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Finished At the Center of the Storm by George Tenet last week.

Pretty quick read. Tenet gives a different view of the same topics Bob Woodward covers in his books about Bush, 9-11, Iraq, etc. He takes pains not to throw Bush under the bus but it's clear he won't be exchanging Xmas cards with Cheney, Libby, or Condi Rice. One of his big points is that CIA mistakes on WMD did not lead to Bush's decision to go to war but he totally sidesteps the issue of how his NIEs led Congress to vote the way it did. The stories about meeting Arafat and participating in the Dayton negotiations re Israeal/Palestine are very interesting. His descriptions of "tradecraft" and how intelligence is processed are interesting too.

Last weekend I started the Reagan Diaries. I'm through about a quarter of it, now up to 1983.

It's really a fascinating insight into Reagan because it's obvious he was writing for history but not planning to have it published in his lifetime. Everything you like or dislike about the man comes out in the entries. He's stubborn, narrow minded and very sure of himself, and everyone who is against him is, in his view, not being honest or is just playing political games, but at the same time these personality characteristics lead to him accomplishing major changes. The press gave the impression that he was pretty lazy, kept a 9 to 5 office and vacationed a lot. That impression does not hold up when you see even a topical highlight of the events on a daily basis and the wide variety of topics he had to cover. He seemed to be far more engaged in writing his own speeches than the current president is. He spent an incredible amount of time lobbying members of Congress directly and meeting them for dinners, social events, etc.

Most interesting entries so far:

--when he talks about Saddam Hussein being a "nut" who wants to acquire nuclear weapons and take over the neigboring Arab countries, but he's not in favor of Israel's bombing their nuclear reactor;

--his frustration with the Israelis and what he sees as their aggressiveness, failure to pull out of Lebanon, etc.;

--his views on some of his meetings with Tip O'Neill, who he thinks is genial but misguided and gets his facts wrong (I read O'Neill's book and Tip said basically the same thing about Reagan; it sounds like they had a few heated exchanges and each thought they came out ahead);

--he's really devoted to his wife, frustrated by his kids on occasion, etc. Ron Jr. does not like having Secret Service protection and constantly complains, one time hanging up on RR and they are not talking for a while. Patti's like a "yo-yo", friendly at times, distant at others, calls for money when she's broke, though;

--he sees no contradiction in introducing intermediate nuclear weapons in Europe, or starting an MX missile program and stealth bomber program, while bargaining for arms limitations;

--he follows the numbers closely on his economic recovery plan which depends on tax cuts. When deficits ensue, it's always something other than his policy at fault, for example we were too good at curbing inflation so tax revenues are affected, or the Dems won't let me make sufficient further cuts, etc.

--but, he knows when to hold 'em and when to fold 'em, and will make a deal when it gets him most of what he wants. This leads to constant criticism from the right, who seem to think he's betrayed them. He finds it particularly amusing when people like Richard Viguerie (who opposed him and wanted Al Haig as a candidate) write to him expressing disappointment that he did not live up to their expectations.

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I started Stephen King's Dark Tower series again (I quit reading after the first one several years ago). I am still looking for the rest.

I started "Eaters of the Dead" by M. Crichton today.

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Last Breath

Phenomenal, as long as drowning, hypothermia, dehydration, etc. don't freak you out.

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Night Shift by Stephen King

This is the first King short story collection I've read. Some of the stories were really good, and some were really bad. But overall, I think it was pretty solid. Though Lawnmower Man is one of the worst things I have ever read.

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Night Shift by Stephen King

This is the first King short story collection I've read. Some of the stories were really good, and some were really bad. But overall, I think it was pretty solid. Though Lawnmower Man is one of the worst things I have ever read.

I think that was the first King I ever read when I was about 16, and it hooked me. I don't remember much of it other than The Fog and the one about the toy monkey, I may have to reread that one, although I hardly ever reread books.

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Night Shift by Stephen King

This is the first King short story collection I've read. Some of the stories were really good, and some were really bad. But overall, I think it was pretty solid. Though Lawnmower Man is one of the worst things I have ever read.

I think that was the first King I ever read when I was about 16, and it hooked me. I don't remember much of it other than The Fog and the one about the toy monkey, I may have to reread that one, although I hardly ever reread books.
I think you're referring to a different collection. There was no story about a toy monkey or fog.

