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shuke

Whatcha readin now? (book, books, reading, read)

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I was looking for a book to read on our bookshelf at home and found that my wife had a copy of "Uncle Tom's Cabin". So I started that last night.

So far so good.

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Flags of Our Fathers. Started it a couple months ago and didn't have time to read it. I'm back into it now and it's pretty good. I read "Fly Boys" by the same author last year.

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I just finished reading Slaughterhouse - 5. It was interesting enough, but I'm not sure I get why the book is so lauded.

Next up is Catch-22.

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Started The Road by Cormac McCarthy last night. It's a very swift read (I'm already 100 pages in). Leaves a lot to the imagination of the reader, but I'm getting why many reviews (pro and amateur) mentioned emotional effects re: the relationship between father and son. I'd definitely recommend it. (Heck, though, who am I? Pulitzer recommends it...listen to them.)

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Just finished White Noise by Don Delillo. I never read anything be him before, he's a great author. I'm probalby going to have to read it again sometime in a couple months to get a full grasp of what I just read. I think I'll be able to appreciate the ideas the second time around. In general it's about a man living with a pervasive fear of death. If somebody feels like they have a real good understanding of what happened send it to me in a PM. Parts I got, parts I was like :whoosh:

Is Delillo's style similar to Pynchon?
I don't know I 've never read any Pynchon. I've seen his name in here a couple times, what would be your suggestion to start off with if I were to read a book or two by him.
I wouldn't. Talk to kupcho.
Start with The Crying of Lot 49. If you don't like that, stop. It's about as accessible Pynchon gets.

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I just finished reading Slaughterhouse - 5. It was interesting enough, but I'm not sure I get why the book is so lauded.Next up is Catch-22.

I just read Slaughterhouse 5 as well. I've read quite a bit of Vonnegut, but for some reason I never got around to it. I enjoyed it, but not as much as Mother Night.Don't waste your time with Catch-22.I read "The Big Investment Lie" by Michael Edesses and "Veronica" by Mary Gaitskill over vacation. Both were well worth the time.

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I am reading: absolutely nothing. I haven't read on a daily basis probably since I was like 17.

So I need some recommendations from you all. I'd like to start reading again, get the ol' synapses firing and so forth. I really need to take a break from smoking weed and playing video games. Here are all the books that I've really enjoyed the past few years:

The Jungle

1984

Moneyball

The Education of a Coach

Next Man Up

When I was younger, I read the piss out of the Goosebumps series, and I even hopped on an Encyclopedia Brown book here and there. I'm not looking for any 3,000-page King novels. TIA for any recommendations.

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I am reading: absolutely nothing. I haven't read on a daily basis probably since I was like 17.So I need some recommendations from you all. I'd like to start reading again, get the ol' synapses firing and so forth. I really need to take a break from smoking weed and playing video games. Here are all the books that I've really enjoyed the past few years:The Jungle1984MoneyballThe Education of a CoachNext Man UpWhen I was younger, I read the piss out of the Goosebumps series, and I even hopped on an Encyclopedia Brown book here and there. I'm not looking for any 3,000-page King novels. TIA for any recommendations.

Moneyball ---> Baseball Between The Numbers, by the Baseball Prospectus people.

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Just finished The Sheltering Sky by Paul Bowles, and currently wrapping up The Golden Compass by Phillip Pullman. Society Must be Defended by Michel Foucalt is on deck, with a possible reread of Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman.

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I just finished Pet Sematary. I hadn't read it in 20 years. Still creeped me out.

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I am reading: absolutely nothing. I haven't read on a daily basis probably since I was like 17.So I need some recommendations from you all. I'd like to start reading again, get the ol' synapses firing and so forth. I really need to take a break from smoking weed and playing video games. Here are all the books that I've really enjoyed the past few years:The Jungle1984MoneyballThe Education of a CoachNext Man UpWhen I was younger, I read the piss out of the Goosebumps series, and I even hopped on an Encyclopedia Brown book here and there. I'm not looking for any 3,000-page King novels. TIA for any recommendations.

