. He will stand tall and deliver with a rusher in his face; he doesn't flinch after taking a big shot in the pocket. Against the Hurricanes, Bridgewater exploited their blitz tactics by consistently identifying and hitting the hot read in the route progression. This rendered the Hurricanes' aggressive pressure tactics useless and allowed the Cardinals to march up and down the field.

When Miami opted to play soft coverage (Cover 4) on the perimeter, Bridgewater picked apart the underneath areas to keep his offense in manageable situations. This "connect the dots" approach doesn't resonate with some fans, but NFL coaches covet quarterbacks with superb judgment and management skills. Bridgewater fits the bill with his patient attack; it shows in his efficiency and consistency guiding the Cardinals' offense.

Football intelligence

Elite quarterbacks exhibit exceptional football intelligence and awareness. Astute signal callers capably orchestrate pre-snap shifts and motions, while also making checks and adjustments based on the defense's reaction. To handle these responsibilities, a quarterback must excel in the film room and take that information to the field.

Bridgewater has earned high marks for his preparation throughout his time at Louisville; it shows in the way he manages the game for the Cardinals at the line. Watching him direct Louisville's pro-style offense, I was impressed with his mastery of the team's intricate pre-snap movement game. He efficiently signaled to his designated movers when to shift, yet maintained his vision on the defense to spot a potential weakness in the coverage. This not only helped the Cardinals excel in the passing game, but it resulted in a few positive plays on the ground when executing a "check with me" scheme.

After the snap, Bridgewater showed tremendous awareness, anticipation and judgment manipulating coverage down field. He routinely moved defenders out of windows with his eyes to set up big plays on the backside. Looking at his 26-yard touchdown to Parker, Bridgewater identified and moved the free safety out of the middle of the field to hit the seam route in the end zone. The subtle head fake created space down the middle, leaving enough space for Bridgewater to fit in a dart against tight coverage.

With franchise quarterbacks at the NFL level consistently exhibiting those skills, Bridgewater is well ahead of the curve at this point.

Clutch factor

It's not always fair, but quarterbacks are judged by their ability to win big games. Bridgewater could leave Louisville with a 22-3 record over the past two seasons, showing remarkable poise and confidence under pressure. Skeptics will point to a soft schedule inflating those numbers, but standout performances against Florida (2013 Sugar Bowl) and Miami will squash some of the complaints about his ability to win against teams chock full of NFL-caliber talent.

In both of those games, Bridgewater was the best guy on the field, particularly against the Hurricanes. The 6-3, 205-pound quarterback was on his game from the start despite taking a safety that put the Cardinals in an early hole. He responded by torching the Hurricanes with a brilliant performance that showcased his potential as a playmaker in a pro-style offense. From his dart-like tosses to Parker on intermediate routes to his rainbow throws to Copeland and Harris, Bridgewater looked like the quintessential playmaker NFL coaches covet at the position.

With a career resume that features a several spectacular performances in this vein, I believe Bridgewater is primed and ready to excel at the next level.

Conclusion

I've been a Bridgewater fan since watching him tear up the Florida Gators in the 2013 Sugar Bowl. I thought he exhibited franchise quarterback traits in that performance; he has continued to build upon those characteristics throughout his junior campaign. Although there are concerns about his slender build, I watched Aaron Rodgers overcome the same issues coming out of Cal (Rodgers measured 6-2, 205 during his final season with the Bears) to become one of the best quarterbacks in the NFL. With Bridgewater displaying similar traits as a playmaker and leader, I believe he should be the crown jewel of the 2014 quarterback class -- and Johnny Manziel is the only other quarterback capable of challenging his spot at the top.

Follow Bucky Brooks on Twitter @BuckyBrooks.

Edited by Faust

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How big is Teddy? He looks small to me.

ESPN lists him at 6'3", 196. He's not big but not really small, either. He's a bit thin but I don't see that as any issue.

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ESPN has him at 6"3" and 196 lbs so this is probably the max for both figures. He looks thin but I'm not concerned. In fact, I think a good argument can be made that his arm strength will increase when he adds weight. Kinda like Tom Brady.

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So assuming the Texans draft him, where do you see Bridgewater shaking out in QB dynasty league rankings next season? I think Houston would be a great spot for him. They have a lot of weapons.

