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Whatcha readin now? (book, books, reading, read)

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I also just started Satanic Verses by Rushdie. Has anyone read this? Is it good?

It is very good. Not my favorite (probably Midnight's Children, or The Moor's Last Sigh), but still damn good.

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Started on Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow, but it hurt my head too much to read at the pool. :thumbup:

:thumbup:

Most newspapers seem to do a feature on summer books for beach (or pool) reading. I think if they listed the books you'd least enjoy at the beach/pool, GR would be high on that list.

My advice would be to save it for winter.

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I'm moving through a Ulysses Grant bio right now. His career and life before the Civil War is depressing as hell.

I also finally broke down and decided to read the Harry Potter series. I read the first three over the weekend. The first one didn't flow great to me but the story was fun. I can see how it became a hit. So far, Azkaban was far and away better then the other two.

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Started on Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow, but it hurt my head too much to read at the pool. :confused:

:lmao:

Most newspapers seem to do a feature on summer books for beach (or pool) reading. I think if they listed the books you'd least enjoy at the beach/pool, GR would be high on that list.

My advice would be to save it for winter.

Yeah... the funny part is I actually took out some Neitzsche afterward for some LIGHTER reading - that says all you need to know about Pynchon. But the Coupland books were PERFECT for the pool.

I read crying of Lot 49 back in college and really want to at least try Rainbow - perhaps in winter as you suggest.

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Just finished "A Confederacy of Dunces" on the advice of Mr. Nails. Enjoyed it thoroughly.

Currently reading two books:

1) "The Blind Watchmaker" by Richard Dawkins (2nd reading)

2) "Tale of the Body Thief" by Anne Rice

Hungrily anticipating "A Dance With Dragons" by George R. R. Martin.

Awesome. The Ignatius character is one of the most entertaining ones I can ever remember.

Ironically...I'm just 10 pages into a Game of Thrones based on recommendations for Smoo and others. :goodposting:

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Just finished "A Confederacy of Dunces" on the advice of Mr. Nails. Enjoyed it thoroughly.

Currently reading two books:

1) "The Blind Watchmaker" by Richard Dawkins (2nd reading)

2) "Tale of the Body Thief" by Anne Rice

Hungrily anticipating "A Dance With Dragons" by George R. R. Martin.

Awesome. The Ignatius character is one of the most entertaining ones I can ever remember.

Ironically...I'm just 10 pages into a Game of Thrones based on recommendations for Smoo and others. :thumbup:

Bad move. And I say that as someone that has read the first two books of the series and think they are the greatest fantasy ever written.

Just like fans of Robert Jordan, Martin's fans are really frustrated these days because of the length of time between books and the need for closure.

IMO, it's a good idea to wait on any series until the final book in the series has a firm release date before starting book one. That way you don't end up having to decide between re-reading the series or forgetting half of what's going on by the time the next volume comes out.

:2cents:

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Carrion Comfort by Dan Simmons

The second novel by World Fantasy Award-winner Simmons ( The Song of Kali ) is a 636-page epic that draws on a variety of genres--horror, science fiction, political thriller, Hollywood roman a clef. It centers around a small number of "mind vampires" who can subjugate other people to their wills, read their minds, experience through their senses. The immensely powerful vampires use others, often bloodily, and often in frivolous "games" (hunting human prey, chess games with human pieces, and so on). Opposing them are Saul Laski, a psychologist and concentration-camp survivor, who is devoted to tracking down the Nazi vampire von Borchert; Natalie Preston, whose father inadvertently and fatally crossed the path of a pawn of the ancient, dotty vampire Melanie Fuller; Sheriff Bobby Joe Gentry, dragged in while investigating the multiple murders that marked the departure of Melanie Fuller from Charleston; and a host of other normals and vampires whose lives impinge on those of the principals. While he could profitably have trimmed the novel by a third, Simmons has produced, overall, a compelling thriller.

Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc.

I can't ####ing get through this book. 3 months and only 700 pages through. Not sure why, as it's not that boring, but I read 2 pages before I start falling asleep.