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Night Shift by Stephen King

This is the first King short story collection I've read. Some of the stories were really good, and some were really bad. But overall, I think it was pretty solid. Though Lawnmower Man is one of the worst things I have ever read.

I think that was the first King I ever read when I was about 16, and it hooked me. I don't remember much of it other than The Fog and the one about the toy monkey, I may have to reread that one, although I hardly ever reread books.
I think you're referring to a different collection. There was no story about a toy monkey or fog.
My bad, I'm thinking of Skeleton Crew, which hooked me on King.

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Night Shift by Stephen King

This is the first King short story collection I've read. Some of the stories were really good, and some were really bad. But overall, I think it was pretty solid. Though Lawnmower Man is one of the worst things I have ever read.

I think that was the first King I ever read when I was about 16, and it hooked me. I don't remember much of it other than The Fog and the one about the toy monkey, I may have to reread that one, although I hardly ever reread books.
I think you're referring to a different collection. There was no story about a toy monkey or fog.
My bad, I'm thinking of Skeleton Crew, which hooked me on King.
:thumbup:

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Encyclopedia of Chart Patterns - Thomas Bulkowski

The Trading Tribe - Ed Seykota

American Psycho - Bret Easton Ellis

read all these before but neccessary read trading books again and American Psycho just great book.

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I read a lot of old newspaper, magazine, etc. articles. Things where I can glean direct insight into history as it happened. Some of the most insightful things I've read is punditry on widely-assumed future events that turned out much differently. Its always interesting to see exactly where the most celebrated and respected voices get it wrong.

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I read a lot of old newspaper, magazine, etc. articles. Things where I can glean direct insight into history as it happened. Some of the most insightful things I've read is punditry on widely-assumed future events that turned out much differently. Its always interesting to see exactly where the most celebrated and respected voices get it wrong.

I also have a fairly decent personal collection of written material from the 1970s, that I review and reread every so often. Always important to reread and review.

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leaving on vacation in a couple weeks. need to bring a couple books. pick one or two for me. (yes i like history, books about war, biographies, non-fiction)

Nixon and Kissinger: Partners in Power by Robert Dallek (Author) $21.45

Off the Books: The Underground Economy of the Urban Poor by Sudhir Alladi Venkatesh

A War Like No Other: How the Athenians and Spartans Fought the Peloponnesian War by Victor Hanson (Author) $10.85

The Wonga Coup: Guns, Thugs and a Ruthless Determination to Create Mayhem in an Oil-Rich Corner of Africa by Adam Roberts (Author) $17.16

Player Piano by Kurt Vonnegut (Author) $11.20

The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut (Author) $11.20

The Wars by Timothy Findley (Author)

Hell in the Holy Land: World War I in the Middle East by David R. Woodward (Author) $19.77

Afghanistan: The Soviet Invasion and the Afghan Response, 1979-1982 by Mohammed Kakar (Author) $19.55

Gallipoli (Perennial Classics) by Alan Moorehead (Author) $11.66

Land of Opportunity: One Family's Quest for the American Dream in the Age of Crack by William M. Adler (Author)

Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion by Gary Webb (Author) $16.47

The Sixth Family: The Collapse of the New York Mafia and the Rise of Vito Rizzuto by Lee Lamothe (Author), Adrian Humphreys (Author) $16.47

Sound and Fury: Two Powerful Lives, One Fateful Friendship by Dave Kindred (Author) $20.52

Choice of Weapons (Borealis Books) by Gordon Parks (Author)

War of the Running Dogs: Malaya, 1948-1960 by Noel Barber (Author) $9.95

The Counter-Insurgency Manual by Leroy Thompson (Author) $17.12

First In: An Insider's Account of How the CIA Spearheaded the War on Terror in Afghanistan by Gary Schroen (Author)

Rakim Told Me: Wax Facts Straight from the Original Artists--The '80s. by Brian Coleman (Author)

The Second World War by John Keegan (Author)

Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York by Luc Sante (Author) $11.56

I Heard You Paint Houses: Frank "The Irishman" Sheeran and the Inside Story of the Mafia, the Teamsters, and the Final Ride of Jimmy Hoffa by Charles Brandt (Author)

The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (Routledge Classics) by Max Weber (Author) $15.61

Our Word Is Our Weapon: Selected Writings by Subcomandante Marcos (Author), et al. $12.21

OPUS: 25 Years of His Sunday Best by Berkeley Breathed (Author) $19.77

War Trash: A novel by Ha Jin (Author) $19.00

I Spit on Your Graves by Boris Vian (Author) $11.56

The New Crusade: America's War on Terrorism by Rahul Mahajan (Author) $17.95

Edited by mr. furley

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I'm about halfway through The Peoples History of the United States now. Pretty slow at the beginning, but so are most history books. I am just getting to the end of WWI so it is picking up and a bit more interesting.