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Those that are concerned say he has a thin frame. That would concern me more if he was a wild runner taking shots all the time. If he is as cerebral about the game as some say I think he can minimize taking killer shots to some degree. A guy like Peyton makes his OL better just by his command of the game. While I dont expect him to be Peyton I think his "student of the game" approach can help Bridgewater alleviate concerns about his frame.

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The Skinny On Teddy

Rotoworld take on the article linked above:

The MMQB's Greg A. Bedard believes no draft-eligible QB is more ready "to be a face-of-the-franchise" passer than Louisville junior Teddy Bridgewater.

"Wait until [teams] talk to him and get him up on the blackboard," said an NFL personnel executive who has known Bridgewater since ninth grade. "He lives and breathes football. Always has. Teams are going to fall in love with him." Bedard, who covered the Patriots for years, believes there are similarities between Bridgewater and Tom Brady off the field, which could certainly appeal new Texans coach Bill O'Brien. Our own Josh Norris considers Bridgewater on a different level compared to the other declared quarterbacks.
Source: The MMQB

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Bridgewater and Bill O'Brien together in Houston?

Looks very possible

Something makes me think Bill O'Brien will prefer a taller, more physical QB

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Bridgewater and Bill O'Brien together in Houston?

Looks very possible
Something makes me think Bill O'Brien will prefer a taller, more physical QB
That is certainly possible. I have stated before that I think O'Brien will fall in love with Bridgewater's football IQ and ability to command the offense but that is purely my own speculation.

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Rotoworld:

NFL.com's Bucky Brooks compared Louisville junior QB Teddy Bridgewater to Packers' star Aaron Rodgers.

"Teddy Bridgewater is like Aaron Rodgers to me," Brooks said. "Aaron Rodgers entered the league at 6-2, 202 pounds. He was a guy that I graded as a bottom-of-the-first-round player. It took him a couple years in the league before he found his niche, then he (went on) to be an NFL MVP. ... I think Teddy Bridgewater's a fascinating player, he's just not in that Andrew Luck category." Scouts Inc.'s recently ranked Bridgewater as the No. 9 overall player in the class, and ESPN's Todd McShay lists him No. 12.
Source: NFL.com

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Rotoworld:

"Several" NFL teams do not have a first-round grade on Louisville QB Teddy Birdgewater, according to NFL.com's Daniel Jeremiah.

"I have Bridgewater as a top 10 talent in this draft but I know several teams that don't view him as a 1st round player," Jeremiah tweeted. We aren't exactly sure what several means, but the fact that multiple teams do not consider Bridgewater a top talent is noteworthy. Many teams won't spend as much time evaluating the position if they have a quality starter in place, however, take the reports of Blake Bortles or Johnny Manziel as the top passer seriously. Our own Josh Norris will continue to rank Teddy at the top.
Edited by Faust

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How big is Teddy? He looks small to me.

ESPN lists him at 6'3", 196. He's not big but not really small, either. He's a bit thin but I don't see that as any issue.

If peaple think RG3's build is an issue, they have to think Bridgewater's is.

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I think the issue some have with RG3 is that he runs a lot, Bridgewater is more of a pocket passer. His build has been criticized, and he will have to withstand punishment in the pocket, but it probably won't be as bad as what RG3 has dealt with, due to their stylistic differences. Than again, RG3 is bigger at a listed 6'2" 218 lbs.

Aaron Rodgers was similar size to Bridgewater when he came out (I don't recall if that contributed to his dropping in the draft?), but sat for several years and added about 20 lbs. One question is, does he have the kind of frame to put on 10-20 lbs?

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This guy is now my #4 QB but it will take about 4-5 years to see that. There are 2 QBs that won't start right off the bat because NFL coaches are afraid to take the chance on the better small school prospects. If either Mathews or Wenning get picked by the Broncos, they will be a star. Once they sit behind Manning and learn for 2 years, they will get the start with far more valuable knowledge than the others. Not sold on Oswilder.

Mathews

Wenning

Bortles

Bridgewater

Garrapolo

Manziel

Fales

That's my ranking order but it will take time to shake out.

