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Xue

Dynasty & Re-Draft: Mike Evans, WR Tampa Bay Bucs

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There wasn't a thread on Mike Evans, so here we go.

I'll start by squashing the notion that Evans doesn't have enough speed. Here he is burning LSU CB Rashad Robinson who ran a career best 10.46 100m.

http://youtu.be/iTOSJxctBIE?t=2m11s

He's not Mike Wallace, but his combination of size and strength and subtle moves will allow him to regularly get open downfield.

There may be a number of people who will label him "stiff" and question his ability to "sink the hips". Well, Demaryius Thomas wasn't exactly the polished route runner when he came into the league: http://mattwaldmanrsp.com/2012/12/04/influenced-by-excellence-demaryius-thomas/

http://youtu.be/1nDhGrYAx5g?t=4m13s

Evans probably won't and shouldn't be asked to run square ins/outs or comebacks a lot in the NFL.

Edited by Xue

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Beast. Plus he's 20 YO and has only played football for like 3 years. Lol if @ anybody that doesn't think he's going to get better.

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Beast. Plus he's 20 YO and has only played football for like 3 years. Lol if @ anybody that doesn't think he's going to get better.

I have him as the #1 ranked WR.

you?

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Beast. Plus he's 20 YO and has only played football for like 3 years. Lol if @ anybody that doesn't think he's going to get better.

I have him as the #1 ranked WR.

you?

Yes he's my #1 wr. Size/speed/hands combo like Evans has doesn't come along very often. Edited by Milkman

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He has a big body with a large catch radius, soft hands, and an aggressive mentality. In terms of WR skills, he has everything you'd want. Athletically, he's missing a few ingredients. He's an upright long strider with relatively poor suddenness and agility. Without that dynamic athletic ability before and after the catch, he may struggle to separate and gain YAC. The track record of big-framed guys who didn't have phone booth quickness isn't that great. Mike Williams, Reggie Williams, Matt Jones, and Jon Baldwin have all been big busts in the NFL. At the pro level, a big guy who can't move is generally pretty easy prey for defenders. Evans is neither blazing fast nor particularly quick and fluid, so it's unclear how he's going to find space against pro caliber defenders. The simple answer might be that he won't find space, and that if he's going to be successful then it will be entirely because of his tall frame and large catch radius. In other words, he'll need to be a guy who can consistently catch the ball even when he's covered.

I won't guarantee that he'll bust. He's too highly-regarded by too many people for me to dismiss the possibility of him being successful, but I wouldn't pay market value for him in FF or in the NFL. Much rather invest in players who can create space for themselves and make things happen with the ball in their hands.

Edited by EBF

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outstanding post. About three sentences in before your list . . . I thought . . . "he is describing Mike Williams"

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He has a big body with a large catch radius, soft hands, and an aggressive mentality. In terms of WR skills, he has everything you'd want. Athletically, he's missing a few ingredients. He's an upright long strider with relatively poor suddenness and agility. Without that dynamic athletic ability before and after the catch, he may struggle to separate and gain YAC. The track record of big-framed guys who didn't have phone booth quickness isn't that great. Mike Williams, Reggie Williams, Matt Jones, and Jon Baldwin have all been big busts in the NFL. At the pro level, a big guy who can't move is generally pretty easy prey for defenders. Evans is neither blazing fast nor particularly quick and fluid, so it's unclear how he's going to find space against pro caliber defenders. The simple answer might be that he won't find space, and that if he's going to be successful then it will be entirely because of his tall frame and large catch radius. In other words, he'll need to be a guy who can consistently catch the ball even when he's covered.

I won't guarantee that he'll bust. He's too highly-regarded by too many people for me to dismiss the possibility of him being successful, but I wouldn't pay market value for him in FF or in the NFL. Much rather invest in players who can create space for themselves and make things happen with the ball in their hands.

