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Whatcha readin now? (book, books, reading, read)

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In the last month or 2 I have read: Fight Club, American Psycho, and Survivor (fight club guy). I'm sure I am behind the FBG curve on these so far.

I will either read another Ellis book (Less Than Zero) or go for Paradise Lost (war in heaven etc) next.

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In the last month or 2 I have read: Fight Club, American Psycho, and Survivor (fight club guy). I'm sure I am behind the FBG curve on these so far.I will either read another Ellis book (Less Than Zero) or go for Paradise Lost (war in heaven etc) next.

If you like Palahniuk, try Choke. It's the best of his novels if you ask me.

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The Shining by Stephen King

Love this book. I first read it several years ago, then picked it up again last weekend. Quite possibly the scariest book I've ever read. There is no doubt that King's best work was done in the late 70s, early 80s.

I think it might be the scariest book ever written.

I first read the book when I was 15 years old. One afternoon I got so scared I ended up calling my dad to see if he was coming home soon.

Right now I'm reading Shadowplay, the second in Tad Williams' new trilogy. Pretty good. He's one of the few fantasy writers I can stomach.

just finished that on, this week, myself. it seems a lot of people find his 'deliberate' pace off-putting. i've enjoyed his other series (memmory, sorrow and thorn). otherland was alittle harder to get into - have the sendond book but haven't read it yet.

if you like williams, try some of c.j. cherryh's stuff (the 'dreaming tree', which is two former books 'the dreamstone' and 'the tree of swords and jewels' in one volume and the 'fortress' series {fortress of dragons, fortress of owls, fortess of eagles, fortress in the eye of time, and fortress of ice}). cherryh also some some very good 'hard' sf (the faded sun series).

out of curiosity, who else do you read a lot?

I see Cherryh's books all the time while perusing in bookstores, but I've never read one. I'll give it a shot.
Cherryh is an excellent writer. Based on your criticism of the Cooper/Niven heroine, I'd recommend Downbelow Station. The characters aren't unwaveringly good or evil; the groups opposing each other aren't the "good guys" against the "bad guys"; they are realistically complicated characters.

Paladin is also a wonderful book, although not truly a fantasy.

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In the last month or 2 I have read: Fight Club, American Psycho, and Survivor (fight club guy). I'm sure I am behind the FBG curve on these so far.I will either read another Ellis book (Less Than Zero) or go for Paradise Lost (war in heaven etc) next.

If you like Palahniuk, try Choke. It's the best of his novels if you ask me.
I plan on reading all of his stuff by the end of the summer I hope. I liked Survivor more than Fight Club (although that is perhaps because I liked the movie Fight Club so much . . . this was the first time I EVER liked a movie better than the book). American Psycho I thought was a great book. It may even be my favorite book now, so I am going to keep reading him as well.I'm going for Paradise Lost and Dante's works as well just because I never read them and I feel like I should. :towelwave:

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In the last month or 2 I have read: Fight Club, American Psycho, and Survivor (fight club guy). I'm sure I am behind the FBG curve on these so far.

I will either read another Ellis book (Less Than Zero) or go for Paradise Lost (war in heaven etc) next.

If you like Palahniuk, try Choke. It's the best of his novels if you ask me.
I plan on reading all of his stuff by the end of the summer I hope. I liked Survivor more than Fight Club (although that is perhaps because I liked the movie Fight Club so much . . . this was the first time I EVER liked a movie better than the book).

American Psycho I thought was a great book. It may even be my favorite book now, so I am going to keep reading him as well.

I'm going for Paradise Lost and Dante's works as well just because I never read them and I feel like I should. :towelwave:

Here's one of those hit-or-miss type Amazon lists that may be perfect for you:

Palahnium and friends

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The Shining by Stephen King

Love this book. I first read it several years ago, then picked it up again last weekend. Quite possibly the scariest book I've ever read. There is no doubt that King's best work was done in the late 70s, early 80s.

I think it might be the scariest book ever written.

I first read the book when I was 15 years old. One afternoon I got so scared I ended up calling my dad to see if he was coming home soon.

Right now I'm reading Shadowplay, the second in Tad Williams' new trilogy. Pretty good. He's one of the few fantasy writers I can stomach.

just finished that on, this week, myself. it seems a lot of people find his 'deliberate' pace off-putting. i've enjoyed his other series (memmory, sorrow and thorn). otherland was alittle harder to get into - have the sendond book but haven't read it yet.

if you like williams, try some of c.j. cherryh's stuff (the 'dreaming tree', which is two former books 'the dreamstone' and 'the tree of swords and jewels' in one volume and the 'fortress' series {fortress of dragons, fortress of owls, fortess of eagles, fortress in the eye of time, and fortress of ice}). cherryh also some some very good 'hard' sf (the faded sun series).

out of curiosity, who else do you read a lot?