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Rotoworld:

ESPN's Adam Caplan writes that "size is going to be a factor for some teams" with Louisville QB Teddy Bridgewater.

"Some people think he'll measure closer to 6-foot-1," Caplan tweeted. The vultures (not Caplan) are beginning to descend around Bridgewater. The consensus No. 1 pick during the regular season appears to have been supplanted by Johnny Manziel by some national analysts. Your friendly draft correspondents at Rotoworld refuse to get pulled under by the riptide: Bridgewater remains our No. 1 quarterback.

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Rotoworld:

ESPN.com's Mel Kiper had Louisville QB Teddy Bridgewater dropping to the Vikings at No. 8 in a mock draft published earlier this week.

As Johnny Manziel's draft stock starts to sizzle, Bridgewater's has begun to fizzle. NFL.com's Daniel Jeremiah even wrote earlier this week that "several" teams didn't have a first-round grade on him. "In terms of his ability as a passer, Bridgewater could go higher," Kiper wrote. "But while I currently have him rated as the top QB on my Big Board, Bridgewater will need to prove to teams that he can command an NFL huddle and be the face of a franchise. I think he has the necessary physical tools to succeed, and shows an advanced approach with his footwork, anticipation, pre-snap command and ability to improvise. He's a very good value here for a team with a huge need at the position. Whether he can start right away is a question we'll need more time to answer."

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How big is Teddy? He looks small to me.

ESPN lists him at 6'3", 196. He's not big but not really small, either. He's a bit thin but I don't see that as any issue.
If peaple think RG3's build is an issue, they have to think Bridgewater's is.

Bridgewater is a pro style pocket passer... The concerns over RG3's size is due to his running the ball. Those concerns aren't there for Teddy.

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This guy is now my #4 QB but it will take about 4-5 years to see that. There are 2 QBs that won't start right off the bat because NFL coaches are afraid to take the chance on the better small school prospects. If either Mathews or Wenning get picked by the Broncos, they will be a star. Once they sit behind Manning and learn for 2 years, they will get the start with far more valuable knowledge than the others. Not sold on Oswilder.

Mathews

Wenning

Bortles

Bridgewater

Garrapolo

Manziel

Fales

That's my ranking order but it will take time to shake out.

Bridgewater is the clear #1. I don't know how anyone has anything to back up otherwise. Get off recency bias train of the Shrine guys. Mathews has a great arm, but he's slow to process things.

I don't know how you can be so confident in ranking Mathews and Wenning so high, yet put a condition on their success. Mathews isn't much different from Osweiler talentwise, and size-wise.

Garropolo has been the best QB at the Shrine game/practices. Not sure how you have him below the other two.

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Rotoworld:

ESPN's Adam Caplan writes that "size is going to be a factor for some teams" with Louisville QB Teddy Bridgewater.

"Some people think he'll measure closer to 6-foot-1," Caplan tweeted. The vultures (not Caplan) are beginning to descend around Bridgewater. The consensus No. 1 pick during the regular season appears to have been supplanted by Johnny Manziel by some national analysts. Your friendly draft correspondents at Rotoworld refuse to get pulled under by the riptide: Bridgewater remains our No. 1 quarterback.

This is hilarious. There's no way he's 6'1". He's the same height as DeVante Parker, who is listed at 6'3" and towers over DBs.

http://www4.pictures.zimbio.com/gi/DeVante%2BParker%2BTeddy%2BBridgewater%2BEastern%2BKentucky%2BdrV9HAJ8Ig2l.jpg

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Rotoworld:

ESPN's Adam Caplan writes that "size is going to be a factor for some teams" with Louisville QB Teddy Bridgewater.

"Some people think he'll measure closer to 6-foot-1," Caplan tweeted. The vultures (not Caplan) are beginning to descend around Bridgewater. The consensus No. 1 pick during the regular season appears to have been supplanted by Johnny Manziel by some national analysts. Your friendly draft correspondents at Rotoworld refuse to get pulled under by the riptide: Bridgewater remains our No. 1 quarterback.