That is one of the books mentioned in that movie with Robin Williams and Mat Damon. Always wondered about that one. Is it very different fron typical history?

I am about to finish Darwins Children by Greg Bear. Sequel to Darwins Raido. Near future Scifi about human evolution. His next book is Quantico-soon.

Also picked up 'I Am A Strange Loop' by Douglas Hofstadter. He wrote 'Godel-Esher-Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid'. Facinating stuff on human concsiousness.

I read Moving Mars and thoroughly enjoyed it, you seem like a big fan how do the rest of his books compare to MM?
The Darwin books are the only Bear stuff I have read.

Saw him do an interview on TV and found Darwin at the library when looking for Quantico.

Is MM far-future hard sifci?

Just finished Quantico. Good read. Near-future scifi based on Bio-terror. Very good read, pased well and researched.

Moving Mars is waiting for me at the library.

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"Conqueror" by Stephen Baxter. An alternate-history epic with a sci-fi twist. It's book 2 in a series, but the 2 books appear unrelated, so....

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leaving on vacation in a couple weeks. need to bring a couple books. pick one or two for me. (yes i like history, books about war, biographies, non-fiction)

Nixon and Kissinger: Partners in Power by Robert Dallek (Author) $21.45

Off the Books: The Underground Economy of the Urban Poor by Sudhir Alladi Venkatesh

A War Like No Other: How the Athenians and Spartans Fought the Peloponnesian War by Victor Hanson (Author) $10.85

The Wonga Coup: Guns, Thugs and a Ruthless Determination to Create Mayhem in an Oil-Rich Corner of Africa by Adam Roberts (Author) $17.16

Player Piano by Kurt Vonnegut (Author) $11.20

The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut (Author) $11.20

The Wars by Timothy Findley (Author)

Hell in the Holy Land: World War I in the Middle East by David R. Woodward (Author) $19.77

Afghanistan: The Soviet Invasion and the Afghan Response, 1979-1982 by Mohammed Kakar (Author) $19.55

Gallipoli (Perennial Classics) by Alan Moorehead (Author) $11.66

Land of Opportunity: One Family's Quest for the American Dream in the Age of Crack by William M. Adler (Author)

Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion by Gary Webb (Author) $16.47

The Sixth Family: The Collapse of the New York Mafia and the Rise of Vito Rizzuto by Lee Lamothe (Author), Adrian Humphreys (Author) $16.47

Sound and Fury: Two Powerful Lives, One Fateful Friendship by Dave Kindred (Author) $20.52

Choice of Weapons (Borealis Books) by Gordon Parks (Author)

War of the Running Dogs: Malaya, 1948-1960 by Noel Barber (Author) $9.95

The Counter-Insurgency Manual by Leroy Thompson (Author) $17.12

First In: An Insider's Account of How the CIA Spearheaded the War on Terror in Afghanistan by Gary Schroen (Author)

Rakim Told Me: Wax Facts Straight from the Original Artists--The '80s. by Brian Coleman (Author)

The Second World War by John Keegan (Author)

Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York by Luc Sante (Author) $11.56

I Heard You Paint Houses: Frank "The Irishman" Sheeran and the Inside Story of the Mafia, the Teamsters, and the Final Ride of Jimmy Hoffa by Charles Brandt (Author)

The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (Routledge Classics) by Max Weber (Author) $15.61

Our Word Is Our Weapon: Selected Writings by Subcomandante Marcos (Author), et al. $12.21

OPUS: 25 Years of His Sunday Best by Berkeley Breathed (Author) $19.77

War Trash: A novel by Ha Jin (Author) $19.00

I Spit on Your Graves by Boris Vian (Author) $11.56

The New Crusade: America's War on Terrorism by Rahul Mahajan (Author) $17.95

Heard good things about the Wonga Coup book, In keeping with the Africa theme, I'd also suggestA Long Way Gone

Player Piano is a good, if short, read.

