Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums
shuke

Whatcha readin now? (book, books, reading, read)

Recommended Posts

Just got done reading Killing Yourself to Live by Chuck Klosterman. Very good book. He takes a cross country trip to visit the site of rock-n-roll tragedys. He visited where the Leonard Skynard plane went down, where the night club in RI burnt down at the Great White show, Graceland (I think), and where Curt Kobain died. Klosterman actually took this trip and intended to write about it for SPIN magazine but he made it into a book instead. The book had more to do with his past relationships (he visited some old girlfriends) and the people he met along the way... and not so much about the 'death sites' he visited. It was a really good book, but I just really like his writing style and the topic of pop culture.

I am reading Talking to Girls About Duran Duran: one young mans quest for true love and a cooler haircut by Rob Sheffield. I've only read one chapter so far, but so far so good. Anyone that grew up in the 80's would probably enjoy this book.

I also bought (but have not read yet):

Chuck Klosterman IV by Chuck Klosterman

Fargo Rock City by Klosterman

and Bible of Unspeakable Truths by Greg Gutfeld (the host of Red Eye on Fox)

I liked most of Klosterman's stuff except for Downtown Owl (awful). Killing Yourself to Live was no exception.

I haven't read the Duran Duran book, but I did like Sheffield's first book, Love is a Mix Tape. A little sappy, but made up for by his writing on his love for music and irony. I saw a lot of parallels between Klosterman and Sheffield and not just because they both write for music 'zines.

I also heard Downtown Owl was bad. I like him a lot but I have no intention of reading that one.

Klosterman wrote a 'blurb' that was printed on the front and back cover of the Duran Duran book and made it sound awesome. That was a big factor in why I decided to check it out. I heard that Sheffield's first book was good too. They said it had a lot to do with his wifes untimely death... but that the Duran Duran book was much more lighthearted but still good. I am looking forward to reading the rest of it.

Just read Duran Duran book. I liked it and found it better than Love is a Mix Tape. They were similar enough that if you liked one, you'd probably like the other by Sheffield.
Cool man. I will probably finish Duran Duran on a flight home tomorrow. I don't have much left. I really like it too. The chapter about him riding around Boston selling ice cream sticks out to me. You know, the Love is a Mix Tape book sounds really good but I'm just not sure if I want to read a book that is so sad. I usually go for lighter fare. Edited by Jutz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just started the new Keith Richards memoir, "Life." Only a couple of chapters in and I am loving it. Amazingly, the chapter I'm in now is all about his boyhood and it's great - if I'm finding this part good, I'm hoping the "good stuff" will be outstanding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm reading The Help by Kathryn Stockett.

Every single chick on my train for the past six months is reading that book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins. This is the follow up to Hunger Games. Very well done series so far. I cant wait for the third one. I am on a very long waiting list at the library for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I Had to fight my oldest son in order to finish The Lost Hero. It is a Young Adult novel, but if you read the Percy Jackson series (The Last Olympian) The Lightning Thief is the first in that series.

The Lost Hero is set in the same world as the other series but there are new characters and twists. I love How Rick Riordan is able to reuse the material without making it stale. For a quick and fun read I highly recommend The Lost Hero.

Edited by Exfireman_62

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Passage by Cronin. Based on this thread and the ***Official*** thread, I'm pretty excited, despite the mixed reviews. 50 pages in, and loving it so far...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished Fall of Giants by Ken Follett. I absolutely loved it. Although it deals with a different time period, it's similar in style to Pillars of the Earth and World Without End. Can't wait till the next one comes out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just picked up Games That Changed The Game by Ron "Jaws" Jaworski. Really good so far, very detailed but not so much you get bored. His writing style comes across like talking to one of your buddies who is very excited about something and wants to tell you all about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just picked up Games That Changed The Game by Ron "Jaws" Jaworski. Really good so far, very detailed but not so much you get bored. His writing style comes across like talking to one of your buddies who is very excited about something and wants to tell you all about it.

So he writes like he speaks. Good to know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished Fall of Giants by Ken Follett. I absolutely loved it. Although it deals with a different time period, it's similar in style to Pillars of the Earth and World Without End. Can't wait till the next one comes out.

:goodposting: I'm about halfway through and it is outstanding.

Book 13 of the Wheel of Time series came in this week and is next in the queue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am midway through the Larsson Trilogy series. Am halfway through Girl who played with Fire to be specific. Am I the only one who finds the actual writing to be horrible but the story is so exciting and well thought it its still a good read? Sounds weird but every other sentence is a cliche we have heard a million times like "you can cut the tension with a knife"What do you guys say about the series?