Source: Adam Caplan on Twitter

This is hilarious. There's no way he's 6'1". He's the same height as DeVante Parker, who is listed at 6'3" and towers over DBs.

http://www4.pictures.zimbio.com/gi/DeVante%2BParker%2BTeddy%2BBridgewater%2BEastern%2BKentucky%2BdrV9HAJ8Ig2l.jpg

all this talk on his questionable size, none on his incredible accuracy. This is how misinformed opinions are developed.
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How does Teddy Bridgewater compare to recent top QB prospects?

Peter Bukowski

click on the linked article to see the related video clips

If an NFL team isn't sure it has a franchise quarterback, it doesn't. There are no "maybes" when it comes to the most important player on the field. And the old adage is you can't pass on a franchise quarterback in the draft unless you have a franchise quarterback on the roster.

Twenty of the league's opening-day starters at quarterback in 2013 were first-round picks. That leaves teams like Houston, Cleveland, Minnesota, Jacksonville, Oakland and others scouting the college ranks for a signal-caller who could change their fortunes.

Louisville's Teddy Bridgewater leads the discussion as the presumptive No. 1 pick, the top quarterback in the draft with a quarterback-needy team (Houston) making the pick.

But can he turn the Texans around? Is he the sort of elite No. 1 overall pick capable of shifting the tide for a team saddled with a culture of disappointment last season?

"I've seen a lot of Teddy. I don't have him in [Andrew] Luck's class as a prospect," one veteran NFC scout told SI.com.

"I don't see Bridgewater as a franchise savior like RGIII was in Washington ... Now if he went to the Houston Texans, which is a damn good team already, could he turn them around kind of like the Chiefs did this year? Yeah, he could."

When asked to compare Bridgewater to recent No. 1 picks at the quarterback position, the scout wasn't sold on how Bridgewater stacks up.

"I think when you look at a guy like Sam Bradford, he was damn good in college. I loved that guy. He was pinpoint accurate, with ball placement, timing, arm strength. He had all those areas [better than Bridgewater]. "

It's important to remember that how a player projects as a prospect doesn't preclude him from outperforming that grade as a pro. Just look at Tom Brady or Aaron Rodgers. Bradford has underwhelmed as an NFL player, but remember, the former Oklahoma standout was an elite prospect entering the draft.

In fact, former Tampa Bay Buccaneers team operations coordinator Joe Bussell believes Bradford is the closest comparable recent quarterback to Bridgewater.

"I think a good comparison -- and one that might scare people away -- is Sam Bradford. Bradford's mediocre production in the NFL will frighten some, but if you remove access to those results, Bradford is one of the most highly-touted quarterbacks ever, coming out of the 2010 draft," Bussell explained.

"He received high grades in accuracy, congruent with what I see in Bridgewater. While, [Matthew] Stafford was one of those QBs that [needed] a couple years to grow in the NFL as we've seen, Bridgewater is the type [that] can come in and start immediately, while making minimal mistakes as he learns on the job."

It was clear, speaking with NFL evaluators current and former, that Bridgewater isn't in the tier of players like Andrew Luck, Robert Griffin III, or even Matthew Stafford in terms of pure physical ability and talent. But that doesn't take the shine off his potential star in the NFL.

In fact, the comparison many have favored when speaking of Bridgewater is Russell Wilson, a former third-round pick. Bridgewater is taller, 6-foot-3, but is slight of build and doesn't have the cannon arm of other elite prospects like Stafford or even Bradford. Coincidentally, many said of Wilson at Wisconsin that if he were taller, he would certainly be a first-round pick.

Like Wilson, Bridgewater is an efficient, accurate passer, who can improvise and beat defenses with his feet when the play breaks down. It's hard to see a play like the touchdown pass he threw against Cincinnati in December and not see flashes of Russell Wilson. His ability to throw on the move with accuracy has even been compared to Aaron Rodgers, the best in the league at beating defenses from outside the pocket.

"The thing I love about Bridgewater is that we don't have to worry [about] what he is because he's so consistent in everything he does, " Bussell insisted.

"His poise allows him to not get thrown off his game. He's accurate with the football, both from the pocket and on the move."

In the play above, Bridgewater throws to a wide-open receiver by NFL standards, but on the move, from more than 30 yards away, Bridgewater puts the ball the only place he can: to the back corner, with enough room for the receiver to make the catch in bounds.

