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The Stolen Child by Keith Donohue

From Publishers Weekly

Folk legends of the changeling serve as a touchstone for Donohue's haunting debut, set vaguely in the American northeast, about the maturation of a young man troubled by questions of identity. At age seven, Henry Day is kidnapped by hobgoblins and replaced by a look-alike impostor. In alternating chapters, each Henry relates the tale of how he adjusts to his new situation. Human Henry learns to run with his hobgoblin pack, who never age but rarely seem more fey than a gang of runaway teens. Hobgoblin Henry develops his uncanny talent for mimicry into a music career and settles into an otherwise unremarkable human life. Neither Henry feels entirely comfortable with his existence, and the pathos of their losses influences all of their relationships and experiences. Inevitably, their struggles to retrieve their increasingly forgotten pasts put them on paths that intersect decades later. Donohue keeps the fantasy as understated as the emotions of his characters, while they work through their respective growing pains. The result is an impressive novel of outsiders whose feelings of alienation are more natural than supernatural.

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Chronicles of Narnia. Now on book 4, something about a chair I think.

The Silver Chair. I must have read those books a hundred times when I was a kid.

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Just finished Marcus Aurelius' Meditations. I've never been much for stoic philosophy but even so, this is an incredible read.

Just started Robert Greene's "48 Laws of Power". Have to see what all the hype is about. After just reading the preface it seems a bit... I dunno... amoral for my tastes but I've had several people insist I read it. Anyone else read it?

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Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman

This was my third Gaiman book, and I will definitely read the rest of them. He can't miss.

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finished David Mitchell's Black Swan Green and loved it. Very fast easy summer read. Takes you back to what its like to be a pre teen.

After that I read R Scott Bakers - The Darkness That Comes Before Was a good but not great fantasy novel with chapters bouncing around to be told by different characters. The story focuses on the coming of a holy war which was a bit different than most fantasy I've read. Not as good as the Malazan series but good enough to recommend.

Currently reading Harry Potter - Deathly Hallows which is much better than the last 2 and have ordered the latest Malazan book Reapers Gale by Erikson.

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While on vacation/honeymoon, I read:Vonnegut - "Galapagos": Good read. Moderately entertaining. Pretty typical VonnegutDarwin - "Voyage of the Beagle": Somewhat interesting but pretty dry, as you might imagine.Tim Powers - "Last Call": Good stuff. Lots of original thought, well written, good story. Stephen King meets Dean Koontz meets H.P. Lovecraft.China Mieville - "Perdido Street Station": The most original fantasy work I've read in years. Really fantastic book with excellent writing.

Am currently reading Last Call and it is a really solid book that was recommended to me, along with Perdido Street Station, by Vivian Darkbloom and he didn't lead me astray with either of them. If you haven't read it, go pick up a copy of Power's "The Annubis Gates" as it was one of those novels that I just couldn't put down. The characters in that one were just incredibly inventive and it is a fascinating book. Think it was a fantasy award winner back in the 80's. I read another one of his called "The Drawing of the Dark" that weaved some of the King Arthur/Fischer King legend stuff that Powers loves to use into a story in the middle ages and a major part of the storyline revolves around beer. It was an entertaining read but not on the same level as Last Call or Annubis Gates. Any guy that can create compelling fantasy novels about beer and poker should have a much bigger following in the FFA.I absolutely agree with your assessment of Perdido as it immediately made it's way towards the top of the list for me in the genre. Tough to define as it is almost equal parts fantasy/sci-fi/horror. The characters, the landscape, the storylines, and even the entirely new branches of science he dreamed up for this thing were some of the most inventive and original writing I've read in years. It was a very dark novel and you just felt like you were there with his descriptions. His parallels to humans with all of the prejudice, class structure, and so on really made it a lot deeper read than the average fantasy novel with thier "hero saves the day through his epic deeds" storylines. The Scar was really good as well but to me not quite on the same level as PSS. Haven't read the most recent one of his yet but will get to it eventually despite being told it isn't as good as the other two.

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Just got done with the second Harry Potter book. Working my way back through them until I'm ready to start the last one. Didn't think my memory of what had happened up to that point was good enough to just start reading the 7th book, as the last two I read in a day each, and the previous 4 within about a week's span. I forgot how good the first books were. The first one was just as wonderful to read the second time as it was the first, as plenty of time had lapsed that I didn't remember all the details from before. Good characters, wonderful writing, great story.