Wasn't that series translated from another language? Could just be a crappy translator, the book probably reads much better in its native language. Never read any of them, just a thought.
yeah it was originally written in Swedish tongue, but if it really was the translator not trying then that sucks since Google Translate could just convert from one language to another.Though much of the series so far is so extreme minded in that almost every male other then the main character is a sex offender/murderer/thief it is a little bit unrealistic but overall a great story which IMO will be a fantastic film (David Fincher is in middle of shooting the American version)
Translations really are an art form all their own. Word-for-word literal translations work for things like menus, but not for novels. That's why you'll never see a novel capably translated by a computer program.
:wub: My favorite author, Haruki Murakami, has two primary translators, and I can tell a huge difference--and have a huge preference--between the two.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just started Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, which, so far, is excellent. Reminds me of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, with a young narrator trying to figure something out that he really has no idea about. His father was killed in 9/11 and he's trying to make sense of what dad left behind. Apparently it will be made into a movie with Hanks and Bullock.

Holy #### that turned out to be a great book. Best one I've read in the last few years. Highly recommended.
I think I've bought this book three times. Will bump it near the top of my list.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now onto A Simple Plan by Scott Smith

:lmao: This book reminded me of Stephen King, who raved about it. It's basically about how one bad decision can lead to another and another and eventually to disaster. Pretty horrific glimpse into the rationalizations 'normal people' can make to justify terrible actions. Edited by D_House

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just started Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, which, so far, is excellent. Reminds me of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, with a young narrator trying to figure something out that he really has no idea about. His father was killed in 9/11 and he's trying to make sense of what dad left behind. Apparently it will be made into a movie with Hanks and Bullock.

Holy #### that turned out to be a great book. Best one I've read in the last few years. Highly recommended.
:lmao:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep meaning to make a list of books read and liked. The Hunger Games reminded me a lot of a Japanese book of the same "lottery of high school kids" theme. Can't remember that title, but it would be one to look for if waiting for the sequels. I think I read about it (the Japanese title) here.

Ah, it was called Battle Royale, here is a review comparing the two (actually the BR movie and Hunger Games book, not a fair comparison), for those looking for such, http://www.examiner.com/speculative-fictio...s-battle-royale

That said, I too am on the waiting list for the sequel to HG.

Reading Michael Connelly for the first time ironically, always picked up his titles then set them down before, not sure why. The book I started is 9 Dragons. Just starting and like it well enough. Am I getting jaded to the jaded detective though? Really miss Robert B. Parker's Spenser series, particularly the early ones. Missed out on an Ebay for autographed first editions of all Spenser titles, wish I would have snagged that.

I also started another book (do that all the time) that is really intriguing so far, titled "Twelve" by Jasper Kent. Set in Russia during the Napoleonic War of 1812. Historical fiction with a paranormal/folk tale plot. It really has grabbed my interest.

And yes, I picked up "The passage" to read on a trip. I had no idea of its mass, good thing I will be out of touch for a few days and can focus on reading. I am hoping it lives up to the zeal here, the Amazon reviews were mixed. I go with the FBG reviews.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished The Big Questions a bit ago, and I'd recommend it. It's a quick read with a lot of interesting topics. You won't always agree with Landsburg, but you should nearly always find him thought-provoking.

I was going to read The Moral Landscape next. I started in on it and found it well written and intelligent (as I find pretty much anything by Sam Harris), but I'm interrupting that to read Decision Points, which has been fairly interesting so far. On the presidential scale, I wouldn't rate Bush very high in terms of his competence, but I do think he generally tried to do the right thing. And I think he's handled his post-presidency so far with class.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Passage by Cronin. Based on this thread and the ***Official*** thread, I'm pretty excited, despite the mixed reviews. 50 pages in, and loving it so far...

Through part 1 (Years 5-1 BV) and think it's fantastic. Seems like some people felt it dragged in the middle so I'm preparing myself for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Currently reading:

Cosa Nostra: A History of the Sicilian Mafia by John Dickie

Well written, maybe a little long but interesting book about the history of the sicilian mafia and its origins

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blood Meridian. Not the easiest read in the world, but I feel like I'm in the presence of greatness as I read.

I'm doing my senior thesis on Blood Meridian and Absalom, Absalom! Two absolutely incredible books.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fully into the "Colony" portion of The Passage. This is the part I've read some less-than-stellar reviews regarding, but I gotta say I still love it. Captured and keeps my attention. Loving this novel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm about 100 pages into Motherless Brooklyn by Jonathan Lethem.