NFL Films guru and respected talent evaluator Greg Cosell sees the Russell Wilson comparison physically. But while some point to congruencies between the two as leaders and people, Cosell dismisses the notion of the "je ne sais quoi" we often speak of with quarterbacks.

"Everything, when all is said and done, manifests itself physically," Cosell said. "You have to make throws. You can't make throws just because you're a neat guy and take your offensive linemen out to dinner.

"If a guy has big-time talent, and can play the position physically and mentally, the fact that he may have the same interpersonal skills as say Russell Wilson, doesn't matter ... I think that's what people say when they're not sure of what they're evaluating."

Cosell points to Bridgewater's lack of elite arm strength as a question in the NFL -- "Can he drive the ball?" -- and says Bridgewater's footwork also needs work, but crucial touchstones like accuracy are certainly there.

One of the central questions for Bridgewater is the competition level he faced in the Big East, which later became the AAC. He simply wasn't running up against elite-level defenses on a consistent basis.

"He'd have two games on his resume that you feel really comfortable about," former Philadelphia Eagles scout John Middlekauff told SI.com.

"It's so much easier to see a guy in the SEC or Pac-12 and every week he's got Anthony Barr or Will Sutton running at him."

Even so, Middlekauff believes Bridgewater is a legitimate Day 1 starter, but he isn't in the Matthew Stafford category as a talent, and would have been in the mix to be the third quarterback drafted in a year like 2012. As a prospect, in terms of a grade, he believes Bridgewater is similar to Ryan Tannehill, who went No. 8 to Miami in 2012.

One of the noteworthy games on Bridgewater's resume is a spectacular performance against Florida in the 2013 Sugar Bowl. In it, you see Bridgewater's accuracy on full display, his ability to slide and move in the pocket, as well as drive the ball into tight windows.

What elevates Bridgewater as a prospect, for some of his physical shortcomings, is the ability to be decisive and quick-minded in his reads.

Bussell says Bridgewater is ahead of a physically superior talent like Stafford in terms of his polish as a passer.

"Polished doesn't mean that Bridgewater has less room for improvement, It just means he has a more refined and precise skillset.

"While Bridgewater doesn't have the pure physical talent that Stafford has, I do believe he can be better than Stafford simply because of his poise and mental grasp of the game," Bussell explained.

"In essence, it's the difference between a Jay Cutler and a Tom Brady."

"Poise" can seem like a nebulous phrase, but you can see with Bridgewater that he doesn't appear to get flustered in the pocket, or by any situation he's presented with in a game.

"All the players, all the coaches, they have an unwavering faith and ability in him," said an NFL scout.

"If there's two minutes left in the game and we're on the 5-yard line, down seven, and Teddy has the ball, we're going to win. That's contagious."

No, Bridgewater isn't a once-in-a-generation talent like Andrew Luck, but that doesn't mean he can't be an effective NFL quarterback. Furthermore, despite Bridgewater not having comparable physical talent to players like Stafford, some evaluators believe Bridgewater has the acumen and confidence to be a superior NFL player.

In other words, opinions vary on just how good Bridgewater is, but the consensus -- though not unanimous -- is that he's good enough as a prospect to bring value as a potential No. 1 overall pick, especially for a team in desperate need of a quarterback.

Edited by Faust

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"I don't see Bridgewater as a franchise savior like RGIII was in Washington"

Not sure you can call RGIII a franchise savior when the team was 3-13 last year ( and not to mention they don't have their #1 pick this year)

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Teddy Bridgewater: Being No. 1 overall draft pick is my dream

By Mike Huguenin

College Football 24/7 writer

If you're going to dream, you might as well dream big. Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater is doing just that.

Bridgewater was on WHBE-AM in Louisville on Wednesday and said that being the overall No. 1 draft pick is "my dream right now, and I'm just trying to make it come true."

The Houston Texans own the first pick in the 2014 draft, and numerous analysts have the Texans taking a quarterback -- whether it be Bridgewater, Johnny Manziel or Blake Bortles -- with the pick. Among College Football 24/7's four mock drafts, NFL Media analyst Charles Davis was the only one to have Bridgewater going No. 1 to the Texans.

Bridgewater is working out at the IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla., to prepare for the combine and his pre-draft workouts. His appearance at the combine will be one of the most scrutinized, partly because of his size. He was listed at 6-foot-3 and 196 pounds at Louisville, and his frame has come under criticism of late.

