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just a heads up that half price books has free shipping from their on-line store tomorrow only. no code required.

Saw this today and had no idea they had an online store. Looks like it's just a network of other sellers.

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just a heads up that half price books has free shipping from their on-line store tomorrow only. no code required.

Saw this today and had no idea they had an online store. Looks like it's just a network of other sellers.
yeah...usually ordering from there is pretty worthless because you have to pay shipping fees from all over the place, which drastically reduces the deals. with the free shipping today, i ordered 13 books for a little over 17 bucks! :banned:

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Currently reading The Sound And The Fury. I haven't been this confused since reading Ulysses.

I love this book.

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I'm Feeling Lucky: The Confessions of Google Employee Number 59

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i ordered 13 books for a little over 17 bucks! :banned:

Like what?

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I just finished Consider the Lobster and other Essays, by David Foster Wallace. It's been reviewed in this thread already. The title essay, the piece on the 2000 McCain campaign, and the short piece on the Tracy Austin book review were all particularly insightful reads.

I love this book. A lot of people get scared off of reading anything by DFW because of how big Infinite Jest is, but his essays are incredible as well. I found his essay on the Tracy Austin autobiography to be one of the most insightful essays on sports I've ever read. I'm biased because I'm a huge DFW fan, but I would recommend these essays to anyone. His essay on attending the porn convention is also hilarious and really frightening.
What essay is about the porn convention?

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Checked out an old copy of the Bachman Books from the library.

Rage by Stephen King (Richard Bachman): Stephen King let this go out of print after several school shootings, including one where the book was found in the shooter's locker. Interesting book and supposedly one of the first things he ever wrote, starting it in 1966. The violence isn't the central focus of the book. Rather, the students who are taken hostage bond with their captor and end up telling a series of life stories, focusing on how life in general and growing up sucks. I'm planning on reading The Long Walk and The Running Man, but is Roadwork any good from this collection?

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Checked out an old copy of the Bachman Books from the library.Rage by Stephen King (Richard Bachman): Stephen King let this go out of print after several school shootings, including one where the book was found in the shooter's locker. Interesting book and supposedly one of the first things he ever wrote, starting it in 1966. The violence isn't the central focus of the book. Rather, the students who are taken hostage bond with their captor and end up telling a series of life stories, focusing on how life in general and growing up sucks. I'm planning on reading The Long Walk and The Running Man, but is Roadwork any good from this collection?

Haven't read it in years but remember Roadwork being the weakest of the 4.

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Just finished Needful Things by Stephen King. I really liked the story and the gradual escalation of events, but the last 50 pages weren't good. Disappointing ending.

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I just finished Consider the Lobster and other Essays, by David Foster Wallace. It's been reviewed in this thread already. The title essay, the piece on the 2000 McCain campaign, and the short piece on the Tracy Austin book review were all particularly insightful reads.

I love this book. A lot of people get scared off of reading anything by DFW because of how big Infinite Jest is, but his essays are incredible as well. I found his essay on the Tracy Austin autobiography to be one of the most insightful essays on sports I've ever read. I'm biased because I'm a huge DFW fan, but I would recommend these essays to anyone. His essay on attending the porn convention is also hilarious and really frightening.
What essay is about the porn convention?
It's called Big Red Son

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Just finished 11/22/63. It is King's best work in a long time. I have read just everything he has written, and haven't enjoyed any of his books over the last 10 years as much as this one.

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Just finished 11/22/63. It is King's best work in a long time. I have read just everything he has written, and haven't enjoyed any of his books over the last 10 years as much as this one.

I'm about 2/3 through and really like it too. I could tell that, whatever mojo many thought he had lost, he was back on his game with his short story collection last year (though I wasn't one who thought all of his recent output was junk). 11/22/63 is a long book, but it doesn't feel bloated at all. It's not edge-of-your-seat suspense 100% of the time, but that's ok - there is some really good writing even in the slower moments.

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Currently reading The Sound And The Fury. I haven't been this confused since reading Ulysses.

The Benjy and Quentin sections are incredibly confusing (intentionally) but you need to embrace that going in. Faulkner attempts to get inside the mind of someone with no concept of time, and someone on the verge of suicide. The first time you read the book you should probably use sparknotes or something to help you understand the first 2 sections. It's well worth it though, because the book is incredible.
It was very good. I did end up using Sparknotes which helped a lot.

Next up, Moby Dick.