Impossible - No one likes 1984. I read it in HS and although it was full of ideas it was meandering most of the time and horribly borish.

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I just finished reading Slaughterhouse - 5. It was interesting enough, but I'm not sure I get why the book is so lauded.Next up is Catch-22.

I just read Slaughterhouse 5 as well. I've read quite a bit of Vonnegut, but for some reason I never got around to it. I enjoyed it, but not as much as Mother Night.Don't waste your time with Catch-22.I read "The Big Investment Lie" by Michael Edesses and "Veronica" by Mary Gaitskill over vacation. Both were well worth the time.
I liked Catch-22 - we had to read it in school, and I never would have read it otherwise, but I definitely wouldn't put it in the waste of time category.

I am reading: absolutely nothing. I haven't read on a daily basis probably since I was like 17.So I need some recommendations from you all. I'd like to start reading again, get the ol' synapses firing and so forth. I really need to take a break from smoking weed and playing video games. Here are all the books that I've really enjoyed the past few years:The Jungle1984MoneyballThe Education of a CoachNext Man UpWhen I was younger, I read the piss out of the Goosebumps series, and I even hopped on an Encyclopedia Brown book here and there. I'm not looking for any 3,000-page King novels. TIA for any recommendations.

Impossible - No one likes 1984. I read it in HS and although it was full of ideas it was meandering most of the time and horribly borish.
Count me as one who liked 1984. Good stuff.

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I am reading: absolutely nothing. I haven't read on a daily basis probably since I was like 17.So I need some recommendations from you all. I'd like to start reading again, get the ol' synapses firing and so forth. I really need to take a break from smoking weed and playing video games. Here are all the books that I've really enjoyed the past few years:The Jungle1984MoneyballThe Education of a CoachNext Man UpWhen I was younger, I read the piss out of the Goosebumps series, and I even hopped on an Encyclopedia Brown book here and there. I'm not looking for any 3,000-page King novels. TIA for any recommendations.

Impossible - No one likes 1984. I read it in HS and although it was full of ideas it was meandering most of the time and horribly borish.
It's one of my favorite books. :rolleyes:

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I am reading: absolutely nothing. I haven't read on a daily basis probably since I was like 17.

So I need some recommendations from you all. I'd like to start reading again, get the ol' synapses firing and so forth. I really need to take a break from smoking weed and playing video games. Here are all the books that I've really enjoyed the past few years:

The Jungle

1984

Moneyball

The Education of a Coach

Next Man Up

When I was younger, I read the piss out of the Goosebumps series, and I even hopped on an Encyclopedia Brown book here and there. I'm not looking for any 3,000-page King novels. TIA for any recommendations.

Are you looking for a specific theme? Genre? Fiction / non-fiction? Your list of books that you liked is pretty diverse.

If you like non-fiction, I recommend Freakonomics.

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I am reading: absolutely nothing. I haven't read on a daily basis probably since I was like 17.So I need some recommendations from you all. I'd like to start reading again, get the ol' synapses firing and so forth. I really need to take a break from smoking weed and playing video games. Here are all the books that I've really enjoyed the past few years:The Jungle1984MoneyballThe Education of a CoachNext Man UpWhen I was younger, I read the piss out of the Goosebumps series, and I even hopped on an Encyclopedia Brown book here and there. I'm not looking for any 3,000-page King novels. TIA for any recommendations.

Moneyball ---> Baseball Between The Numbers, by the Baseball Prospectus people.
Thanks, man. I'm a huge fantasy baseball nerd and my nerd friend who plays in leagues with me is all-in for BP.

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I hit page 98 of The Reluctant Fundamentalist and suddenly Mohsin Hamid's metaphors, symbols and iconography fell into place for me. I felt I should have caught onto his literary sleight of hand earlier in the novel.

So I stopped reading it for a couple of days. Now I'm trying to figure out how it all ends before I pick it back up and find out.

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I just finished reading Slaughterhouse - 5. It was interesting enough, but I'm not sure I get why the book is so lauded.Next up is Catch-22.