I see Cherryh's books all the time while perusing in bookstores, but I've never read one. I'll give it a shot.

I read more sf than fantasy. I've read too many fantasy books where the author was more of a fan of the genre than a real writer (David Eddings comes to mind). I recently tried to get into some of L.E. Modesitt's stuff, but I found the first Recluse book a bit dull. The writing was very good, though.

Williams is by far my favorite fantasy writer, though. I liked MS&T, really liked Otherland (though I was disappointed by the ending), and enjoyed War of the Flowers. I haven't heard criticisms of Williams' pacing, but I like how he takes his time in developing his characters and stories.

BTW, isn't there a thread for sf/fantasy book discussion? I seem to remember posting in one a few months ago.

there is sf/fantasy thread out there. this was 'active' and i was lazy...

i have read most of the recluse stuff. like most genres there are people who write and people who write well. i like slavatore's 'dark elf series' but i don't consider it 'high art'. modesitt's stuff eventually wore a little thin - seemed he was having trouble developing new story lines. eddings/gemell's/stackpole's books are a lot like a loius l'amour western (i think i've read all l'amour's stuff - and enjoyed them) - nice formula, usually interesting story, over quickly and ocacasionally a very good book. sometimes you want a steak, other times just a snack...

for hard sf try cherryh's faded sun series (originally 3 books now in one volume, her chanur series, or 'brother from earth'.

greg bear also writes some very good sf. he also has one very good fantasy book (actually quite an exquisite book - interesting premise and characters) called 'songs of earth and power.

i've found simon green's deathstalker series to be good sf.

gordon dickinson is also another good sf writer (his dorsai/childe cycle series is very good - kinda falls into the militray scifi genre).

the current king of military scfi is david webber - light reading but good escapism.

for a real trip on old scfi try e.e. doc smith's lensmen or skylark series. good examples of the early space opera genre. on the fantasy side, try andre norton's 'witch world' series.

most of my reading is fantasy because so few current writers (bear, dan simmons, joe haldeman being exceptions) can come close to the quality of clarke/heinlein/asimov. if you have never read heinlein's "time enough for love" or "stranger in a strange land", you have missed out on a couple of classics.

what current hard scifi authors do you collect???

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Dead Witch Walking by Kim Harrison.

Actually finished Book 1 through 5 (For A Few Demons More).

Rachel Morgan leaves her employment group, I.S., being joined by a pixie (Jenks) and living vampire (Ivy) to form her own group to retrieve misbehaving supernaturals. A thoroughly fun read taking place in Cincinnati with supernaturals co-existing with humans. The characters are fun and the complexity of the relationships, esp. Rachel and Ivy, make it a cut above in the Sci-Fi genre.

I just finished the first one and really like it. Fast paced, funny, and unique. Highly recommended.

Other books I have just read/reading:

Earthcore by Scott Sigler - pretty darn good book. Tense, imaginative, and pretty bloody.

The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam and the Crusdades - Much better researched than I would have thought and a huge eye opener. Highly recommended.

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The Shining by Stephen King

Love this book. I first read it several years ago, then picked it up again last weekend. Quite possibly the scariest book I've ever read. There is no doubt that King's best work was done in the late 70s, early 80s.

I think it might be the scariest book ever written.

I first read the book when I was 15 years old. One afternoon I got so scared I ended up calling my dad to see if he was coming home soon.

Right now I'm reading Shadowplay, the second in Tad Williams' new trilogy. Pretty good. He's one of the few fantasy writers I can stomach.

just finished that on, this week, myself. it seems a lot of people find his 'deliberate' pace off-putting. i've enjoyed his other series (memmory, sorrow and thorn). otherland was alittle harder to get into - have the sendond book but haven't read it yet.

if you like williams, try some of c.j. cherryh's stuff (the 'dreaming tree', which is two former books 'the dreamstone' and 'the tree of swords and jewels' in one volume and the 'fortress' series {fortress of dragons, fortress of owls, fortess of eagles, fortress in the eye of time, and fortress of ice}). cherryh also some some very good 'hard' sf (the faded sun series).

out of curiosity, who else do you read a lot?

I see Cherryh's books all the time while perusing in bookstores, but I've never read one. I'll give it a shot.