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Just finished 11/22/63. It is King's best work in a long time. I have read just everything he has written, and haven't enjoyed any of his books over the last 10 years as much as this one.

I'm about 2/3 through and really like it too. I could tell that, whatever mojo many thought he had lost, he was back on his game with his short story collection last year (though I wasn't one who thought all of his recent output was junk). 11/22/63 is a long book, but it doesn't feel bloated at all. It's not edge-of-your-seat suspense 100% of the time, but that's ok - there is some really good writing even in the slower moments.
Thanks for this. I've been waiting for a little confirmation, as I was really disappointed with his last book I read (Under the Dome.) This one looked good, but ... so did Under the Dome. Been reading a bit of non-fiction stuff lately, so I'm due for a fiction book. I'll probably pick this up soon.

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The Extra 2% by Jonah Keri

Good book for baseball fans, but it is essentially a sequel to Moneyball. Different team, updated philosophy, though still a story of a team with limited resources doing more than most. Keri is a good writer, as evidenced by his articles on Grantland, but the book was just a touch too repetitive of its predecessor to completely pull me in.

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Gave up on Fall of Giants by Ken Follett. Just too ridiculous with all the characters coincidentally meeting each other and major historical figures. Think Forrest Gump, but taking itself seriously.

Flew through Moonlight Mile by Dennis Lehane. Fun, easy sequel to Gone Baby Gone.

Now starting The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, first in a fantasy trilogy. Based entirely on reviews I read on Amazon and my love of Game of Thrones. 100 pages in, and loving it so far.

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Just finished 11/22/63. It is King's best work in a long time. I have read just everything he has written, and haven't enjoyed any of his books over the last 10 years as much as this one.

I'm about 2/3 through and really like it too. I could tell that, whatever mojo many thought he had lost, he was back on his game with his short story collection last year (though I wasn't one who thought all of his recent output was junk). 11/22/63 is a long book, but it doesn't feel bloated at all. It's not edge-of-your-seat suspense 100% of the time, but that's ok - there is some really good writing even in the slower moments.
I am at about the same place. I agree with you. I am really enjoying all the side stories. Some of it is quite moving.

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Finished the Hunger Games trilogy at the behest of my children. The first book had an interesting storyline. The others, not so much. I guess the best thing to be said for it is that it should make a decent movie. Oh, and it did provide an impetus to give my daughter the Foundation trilogy to read. Now on to Freedom by Franzen.

I just read this at the insistence of friends and I pretty much agree. I enjoyed the first one (I would even call it enthralling) the second one was okay but felt more like a retake of the first one and the third one could have been interesting but I felt that the author had zero clear direction for Katniss, frankly I found her almost useless to the plot, which is an odd thing to say about the principle character in a trilogy. On the plus side they violence is creative and entertaining enough (even if it does become derivative over time) that these are very quick reads (I read all of book three on a flight from Brussels to Los Angeles).

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Just finished 11/22/63. It is King's best work in a long time. I have read just everything he has written, and haven't enjoyed any of his books over the last 10 years as much as this one.

I'm about 2/3 through and really like it too. I could tell that, whatever mojo many thought he had lost, he was back on his game with his short story collection last year (though I wasn't one who thought all of his recent output was junk). 11/22/63 is a long book, but it doesn't feel bloated at all. It's not edge-of-your-seat suspense 100% of the time, but that's ok - there is some really good writing even in the slower moments.
I am at about the same place. I agree with you. I am really enjoying all the side stories. Some of it is quite moving.
I'll probably get blasted for this, but I think King is a much better writer now than he was when he was in his "prime". He writes passages/sentences/paragraphs that are as beautiful (the final "Jake" chapter in DT VII had me in tears) and as touching as anything I've ever read. Faulkner, Joyce, and Rand can kiss my ###. King dusts them all.

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Dead Man's Walk & Comanche Moon - Interesting but nothing special. They did a good job of putting the relationship between Gus and Call into perspective (particularly Dead Man's Walk). However I found it difficult to understand how they got such reputations as tremendous Texas Rangers.

They had something like two direct encounters with any of the principle "bad guys", Ahumado, Buffalo Hump, Kicking Wolf, Blue Duck and all of them, except Blue Duck, died of old age. And the Indians pretty much got the better of the Rangers at every turn. I am sure Gus and Call handled the routine cattle rustlers, horse thieves, bandits & Indians with great skill but I would have thought they would have taken down at least one 'Boss' level character.