Still, he is in play for the overall No. 1 spot. Bridgewater said he has been "purpose-driven" his entire life, and that "I just want to be that guy" who goes first.

Bridgewater also said he is looking for an agent.

"I've been advised by guys who have played in the NFL and guys who have my best interests," he said. "It's a process. When you meet people, you have to gain their trust with just one meeting. I've been talking to a couple guys and just trying to build that relationship."

Bridgewater also said some agents were "reaching out to my mom and to my brothers and sisters, just trying to say, 'Hey, I'm here,' and just trying to get their names out there."

One thing Bridgewater said he would do with his NFL money is to give his mom a present.

"When I was in third grade, I promised my mom that I would get her a pink Cadillac Escalade," he said.

Bridgewater's mom was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2007 and currently is in remission.

"Pink is the color that represents breast cancer, so I just want to get her that big pink Escalade truck and see that big smile on her face."

Mike Huguenin can be reached at mike.huguenin@nfl.com. You also can follow him on Twitter @MikeHuguenin.

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"I don't see Bridgewater as a franchise savior like RGIII was in Washington"

Not sure you can call RGIII a franchise savior when the team was 3-13 last year ( and not to mention they don't have their #1 pick this year)

Assume that means how he was perceived prior to being drafted. It also could mean his current potential, but the word "was" indicates a prior perception, not that he is currently saving the franchise.

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One of the central questions for Bridgewater is the competition level he faced in the Big East, which later became the AAC. He simply wasn't running up against elite-level defenses on a consistent basis.

The guy destroyed a Florida defense with as much NFL talent as anyone in the country, including 3 potential first round picks in the secondary, and 3 on the line.

And I don't remember Bradford being more accurate than Teddy at all. How much more accurate can a human be, throwing the football?

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Rotoworld:

CBS Sports' Dane Brugler tabbed Louisville QB Teddy Bridgewater the best player in the 2014 NFL Draft class.

Brugler acknowledged that he'd considered questions regarding Bridgewater's slender frame and deep ball accuracy, but they didn't sway him off the former Cardinals' star. "Bridgewater succeeds with his mobility, arm talent and efficient ability above the neck," Brugler wrote. "He is a pro-style passer who is grounded, mature and has shown the ability to easily digest information."

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Prospect Profile: Teddy Bridgewater

By Russ Lande

There is little question that much of the country's focus this week is on the Super Bowl, but for the 30 NFL teams not playing this Sunday, it's all about the 2014 NFL draft. This week, we'll be offering an introduction to five players whom we are confident will be selected within the Top 10 picks of the draft. We'll review what NFL teams know about them and what's still a mystery. We started on Monday with a look at University of Buffalo defensive end/outside linebacker Khalil Mack; today we focus the spotlight on Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater.

I'm always skeptical when evaluating players who have received a ton of hype, but I was pleasantly surprised by Bridgewater's overall game. Possessing a quick release and an underrated arm allows Bridgewater to easily make every NFL throw with zip and precision when his footwork is on. Out of the presumptive top five quarterbacks in the 2014 NFL draft (Derek Carr, Blake Bortles, Johnny Manziel, Teddy Bridgewater and Zach Mettenberger), Bridgewater finished second in accuracy when I charted them out (although scouts do have one concern, which I'll delve into below). Excellent football intelligence helped him to be consistently productive against the blitz as he was able to identify where the rush was coming from, make the appropriate read and get rid of the ball quickly and on the mark to the correct receiver. Not only did his accuracy help him to make big plays, but it also made him be a much more efficient passer.

Bridgewater made few mistakes this season (31 touchdowns with only four interceptions) thanks to the aforementioned skills. Few college quarterbacks possess the athleticism to avoid sacks and buy second chances while also having a quick release and the ability to make good throws in nearly any situation. These traits are what allowed Bridgewater to consistently convert third downs into first downs to keep drives alive, something that's often overlooked. When you add up all the great things he does on film and combine that with his smarts, leadership and character, you have nearly the complete package -- which is why many expect the Texans to draft him with the first overall pick. However, there are still a few questions that have been raised.