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from the baseball forum...

i'm currently reading Summerland (that's a pretty good review in the link, btw), by Michael Chabon. The noted novelist takes a stab at so-called teen fiction, in the Harry Potter milieu, with fantastic worlds and creatures that might remind readers of Narnia or Middle Earth. But it's centered around baseball. And it's not just for kids.

i'm really enjoying it.

actually, finished this and now reading Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marisha Pessl (of Asheville, NC)
i LOVE chabon. that was a great read and this is the perfect time to read it. hes consistently excellent.

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The Terror by Dan Simmons.

Great book, almost done. It's a departure from his normal sci-fi books (also great). It's sort of an historical fiction / horror novel. I recommend it highly.

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The Average American Male by Chad Kultgen. Unfiltered first response to what most men think when they see a woman - any woman. Id on steroids. Read the whole thing on a cross country flight - couldn't put it down. Won't be for everybody though..

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The Terror by Dan Simmons.

Great book, almost done. It's a departure from his normal sci-fi books (also great). It's sort of an historical fiction / horror novel. I recommend it highly.

:kicksrock:

Every time I reach for this book I find another relative has borrowed it for a week or two. Definitely on my summer reading list, but I'm running out of summer days...

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Just finished Erickson's "Garden of the Moon", first book of The Malazan Books of the Fallen.

It was good - super high fantasy (tons of magic, gods demons) - but I found it a bit disorganized. It seemed like at times, Erickson wasn't sure where he was going, and at others he seemed to be in too much of a rush to get somewhere.

I've got the second one. I like the setting and the story, but I hope the structuring improves as the series progresses.

i've read all the published malazan series... i think as you get into them you will realize the 'disorganization' in gardens is him merely setting the stage for what is to come. the scope and number of characters in this series is immense. what might be viewed as a throw-off comment/scene in one book is revisited in detail in a later book.

gardens of the moon is the shortest book in the series - the others go 800-1100+ depending on format. as mentioned before, i consider this series the best one i've read - and i've read them all...

be prepared to read this series again and again. i've read the series at least 5 times front to back and each time pick up something i'd missed earlier that ties in to later events/books. erickson knows exactly where he is going...

I wonder if the first one was edited down since he hadn't established himself or the series yet and that leads to the feeling of being disorganized and sometimes in a rush.
Some of gardens was really confusing for me and I agree the editing is very jumpy. None of the other books are like that however.

Originally Erikson and his cowriter Ian Esslemont pitched Gardens to be a screenplay. Here are the details:

Steve has said that you and he co-created the world of Malaz. Can you

elaborate on that and do you still work together on what goes into his

MBotF books?

…Again, here, Steve’s intro in NoK (fid edit: Night of Knives a book in the malazan world by Esslemont) goes far to answering this question

so I don’t want to just repeat what can be found there. In any case, the

short answer is yes. Steve and I co-created the world and worked out a

set of major novels (ten for him, five for me) that would carry it

forward. Since then (so long ago it amazes me), life intervened as it

does and we went our separate ways – he to Winnipeg and England, me to

Thailand and Minneapolis. Steve, to his enormous credit, kept hammering

away at realizing the project, and, eventually, Gardens found a home.

Since then we have always kept the dialogue going on events, characters,

sub-plots, etc.

What made you decide to “come out” after working more or less in the background?

The short answer here is I “came out” because Knives had finally found a

publisher. Readers of the Malaz world might look at Steve’s novels and

see a fully established fantasy series, but you may be horrified to know

just how improbable its birth has been.

Steve and I originally wrote Gardens as a full-length motion picture

screenplay. He and I pitched it and other screenplays but none made it

into development. Over the years Steve became fed up and asked if he

could just go ahead and novelize Gardens. I said: go for it! He finished

the novel and showed it around. It caught some interest in England and

Steve and I were thrilled. But there was a problem: this “shared world”

thing. Apparently, and this dumbfounded me, the fantasy publishers, the

agents, no one knew what to do with this “shared world” idea. They

couldn’t get their heads around it (still can’t frankly). That both

Steve and I did, could, and would continue to write in the world made

publishers uneasy – too “messy” or uncertain (God knows what they

thought). In any case, since even getting anything into print is so

unsure in fantasy, Steve and I agreed not to push the “shared” aspect

publicly until (fait accompli) the world became real and couldn’t just

be wished away by the industry.