I guess it's more because they survived than anything else.

I am still unclear on Call's underlying motivation for the way he treated Maggie. It was arbitrary and cruel although it makes his personality in LD more understandable.

Also these books were significantly more violent than Lonesome Dove. By orders of magnitude. The tortures the Indians employ and the general misogyny were painted in vivid detail and plausibility. I found that to be very uncomfortable, even gratuitous, at times. In contrast to what I said about the decent entertainment value of the violence in The Hunger Games (post 4590) the violence in these books were far more difficult to read simply because they have a basis in reality unlike The Hunger Games.

If you're a fan of the series, they are worth a read but don't expect to recapture the magic of Lonesome Dove. I still haven't read Streets of Laredo but I'll get to it at some point soon.

Edited by Chaka

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Faulkner, Joyce, and Rand can kiss my ###. King dusts them all.

I'll give you Rand (of course I'm not really familiar with the work), but you're out of your mind on the others.

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Faulkner, Joyce, and Rand can kiss my ###. King dusts them all.

I'll give you Rand (of course I'm not really familiar with the work), but you're out of your mind on the others.
Probably. I'm not stupid, but working literary acrostics ain't my idea of fun and, anyway, both bore me to tears.

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Dead Man's Walk & Comanche Moon - Interesting but nothing special. They did a good job of putting the relationship between Gus and Call into perspective (particularly Dead Man's Walk). However I found it difficult to understand how they got such reputations as tremendous Texas Rangers.

They had something like two direct encounters with any of the principle "bad guys", Ahumado, Buffalo Hump, Kicking Wolf, Blue Duck and all of them, except Blue Duck, died of old age. And the Indians pretty much got the better of the Rangers at every turn. I am sure Gus and Call handled the routine cattle rustlers, horse thieves, bandits & Indians with great skill but I would have thought they would have taken down at least one 'Boss' level character.

I guess it's more because they survived than anything else.

I am still unclear on Call's underlying motivation for the way he treated Maggie. It was arbitrary and cruel although it makes his personality in LD more understandable.

Also these books were significantly more violent than Lonesome Dove. By orders of magnitude. The tortures the Indians employ and the general misogyny were painted in vivid detail and plausibility. I found that to be very uncomfortable, even gratuitous, at times. In contrast to what I said about the decent entertainment value of the violence in The Hunger Games (post 4590) the violence in these books were far more difficult to read simply because they have a basis in reality unlike The Hunger Games.

If you're a fan of the series, they are worth a read but don't expect to recapture the magic of Lonesome Dove. I still haven't read Streets of Laredo but I'll get to it at some point soon.

Streets is as grim as the others. I'm with you as both are so bleak, they're hard to read. The writing itself is great, but damn I winced a bunch reading 'em. I originally read them in the order published, then did a reread a few years ago in chronological (for the story) order. Man oh man, McMurtry must have either been going through some crazy stuff he needed to bleed out or he's just a seriously messed up dude.

Also agree that they don't match up to Dove but, then again, no other novel does either. The more I read (& I ain't hard to please), the more I'm convinced it's the Great American Novel.

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I just got finished reading The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein. It's a quick read, and a beautiful story told through the eyes of a dog.

I've had this recomemnded to me by Amazon forever. I've stayed away for a lot of reasons, but maybe I shouldn't have. I'll check it out simey and, if I don't like it, it's on you.

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Whew. Finally made it through the Dark Tower series. Really enjoyed it. Seems there is some backlash online about the ending but I can't really think of any other way he could have ended it. :shrug:

I loved the ending.
:goodposting: The more I think about it, the more I like it as well.

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Currently reading The Sound And The Fury. I haven't been this confused since reading Ulysses.

The Benjy and Quentin sections are incredibly confusing (intentionally) but you need to embrace that going in. Faulkner attempts to get inside the mind of someone with no concept of time, and someone on the verge of suicide. The first time you read the book you should probably use sparknotes or something to help you understand the first 2 sections. It's well worth it though, because the book is incredible.
It was very good. I did end up using Sparknotes which helped a lot.

Next up, Moby Dick.

:thumbup: :thumbup: One of my favorites

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Gave up on Fall of Giants by Ken Follett. Just too ridiculous with all the characters coincidentally meeting each other and major historical figures. Think Forrest Gump, but taking itself seriously.