I just read Slaughterhouse 5 as well. I've read quite a bit of Vonnegut, but for some reason I never got around to it. I enjoyed it, but not as much as Mother Night.Don't waste your time with Catch-22.I read "The Big Investment Lie" by Michael Edesses and "Veronica" by Mary Gaitskill over vacation. Both were well worth the time.
Catch-22 is definitely not a waste of time, it is one of my favorite books and one that I feel is a must read. Enjoyed Slaughterhouse 5 but am just not a big fan of Vonnegut like some around here are. I've read that one, Cat's Cradle, and the Sirens of Titan and none of them really blew me away. Slaughterhouse 5 was my favorite of the 3.Currently reading "Last Call" by Tim Powers and am really enjoying it despite not having much time to read on it lately. It was recommended by Vivian Darkbloom a while back in a book thread and I've read 2 or 3 others of his recommendations that were stellar so he hasn't led me wrong yet. Also started "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People" but haven't gotten too far and have a copy of "Mountain Bike like a Champion" by Ned Overend that I've been reading in the john.

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I am reading: absolutely nothing. I haven't read on a daily basis probably since I was like 17.So I need some recommendations from you all. I'd like to start reading again, get the ol' synapses firing and so forth. I really need to take a break from smoking weed and playing video games. Here are all the books that I've really enjoyed the past few years:The Jungle1984MoneyballThe Education of a CoachNext Man UpWhen I was younger, I read the piss out of the Goosebumps series, and I even hopped on an Encyclopedia Brown book here and there. I'm not looking for any 3,000-page King novels. TIA for any recommendations.

Moneyball ---> Baseball Between The Numbers, by the Baseball Prospectus people.
Thanks, man. I'm a huge fantasy baseball nerd and my nerd friend who plays in leagues with me is all-in for BP.
You'll love this book then. It turns a lot of baseball CW on its ear. It does make listening to Joe Morgan do color commentary an even more excruciating experience, but those are the breaks.

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Finished Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire on Friday. Best one yet.

Now it's on to Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. A buddy at work has been bugging me for about two years to read this. Says it's the best book he's ever read. 75 pages in and bored.

Screw it. 100 pages into Gone With the Wind and I'm done.
You have to like the movie to like the book. Its about the same, except in the book Scarlet has more kids, I don't think she could keep up with how many she had.

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Not reading it yet, but just heard that the Hosseini (author of the Kite Runner) is coming out with a new book this month. A Thousand Splendid Suns. Really looking forward to that one.

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Finished A Dangerous Fortune by Ken Follett last night. Not bad. But I'm still eagerly waiting for the sequel to Pillars of the Earth, his best book and one of the better books I've read in the last few years.

Next up is Harry Potter #5, and then Bush at War by Bob Woodward.

Wow, I haven't read Pillars in years but I don't recall thinking "sequel" when I was done (can't recall at this point even how it ended). Thanks for the heads-up, as I really liked the original.

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Not reading it yet, but just heard that the Hosseini (author of the Kite Runner) is coming out with a new book this month. A Thousand Splendid Suns. Really looking forward to that one.

May 22 release date. I've been looking forward to this one for a while now. And the early reviews are great.From Publishers WeeklyStarred Review. Afghan-American novelist Hosseini follows up his bestselling The Kite Runner with another searing epic of Afghanistan in turmoil. The story covers three decades of anti-Soviet jihad, civil war and Taliban tyranny through the lives of two women. Mariam is the scorned illegitimate daughter of a wealthy businessman, forced at age 15 into marrying the 40-year-old Rasheed, who grows increasingly brutal as she fails to produce a child. Eighteen later, Rasheed takes another wife, 14-year-old Laila, a smart and spirited girl whose only other options, after her parents are killed by rocket fire, are prostitution or starvation. Against a backdrop of unending war, Mariam and Laila become allies in an asymmetrical battle with Rasheed, whose violent misogyny—"There was no cursing, no screaming, no pleading, no surprised yelps, only the systematic business of beating and being beaten"—is endorsed by custom and law. Hosseini gives a forceful but nuanced portrait of a patriarchal despotism where women are agonizingly dependent on fathers, husbands and especially sons, the bearing of male children being their sole path to social status. His tale is a powerful, harrowing depiction of Afghanistan, but also a lyrical evocation of the lives and enduring hopes of its resilient characters.