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Just finished "A Confederacy of Dunces" on the advice of Mr. Nails. Enjoyed it thoroughly.

Currently reading two books:

1) "The Blind Watchmaker" by Richard Dawkins (2nd reading)

2) "Tale of the Body Thief" by Anne Rice

Hungrily anticipating "A Dance With Dragons" by George R. R. Martin.

Awesome. The Ignatius character is one of the most entertaining ones I can ever remember.

Ironically...I'm just 10 pages into a Game of Thrones based on recommendations for Smoo and others. :rolleyes:

Bad move. And I say that as someone that has read the first two books of the series and think they are the greatest fantasy ever written.

Just like fans of Robert Jordan, Martin's fans are really frustrated these days because of the length of time between books and the need for closure.

IMO, it's a good idea to wait on any series until the final book in the series has a firm release date before starting book one. That way you don't end up having to decide between re-reading the series or forgetting half of what's going on by the time the next volume comes out.

:shrug:

I won't go so far as to say "stop reading" but if you're going to be frustrated by not having the entire story ready for non-stop consumption, now is the time to lay off. If you go too far into "Thrones" there's no way in hell you'll be able to stop until you fly through all 4 books published so far. And then you'll be as frustrated as the rest of us waiting for Martin to publish the next installment. There are (supposedly) 3 more to come. I'd imagine "A Dance With Dragons" will be out in the next year (hopefully sooner), but I would expect the final two to take at least two years apiece (& that's being VERY optimistic given Martin's recent rate of output) putting us no sooner than 2012 to wrap things up.

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Just finished "A Confederacy of Dunces" on the advice of Mr. Nails. Enjoyed it thoroughly.

Currently reading two books:

1) "The Blind Watchmaker" by Richard Dawkins (2nd reading)

2) "Tale of the Body Thief" by Anne Rice

Hungrily anticipating "A Dance With Dragons" by George R. R. Martin.

Awesome. The Ignatius character is one of the most entertaining ones I can ever remember.

Ironically...I'm just 10 pages into a Game of Thrones based on recommendations for Smoo and others. :rolleyes:

Bad move. And I say that as someone that has read the first two books of the series and think they are the greatest fantasy ever written.

Just like fans of Robert Jordan, Martin's fans are really frustrated these days because of the length of time between books and the need for closure.

IMO, it's a good idea to wait on any series until the final book in the series has a firm release date before starting book one. That way you don't end up having to decide between re-reading the series or forgetting half of what's going on by the time the next volume comes out.

:shrug:

I'll read Thrones...then a few other books...then Clash of Kings...then a few others books...etc, etc. It will take me at least 18 months to get all 4 of the current ones read. Dragons might be out by then. Plus...with the internet, there is no reason to feel like you have to re-read an entire novel to recall all the details. There are tons of commentaries, summaries, etc, that you can read before starting in on the next book.

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Just finished "A Confederacy of Dunces" on the advice of Mr. Nails. Enjoyed it thoroughly.

Currently reading two books:

1) "The Blind Watchmaker" by Richard Dawkins (2nd reading)

2) "Tale of the Body Thief" by Anne Rice

Hungrily anticipating "A Dance With Dragons" by George R. R. Martin.

Awesome. The Ignatius character is one of the most entertaining ones I can ever remember.

Ironically...I'm just 10 pages into a Game of Thrones based on recommendations for Smoo and others. :excited:

Bad move. And I say that as someone that has read the first two books of the series and think they are the greatest fantasy ever written.

Just like fans of Robert Jordan, Martin's fans are really frustrated these days because of the length of time between books and the need for closure.

IMO, it's a good idea to wait on any series until the final book in the series has a firm release date before starting book one. That way you don't end up having to decide between re-reading the series or forgetting half of what's going on by the time the next volume comes out.