I read more sf than fantasy. I've read too many fantasy books where the author was more of a fan of the genre than a real writer (David Eddings comes to mind). I recently tried to get into some of L.E. Modesitt's stuff, but I found the first Recluse book a bit dull. The writing was very good, though.

Williams is by far my favorite fantasy writer, though. I liked MS&T, really liked Otherland (though I was disappointed by the ending), and enjoyed War of the Flowers. I haven't heard criticisms of Williams' pacing, but I like how he takes his time in developing his characters and stories.

BTW, isn't there a thread for sf/fantasy book discussion? I seem to remember posting in one a few months ago.

there is sf/fantasy thread out there. this was 'active' and i was lazy...

i have read most of the recluse stuff. like most genres there are people who write and people who write well. i like slavatore's 'dark elf series' but i don't consider it 'high art'. modesitt's stuff eventually wore a little thin - seemed he was having trouble developing new story lines. eddings/gemell's/stackpole's books are a lot like a loius l'amour western (i think i've read all l'amour's stuff - and enjoyed them) - nice formula, usually interesting story, over quickly and ocacasionally a very good book. sometimes you want a steak, other times just a snack...

for hard sf try cherryh's faded sun series (originally 3 books now in one volume, her chanur series, or 'brother from earth'.

greg bear also writes some very good sf. he also has one very good fantasy book (actually quite an exquisite book - interesting premise and characters) called 'songs of earth and power.

i've found simon green's deathstalker series to be good sf.

gordon dickinson is also another good sf writer (his dorsai/childe cycle series is very good - kinda falls into the militray scifi genre).

the current king of military scfi is david webber - light reading but good escapism.

for a real trip on old scfi try e.e. doc smith's lensmen or skylark series. good examples of the early space opera genre. on the fantasy side, try andre norton's 'witch world' series.

most of my reading is fantasy because so few current writers (bear, dan simmons, joe haldeman being exceptions) can come close to the quality of clarke/heinlein/asimov. if you have never read heinlein's "time enough for love" or "stranger in a strange land", you have missed out on a couple of classics.

what current hard scifi authors do you collect???

Oh, it wasn't a criticism at all. I was just trying to remember. I'm not much on staying on topicin FBG threads, anyway.

I read Salvatore's trilogy when I was a teenager and enjoyed it, and I agree with your steak/snack description.

Greg Bear is great. If you haven't read Eon, you should. It should be considered a classic. Forge of God/Anvil of Stars is very good as well (though AoS is much more entertaining).

Besides Bear, I have a lot of Niven, a lot of Stephen Baxter, and a lot of asimov. I've read Dan Simmons' Hyperion, and I have his big new one (Ilium) ready to go when I finish Shadowplay. I have a couple of David Weber books, but I haven't gotten to them yet. Not even sure I've heard of Joe Haldeman (hopefully not the Watergate Haldeman), but I'll look him up, too. I just reread Starship Troopers - man, Heinlein's books keep getting better the more I read them. I haven't read Stranger or The Moon is a Harsh Mistress in ages, though.

BTW, my gripe about fantasy fanboy authors applies equally well to sci fi. That's why I tend to stick to just a few authors I know won't let me down. I should be more adventurous.

Edit - I've also gotten back into sf short stories. "The Year's Best Sci-Fi" collections are good.

Edited by shining path

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For the Fantasy Authors thread, go here:

Fantasy Genre Authors

I'm gonna check into the malazan series I think. I currently read a lot of Fantasy (Martin, Jordan, Goodkind, etc.) but have had a hard time recently finding new series/books to read in that genre.

I'm currently reading Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson. So far, it's been slow to get going, and it darts off in tangents (too much of what the people are thinking, even when that has absolutely nothing to do with the book/story), but is starting to get interesting. Definitely something that fans of codebreaking and cryptography should check into, although it hasn't gone into too much depth yet. It jumps back and forth from a story set in "present day" to a WWII era story about the cryptography during the war. I'm sure the stories merge together at some point, just not sure how yet.

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For the Fantasy Authors thread, go here:

Fantasy Genre Authors

I'm gonna check into the malazan series I think. I currently read a lot of Fantasy (Martin, Jordan, Goodkind, etc.) but have had a hard time recently finding new series/books to read in that genre.