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I am reading: absolutely nothing. I haven't read on a daily basis probably since I was like 17.So I need some recommendations from you all. I'd like to start reading again, get the ol' synapses firing and so forth. I really need to take a break from smoking weed and playing video games. Here are all the books that I've really enjoyed the past few years:The Jungle1984MoneyballThe Education of a CoachNext Man UpWhen I was younger, I read the piss out of the Goosebumps series, and I even hopped on an Encyclopedia Brown book here and there. I'm not looking for any 3,000-page King novels. TIA for any recommendations.

Summer of 49 :) Great Halberstam book

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Finished A Dangerous Fortune by Ken Follett last night. Not bad. But I'm still eagerly waiting for the sequel to Pillars of the Earth, his best book and one of the better books I've read in the last few years.

Next up is Harry Potter #5, and then Bush at War by Bob Woodward.

Wow, I haven't read Pillars in years but I don't recall thinking "sequel" when I was done (can't recall at this point even how it ended). Thanks for the heads-up, as I really liked the original.
Sequel may be a little strong. The new novel takes place in the same town, Kingsbridge, only 200 years later during the Black Death. And the characters are descendants of the originals.

Release date is October 9.

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Cold Mountain - The book is good in ways that I don't usually find I enjoy books. Good imagery (remarkably visual) and a meandering plot line.

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My last two books were life of pi and the curious incident of the dog in the night time. I liked both a lot. I'm looking for something similar, but don't know where to start. Also interested in audiobooks, so I can put them up on my iPod and listen on a long flight. Any suggestions?

I would both of those books in my top ten that I've read in the last year.Some others that I really like include:The Kite Runner by Khaled HosseiniThe Memory of Running by Ron McLartyThe Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz ZafonThe Beach by Alex Garland
I just finished The Memory Of Running on your recommendation and really enjoyed it. Have you read his second book Traveller? I loved The Beach, Life of Pi, Curious Incident also. Going to look into The Shadow Of The Wind. Gracias.

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I just finished reading Slaughterhouse - 5. It was interesting enough, but I'm not sure I get why the book is so lauded.Next up is Catch-22.

I just read Slaughterhouse 5 as well. I've read quite a bit of Vonnegut, but for some reason I never got around to it. I enjoyed it, but not as much as Mother Night.Don't waste your time with Catch-22.I read "The Big Investment Lie" by Michael Edesses and "Veronica" by Mary Gaitskill over vacation. Both were well worth the time.
Catch-22 is definitely not a waste of time, it is one of my favorite books and one that I feel is a must read. Enjoyed Slaughterhouse 5 but am just not a big fan of Vonnegut like some around here are. I've read that one, Cat's Cradle, and the Sirens of Titan and none of them really blew me away. Slaughterhouse 5 was my favorite of the 3.Currently reading "Last Call" by Tim Powers and am really enjoying it despite not having much time to read on it lately. It was recommended by Vivian Darkbloom a while back in a book thread and I've read 2 or 3 others of his recommendations that were stellar so he hasn't led me wrong yet. Also started "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People" but haven't gotten too far and have a copy of "Mountain Bike like a Champion" by Ned Overend that I've been reading in the john.
Last Call is a great book. Have you read Anubis Gates by Powers? Another excellent Powers book. I have his newest at home but haven't read yet (3 days to never).

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My last two books were life of pi and the curious incident of the dog in the night time. I liked both a lot. I'm looking for something similar, but don't know where to start. Also interested in audiobooks, so I can put them up on my iPod and listen on a long flight. Any suggestions?

I would both of those books in my top ten that I've read in the last year.

Some others that I really like include:

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

The Memory of Running by Ron McLarty

The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

The Beach by Alex Garland

I just finished The Memory Of Running on your recommendation and really enjoyed it. Have you read his second book Traveller? I loved The Beach, Life of Pi, Curious Incident also. Going to look into The Shadow Of The Wind. Gracias.