:shrug:

I'll read Thrones...then a few other books...then Clash of Kings...then a few others books...etc, etc. It will take me at least 18 months to get all 4 of the current ones read. Dragons might be out by then. Plus...with the internet, there is no reason to feel like you have to re-read an entire novel to recall all the details. There are tons of commentaries, summaries, etc, that you can read before starting in on the next book.
I posted this link somewhere around here but it may have been in another thread. It links to a site that has chapter summaries.

http://towerofthehand.com/books/

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While on vacation/honeymoon, I read:

Vonnegut - "Galapagos": Good read. Moderately entertaining. Pretty typical Vonnegut

Darwin - "Voyage of the Beagle": Somewhat interesting but pretty dry, as you might imagine.

Tim Powers - "Last Call": Good stuff. Lots of original thought, well written, good story. Stephen King meets Dean Koontz meets H.P. Lovecraft.

China Mieville - "Perdido Street Station": The most original fantasy work I've read in years. Really fantastic book with excellent writing.

Edited by Drifter

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Just finished "A Confederacy of Dunces" on the advice of Mr. Nails. Enjoyed it thoroughly.

Currently reading two books:

1) "The Blind Watchmaker" by Richard Dawkins (2nd reading)

2) "Tale of the Body Thief" by Anne Rice

Hungrily anticipating "A Dance With Dragons" by George R. R. Martin.

Awesome. The Ignatius character is one of the most entertaining ones I can ever remember.

Ironically...I'm just 10 pages into a Game of Thrones based on recommendations for Smoo and others. :shrug:

Bad move. And I say that as someone that has read the first two books of the series and think they are the greatest fantasy ever written.

Just like fans of Robert Jordan, Martin's fans are really frustrated these days because of the length of time between books and the need for closure.

IMO, it's a good idea to wait on any series until the final book in the series has a firm release date before starting book one. That way you don't end up having to decide between re-reading the series or forgetting half of what's going on by the time the next volume comes out.

:2cents:

I'll read Thrones...then a few other books...then Clash of Kings...then a few others books...etc, etc. It will take me at least 18 months to get all 4 of the current ones read. Dragons might be out by then. Plus...with the internet, there is no reason to feel like you have to re-read an entire novel to recall all the details. There are tons of commentaries, summaries, etc, that you can read before starting in on the next book.
Enjoy the books. :thumbup:

I couldn't stand waiting that long for the conclusion, but more power to you if you're so inclined. Like I said before, best fantasy I have ever read.

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Up Country

I liked Up Country. DeMille has quite a few good reads out there. He has a way of adding a great scarcastic dialouge to his characters while keeping the read entertaining.I've just started State of Fear (Crichton I think?). It's not too bad. The last one of his I read was Prey. Interesting story. Hopefully this one is a little better. Edited by Peak

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Up Country

I liked Up Country. DeMille has quite a few good reads out there. He has a way of adding a great scarcastic dialouge to his characters while keeping the read entertaining.I've just started State of Fear (Crichton I think?). It's not too bad. The last one of his I read was Prey. Interesting story. Hopefully this one is a little better.
I liked State of Fear, it was one of his better recent works.

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Just got done with The Brothers Karamazov. I enjoyed it quite a bit. I especially liked the dream sequence with the devil, possibly my favorite part of the book.

Now, as with all books I enjoy, I actually miss the main characters. After reading it over so many weeks, before work, after work, etc, it feels like I'm leaving old friends. Sometimes I catch myself wondering what they're up to. Wish ol' Fyodor wouldn't have died :D.

On to "This side of Paradise" by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

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Just got done with The Brothers Karamazov. I enjoyed it quite a bit. I especially liked the dream sequence with the devil, possibly my favorite part of the book.

Now, as with all books I enjoy, I actually miss the main characters. After reading it over so many weeks, before work, after work, etc, it feels like I'm leaving old friends. Sometimes I catch myself wondering what they're up to. Wish ol' Fyodor wouldn't have died :homer:.

I'm about 150 pages into The Brothers Karamazov

Thanks for the spoiler. Jackass

:D

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Just got done with The Brothers Karamazov. I enjoyed it quite a bit. I especially liked the dream sequence with the devil, possibly my favorite part of the book.