Fantastic so far. :thumbup:

:excited:

I'm at 123 pages after starting it a little while ago, just setting the book down now to rave here. I've already laughed out loud several times.

There was a lot of praise in here for Beat the Reaper, I'd highly recommend this to fans of that book, as this is in a similar vein in terms of plot and setting. The main character is a small time crook trying to find out who killed his boss and why. Oh, and he has Tourette's syndrome. Lethem's descriptions of the character's tics, both verbal and physical, are hilarious. According to the wiki page kupcho linked above, Ed Norton is involved in adapting a film version.

Read Lethem's Chronic City over vacation. It's brilliant and bizarre. Would love to hear what other's think about it. I'm still not sure about certain parts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, this is probably the best audience for this question so I'll throw it in here.

What do you guys do with your books (for those that buy actual books) when you're done?

Was thinking of trying to sell off some books to clear some shelf space and make some spare $ to help pay for a Kindle.

Looks like books don't go for much, if anything, anymore though (on ebay, half.com, amazon anyway).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blood Meridian. Not the easiest read in the world, but I feel like I'm in the presence of greatness as I read.

I'm doing my senior thesis on Blood Meridian and Absalom, Absalom! Two absolutely incredible books.
What's the connection? Or does it not matter?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, this is probably the best audience for this question so I'll throw it in here.What do you guys do with your books (for those that buy actual books) when you're done?Was thinking of trying to sell off some books to clear some shelf space and make some spare $ to help pay for a Kindle.Looks like books don't go for much, if anything, anymore though (on ebay, half.com, amazon anyway).

I put them on my bookshelf so guests can see how awesome I am.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, this is probably the best audience for this question so I'll throw it in here.

What do you guys do with your books (for those that buy actual books) when you're done?

Was thinking of trying to sell off some books to clear some shelf space and make some spare $ to help pay for a Kindle.

Looks like books don't go for much, if anything, anymore though (on ebay, half.com, amazon anyway).

seinfeld's take

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, this is probably the best audience for this question so I'll throw it in here.What do you guys do with your books (for those that buy actual books) when you're done?Was thinking of trying to sell off some books to clear some shelf space and make some spare $ to help pay for a Kindle.Looks like books don't go for much, if anything, anymore though (on ebay, half.com, amazon anyway).

If they are good...I do my best to pass them on to somebody who I think would like them. If they aren't good (or I don't pass them on, this is most of my books)...I'll donate them to the library book re-seller so they can maybe make .50 on it in 4 years when it sells (but I feel like I'm doing something good at least).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well written, maybe a little long but interesting book about the history of the sicilian mafia and its origins

What's the name of that book again?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished the first Culture novel by Iain Banks. Sucked. I haven't found much sci-fi over the years that I actually enjoyed, but I was pretty excited about this one as I had heard such high praise for Banks. Just boring. Cardboard characters that I didn't care about. An uninspiring story that I didn't care about. And a society and way of life that I didn't care about. Probably my last Banks novel.

And I just started the new Lee Child book, Worth Dying For. His books are like crack to me. I'm about 50 pages in and he's already kicked some serious ### two different times. These books have the same effect on me as the first dozen or so Dirk Pitt books.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished the first Culture novel by Iain Banks. Sucked. I haven't found much sci-fi over the years that I actually enjoyed, but I was pretty excited about this one as I had heard such high praise for Banks. Just boring. Cardboard characters that I didn't care about. An uninspiring story that I didn't care about. And a society and way of life that I didn't care about. Probably my last Banks novel.

The only praise I've ever heard for Banks was for The Wasp Factory, which is good but not sci-fi.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished The Passage a few weeks ago (based on FBG thread of course) and loved it. I even have my wife reading it now, and she normally hates the post-apocalyptic genre.

Now I'm reading this one and also liking it quite a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami.

Comprising two distinct but interrelated plots, the narrative runs back and forth between the two, taking up each plotline in alternating chapters.

The odd chapters tell the 15 year old Kafka's story as he runs away from his father's house to escape an Oedipal curse and to embark upon a quest to find his mother and sister. After a series of adventures, he finds shelter in a quiet, private library in Takamatsu, run by the distant and aloof Miss Saeki and the intelligent but more welcoming Oshima. There he spends his days reading the unabridged Richard Francis Burton translation of A Thousand and One Nights and the collected works of Natsume Sōseki until the police begin inquiring after him in connection with a brutal murder.