Traveler was excellent, just a notch below The Memory of Running.

Another really good book is The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger. The movie version is scheduled to begin shooting this fall starring Rachel McAdams and Eric Bana.

Glad you enjoyed the books. :thumbup: It seems like we have similar tastes, so feel free to pass recommendations along of anything else you really like.

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I just finished reading Slaughterhouse - 5. It was interesting enough, but I'm not sure I get why the book is so lauded.Next up is Catch-22.

I just read Slaughterhouse 5 as well. I've read quite a bit of Vonnegut, but for some reason I never got around to it. I enjoyed it, but not as much as Mother Night.Don't waste your time with Catch-22.I read "The Big Investment Lie" by Michael Edesses and "Veronica" by Mary Gaitskill over vacation. Both were well worth the time.
Catch-22 is definitely not a waste of time, it is one of my favorite books and one that I feel is a must read. Enjoyed Slaughterhouse 5 but am just not a big fan of Vonnegut like some around here are. I've read that one, Cat's Cradle, and the Sirens of Titan and none of them really blew me away. Slaughterhouse 5 was my favorite of the 3.Currently reading "Last Call" by Tim Powers and am really enjoying it despite not having much time to read on it lately. It was recommended by Vivian Darkbloom a while back in a book thread and I've read 2 or 3 others of his recommendations that were stellar so he hasn't led me wrong yet. Also started "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People" but haven't gotten too far and have a copy of "Mountain Bike like a Champion" by Ned Overend that I've been reading in the john.
Last Call is a great book. Have you read Anubis Gates by Powers? Another excellent Powers book. I have his newest at home but haven't read yet (3 days to never).
Loved Anubis Gates, a little moreso than Last Call even. I've also read "The Drawing of the Dark" by him which was a fun read and have another one on the shelf, "Declare", that I picked up in a bargain bin somewhere. Powers was definitely an excellent recommendation from Darkbloom. The others he recommended that I read were "Perdido Street Station" and "The Scar" from China Mieville and they were tremendous. Very different than these in that they are much more dark but they are some of the more inventive characters and settings that I've read in some time. Powers is very similar in that his characters are extremely interesting and sometimes quite unusual (as in Anubis Gates especially).

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I just finished reading Slaughterhouse - 5. It was interesting enough, but I'm not sure I get why the book is so lauded.

Next up is Catch-22.

I just read Slaughterhouse 5 as well. I've read quite a bit of Vonnegut, but for some reason I never got around to it. I enjoyed it, but not as much as Mother Night.

Don't waste your time with Catch-22.

I read "The Big Investment Lie" by Michael Edesses and "Veronica" by Mary Gaitskill over vacation. Both were well worth the time.

Catch-22 is definitely not a waste of time, it is one of my favorite books and one that I feel is a must read. Enjoyed Slaughterhouse 5 but am just not a big fan of Vonnegut like some around here are. I've read that one, Cat's Cradle, and the Sirens of Titan and none of them really blew me away. Slaughterhouse 5 was my favorite of the 3.

Currently reading "Last Call" by Tim Powers and am really enjoying it despite not having much time to read on it lately. It was recommended by Vivian Darkbloom a while back in a book thread and I've read 2 or 3 others of his recommendations that were stellar so he hasn't led me wrong yet. Also started "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People" but haven't gotten too far and have a copy of "Mountain Bike like a Champion" by Ned Overend that I've been reading in the john.

Last Call is a great book. Have you read Anubis Gates by Powers? Another excellent Powers book. I have his newest at home but haven't read yet (3 days to never).
Loved Anubis Gates, a little moreso than Last Call even. I've also read "The Drawing of the Dark" by him which was a fun read and have another one on the shelf, "Declare", that I picked up in a bargain bin somewhere. Powers was definitely an excellent recommendation from Darkbloom. The others he recommended that I read were "Perdido Street Station" and "The Scar" from China Mieville and they were tremendous. Very different than these in that they are much more dark but they are some of the more inventive characters and settings that I've read in some time. Powers is very similar in that his characters are extremely interesting and sometimes quite unusual (as in Anubis Gates especially).
Darkbloom also turned me onto China Mieville. Loved perdido and the scar but the third one I didn't enjoy as much. Iron something. I forget the title.