Flew through Moonlight Mile by Dennis Lehane. Fun, easy sequel to Gone Baby Gone.

Now starting The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, first in a fantasy trilogy. Based entirely on reviews I read on Amazon and my love of Game of Thrones. 100 pages in, and loving it so far.

I honestly have no idea what people see in it. Hope you enjoy it, but I just do not get the love, at all. Not sure if I'll try for closure when the 3rd book comes out.

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Dead Man's Walk & Comanche Moon - Interesting but nothing special. They did a good job of putting the relationship between Gus and Call into perspective (particularly Dead Man's Walk). However I found it difficult to understand how they got such reputations as tremendous Texas Rangers.

They had something like two direct encounters with any of the principle "bad guys", Ahumado, Buffalo Hump, Kicking Wolf, Blue Duck and all of them, except Blue Duck, died of old age. And the Indians pretty much got the better of the Rangers at every turn. I am sure Gus and Call handled the routine cattle rustlers, horse thieves, bandits & Indians with great skill but I would have thought they would have taken down at least one 'Boss' level character.

I guess it's more because they survived than anything else.

I am still unclear on Call's underlying motivation for the way he treated Maggie. It was arbitrary and cruel although it makes his personality in LD more understandable.

Also these books were significantly more violent than Lonesome Dove. By orders of magnitude. The tortures the Indians employ and the general misogyny were painted in vivid detail and plausibility. I found that to be very uncomfortable, even gratuitous, at times. In contrast to what I said about the decent entertainment value of the violence in The Hunger Games (post 4590) the violence in these books were far more difficult to read simply because they have a basis in reality unlike The Hunger Games.

If you're a fan of the series, they are worth a read but don't expect to recapture the magic of Lonesome Dove. I still haven't read Streets of Laredo but I'll get to it at some point soon.

Streets is as grim as the others. I'm with you as both are so bleak, they're hard to read. The writing itself is great, but damn I winced a bunch reading 'em. I originally read them in the order published, then did a reread a few years ago in chronological (for the story) order. Man oh man, McMurtry must have either been going through some crazy stuff he needed to bleed out or he's just a seriously messed up dude.

Also agree that they don't match up to Dove but, then again, no other novel does either. The more I read (& I ain't hard to please), the more I'm convinced it's the Great American Novel.

I got to meet him. I spent about 15 mins talking with him. He comes across as a cranky old man. He has a rep of being an ###. Others that have had any interaction with him were surprised I lasted as long as I did.

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I just got finished reading The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein. It's a quick read, and a beautiful story told through the eyes of a dog.

I've had this recomemnded to me by Amazon forever. I've stayed away for a lot of reasons, but maybe I shouldn't have. I'll check it out simey and, if I don't like it, it's on you.
I did not like this book. At first I thought it was pretty good but then it just turned into a depressing story. The dog is pretty superfluous to the story which is a shame as it does not start out that way. It is an easy read though.

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Now starting The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, first in a fantasy trilogy. Based entirely on reviews I read on Amazon and my love of Game of Thrones. 100 pages in, and loving it so far.

Do you like other fantasy, or just GoT?

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I just got finished reading The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein. It's a quick read, and a beautiful story told through the eyes of a dog.

I've had this recomemnded to me by Amazon forever. I've stayed away for a lot of reasons, but maybe I shouldn't have. I'll check it out simey and, if I don't like it, it's on you.
I did not like this book. At first I thought it was pretty good but then it just turned into a depressing story. The dog is pretty superfluous to the story which is a shame as it does not start out that way. It is an easy read though.
I loved the book as did my wife.

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Now starting The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, first in a fantasy trilogy. Based entirely on reviews I read on Amazon and my love of Game of Thrones. 100 pages in, and loving it so far.

Do you like other fantasy, or just GoT?
The Kingkiller series is awesome. I will say I don't know how he's going to wrap it all up in three books.

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Now starting The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, first in a fantasy trilogy. Based entirely on reviews I read on Amazon and my love of Game of Thrones. 100 pages in, and loving it so far.

Do you like other fantasy, or just GoT?
Not much. I've liked Tolkein, CS Lewis, and GoT, though I've enjoyed King's style of fantasy (if that's what you'd call it), some of Neil Gaiman, and a couple of John Connolly books as well. I'm almost embarrassed to admit that while I'm a huge fan of Dan Simmons for much of his work, I couldn't get into his fantasy stuff at all. Just too dense of an alternate world for me. Maybe that's more sci-fi?