I'm currently reading Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson. So far, it's been slow to get going, and it darts off in tangents (too much of what the people are thinking, even when that has absolutely nothing to do with the book/story), but is starting to get interesting. Definitely something that fans of codebreaking and cryptography should check into, although it hasn't gone into too much depth yet. It jumps back and forth from a story set in "present day" to a WWII era story about the cryptography during the war. I'm sure the stories merge together at some point, just not sure how yet.

i've read martin. jordan, goodkind, donaldson (remember thomas covenant??) and enjoyed them (for the most part - jordan and goodkind tend to duck-walk/wander at times). you will not go wrong with the malazan series... Edited by nephilim

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Greg Bear is great. If you haven't read Eon, you should. It should be considered a classic. Forge of God/Anvil of Stars is very good as well (though AoS is much more entertaining).

Indeed - these are his three best. Eon is wild. FoG/AoS should be the next LoTR epic movie production. It would be superb.

The only person who really compares to Bear in true SF right now is Neal Stephenson. Snowcrash is an instant classic. As good as that was The Diamond Age is the best book I have read in near a decade (since The Golden Key). I have started Cryptonomicon, but can't find the time to get into it properly.

Edited by Sand

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just finished: The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner by Alan Sillitoe, Very well written book, liked it a lot.

Currently reading a book with narrations from Tolstoj, including "How Much Land Does a Man Need?" I am realy enjoing this one so far.

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Also finally picked up the Tipping Point, finally. A good, quick read. Found myself going "huh, that makes sense" a lot. Economics was never my strong suit, so I found this somewhat informative and interesting.

I found the Broken Window theory mentioned in Tipping very intriguing. Although Freakonomics credits abortion for the fall in NY crime, so I'm not sure what to believe. But still, I like Gladwell's explanation for improved crime rates much better.

I still haven't finished the book, because I found the chapters regarding children's programming very boring. I definitely need to finish this one up though.

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A Long Way Home: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier

Ishmael Beah

Crazy life this kid lived. Vivid recollections of being a child soldier (12) in Sierra Leone. Good book.

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reaper's gale - a malazan book of the fallen (#7), steven erikson

i have been a big sf/fantasy fan for years. erikson's malazan book of the fallen series is by far the best i've read in this genre. scope is absolutely huge, character development is detailed and 'twists' abound. a seemingly minor reference/statement/action in one book turns out to have profound implications one or two books down stream. i've just finished book 7 (funny how those dang things get published in england before the us - thank god bagabook/amazon imports the things...). i've read books 1-6 numerous times. time to start over with book one and finish with 7. except for the 1st one (only 680+), most of these books are 900-1100 pages long. takes an entire day to read just one... :rant::yucky::lmao:

my shelves are full of books by zelazny, cherryh, jordan, williams, kerr, de lint, tepper, robberson, morecock, goodkind, friedman, bear, rawn, etc. erikson is something truly special..

if you are a sf-fantasy fan, do yourself a favor and pick these books up. you will not be disappointed...

seconded although I havent read this latest yet

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just finished

Ghostwritten - David Mitchell

His debut novel. Liked much better than number9dream, but not nearly as much as Cloud Atlas.

Murder at Manasses - Michael Kilian

big fan of the Abel Jones series by Owen Parry, so i thought i'd give this series a try. Both series involve murder mysteries set against the Civil War. A good beach read here, but Parry's stuff is much better.

currently reading

What Is The What - Dave Eggers

just started this, but loving it so far. a fictionalized memoir of a Sudanese boy. An Uncle Tom's Cabin for the Sudan crisis?

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just finished

Ghostwritten - David Mitchell

His debut novel. Liked much better than number9dream, but not nearly as much as Cloud Atlas.

I completely agree. Mitchell is fantastic, and Cloud Atlas is his best.

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No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy

I was planning on reading The Road, but the wait list at the library is huge, so I grabbed this one instead. Excellent book. Great story with a quick flow to it, and McCarthy's use of dialogue was phenomenal. I will definitely be checking out The Road and the Border Trilogy.

I just saw that a film version of this book is due out late this year. The
looks great, and the film is directed by the Coen brothers.

If you're a fan of McCarthy, you'll definitely want to check this book out. And if you're not, then you probably just haven't read any of his books yet. Phenomenal writer. One of the very best out there right now.

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Just finished Jihad! by Tom Carew. The story of an SAS operative during the early years of Afghanistan war with the Soviets. Decent read nothing exceptional but it has prompted me to re-read Ghost Wars by Steve Coll. Just got it from the library yesterday.

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I am reading "Prey" by Michael Crichton.

Prey was excellent, one of his best. Crighton's best (IMO) is Timeline - try that one after Prey if you haven't already.