On to book 3.

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While on vacation/honeymoon, I read:Vonnegut - "Galapagos": Good read. Moderately entertaining. Pretty typical VonnegutDarwin - "Voyage of the Beagle": Somewhat interesting but pretty dry, as you might imagine.Tim Powers - "Last Call": Good stuff. Lots of original thought, well written, good story. Stephen King meets Dean Koontz meets H.P. Lovecraft.China Mieville - "Perdido Street Station": The most original fantasy work I've read in years. Really fantastic book with excellent writing.

I absolutely agree with your assessment of Perdido as it immediately made it's way towards the top of the list for me in the genre. Tough to define as it is almost equal parts fantasy/sci-fi/horror. The characters, the landscape, the storylines, and even the entirely new branches of science he dreamed up for this thing were some of the most inventive and original writing I've read in years. It was a very dark novel and you just felt like you were there with his descriptions. His parallels to humans with all of the prejudice, class structure, and so on really made it a lot deeper read than the average fantasy novel with thier "hero saves the day through his epic deeds" storylines. The Scar was really good as well but to me not quite on the same level as PSS. Haven't read the most recent one of his yet but will get to it eventually despite being told it isn't as good as the other two.
"Dark" is an understatement. I walked around in a state of shock/depression for a solid day after finishing. Edited by Drifter

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Just started "From a Buick 8" by Stephen King. Not crazy about it so far, I don't think he has a very good style when writing in first person.

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On a scale of 1 to 10, how are are these 2 books to read ??

House of Leaves

Gravity's Rainbow

House of Leaves is one of my all-time favorites. It's different, to say the least. Certainly not for everybody. If you ever want a good book to discuss and have a book club-like exchange over...this is perfect for that. Great twists, great subplots, great suspense. The gimmicky formatting got on my nerves a little, but that's a pretty minor complaint as I loved the story.

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On a scale of 1 to 10, how are are these 2 books to read ??

House of Leaves

Gravity's Rainbow

I thought House of Leaves was great.

I've only read one Pynchon book, and it was an awful experience.

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On a scale of 1 to 10, how are are these 2 books to read ??

House of Leaves

Gravity's Rainbow

I thought House of Leaves was great.

I've only read one Pynchon book, and it was an awful experience.

So, HoL isn't that tough to get through, it's just slightly annoying with the sideways writing, etc. - or is it still a difficult read, but worth it?

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On a scale of 1 to 10, how are are these 2 books to read ??

House of Leaves

Gravity's Rainbow

I thought House of Leaves was great.

I've only read one Pynchon book, and it was an awful experience.

So, HoL isn't that tough to get through, it's just slightly annoying with the sideways writing, etc. - or is it still a difficult read, but worth it?
It's not "difficult" at all. The sideways writing gives it a pretty cool "lost" feeling...but it gets old pretty quickly.

You can read it pretty quickly and get a lot entertainment out of it. Or you can read it, re-read some parts, back track, look things over again, etc, and get a ton of depth out of the story. Enjoyable either way.

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While on vacation/honeymoon, I read:Vonnegut - "Galapagos": Good read. Moderately entertaining. Pretty typical VonnegutDarwin - "Voyage of the Beagle": Somewhat interesting but pretty dry, as you might imagine.Tim Powers - "Last Call": Good stuff. Lots of original thought, well written, good story. Stephen King meets Dean Koontz meets H.P. Lovecraft.China Mieville - "Perdido Street Station": The most original fantasy work I've read in years. Really fantastic book with excellent writing.

I absolutely agree with your assessment of Perdido as it immediately made it's way towards the top of the list for me in the genre. Tough to define as it is almost equal parts fantasy/sci-fi/horror. The characters, the landscape, the storylines, and even the entirely new branches of science he dreamed up for this thing were some of the most inventive and original writing I've read in years. It was a very dark novel and you just felt like you were there with his descriptions. His parallels to humans with all of the prejudice, class structure, and so on really made it a lot deeper read than the average fantasy novel with thier "hero saves the day through his epic deeds" storylines. The Scar was really good as well but to me not quite on the same level as PSS. Haven't read the most recent one of his yet but will get to it eventually despite being told it isn't as good as the other two.
"Dark" is an understatement. I walked around in a state of shock/depression for a solid day after finishing.
LOL. Definitely not bunnies and butterflies and warm fuzzies. Excellent book though but it isn't exactly a pick me up. The Scar is probably not much more uplifting.Just finished Last Call and although I didn't enjoy it as much as Annubis Gates. Fewer twists and turns to the plot than in Annubis Gates and had more of the storybook ending, but an excellent book nonetheless with unique storyline and characters.