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Burning Angel by James Lee Burke

Burke is a poet. His dialogue and descriptive passages are like nothing I've ever seen in the mystery genre.

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Now starting The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, first in a fantasy trilogy. Based entirely on reviews I read on Amazon and my love of Game of Thrones. 100 pages in, and loving it so far.

Do you like other fantasy, or just GoT?
Not much. I've liked Tolkein, CS Lewis, and GoT, though I've enjoyed King's style of fantasy (if that's what you'd call it), some of Neil Gaiman, and a couple of John Connolly books as well. I'm almost embarrassed to admit that while I'm a huge fan of Dan Simmons for much of his work, I couldn't get into his fantasy stuff at all. Just too dense of an alternate world for me. Maybe that's more sci-fi?
I don't really consider myself a "fantasy" guy but I loved GoT. Curious what else is out there.

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Now starting The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, first in a fantasy trilogy. Based entirely on reviews I read on Amazon and my love of Game of Thrones. 100 pages in, and loving it so far.

Do you like other fantasy, or just GoT?
Not much. I've liked Tolkein, CS Lewis, and GoT, though I've enjoyed King's style of fantasy (if that's what you'd call it), some of Neil Gaiman, and a couple of John Connolly books as well. I'm almost embarrassed to admit that while I'm a huge fan of Dan Simmons for much of his work, I couldn't get into his fantasy stuff at all. Just too dense of an alternate world for me. Maybe that's more sci-fi?
I don't really consider myself a "fantasy" guy but I loved GoT. Curious what else is out there.
Loved GOT. It was my first real foray into the fantasy genre. I have never ready any high fantasy like Tolkein or Wheel of Time but I jumped into The Kingkiller Chronicles (Name of the Wind and Wise Man's Fear) after reading GOT based on recommendations and I loved it. Can't recommend the series enough. Is more fantasy orientated than GOT because it has a lot to do with magic but also has some of the realism GOT brought to the fantasy genre. There is some world building involved and you are going to get introduced to a few "non-human" races but nothing to the extent of like legions of orcs and elves (atleast not yet). Crudely it is a mix between GOT and an adult Harry Potter (because of the magic college stuff). The magic system is more reality based (as much as one could be) than Harry Potter and has limitations. It differs from GOT in that it is from the POV of a singular character.

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Burning Angel by James Lee BurkeBurke is a poet. His dialogue and descriptive passages are like nothing I've ever seen in the mystery genre.

:goodposting:

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Now starting The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, first in a fantasy trilogy. Based entirely on reviews I read on Amazon and my love of Game of Thrones. 100 pages in, and loving it so far.

Do you like other fantasy, or just GoT?
Not much. I've liked Tolkein, CS Lewis, and GoT, though I've enjoyed King's style of fantasy (if that's what you'd call it), some of Neil Gaiman, and a couple of John Connolly books as well. I'm almost embarrassed to admit that while I'm a huge fan of Dan Simmons for much of his work, I couldn't get into his fantasy stuff at all. Just too dense of an alternate world for me. Maybe that's more sci-fi?
I don't really consider myself a "fantasy" guy but I loved GoT. Curious what else is out there.
Loved GOT. It was my first real foray into the fantasy genre. I have never ready any high fantasy like Tolkein or Wheel of Time but I jumped into The Kingkiller Chronicles (Name of the Wind and Wise Man's Fear) after reading GOT based on recommendations and I loved it. Can't recommend the series enough. Is more fantasy orientated than GOT because it has a lot to do with magic but also has some of the realism GOT brought to the fantasy genre. There is some world building involved and you are going to get introduced to a few "non-human" races but nothing to the extent of like legions of orcs and elves (atleast not yet). Crudely it is a mix between GOT and an adult Harry Potter (because of the magic college stuff). The magic system is more reality based (as much as one could be) than Harry Potter and has limitations. It differs from GOT in that it is from the POV of a singular character.
Pretty good breakdown here. I'm not too far into Name of the Wind, but I'd agree that there are similarities with GoT. While there are spots that lag, the overall story is very compelling to me. And while it's true there is world-building, it's nothing so dense as some of the stuff I've tried (I could only stay with Tolkein because I'd previously seen the movies). Like GoT - and The Dark Tower as well - I've had no problem envisioning the world and the players, even when they're only alluded to. I guess that's the reason I love GoT and why I've really dug Name of the Wind so far: the fantasy part is enough to be interesting and intriguing, but the realism and grit and the characters are what keep me turning pages.