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"the road" by cormac mccarthy was both horrifying and inspiring, one of the more unique reads i've had in a long, long time. truly an original.

Should get this one from the library this week (on the wait list right now).

I've read No Country for Old Men and really liked it, so I'm definitely looking forward to this one.

Go with Blood Meridian while you're waiting. Awesome book. Seriously awesome.
Just finished The Road this weekend.

Easily the best post-apocalyptic book I've read, and the first to really scare the hell out of me by actually conveying how truly awful it would be. Gut-wrenching, but I'll definitely read it again.

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An Instance of the Fingerpost by Iain Pears.

Not bad.

mytagid = Math.floor( Math.random() * 100 );document.write("

Kind of a mix of "Key to Rebecca" (set 300 years earlier), "The Name of the Rose" (but much faster paced), "King Lear" (liked the fact that that was the play in the book :scared: ) and "The Davinci Code" (but by someone that can actually write).

*** SPOILER ALERT! Click this link to display the potential spoiler text in this box. ***");document.close();

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I'm about 2/3 of the way through Survival of the Sickest, which I bought yesterday afternoon. It's kind of an updated version of Nesse & Williams, Why We Get Sick. It's a look at human health and ailments from an evolutionary perspective.

For example, it's fairly well established that the gene responsible for sickle-cell disease also offers protection against malaria, which explains its prevalence among populations where malaria is a severe risk. But that's far from the only example of its kind.

Hemochromatosis, a genetic disorder that prevents people from metabolizing iron, was likely an adaptation that helped people survive the bubonic plague.

A genetic propensity for type 1 diabetes may well be an adaptation that helped people survive the most recent ice age (the Younger Dryas).

There's also some interesting stuff about parasites, about how levels of virulence depend on methods of transmission, etc.

I'm making it sound boring, but it's quite fascinating (and well written).

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I just finished Gemma by Meg Tilly. :lmao:

Yeah, that Meg Tilly. It was actually quite good.

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Based on this thread I took "Ghost Soldiers" to the beach with me last week while on vacation. What an incredible book.

Thanks.

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just finished

Ghostwritten - David Mitchell

His debut novel. Liked much better than number9dream, but not nearly as much as Cloud Atlas.

I just completed number9dream and agree completely. Ghostwritten and Cloud Atlas blew me away, something dream never managed to do.

Have you read Black Swan Green yet? It's similar to number9dream in that it's a tale of a boy becoming a man, but the similarities end there.

I'd rate Mitchell's books:

Cloud Atlas

Ghostwritten / Black Swan Green

v

number9dream

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I am reading "Prey" by Michael Crichton.

Prey was excellent, one of his best. Crighton's best (IMO) is Timeline - try that one after Prey if you haven't already.
You thought Prey was one of his best? Have you read a lot of Crichton?

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Dead Witch Walking by Kim Harrison.

Actually finished Book 1 through 5 (For A Few Demons More).

Rachel Morgan leaves her employment group, I.S., being joined by a pixie (Jenks) and living vampire (Ivy) to form her own group to retrieve misbehaving supernaturals. A thoroughly fun read taking place in Cincinnati with supernaturals co-existing with humans. The characters are fun and the complexity of the relationships, esp. Rachel and Ivy, make it a cut above in the Sci-Fi genre.

I just read this a few weeks ago. It was an interesting take on vampires, but the book is definitely geared more for women. Lots of relationship and soul searching issues for the female lead.

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Just finished John Connolly's "The Unquiet." Love - LOVE - Connolly's writing. P.I. novels with a supernatural twist.

Will begin "Blaze" the "lost" Bachman (Stephen King) book this evening.

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Just finished A Widow for One Year by John Irving. Irving is an amazing writer and this book was absolutely great. I highly recommend it.

I also just started Satanic Verses by Rushdie. Has anyone read this? Is it good?

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The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch

If you`re into the fantasy genre I`d recommend these two. The Road by Cormac McCarthy was one of the best books I`ve read in a long time , moving almost impossible to put down.

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Been reading some quick fiction lately. Just started Darwin's Radio and it's pretty good so far. Also just read Dan Brown's Digital Fortress - it was alright, nothing amazing just a good quick summer read.

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About a dozen years ago I used to help Seamus Heaney with wine selections when he was at Harvard (also about the time he won the Nobel Prize.) He was always a real nice guy-great to talk to and very funny. So I picked up Opened Ground. At first I was going to grab his translation of Beowulf since that movie is coming out soon, but I passed (for now.) Only a few poems in, but so far it's great. Here's a light little ditty:

Mid-Term Break

I sat all morning in the college sick bay

Counting bells knelling classes to a close.