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Just finished The Autobiography of Malcolm X a few days ago. Great stuff. Very enlightening and pretty remarkable are the various changes he went through.

I'm about halfway through The Peoples History of the United States now. Pretty slow at the beginning, but so are most history books. I am just getting to the end of WWI so it is picking up and a bit more interesting. I prefer non-fiction books and these two were both recommended to me.

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Just got done with What the Dead Know by Laura Lippman. It was above average - decent idea/story but the ending didn't do much for me.

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The Chronic-WHAT?-cles of Narnia: Book VI - The Magician's Nephew

Never read them growing up and am enjoying the series immensely now.

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I'm about halfway through The Peoples History of the United States now. Pretty slow at the beginning, but so are most history books. I am just getting to the end of WWI so it is picking up and a bit more interesting.

That is one of the books mentioned in that movie with Robin Williams and Mat Damon. Always wondered about that one. Is it very different fron typical history? I am about to finish Darwins Children by Greg Bear. Sequel to Darwins Raido. Near future Scifi about human evolution. His next book is Quantico-soon.Also picked up 'I Am A Strange Loop' by Douglas Hofstadter. He wrote 'Godel-Esher-Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid'. Facinating stuff on human concsiousness.

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Just started 'Atlas Shrugged'. So who's John Galt? :thumbup:

You're going to be disappointed.
It is a bit of a let down.Still liked the book though.

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I'm about halfway through The Peoples History of the United States now. Pretty slow at the beginning, but so are most history books. I am just getting to the end of WWI so it is picking up and a bit more interesting.

That is one of the books mentioned in that movie with Robin Williams and Mat Damon. Always wondered about that one. Is it very different fron typical history?

I am about to finish Darwins Children by Greg Bear. Sequel to Darwins Raido. Near future Scifi about human evolution. His next book is Quantico-soon.

Also picked up 'I Am A Strange Loop' by Douglas Hofstadter. He wrote 'Godel-Esher-Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid'. Facinating stuff on human concsiousness.

I read Moving Mars and thoroughly enjoyed it, you seem like a big fan how do the rest of his books compare to MM?

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I'm about halfway through The Peoples History of the United States now. Pretty slow at the beginning, but so are most history books. I am just getting to the end of WWI so it is picking up and a bit more interesting.

That is one of the books mentioned in that movie with Robin Williams and Mat Damon. Always wondered about that one. Is it very different fron typical history?

I am about to finish Darwins Children by Greg Bear. Sequel to Darwins Raido. Near future Scifi about human evolution. His next book is Quantico-soon.

Also picked up 'I Am A Strange Loop' by Douglas Hofstadter. He wrote 'Godel-Esher-Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid'. Facinating stuff on human concsiousness.

I read Moving Mars and thoroughly enjoyed it, you seem like a big fan how do the rest of his books compare to MM?
The Darwin books are the only Bear stuff I have read.

Saw him do an interview on TV and found Darwin at the library when looking for Quantico.

Is MM far-future hard sifci?

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if you like bear and want something a little different (sci-fantasy) try 'songs of earth and power'. different and very good. i'm a 'bear' fan and i've re-read songs more times than i can remember...

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I'm about halfway through The Peoples History of the United States now. Pretty slow at the beginning, but so are most history books. I am just getting to the end of WWI so it is picking up and a bit more interesting.

That is one of the books mentioned in that movie with Robin Williams and Mat Damon. Always wondered about that one. Is it very different fron typical history?

I am about to finish Darwins Children by Greg Bear. Sequel to Darwins Raido. Near future Scifi about human evolution. His next book is Quantico-soon.

Also picked up 'I Am A Strange Loop' by Douglas Hofstadter. He wrote 'Godel-Esher-Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid'. Facinating stuff on human concsiousness.