Anyway, enough ranting about blinkered publishers. As to the second half

of the question, as you saw above, I have five Malazan novel projects of

the original ones Steve and I sketched out (not counting NoK). One is

written already and I am currently rewriting it to bring it up to speed.

more here: http://www.malazanworld.com/forums/showthr...light=esslemont

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The Terror by Dan Simmons.

Great book, almost done. It's a departure from his normal sci-fi books (also great). It's sort of an historical fiction / horror novel. I recommend it highly.

Simmons wrote a few horror novels before his Hyperion sci/fi stuff. "Carrion Comfort" (modern day vampire tale), "Summer Of Night" (sort of like King's "IT") & "Children Of Night" (sorta-sequel to "SON" & a another pretty interesting vampire take) are three good ones. He also did a historical espionage novel called "Crook Factory" starring none other than Ernest Hemingway which I thought was really well done. Edited by Uruk-Hai

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The Terror by Dan Simmons.

Great book, almost done. It's a departure from his normal sci-fi books (also great). It's sort of an historical fiction / horror novel. I recommend it highly.

Simmons wrote a few horror novels before his Hyperion sci/fi stuff. "Carrion Comfort" (modern day vampire tale), "Summer Of Night" (sort of like King's "IT") & "Children Of Night" (sorta-sequel to "SON" & a another pretty interesting vampire take) are three good ones. He also did a historical espionage novel called "Crook Factory" starring none other than Ernest Hemingway which I thought was really well done.
Interesting. I guess I had heard about these from those lists of books they put in the beginning of other paperbacks of his I'd read, didn't realize they were more in the horror genre.

The Crook Factory sounds especially interesting.

Hyperion had that whole Canterbury Tales historical twist in it as well.

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The Average American Male by Chad Kultgen. Unfiltered first response to what most men think when they see a woman - any woman. Id on steroids. Read the whole thing on a cross country flight - couldn't put it down. Won't be for everybody though..

wait, what are you implying here? :excited:

i'm 100% natural, #####

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The Average American Male by Chad Kultgen. Unfiltered first response to what most men think when they see a woman - any woman. Id on steroids. Read the whole thing on a cross country flight - couldn't put it down. Won't be for everybody though..

wait, what are you implying here? :shock:

i'm 100% natural, #####

:excited:

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The Man Who Ate Everything by Jeffrey Steingarten.

Steingarten is a food critic who often serves as a judge on Iron Chef America, where he's hilarious. His book is just as entertaining. Educational, too.

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The Average American Male by Chad Kultgen. Unfiltered first response to what most men think when they see a woman - any woman. Id on steroids. Read the whole thing on a cross country flight - couldn't put it down. Won't be for everybody though..

wait, what are you implying here? :hot:

i'm 100% natural, #####

:blackdot:
Horrible.

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now reading The Brothers K by David James Duncan.

had this on my to-read list for a couple of years now, and i'm angry at myself for not reading this book sooner. It's a great, great read, one of the most enjoyable reads ever for me. Pretty much every page is infused with religion or baseball or both, so how could it go wrong.