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Now starting The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, first in a fantasy trilogy. Based entirely on reviews I read on Amazon and my love of Game of Thrones. 100 pages in, and loving it so far.

Do you like other fantasy, or just GoT?
Not much. I've liked Tolkein, CS Lewis, and GoT, though I've enjoyed King's style of fantasy (if that's what you'd call it), some of Neil Gaiman, and a couple of John Connolly books as well. I'm almost embarrassed to admit that while I'm a huge fan of Dan Simmons for much of his work, I couldn't get into his fantasy stuff at all. Just too dense of an alternate world for me. Maybe that's more sci-fi?
I don't really consider myself a "fantasy" guy but I loved GoT. Curious what else is out there.
Loved GOT. It was my first real foray into the fantasy genre. I have never ready any high fantasy like Tolkein or Wheel of Time but I jumped into The Kingkiller Chronicles (Name of the Wind and Wise Man's Fear) after reading GOT based on recommendations and I loved it. Can't recommend the series enough. Is more fantasy orientated than GOT because it has a lot to do with magic but also has some of the realism GOT brought to the fantasy genre. There is some world building involved and you are going to get introduced to a few "non-human" races but nothing to the extent of like legions of orcs and elves (atleast not yet). Crudely it is a mix between GOT and an adult Harry Potter (because of the magic college stuff). The magic system is more reality based (as much as one could be) than Harry Potter and has limitations. It differs from GOT in that it is from the POV of a singular character.
Pretty good breakdown here. I'm not too far into Name of the Wind, but I'd agree that there are similarities with GoT. While there are spots that lag, the overall story is very compelling to me. And while it's true there is world-building, it's nothing so dense as some of the stuff I've tried (I could only stay with Tolkein because I'd previously seen the movies). Like GoT - and The Dark Tower as well - I've had no problem envisioning the world and the players, even when they're only alluded to. I guess that's the reason I love GoT and why I've really dug Name of the Wind so far: the fantasy part is enough to be interesting and intriguing, but the realism and grit and the characters are what keep me turning pages.
I have yet to read Rothfuss's work so I can't offer any opinions on it yet.But a great option in fantasy that minimizes the magic is the First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie. Magic plays a very small role and the books focus much more on the characters. There are slightly less political machinations in Abercrombie's books, but more action and a faster moving story. He does carry the 'gray' characters that Martin is so famous for, where there is no such thing as pure evil or pure good. Plus, the series is done. And Logen is the best fantasy character I have ever read, with Glokta not all that far behind.

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Just finished Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing. Fantastic book.

Are there any other good explorer / survival books? Finished 'The Lost City of Z' a couple months ago and really enjoyed it as well.

I really liked In the Heart of the Sea by Philbrick.

Closely related to this, but much later in history is In Harm's Way by Doug Stanton. This is the story of the USS Indianapolis referenced by Quint in Jaws.

I liked In the Heart of the Sea better of these two.

Two good recommendations. You could also try Skeletons on the Zahara by Dean King and Ghosts of Cape Sabine by Leonard Guttridge. Both compare well with the Shackleton story.
Thanks to both of you for these recommendations. Just finished up In Harm's Way. Got Tear's in Darkness (Bataan death march) queued up. Any other recommendations for these type of books?
Check out Laura Hildebrand's Unbroken about an American POW in Japan.
:goodposting: Excellent book.

:goodposting:

Not a huge book guy - but, more-so recently with the the e-reader/Kindle.

Hard for me to find a good book - not into the sci-fi stuff.

LOVED this book though. :thumbup:

Couldn't put it down and whipped though it.

I guess I'll try Seabiscuit now.

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Burning Angel by James Lee BurkeBurke is a poet. His dialogue and descriptive passages are like nothing I've ever seen in the mystery genre.

Burke is a great writer. I read everything he writes.If you like outside the box mystery, try some of the Irish stuff by Benjamin Black (really John Banville, the greatest living Irish writer) and Tana French's series (In the Woods, The Likeness and The Faithful Place).

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Burning Angel by James Lee BurkeBurke is a poet. His dialogue and descriptive passages are like nothing I've ever seen in the mystery genre.