Now, as with all books I enjoy, I actually miss the main characters. After reading it over so many weeks, before work, after work, etc, it feels like I'm leaving old friends. Sometimes I catch myself wondering what they're up to. Wish ol' Fyodor wouldn't have died :(.

I'm about 150 pages into The Brothers Karamazov

Thanks for the spoiler. Jackass

:hot:

:lmao:

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Just got done with The Brothers Karamazov. I enjoyed it quite a bit. I especially liked the dream sequence with the devil, possibly my favorite part of the book.

Now, as with all books I enjoy, I actually miss the main characters. After reading it over so many weeks, before work, after work, etc, it feels like I'm leaving old friends. Sometimes I catch myself wondering what they're up to. Wish ol' Fyodor wouldn't have died :(.

I'm about 150 pages into The Brothers Karamazov

Thanks for the spoiler. Jackass

:lmao:

Fyodor would be the first name of Mr. Dostoyevsky, the author.

:hot:

Edited by igbomb

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For those of us that love GRR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series, but are frustrated that it's going to be another 5 years before it is concluded, what would the well-read fantasy fan recommend? I am only interested in reading series that are completed.

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Just got done with The Brothers Karamazov. I enjoyed it quite a bit. I especially liked the dream sequence with the devil, possibly my favorite part of the book.

Now, as with all books I enjoy, I actually miss the main characters. After reading it over so many weeks, before work, after work, etc, it feels like I'm leaving old friends. Sometimes I catch myself wondering what they're up to. Wish ol' Fyodor wouldn't have died :lmao:.

I'm about 150 pages into The Brothers Karamazov

Thanks for the spoiler. Jackass

:moneybag:

:thumbup:

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For those of us that love GRR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series, but are frustrated that it's going to be another 5 years before it is concluded, what would the well-read fantasy fan recommend? I am only interested in reading series that are completed.

I haven't read all of these, but here are some that I've heard recommended. (All of these at least have completed trilogies, though there may be future books in the same world.)Raymond Feist -- Riftwar SagaRobin Hobb -- Farseer TrilogyTerry Brooks -- ShannaraStephen King -- Dark TowerAnd the final Robert Jordan book is expected out in early 2008, and it may take that long to read the first 11 books plus the prequel.

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I am about 100 pages into Gates of Fire and enjoying it a lot. :confused:

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For those of us that love GRR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series, but are frustrated that it's going to be another 5 years before it is concluded, what would the well-read fantasy fan recommend? I am only interested in reading series that are completed.

I haven't read all of these, but here are some that I've heard recommended. (All of these at least have completed trilogies, though there may be future books in the same world.)Raymond Feist -- Riftwar SagaRobin Hobb -- Farseer TrilogyTerry Brooks -- ShannaraStephen King -- Dark TowerAnd the final Robert Jordan book is expected out in early 2008, and it may take that long to read the first 11 books plus the prequel.
Riftwar is good. I don't like Shannara. Dark Tower is different.As I just posted, you might want to check out Perdido Street Station by China Mievilla for a slightly different (refreshing) flavor of fantasy. It's not a series but The Scar is set in the same universe.There's a whole thread devoted to fantasy works. I suggest you start there as you're question is a pretty loaded one and could easily hijack this thread.

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Just got done with The Brothers Karamazov. I enjoyed it quite a bit. I especially liked the dream sequence with the devil, possibly my favorite part of the book.

Now, as with all books I enjoy, I actually miss the main characters. After reading it over so many weeks, before work, after work, etc, it feels like I'm leaving old friends. Sometimes I catch myself wondering what they're up to. Wish ol' Fyodor wouldn't have died :lmao:.

I'm about 150 pages into The Brothers Karamazov

Thanks for the spoiler. Jackass

:confused:

Fyodor would be the first name of Mr. Dostoyevsky, the author.

:shrug:

While that is certainly true, its also the name of the pater familias, Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov.

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Just got done with The Brothers Karamazov. I enjoyed it quite a bit. I especially liked the dream sequence with the devil, possibly my favorite part of the book.