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leaving on vacation in a couple weeks. need to bring a couple books. pick one or two for me. (yes i like history, books about war, biographies, non-fiction)Nixon and Kissinger: Partners in Power by Robert Dallek (Author) $21.45 Off the Books: The Underground Economy of the Urban Poor by Sudhir Alladi Venkatesh A War Like No Other: How the Athenians and Spartans Fought the Peloponnesian War by Victor Hanson (Author) $10.85 The Wonga Coup: Guns, Thugs and a Ruthless Determination to Create Mayhem in an Oil-Rich Corner of Africa by Adam Roberts (Author) $17.16 Player Piano by Kurt Vonnegut (Author) $11.20 The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut (Author) $11.20 The Wars by Timothy Findley (Author) Hell in the Holy Land: World War I in the Middle East by David R. Woodward (Author) $19.77 Afghanistan: The Soviet Invasion and the Afghan Response, 1979-1982 by Mohammed Kakar (Author) $19.55 Gallipoli (Perennial Classics) by Alan Moorehead (Author) $11.66 Land of Opportunity: One Family's Quest for the American Dream in the Age of Crack by William M. Adler (Author) Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion by Gary Webb (Author) $16.47 The Sixth Family: The Collapse of the New York Mafia and the Rise of Vito Rizzuto by Lee Lamothe (Author), Adrian Humphreys (Author) $16.47 Sound and Fury: Two Powerful Lives, One Fateful Friendship by Dave Kindred (Author) $20.52 Choice of Weapons (Borealis Books) by Gordon Parks (Author) War of the Running Dogs: Malaya, 1948-1960 by Noel Barber (Author) $9.95 The Counter-Insurgency Manual by Leroy Thompson (Author) $17.12 First In: An Insider's Account of How the CIA Spearheaded the War on Terror in Afghanistan by Gary Schroen (Author) Rakim Told Me: Wax Facts Straight from the Original Artists--The '80s. by Brian Coleman (Author) The Second World War by John Keegan (Author) Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York by Luc Sante (Author) $11.56 I Heard You Paint Houses: Frank "The Irishman" Sheeran and the Inside Story of the Mafia, the Teamsters, and the Final Ride of Jimmy Hoffa by Charles Brandt (Author) The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (Routledge Classics) by Max Weber (Author) $15.61 Our Word Is Our Weapon: Selected Writings by Subcomandante Marcos (Author), et al. $12.21 OPUS: 25 Years of His Sunday Best by Berkeley Breathed (Author) $19.77 War Trash: A novel by Ha Jin (Author) $19.00 I Spit on Your Graves by Boris Vian (Author) $11.56The New Crusade: America's War on Terrorism by Rahul Mahajan (Author) $17.95

Hell in the Holy Land and Keegan's book about the FIRST World War should keep you busy AND entertained. Good stuff.

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The Average American Male by Chad Kultgen. Unfiltered first response to what most men think when they see a woman - any woman. Id on steroids. Read the whole thing on a cross country flight - couldn't put it down. Won't be for everybody though..

wait, what are you implying here? ;)

i'm 100% natural, #####

:thumbup:
Horrible.
laughter is healthy. i don't get it.

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Hell in the Holy Land and Keegan's book about the FIRST World War should keep you busy AND entertained. Good stuff.

actually read Keegan's 1st WW book. awesome. that's what got me adding those books about Gallipoli to my list.

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A little more than half way done with "Clemente" by David Maraniss. Clemente was one of my heroes growing up. He was a great human being.

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Hell in the Holy Land and Keegan's book about the FIRST World War should keep you busy AND entertained. Good stuff.

actually read Keegan's 1st WW book. awesome. that's what got me adding those books about Gallipoli to my list.
Another one about the ME and WWI is A Peace to End All Peace by David Fromkin. Recommended by Doctor Detroit and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Speaks to the end of the Ottoman Empire and the British, Russian, French and US goals in the ME during and after WWI.

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The Average American Male by Chad Kultgen. Unfiltered first response to what most men think when they see a woman - any woman. Id on steroids. Read the whole thing on a cross country flight - couldn't put it down. Won't be for everybody though..

wait, what are you implying here? :thumbup:

i'm 100% natural, #####

:thumbup:
Horrible.
laughter is healthy. i don't get it.
Laughing at a post by your own alias is the worst shtick ever. Desist immediately if not sooner.

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The Average American Male by Chad Kultgen. Unfiltered first response to what most men think when they see a woman - any woman. Id on steroids. Read the whole thing on a cross country flight - couldn't put it down. Won't be for everybody though..

wait, what are you implying here? :hot:

i'm 100% natural, #####

:unsure:
Horrible.
laughter is healthy. i don't get it.
Laughing at a post by your own alias is the worst shtick ever. Desist immediately if not sooner.
Wow.

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The Average American Male by Chad Kultgen. Unfiltered first response to what most men think when they see a woman - any woman. Id on steroids. Read the whole thing on a cross country flight - couldn't put it down. Won't be for everybody though..

wait, what are you implying here? :hot:

i'm 100% natural, #####

:unsure:
Horrible.
laughter is healthy. i don't get it.
Laughing at a post by your own alias is the worst shtick ever. Desist immediately if not sooner.
Wow.
As if you haven't laughed at your aliai before.