I read Moving Mars and thoroughly enjoyed it, you seem like a big fan how do the rest of his books compare to MM?
The Darwin books are the only Bear stuff I have read.

Saw him do an interview on TV and found Darwin at the library when looking for Quantico.

Is MM far-future hard sifci?

Absolutely it is. I don't want to give away to much story line but his divergence into the concept of descriptor theory was mind boggling. I think it may have been a nebula award winner or finalist.

I will look into the Darwin books. He really is worth a deeper look.

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if you like bear and want something a little different (sci-fantasy) try 'songs of earth and power'. different and very good. i'm a 'bear' fan and i've re-read songs more times than i can remember...

Thanks. I will do that.

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if you like bear and want something a little different (sci-fantasy) try 'songs of earth and power'. different and very good. i'm a 'bear' fan and i've re-read songs more times than i can remember...

Thanks. I will do that.
Me too. Thanks.Have you read Quantico yet?

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Just started 'Atlas Shrugged'. So who's John Galt? :lmao:

You're going to be disappointed.
:thumbup:I bought the book on the recommendation of the FBG. Some were calling it the finest literature of the 20th century.

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from the baseball forum...

i'm currently reading Summerland (that's a pretty good review in the link, btw), by Michael Chabon. The noted novelist takes a stab at so-called teen fiction, in the Harry Potter milieu, with fantastic worlds and creatures that might remind readers of Narnia or Middle Earth. But it's centered around baseball. And it's not just for kids.

i'm really enjoying it.

actually, finished this and now reading Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marisha Pessl (of Asheville, NC)

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Just started 'Atlas Shrugged'. So who's John Galt? :rolleyes:

You're going to be disappointed.
;)I bought the book on the recommendation of the FBG. Some were calling it the finest literature of the 20th century.
Same here. Boy was I disappointed. It had some colorful characters to be sure, but it was so over the top in general that it was hard to take it very seriously. Not to mention some horribly written sex scenes.Ayn Rand was better off sticking to philosophical essays.

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I'm about halfway through The Peoples History of the United States now. Pretty slow at the beginning, but so are most history books. I am just getting to the end of WWI so it is picking up and a bit more interesting.

That is one of the books mentioned in that movie with Robin Williams and Mat Damon. Always wondered about that one. Is it very different fron typical history? I am about to finish Darwins Children by Greg Bear. Sequel to Darwins Raido. Near future Scifi about human evolution. His next book is Quantico-soon.Also picked up 'I Am A Strange Loop' by Douglas Hofstadter. He wrote 'Godel-Esher-Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid'. Facinating stuff on human concsiousness.
There was a thread a few months ago on five books that you would recommend someone else read before they die. I saw both of those on that thread a few times so I decided to grab them. Zinn's book is definately an interesting read. It is history told from the perspective of people who were rarely heard and not mainstream at the time. It is hard to argue that history is controlled by whoever is in power at the time, and this novel shows it from the people who aren't. Again, kind of rough through parts as he sites so many examples, but you really learn a lot and it helps change your opinion on "facts" you've heard as you were growing up.

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Just finished Erickson's "Garden of the Moon", first book of The Malazan Books of the Fallen.

It was good - super high fantasy (tons of magic, gods demons) - but I found it a bit disorganized. It seemed like at times, Erickson wasn't sure where he was going, and at others he seemed to be in too much of a rush to get somewhere.

I've got the second one. I like the setting and the story, but I hope the structuring improves as the series progresses.

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Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marisha Pessl

Not sure what to think of this one. Basically, it's the story of a high school senior who wanders the country with her professor father, never living in the same place for more than a semester. Then, they decide to settle in one town for her entire senior year. At her new school, she quickly starts to hang out with a group of five priveleged kids from her class and there film teacher, getting together for dinners and watching movies, etc. Anyway, without giving away too much, the book eventually turns into a murder mystery.

The first half of this 500 page book was pretty weak in my opinion. It was too pretentious, meandered all over the place, and couldn't get to the damn point. Then, inexplicably, the second half turned into a really good mystery, and I found myself rushing through it. Pessl certainly has potential, but I don't know if I could recommend the book.

Finally, she may be the hottest fiction writer I have ever seen.