Burke is a great writer. I read everything he writes.If you like outside the box mystery, try some of the Irish stuff by Benjamin Black (really John Banville, the greatest living Irish writer) and Tana French's series (In the Woods, The Likeness and The Faithful Place).
I've read Banville's Booker winning novel. His writing is incredible, though the story was pretty lacking. Never gave much thought to reading his mystery stuff. I'll add it to the list. And French is one I've been wanting to read for a while now. Thanks for the recommendations.

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But a great option in fantasy that minimizes the magic is the First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie. Magic plays a very small role and the books focus much more on the characters. There are slightly less political machinations in Abercrombie's books, but more action and a faster moving story. He does carry the 'gray' characters that Martin is so famous for, where there is no such thing as pure evil or pure good. Plus, the series is done. And Logen is the best fantasy character I have ever read, with Glokta not all that far behind.

Enjoyed these, too. Loved Glokta. Think there's a prequel or sequel or two out there now, though, with Logen, isn't there? Haven't gotten to them yet.Given what shuke has said he's liked elsewhere in the thread, I think he'd like First Law. I think there are some parallels to both Martin and King in Abercrombie's trilogy.

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Now starting The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss, first in a fantasy trilogy. Based entirely on reviews I read on Amazon and my love of Game of Thrones. 100 pages in, and loving it so far.

Do you like other fantasy, or just GoT?
Not much. I've liked Tolkein, CS Lewis, and GoT, though I've enjoyed King's style of fantasy (if that's what you'd call it), some of Neil Gaiman, and a couple of John Connolly books as well. I'm almost embarrassed to admit that while I'm a huge fan of Dan Simmons for much of his work, I couldn't get into his fantasy stuff at all. Just too dense of an alternate world for me. Maybe that's more sci-fi?
I don't really consider myself a "fantasy" guy but I loved GoT. Curious what else is out there.
Loved GOT. It was my first real foray into the fantasy genre. I have never ready any high fantasy like Tolkein or Wheel of Time but I jumped into The Kingkiller Chronicles (Name of the Wind and Wise Man's Fear) after reading GOT based on recommendations and I loved it. Can't recommend the series enough. Is more fantasy orientated than GOT because it has a lot to do with magic but also has some of the realism GOT brought to the fantasy genre. There is some world building involved and you are going to get introduced to a few "non-human" races but nothing to the extent of like legions of orcs and elves (atleast not yet). Crudely it is a mix between GOT and an adult Harry Potter (because of the magic college stuff). The magic system is more reality based (as much as one could be) than Harry Potter and has limitations. It differs from GOT in that it is from the POV of a singular character.
Pretty good breakdown here. I'm not too far into Name of the Wind, but I'd agree that there are similarities with GoT. While there are spots that lag, the overall story is very compelling to me. And while it's true there is world-building, it's nothing so dense as some of the stuff I've tried (I could only stay with Tolkein because I'd previously seen the movies). Like GoT - and The Dark Tower as well - I've had no problem envisioning the world and the players, even when they're only alluded to. I guess that's the reason I love GoT and why I've really dug Name of the Wind so far: the fantasy part is enough to be interesting and intriguing, but the realism and grit and the characters are what keep me turning pages.
I have yet to read Rothfuss's work so I can't offer any opinions on it yet.But a great option in fantasy that minimizes the magic is the First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie. Magic plays a very small role and the books focus much more on the characters. There are slightly less political machinations in Abercrombie's books, but more action and a faster moving story. He does carry the 'gray' characters that Martin is so famous for, where there is no such thing as pure evil or pure good. Plus, the series is done. And Logen is the best fantasy character I have ever read, with Glokta not all that far behind.
:blackdot: Thanks for the rec.

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But a great option in fantasy that minimizes the magic is the First Law trilogy by Joe Abercrombie. Magic plays a very small role and the books focus much more on the characters. There are slightly less political machinations in Abercrombie's books, but more action and a faster moving story. He does carry the 'gray' characters that Martin is so famous for, where there is no such thing as pure evil or pure good. Plus, the series is done. And Logen is the best fantasy character I have ever read, with Glokta not all that far behind.

Enjoyed these, too. Loved Glokta. Think there's a prequel or sequel or two out there now, though, with Logen, isn't there? Haven't gotten to them yet.Given what shuke has said he's liked elsewhere in the thread, I think he'd like First Law. I think there are some parallels to both Martin and King in Abercrombie's trilogy.
Thanks guys. :blackdot:

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