Declare was an excellent book and I spent a little time reading some non fiction about some of the British spies that Powers writes about in that book. It's almost a bit of historical fiction.

I am knee deep into another series he discussed at one point and it is amazing. Steven Erickson is the author, the series is Malazan Tales Of The Fallen. The 7th of the series is being published later this month. It is set to conclude after book 10. I have read the first 6 and have to say that all of the books are amazing however business really picked up in the last 2. They are not books you can put down and come back to later however. There is alot going on and he wastes no time in newer books recapping anything at all. Alot is expected from the reader as far as memory and keeping characters straight. This site helps though: http://www.malazanempire.com/site/index.shtml

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I'm working on a fairely new one about Madison and the Bill of Rights

James Madison and the Struggle for the Bill of Rights, by Richard Lubunski.

I'm about 1/2 through and Virginia just ratified after Patrick Henry tried to torpedo the Constitution because it didn't have the BOR. It's been pretty good. Nothing out of the norm or in contrast to what I've already read in other sources.

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I just finished reading Slaughterhouse - 5. It was interesting enough, but I'm not sure I get why the book is so lauded.

Next up is Catch-22.

I just read Slaughterhouse 5 as well. I've read quite a bit of Vonnegut, but for some reason I never got around to it. I enjoyed it, but not as much as Mother Night.

Don't waste your time with Catch-22.

I read "The Big Investment Lie" by Michael Edesses and "Veronica" by Mary Gaitskill over vacation. Both were well worth the time.

Catch-22 is definitely not a waste of time, it is one of my favorite books and one that I feel is a must read. Enjoyed Slaughterhouse 5 but am just not a big fan of Vonnegut like some around here are. I've read that one, Cat's Cradle, and the Sirens of Titan and none of them really blew me away. Slaughterhouse 5 was my favorite of the 3.

Currently reading "Last Call" by Tim Powers and am really enjoying it despite not having much time to read on it lately. It was recommended by Vivian Darkbloom a while back in a book thread and I've read 2 or 3 others of his recommendations that were stellar so he hasn't led me wrong yet. Also started "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People" but haven't gotten too far and have a copy of "Mountain Bike like a Champion" by Ned Overend that I've been reading in the john.

Last Call is a great book. Have you read Anubis Gates by Powers? Another excellent Powers book. I have his newest at home but haven't read yet (3 days to never).
Loved Anubis Gates, a little moreso than Last Call even. I've also read "The Drawing of the Dark" by him which was a fun read and have another one on the shelf, "Declare", that I picked up in a bargain bin somewhere. Powers was definitely an excellent recommendation from Darkbloom. The others he recommended that I read were "Perdido Street Station" and "The Scar" from China Mieville and they were tremendous. Very different than these in that they are much more dark but they are some of the more inventive characters and settings that I've read in some time. Powers is very similar in that his characters are extremely interesting and sometimes quite unusual (as in Anubis Gates especially).
Darkbloom also turned me onto China Mieville. Loved perdido and the scar but the third one I didn't enjoy as much. Iron something. I forget the title.

Declare was an excellent book and I spent a little time reading some non fiction about some of the British spies that Powers writes about in that book. It's almost a bit of historical fiction.

I am knee deep into another series he discussed at one point and it is amazing. Steven Erickson is the author, the series is Malazan Tales Of The Fallen. The 7th of the series is being published later this month. It is set to conclude after book 10. I have read the first 6 and have to say that all of the books are amazing however business really picked up in the last 2. They are not books you can put down and come back to later however. There is alot going on and he wastes no time in newer books recapping anything at all. Alot is expected from the reader as far as memory and keeping characters straight. This site helps though: http://www.malazanempire.com/site/index.shtml

I think it is Iron Council and I haven't read that one yet. Haven't heard as good of reviews from it as the others bit will probably eventually read it anyhow since I loved the others so much.