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The Average American Male by Chad Kultgen. Unfiltered first response to what most men think when they see a woman - any woman. Id on steroids. Read the whole thing on a cross country flight - couldn't put it down. Won't be for everybody though..

wait, what are you implying here? ;)

i'm 100% natural, #####

:hangover:
Horrible.
laughter is healthy. i don't get it.
Laughing at a post by your own alias is the worst shtick ever. Desist immediately if not sooner.
Wow.
As if you haven't laughed at your aliai before.
As if I have.

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A little more than half way done with "Clemente" by David Maraniss. Clemente was one of my heroes growing up. He was a great human being.

how is this? my sister bought it for my birthday last summer but I havent gotten around to reading yet

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Einstein, by Walter Issaacson.

So, according to Einstein, the cosmos does have an end...what lies outside of it is a meaningless question. This seems like a very weak answer for a genius.

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Riptide by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child

These guys are the best thriller writers going, and this book was another good example of that. Not quite up to the standards of Relic, but really good.

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John Daly's book cracked me up. You can read it in about 15 craps. Love that guy. :goodposting:

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The Glass Castle - Jeanette Walls

Excellent memoir I would recommend to everyone and anyone.

Here's the book description:

Jeannette Walls grew up with parents whose ideals and stubborn nonconformity were both their curse and their salvation. Rex and Rose Mary Walls had four children. In the beginning, they lived like nomads, moving among Southwest desert towns, camping in the mountains. Rex was a charismatic, brilliant man who, when sober, captured his children's imagination, teaching them physics, geology, and above all, how to embrace life fearlessly. Rose Mary, who painted and wrote and couldn't stand the responsibility of providing for her family, called herself an "excitement addict." Cooking a meal that would be consumed in fifteen minutes had no appeal when she could make a painting that might last forever.

Later, when the money ran out, or the romance of the wandering life faded, the Walls retreated to the dismal West Virginia mining town -- and the family -- Rex Walls had done everything he could to escape. He drank. He stole the grocery money and disappeared for days. As the dysfunction of the family escalated, Jeannette and her brother and sisters had to fend for themselves, supporting one another as they weathered their parents' betrayals and, finally, found the resources and will to leave home.

What is so astonishing about Jeannette Walls is not just that she had the guts and tenacity and intelligence to get out, but that she describes her parents with such deep affection and generosity. Hers is a story of triumph against all odds, but also a tender, moving tale of unconditional love in a family that despite its profound flaws gave her the fiery determination to carve out a successful life on her own terms.

For two decades, Jeannette Walls hid her roots. Now she tells her own story. A regular contributor to MSNBC.com, she lives in New York and Long Island and is married to the writer John Taylor.

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Civilwarland in Bad Decline by George Saunders

This is a collection of short stories. All extremely dark, violent, and strangely humorous. Modern american fiction doesn't get much better.

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Civilwarland in Bad Decline by George SaundersThis is a collection of short stories. All extremely dark, violent, and strangely humorous. Modern american fiction doesn't get much better.

:thumbup:This one was recommended to me by the great Vivian Darkbloom. This and The Sot Weed Factor were his two best suggestions.

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Plague Year by Jeff Carlson.

The blurb on the cover of the paperback -- "Part Michael Crichton, part George Romero" -- says it all. A quick summer read.

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"Dead Certain: The Presidency of George W. Bush"

The good bad and ugly of the current administration. I would be curious if anyone else is reading this book and if so what your thoughts are. I know there are a lot of people out there that don't think there is any good to come from this administration, but this seems to be a pretty unbiased look at the President.

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Just finished reading Naked Lunch by William Burroughs.

Not really sure how to explain this book other than a lot of it comes from Burroughs' own experiences with drug addiction and also his wild interpretations and satire of modern society. It was both brilliant and repulsive at the same time. Others who have already read it will understand where I'm coming from. It's not for the faint of heart.

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Just started "From a Buick 8" by Stephen King. Not crazy about it so far, I don't think he has a very good style when writing in first person.

This book sucked. King has lost it.Currently reading The Stranger by Albert Camus.

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Einstein, by Walter Issaacson. So, according to Einstein, the cosmos does have an end...what lies outside of it is a meaningless question. This seems like a very weak answer for a genius.

Einstein believed that the universe had a beginning and was not static therefore had an end. What happens before the "Big Bang" or what happens after the end can be addressed by science - Think of it like standing on the north pole and trying to move going north (or more appropriately not go south).

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