The first relates to hand size. Scouts that have seen Bridgewater in person have told me that his right hand will measure less than nine inches -- the standard of measurement is from the tip of the thumb to the tip of the pinky on the throwing hand when the hand is pressed down and spread out on a table with a measuring tape on it -- which is basically the minimum that NFL teams consider acceptable. Small hands make it difficult to handle the ball in less than ideal weather conditions and often lead to accuracy and fumbling issues. As an underclassman who entered the draft early, Bridgewater has not been measured by combine scouts yet, which is why the question still persists. Even though some reports claim that NFL teams are also concerned about Bridgewater's general physique, numerous scouts I have spoken to are not worried about this and feel that he will add weight and fill out as most players do once they are in the NFL.

The question that cannot be answered by a quick measurement at the combine is about his inconsistent stride length. This may seem like a minor issue, but NFL teams always prefer quarterbacks who have stability in this area as it enables them to be a more predictably accurate passer. In the games I evaluated, Bridgewater showed a tendency to overstride at times, especially when he really had to get a lot of zip on the throw, which led to passes being high. While his overall accuracy was excellent, it could be that much better if his stride length were consistent on every throw for which he has the space. Scouts are interested to watch him throw at both the combine and his pro day to take a closer look at this.

The reality, though, is that when you're down to picking on a quarterback's hand size and stride length, it tells you that nearly everything they do on film is excellent. That, combined with his outstanding intangibles, means that Bridgewater has a good chance of being the first quarterback selected in the 2014 NFL draft.

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Rotoworld:

Louisville QB Teddy Bridgewater hired Kennard McGuire as agent.

Bridgewater can now move onto the far more important task of physically preparing for the draft. He's a potential No. 1 pick, but has lost steam since the season ended. If you're looking for a candidate for a shocking draft day slide, Bridgewater is a strong choice, but he has plenty of time left to turn the tide back around.

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Teddy Bridgewater says he should've hit 80 percent of his passes

By Mike Huguenin

College Football 24/7 writer

It turns out Teddy Bridgewater's biggest critic might be Teddy Bridgewater.

Bridgewater led the nation in completion percentage in 2013 at 71.0 percent. But he told Louisville TV station WDRB "it probably should have been 80 or 85" percent.

Bridgewater is preparing for the NFL Scouting Combine and other pre-draft events at IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla., and is working with former Heisman winner and NFL quarterback Chris Weinke.

As impressive as Bridgewater's completion percentage was this season, it was the lowest to lead the nation since 2009, when Texas' Colt McCoy hit on 70.6 percent of his tosses.

Three quarterbacks had better than a 71 percent completion rate in 2010, seven were better in 2011 -- including Russell Wilson (72.8), Robert Griffin III (72.4) and Andrew Luck (71.3). Two were better in 2012 -- including Geno Smith (71.2).

"When I'm tough on myself, I'm never satisfied," Bridgewater said. "I'm eager to just get better each and every day.

"Sometimes you do get too tough on yourself and you do think the impossible, but that's just the way I want to be. I want to think that I can do the impossible. I'm just going to continue to think that way. I'm just going to continue to think that way and motivate myself."

In the four most recent mock drafts on NFL.com, Bridgewater is forecast to have a relatively short wait before hearing his name called on May 8. His worst current mock draft position is No. 5 to the Oakland Raiders. His highest draft position in those mocks in No. 3 to the Jacksonville Jaguars, while two drafts peg him going to the Cleveland Browns at No. 4.

Bridgewater led Louisville to a 12-1 mark in 2013 and a 23-3 record in his final two seasons at the school. His weigh-in at the combine is eagerly anticipated; he has come under criticism for his lack of bulk. He was listed at 6-foot-3 and 196 pounds at Louisville.

Mike Huguenin can be reached at mike.huguenin@nfl.com. You also can follow him on Twitter @MikeHuguenin.

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Bridgewater should live at McDonalds until the Combine and get up to 220 lbs. :)

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Bridgewater should live at McDonalds until the Combine and get up to 220 lbs. :)

You watch! Bridgewater is going to be stud. I hope the Raiders can get him, if not Bortles. The weight concern is overblown by people looking too hard to try and find warts, any kind of warts to pin on Bridgewater.

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