Hadn't heard of the Malazan series but will have to look it up some time. I still have a bunch of books on my shelf I haven't read yet including a couple of other Darkbloom recommendations in Guy Gavriel Kay and Gene Wolfe.

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My last two books were life of pi and the curious incident of the dog in the night time. I liked both a lot. I'm looking for something similar, but don't know where to start. Also interested in audiobooks, so I can put them up on my iPod and listen on a long flight. Any suggestions?

I would both of those books in my top ten that I've read in the last year.

Some others that I really like include:

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

The Memory of Running by Ron McLarty

The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

The Beach by Alex Garland

I just finished The Memory Of Running on your recommendation and really enjoyed it. Have you read his second book Traveller? I loved The Beach, Life of Pi, Curious Incident also. Going to look into The Shadow Of The Wind. Gracias.

Traveler was excellent, just a notch below The Memory of Running.

Another really good book is The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger. The movie version is scheduled to begin shooting this fall starring Rachel McAdams and Eric Bana.

Glad you enjoyed the books. :rolleyes: It seems like we have similar tastes, so feel free to pass recommendations along of anything else you really like.

I think my wife read the TT Wife. I will have to see if we have that at home.

Here's a few of my favs:

Matthew Kneale - English Passengers

Brooks Hansen - The Chess Garden

TC Boyle - Drop City

Jeff Noon - Vurt

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I just finished reading Slaughterhouse - 5. It was interesting enough, but I'm not sure I get why the book is so lauded.

Next up is Catch-22.

I just read Slaughterhouse 5 as well. I've read quite a bit of Vonnegut, but for some reason I never got around to it. I enjoyed it, but not as much as Mother Night.

Don't waste your time with Catch-22.

I read "The Big Investment Lie" by Michael Edesses and "Veronica" by Mary Gaitskill over vacation. Both were well worth the time.

Catch-22 is definitely not a waste of time, it is one of my favorite books and one that I feel is a must read. Enjoyed Slaughterhouse 5 but am just not a big fan of Vonnegut like some around here are. I've read that one, Cat's Cradle, and the Sirens of Titan and none of them really blew me away. Slaughterhouse 5 was my favorite of the 3.

Currently reading "Last Call" by Tim Powers and am really enjoying it despite not having much time to read on it lately. It was recommended by Vivian Darkbloom a while back in a book thread and I've read 2 or 3 others of his recommendations that were stellar so he hasn't led me wrong yet. Also started "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People" but haven't gotten too far and have a copy of "Mountain Bike like a Champion" by Ned Overend that I've been reading in the john.

Last Call is a great book. Have you read Anubis Gates by Powers? Another excellent Powers book. I have his newest at home but haven't read yet (3 days to never).
Loved Anubis Gates, a little moreso than Last Call even. I've also read "The Drawing of the Dark" by him which was a fun read and have another one on the shelf, "Declare", that I picked up in a bargain bin somewhere. Powers was definitely an excellent recommendation from Darkbloom. The others he recommended that I read were "Perdido Street Station" and "The Scar" from China Mieville and they were tremendous. Very different than these in that they are much more dark but they are some of the more inventive characters and settings that I've read in some time. Powers is very similar in that his characters are extremely interesting and sometimes quite unusual (as in Anubis Gates especially).
Darkbloom also turned me onto China Mieville. Loved perdido and the scar but the third one I didn't enjoy as much. Iron something. I forget the title.

Declare was an excellent book and I spent a little time reading some non fiction about some of the British spies that Powers writes about in that book. It's almost a bit of historical fiction.

I am knee deep into another series he discussed at one point and it is amazing. Steven Erickson is the author, the series is Malazan Tales Of The Fallen. The 7th of the series is being published later this month. It is set to conclude after book 10. I have read the first 6 and have to say that all of the books are amazing however business really picked up in the last 2. They are not books you can put down and come back to later however. There is alot going on and he wastes no time in newer books recapping anything at all. Alot is expected from the reader as far as memory and keeping characters straight. This site helps though: http://www.malazanempire.com/site/index.shtml

I think it is Iron Council and I haven't read that one yet. Haven't heard as good of reviews from it as the others bit will probably eventually read it anyhow since I loved the others so much.