At two o'clock our neighbours drove me home.

In the porch I met my father crying--

He had always taken funerals in his stride--

And Big Jim Evans saying it was a hard blow.

The baby cooed and laughed and rocked the pram

When I came in, and I was embarrassed

By old men standing up to shake my hand

And tell me they were `sorry for my trouble'.

Whispers informed strangers I was the eldest,

Away at school, as my mother held my hand

In hers and coughed out angry tearless sighs.

At ten o'clock the ambulance arrived

With the corpse, stanched and bandaged by the nurses.

Next morning I went up into the room. Snowdrops

And candles soothed the bedside; I saw him

For the first time in six weeks. Paler now,

Wearing a poppy bruise on his left temple,

He lay in the four-foot box as in his cot.

No gaudy scars, the bumper knocked him clear.

A four-foot box, a foot for every year.

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I read my first full on books in YEARS a few weeks back when I was in Mexico.

Two books by Douglas Coupland.

Girlfriend in a Coma and All Families are Psychotic.

I really enjoyed the latter, and while Girlfriend in a Coma was a very good read I was left feeling something was missing... but if you are a Coupland fan, definately worth the time.

Really liked Families - a quirky book with some nice little twists and turns, but I loved the characters and their interplay. A good fun story with enough ongoing commentary on modernity to get you thinking.

I read The Stark Truth =- baseball book by Jayson Stark. Uber Meh.

Read most of Philosophy of the Simpsons (or something like that) - was actually pretty good, a bit more dry than I thought - and if you are a Simpsons fan first and a philosophy fan far behind, you really wont like it.

Started on Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow, but it hurt my head too much to read at the pool. :thumbup:

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The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson

The first two-thirds of this one were great. Strange, but an interesting strange.

Then the final third kind of lost me. It just got weird and silly in my mind and lost all of the story's momentum. All in all, not bad, but it could have been really good.

On yeah, I love the idea of a Primer like the little girl had. If I'd had something like that as a kid, I never would have put it down.

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I am reading "Prey" by Michael Crichton.

Prey was excellent, one of his best. Crighton's best (IMO) is Timeline - try that one after Prey if you haven't already.
You thought Prey was one of his best? Have you read a lot of Crichton?
I went though a big Crichton phase in high school, Andromeda Strain is the best, after that Jurassic Park and the Great Train Robbery.

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Just finished "A Confederacy of Dunces" on the advice of Mr. Nails. Enjoyed it thoroughly.

Currently reading two books:

1) "The Blind Watchmaker" by Richard Dawkins (2nd reading)

2) "Tale of the Body Thief" by Anne Rice

Hungrily anticipating "A Dance With Dragons" by George R. R. Martin.

Edited by Smoo

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I am reading "Prey" by Michael Crichton.

Prey was excellent, one of his best. Crighton's best (IMO) is Timeline - try that one after Prey if you haven't already.
You thought Prey was one of his best? Have you read a lot of Crichton?
I went though a big Crichton phase in high school, Andromeda Strain is the best, after that Jurassic Park and the Great Train Robbery.
Edit: Confused "Prey" with "Next" which is the last Crichton book I read.~~~~Currently reading "The Innocent Man" by John Grisham. I need to finish it up in the next two weeks before HP7 comes out because I know I'll drop anything else to read thru that (although it will probably only take a few days to finish.) Edited by Buckna

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Getting back into the science fiction genre with Ringworld by Larry Niven.

Next up is Ender's game by Orson Scott Card.

They both won Hugo and Nebula awards and came highly recommended.

Edited by Pooch

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Getting back into the science fiction genre with Ringworld by Larry Niven.

Next up is Ender's game by Orson Scott Card.

They both won Hugo and Nebula awards and came highly recommended.

Enjoy them - I've read Ender's Game a number of times.

I am trudging through the Dark Tower series myself.

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I am trudging through the Dark Tower series myself.

How far in are you & what do you think in general?

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Hungrily anticipating "A Dance With Dragons" by George R. R. Martin.

Reading between the lines of his sporadic updates, he seems to really struggling with this book. And, I suspect, struggling with the entire series. He's changed direction a few times already & I think he's lost his momentum (or Muse). Now it's a grind to continue for him, I think. The story has expanded far wider than he originally intended (3 books were his original plan) & I wonder if he's struggling trying to get it to some sort of resolvable point without having to "cheat".

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