The even chapters tell Nakata's story. Due to his uncanny abilities, he has found part-time work in his old age as a finder of lost cats (a clear reference to The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle). The case of one particular lost cat puts him on a path that ultimately takes him far away from his home, ending up on the road for the first time in his life. He befriends a truck-driver named Hoshino. Hoshino takes him on as a passenger in his truck and soon becomes very attached to the old man.

Nakata and Kafka are on a collision course throughout the novel, but their convergence takes place as much on a metaphysical plane as it does in reality and, in fact, that can be said of the novel itself. Due to the Oedipal theme running through much of the novel, Kafka on the Shore has been called a modern Greek tragedy.

I thought it was very good.

Now on to The 42nd Parallel (book 1 of the U.S.A. trilogy) by John Dos Passos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now on to The 42nd Parallel (book 1 of the U.S.A. trilogy) by John Dos Passos.

:goodposting:

I hope you like it - I hype this trilogy to people all the time but it seems like nobody ever takes me up on it. I think it's great. When they were all alive and writing, Dos Passos, Faulkner, Hemingway and Fitzgerald were all considered peers. But as time went by, for some reason Dos Passos dropped out of their league. Let us know what you think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, this is probably the best audience for this question so I'll throw it in here.

What do you guys do with your books (for those that buy actual books) when you're done?

Was thinking of trying to sell off some books to clear some shelf space and make some spare $ to help pay for a Kindle.

Looks like books don't go for much, if anything, anymore though (on ebay, half.com, amazon anyway).

See the bottom of my signature for an idea

I finished The Passage a few weeks ago (based on FBG thread of course) and loved it. I even have my wife reading it now, and she normally hates the post-apocalyptic genre.

Now I'm reading this one and also liking it quite a bit.

For all of you into the post-apocalyptic stuff I just finished a great, quick read that is a very real possibility One Second After. Excellent novel, highly recommend it.

Currently reading Generation Kill. Enjoyed the mini-series, enjoying the book even more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you guys do with your books (for those that buy actual books) when you're done?

My wife actually will get a new book, put it up for sale online, then read it. When she's done she ships it out. I share mine with people that read the same type books then keep them on a shelf. (eventually boxed and put away)

I'm currently reading his (Ken Follett) Fall of Giants.

Finished this over the weekend. Started Towers of Midnight (Wheel of Time series) yesterday

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just picked up Games That Changed The Game by Ron "Jaws" Jaworski. Really good so far, very detailed but not so much you get bored. His writing style comes across like talking to one of your buddies who is very excited about something and wants to tell you all about it.

Just finished this. Outstanding book looking at how different coaches created different offensive/defensive packages and changed the game. He picks one game he thinks highlighted the emergence of the new package and breaks it doen. Jaws also gets comments from the coaches themselves, players who made ths systems work, and observers from around the NFL. Really cool book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, this is probably the best audience for this question so I'll throw it in here.What do you guys do with your books (for those that buy actual books) when you're done?Was thinking of trying to sell off some books to clear some shelf space and make some spare $ to help pay for a Kindle.Looks like books don't go for much, if anything, anymore though (on ebay, half.com, amazon anyway).

I keep a select few on my bookshelf. But only those that I really like and plan to either re-read or hand off to someone else. Everything else I simply give to my public library. The library has saved me a ton of money over the years so I like to help pay back in whatever small way I can (aside from the taxes I pay).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:banned: Great book. If you like Murakami, you'll never read a better book than The Wind-up Bird Chronicle, which I'm sure krista has already attested to.
Yeah, I've read TWuBC and will probably read more Murakami once I work through the current USA Trilogy, Lowboy and Peace Like a River.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I buy books, I buy hardcover versions of those I think are worth keeping and re-reading. Everything else I get in paperback form and trade with other like-minded folks. It's a good system.

Examples of hardcovers worth keeping:

William Shakespeare: The Complete Works

Roget's Thesaurus

The Illuminatus! Trilogy

Ulysses

Anything Asimov, Vonnegut, King, Stephenson, etc.

I re-read a lot, assuming some ideas are incompletely understood until some time has passed learning other stuff...Make sense?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Examples of hardcovers worth keeping:Roget's Thesaurus

A hardcover thesaurus?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Examples of hardcovers worth keeping:Roget's Thesaurus

A hardcover thesaurus?
Yes. A Fourth Edition, if that matters.I prefer hardcovers for obvious longevity reasons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.