Now, as with all books I enjoy, I actually miss the main characters. After reading it over so many weeks, before work, after work, etc, it feels like I'm leaving old friends. Sometimes I catch myself wondering what they're up to. Wish ol' Fyodor wouldn't have died :lmao:.

I'm about 150 pages into The Brothers Karamazov

Thanks for the spoiler. Jackass

:goodposting:

Fyodor would be the first name of Mr. Dostoyevsky, the author.

:confused:

While that is certainly true, its also the name of the pater familias, Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov.
This was the last book Dostoyevsky wrote before he died. He was planning on making more, I believe, following some of the same characters.

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Just got done with The Brothers Karamazov. I enjoyed it quite a bit. I especially liked the dream sequence with the devil, possibly my favorite part of the book.

Now, as with all books I enjoy, I actually miss the main characters. After reading it over so many weeks, before work, after work, etc, it feels like I'm leaving old friends. Sometimes I catch myself wondering what they're up to. Wish ol' Fyodor wouldn't have died :lmao:.

I'm about 150 pages into The Brothers Karamazov

Thanks for the spoiler. Jackass

:goodposting:

Fyodor would be the first name of Mr. Dostoyevsky, the author.

:lmao:

While that is certainly true, its also the name of the pater familias, Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov.
This was the last book Dostoyevsky wrote before he died. He was planning on making more, I believe, following some of the same characters.
Can you spoil those for us as well?

:confused:

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Light summer fare for me right now: Michael Crichton's Next, which is an entertaining look at greed and avarice in the genetic engineering game, and two of Harry Turtledove's -- The Grapple, 10th in the massive 11-part Great War series, and The Gladiator, which is his own version of 1984. The Grapple made me look forward to the final installment, due out any time now, and The Gladiator was entertaining but too brief; it could have covered a lot more ground than it did.

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Light summer fare for me right now: Michael Crichton's Next, which is an entertaining look at greed and avarice in the genetic engineering game, and two of Harry Turtledove's -- The Grapple, 10th in the massive 11-part Great War series, and The Gladiator, which is his own version of 1984. The Grapple made me look forward to the final installment, due out any time now, and The Gladiator was entertaining but too brief; it could have covered a lot more ground than it did.

I was not impressed with Next. There was really no central character to follow in that book. Just a bunch of different people intersecting at different points to make a whole story. There was nobody to latch onto.

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Carrion Comfort by Dan Simmons

The second novel by World Fantasy Award-winner Simmons ( The Song of Kali ) is a 636-page epic that draws on a variety of genres--horror, science fiction, political thriller, Hollywood roman a clef. It centers around a small number of "mind vampires" who can subjugate other people to their wills, read their minds, experience through their senses. The immensely powerful vampires use others, often bloodily, and often in frivolous "games" (hunting human prey, chess games with human pieces, and so on). Opposing them are Saul Laski, a psychologist and concentration-camp survivor, who is devoted to tracking down the Nazi vampire von Borchert; Natalie Preston, whose father inadvertently and fatally crossed the path of a pawn of the ancient, dotty vampire Melanie Fuller; Sheriff Bobby Joe Gentry, dragged in while investigating the multiple murders that marked the departure of Melanie Fuller from Charleston; and a host of other normals and vampires whose lives impinge on those of the principals. While he could profitably have trimmed the novel by a third, Simmons has produced, overall, a compelling thriller.

Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc.

I can't ####ing get through this book. 3 months and only 700 pages through. Not sure why, as it's not that boring, but I read 2 pages before I start falling asleep.
Just started Ilium by Simmons. Compelling right from the start. Simmons doesn't go half-### on anything.

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Carrion Comfort by Dan Simmons

The second novel by World Fantasy Award-winner Simmons ( The Song of Kali ) is a 636-page epic that draws on a variety of genres--horror, science fiction, political thriller, Hollywood roman a clef. It centers around a small number of "mind vampires" who can subjugate other people to their wills, read their minds, experience through their senses. The immensely powerful vampires use others, often bloodily, and often in frivolous "games" (hunting human prey, chess games with human pieces, and so on). Opposing them are Saul Laski, a psychologist and concentration-camp survivor, who is devoted to tracking down the Nazi vampire von Borchert; Natalie Preston, whose father inadvertently and fatally crossed the path of a pawn of the ancient, dotty vampire Melanie Fuller; Sheriff Bobby Joe Gentry, dragged in while investigating the multiple murders that marked the departure of Melanie Fuller from Charleston; and a host of other normals and vampires whose lives impinge on those of the principals. While he could profitably have trimmed the novel by a third, Simmons has produced, overall, a compelling thriller.

Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc.

I can't ####ing get through this book. 3 months and only 700 pages through. Not sure why, as it's not that boring, but I read 2 pages before I start falling asleep.
Just started Ilium by Simmons. Compelling right from the start. Simmons doesn't go half-### on anything.
I enjoyed his Hyperion series.

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Light summer fare for me right now: Michael Crichton's Next, which is an entertaining look at greed and avarice in the genetic engineering game, and two of Harry Turtledove's -- The Grapple, 10th in the massive 11-part Great War series, and The Gladiator, which is his own version of 1984. The Grapple made me look forward to the final installment, due out any time now, and The Gladiator was entertaining but too brief; it could have covered a lot more ground than it did.

I was not impressed with Next. There was really no central character to follow in that book. Just a bunch of different people intersecting at different points to make a whole story. There was nobody to latch onto.
This was indeed a weak point.

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Light summer fare for me right now: Michael Crichton's Next, which is an entertaining look at greed and avarice in the genetic engineering game, and two of Harry Turtledove's -- The Grapple, 10th in the massive 11-part Great War series, and The Gladiator, which is his own version of 1984. The Grapple made me look forward to the final installment, due out any time now, and The Gladiator was entertaining but too brief; it could have covered a lot more ground than it did.

I was not impressed with Next. There was really no central character to follow in that book. Just a bunch of different people intersecting at different points to make a whole story. There was nobody to latch onto.
This was indeed a weak point.
This is one of the most appealing characteristics of David Mitchell's book Ghostwritten.

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just discovered vince flynn. right up my alley. anyone with interest in political/espionage type thrillers should check him out. im only on the second book, but im hooked.

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I am trudging through the Dark Tower series myself.

How far in are you & what do you think in general?
Just finished book 2 about a week ago - I had a hard time getting through book 1, but getting to book 2 was worth it. Book 2 was much better than book 1 IMO. I don't have book 3 yet, but will probably pick it up in a week or two. The story is different than any of King's other work, but it is starting to grow on me.

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doing some light summer reading at the moment...

just finished 'the english assassin' by daniel silva - my first silva book and it was pretty good.

currently catching up on some clive cussler stuff i missed over the years.

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For those of us that love GRR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series, but are frustrated that it's going to be another 5 years before it is concluded, what would the well-read fantasy fan recommend? I am only interested in reading series that are completed.

For something with a Fantasy story, but not quite so much the political intrigue of Martin's books, check out The Death Gate Cycle by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman. I would personally recommend reading the 7 book series without reading the more exhaustive reviews on Amazon or other - it's better to discover the story as you go through the books. The real short review is that the first 4 books are each in a different realm, and the final 3 finish the story. I still think it's one of the best series I ever read, on par with the Martin, Jordon and Goodkind series in my list. I like most all of the Weis/Hickman books I've read FWIW.

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Carrion Comfort by Dan Simmons

The second novel by World Fantasy Award-winner Simmons ( The Song of Kali ) is a 636-page epic that draws on a variety of genres--horror, science fiction, political thriller, Hollywood roman a clef. It centers around a small number of "mind vampires" who can subjugate other people to their wills, read their minds, experience through their senses. The immensely powerful vampires use others, often bloodily, and often in frivolous "games" (hunting human prey, chess games with human pieces, and so on). Opposing them are Saul Laski, a psychologist and concentration-camp survivor, who is devoted to tracking down the Nazi vampire von Borchert; Natalie Preston, whose father inadvertently and fatally crossed the path of a pawn of the ancient, dotty vampire Melanie Fuller; Sheriff Bobby Joe Gentry, dragged in while investigating the multiple murders that marked the departure of Melanie Fuller from Charleston; and a host of other normals and vampires whose lives impinge on those of the principals. While he could profitably have trimmed the novel by a third, Simmons has produced, overall, a compelling thriller.

Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc.

I can't ####ing get through this book. 3 months and only 700 pages through. Not sure why, as it's not that boring, but I read 2 pages before I start falling asleep.
Just started Ilium by Simmons. Compelling right from the start. Simmons doesn't go half-### on anything.
Just not a big fan of his style. :unsure:

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Seductive Poison by Deborah Layton

Awesome, creepy book. Layton was one of the upper ranks member of the Jonestown cult. She escaped a few months before the mass suicide and her affidavit is what prompted Congressman Ryan to go visit, which eventually led to his death and the mass suicide. Fantastic look into how one can get pulled into a cult and how Jones manipulated everyone's mind. Highly recommended to anyone with a hint of interest in the Jonestown story.

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Chronicles of Narnia. Now on book 4, something about a chair I think.

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John Henry Days by Colson Whitehead.

My top recommendation since suggesting Cloud Atlas to FBG. I really enjoyed Whitehead's oddly fascinating (or fascinatingly odd) debut novel The Intuitionist, and JHD takes a big leap forward. Short-listed for the 2002 Pulitzer, JHD weaves a series of vignettes centered around the legend of John Henry. Like Mitchell, Whitehead employs a dazzling array of voices, styles, and period settings in these vignettes.

This is a writer's novel.

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John Henry Days by Colson Whitehead.

My top recommendation since suggesting Cloud Atlas to FBG. I really enjoyed Whitehead's oddly fascinating (or fascinatingly odd) debut novel The Intuitionist, and JHD takes a big leap forward. Short-listed for the 2002 Pulitzer, JHD weaves a series of vignettes centered around the legend of John Henry. Like Mitchell, Whitehead employs a dazzling array of voices, styles, and period settings in these vignettes.

This is a writer's novel.

If it's half as good as Cloud Atlas, I'm in.

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About 1/4 of the way through The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana by Umberto Eco. So far, very good and more readable for a feeble mind like mine than some of his other novels.

The main character has lost his episodic memory, so he can remember things from the public domain like literature, but he has no idea who is is, who his wife is, his mistresses, friends, likes/dislikes, etc. Seems promising.

Oh, and it has PICTURES!!!

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Harrington on Hold 'Em - Dan Harrington

Joe DiMaggio: The Hero's Life - Richard Ben Cramer

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John Henry Days by Colson Whitehead.

My top recommendation since suggesting Cloud Atlas to FBG. I really enjoyed Whitehead's oddly fascinating (or fascinatingly odd) debut novel The Intuitionist, and JHD takes a big leap forward. Short-listed for the 2002 Pulitzer, JHD weaves a series of vignettes centered around the legend of John Henry. Like Mitchell, Whitehead employs a dazzling array of voices, styles, and period settings in these vignettes.

This is a writer's novel.

If it's half as good as Cloud Atlas, I'm in.
I'd say it is, although i'm only halfway through with the book. There's an airiness (sp?), a certain triviality to Whitehead's plots that can turn off some readers. The Intuitionist, for example, told the story of 2 elevator inspectors, using diametrically opposed methods for their inspections, but it was really an allegory on race relations in America. Likewise, JHD is infused with racial themes. Whitehead writes sentence-driven or prose-driven, not plot-driven, novels. But they're decidedly modern.

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I just finished reading "The Road" by Cormac McCarthy, which was utterly fantastic, and prior to that, Phillip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy, which was great as well . . .

About to tear into Murakami's "Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World."

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I just finished reading "The Road" by Cormac McCarthy, which was utterly fantastic, and prior to that, Phillip Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy, which was great as well . . .

About to tear into Murakami's "Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World."

Ooooo, I can't wait to see your update on this one. About a month ago, I finished The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, which easily slid right into my top 10 all-time favorite books. Better than Kafka on the Shore, which I also loved. :confused:

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