Hadn't heard of the Malazan series but will have to look it up some time. I still have a bunch of books on my shelf I haven't read yet including a couple of other Darkbloom recommendations in Guy Gavriel Kay and Gene Wolfe.

We must've made the same list from VD. :rolleyes: I tried both of those Authors as well but they weren't my cup of tea.

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Just finished City of Bones by Michael Connelly. Now I am reading Lost Light by M. Connelly.

Also picked up "Juiced" for $3.99 hardcover.

Also reading Battle Cry of Freedom here and there.

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My last two books were life of pi and the curious incident of the dog in the night time. I liked both a lot. I'm looking for something similar, but don't know where to start. Also interested in audiobooks, so I can put them up on my iPod and listen on a long flight. Any suggestions?

I would both of those books in my top ten that I've read in the last year.

Some others that I really like include:

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

The Memory of Running by Ron McLarty

The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

The Beach by Alex Garland

I just finished The Memory Of Running on your recommendation and really enjoyed it. Have you read his second book Traveller? I loved The Beach, Life of Pi, Curious Incident also. Going to look into The Shadow Of The Wind. Gracias.

Traveler was excellent, just a notch below The Memory of Running.

Another really good book is The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger. The movie version is scheduled to begin shooting this fall starring Rachel McAdams and Eric Bana.

Glad you enjoyed the books. :( It seems like we have similar tastes, so feel free to pass recommendations along of anything else you really like.

I think my wife read the TT Wife. I will have to see if we have that at home.

Here's a few of my favs:

Matthew Kneale - English Passengers

Brooks Hansen - The Chess Garden

TC Boyle - Drop City

Jeff Noon - Vurt

I've read English Passengers. I thought it was good, but it dragged at times.

And I have Talk Talk by TC Boyle on my list, just haven't got to it yet.

I've never read any of those others, but will have to take a look at them.

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Leaving the Saints Behind -- How I Left the Mormons and Found My Faith -- I just started this. Has anyone read it?

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Bush at War by Bob Woodward

Not bad. Pretty dated, but it's interesting to see perspectives before everything went down the crapper.

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If non-fiction is your thing, I highly recommend this book...

The Great Starvation Experiment

Its about a group of conscientious objectors who volunteered to be starved for a period of one year instead of serving in WW2. This is not a war history book and is not filled with dry medical/scientific data. It's a story of the agony, both physical and mental, that these men endured. Very tough book to put down.

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Building Harlequin's Moon by Brenda Cooper and Larry Niven.

Bought it because I'm a big fan of Niven's stuff, but it became apparent early on that Cooper did most of the writing. It was an interesting premise - a colony ship heading for a habitable planet gets marooned when its stardrive failed in a system with no habitable planets. So they had to literally make a habitable world by smashing moons of a gas giant together. Then they smashed a couple of comets into it to give it an ocean and atmosphere.

The main character, however, annoyed me to no end, probably because of some semi-latent male chauvanism on my part. Cooper made her heroine Rachel just waay too perfect. She's smart. She's brave. She's a leader. Her moral compass is unfailing. She's strong. She's beautiful. She's athletic. Everyone loves her, except for the villainess who is out to get her for evil reasons. And by the end of the book, I was really wishing something nasty would happen to her.

Edited by shining path

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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (HP4)...

It's my first time with the series. I started in the end of April and made it my goal to finish all 6 before July 21...

I didn't realize it was going to be so easy. I can't put it down.

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If non-fiction is your thing, I highly recommend this book...

The Great Starvation Experiment

Its about a group of conscientious objectors who volunteered to be starved for a period of one year instead of serving in WW2. This is not a war history book and is not filled with dry medical/scientific data. It's a story of the agony, both physical and mental, that these men endured. Very tough book to put down.

Awesome. This will almost certainly be my next read when I finish freakonomics.

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