Yum

pretty spot on. Pessl is a talented writer, but this has the first-novel disease of throwing every turn-of-phrase, every simile, every last little pretentious thing she's ever thought of into the mix. Or maybe i'm mixing the author with the main character.

In the end, i just didn't buy the plot. I do look forward to more novels from her, though. She's young enough to improve greatly.

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Just finished Erickson's "Garden of the Moon", first book of The Malazan Books of the Fallen.It was good - super high fantasy (tons of magic, gods demons) - but I found it a bit disorganized. It seemed like at times, Erickson wasn't sure where he was going, and at others he seemed to be in too much of a rush to get somewhere.I've got the second one. I like the setting and the story, but I hope the structuring improves as the series progresses.

i've read all the published malazan series... i think as you get into them you will realize the 'disorganization' in gardens is him merely setting the stage for what is to come. the scope and number of characters in this series is immense. what might be viewed as a throw-off comment/scene in one book is revisited in detail in a later book.gardens of the moon is the shortest book in the series - the others go 800-1100+ depending on format. as mentioned before, i consider this series the best one i've read - and i've read them all...be prepared to read this series again and again. i've read the series at least 5 times front to back and each time pick up something i'd missed earlier that ties in to later events/books. erickson knows exactly where he is going...

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Just finished Erickson's "Garden of the Moon", first book of The Malazan Books of the Fallen.It was good - super high fantasy (tons of magic, gods demons) - but I found it a bit disorganized. It seemed like at times, Erickson wasn't sure where he was going, and at others he seemed to be in too much of a rush to get somewhere.I've got the second one. I like the setting and the story, but I hope the structuring improves as the series progresses.

i've read all the published malazan series... i think as you get into them you will realize the 'disorganization' in gardens is him merely setting the stage for what is to come. the scope and number of characters in this series is immense. what might be viewed as a throw-off comment/scene in one book is revisited in detail in a later book.gardens of the moon is the shortest book in the series - the others go 800-1100+ depending on format. as mentioned before, i consider this series the best one i've read - and i've read them all...be prepared to read this series again and again. i've read the series at least 5 times front to back and each time pick up something i'd missed earlier that ties in to later events/books. erickson knows exactly where he is going...
I wonder if the first one was edited down since he hadn't established himself or the series yet and that leads to the feeling of being disorganized and sometimes in a rush.

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Just finished Erickson's "Garden of the Moon", first book of The Malazan Books of the Fallen.It was good - super high fantasy (tons of magic, gods demons) - but I found it a bit disorganized. It seemed like at times, Erickson wasn't sure where he was going, and at others he seemed to be in too much of a rush to get somewhere.I've got the second one. I like the setting and the story, but I hope the structuring improves as the series progresses.

i've read all the published malazan series... i think as you get into them you will realize the 'disorganization' in gardens is him merely setting the stage for what is to come. the scope and number of characters in this series is immense. what might be viewed as a throw-off comment/scene in one book is revisited in detail in a later book.gardens of the moon is the shortest book in the series - the others go 800-1100+ depending on format. as mentioned before, i consider this series the best one i've read - and i've read them all...be prepared to read this series again and again. i've read the series at least 5 times front to back and each time pick up something i'd missed earlier that ties in to later events/books. erickson knows exactly where he is going...
I wonder if the first one was edited down since he hadn't established himself or the series yet and that leads to the feeling of being disorganized and sometimes in a rush.
could be... hadn't really thought about it that way. i do know after reading gardens i was online searching for everything available in the series... :D:D fwiw, they seem to be printed in england before the us. i picked up several 'english' versions (only diff is the covers - and i prefer the english covers...) from bag-a-book...

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The Real All Americans

Good read about the history of football, the Carlisle School for indians, and how the indians lost their land to the US

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Bambi vs. Godzilla

David Mamet's new book on Hollywood. A bit pedantic (as is the case with Mamet's writing), but some good content here.

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Recently finished Michael Palin Diaries 1969 - 1979: The Python Years, which is a fascinating journal of Palin's involvement with Python, and his development as a writer, actor and father. After that, I quickly read Ursula Leguin's Tehanu, the fourth story in her excellent Earthsea quartet. Now I'm knee-deep into Bill Bryson's A Walk in the Woods, which (so far) is a really fun read.

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