You'd rather not invest in players who fit the profile of the WRs who dominate the NFL? You know, "big" WRs. You'd rather have the Kendall Wrights and Marqise Lees? I'd rather invest in WRs who can actually play WR and make things happen downfield, not catch short passes all day. I'd rather have the doubles and homerun hitter than the singles hitter who needs to steal bases.

He's not a slot receiver so he won't need to create as much space. He's shown more speed than Alshon Jeffery did. The one WR he reminds me of most is Michael Floyd: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4q0gOHDpfTU

I don't know why you value YAC so much. It's probably one of the least important criteria for evaluating a WR. I would rather have a WR who can make plays downfield than one who has to be forcefed because he can't (Cordarrelle Patterson).

You've mentioned before you don't like the Vincent Jackson comparison, yet look at Jackson's YAC numbers for his career, especially his Charger days: http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/players/7237/

That's fairly below average, yet you think Jackson is a better "mover" than Evans. Jackson has been a "catch and fall" receiver for most of his career.

Let's look at Brandon Marshall, another common comparison that you disagree with: http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/players/7868/

Marshall's YAC numbers have been declining, yet he's still producing at a high level.

How about Marques Colston: Another guy whose YAC numbers on the decline, yet still producing. I bet he can't separate anymore.

Hmm....AJ Green: Fairly average.

Larry Fitzgerald: Really poor YAC numbers, get him off my team! How about a "small" WR, Marvin Harrison: 3.3 YAC for his career, no don't want him either. More? Um...Plaxico Burress: 3.2 career YAC; yea he wasn't any good.

Evans likely won't be among the yearly leaders in YAC like Demaryius Thomas, Anquan Boldin, Michael Crabtree, Keenan Allen, Da'Rick Rogers, Julio Jones, Terrell Owens, but that one aspect doesn't make him less of a prospect.

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He has a big body with a large catch radius, soft hands, and an aggressive mentality. In terms of WR skills, he has everything you'd want. Athletically, he's missing a few ingredients. He's an upright long strider with relatively poor suddenness and agility. Without that dynamic athletic ability before and after the catch, he may struggle to separate and gain YAC. The track record of big-framed guys who didn't have phone booth quickness isn't that great. Mike Williams, Reggie Williams, Matt Jones, and Jon Baldwin have all been big busts in the NFL. At the pro level, a big guy who can't move is generally pretty easy prey for defenders. Evans is neither blazing fast nor particularly quick and fluid, so it's unclear how he's going to find space against pro caliber defenders. The simple answer might be that he won't find space, and that if he's going to be successful then it will be entirely because of his tall frame and large catch radius. In other words, he'll need to be a guy who can consistently catch the ball even when he's covered.

I won't guarantee that he'll bust. He's too highly-regarded by too many people for me to dismiss the possibility of him being successful, but I wouldn't pay market value for him in FF or in the NFL. Much rather invest in players who can create space for themselves and make things happen with the ball in their hands.

You'd rather not invest in players who fit the profile of the WRs who dominate the NFL? You know, "big" WRs. You'd rather have the Kendall Wrights and Marqise Lees? I'd rather invest in WRs who can actually play WR and make things happen downfield, not catch short passes all day. I'd rather have the doubles and homerun hitter than the singles hitter who needs to steal bases.

He's not a slot receiver so he won't need to create as much space. He's shown more speed than Alshon Jeffery did. The one WR he reminds me of most is Michael Floyd: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4q0gOHDpfTU

I don't know why you value YAC so much. It's probably one of the least important criteria for evaluating a WR. I would rather have a WR who can make plays downfield than one who has to be forcefed because he can't (Cordarrelle Patterson).

You've mentioned before you don't like the Vincent Jackson comparison, yet look at Jackson's YAC numbers for his career, especially his Charger days: http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/players/7237/

That's fairly below average, yet you think Jackson is a better "mover" than Evans. Jackson has been a "catch and fall" receiver for most of his career.

Let's look at Brandon Marshall, another common comparison that you disagree with: http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/players/7868/

Marshall's YAC numbers have been declining, yet he's still producing at a high level.

How about Marques Colston: Another guy whose YAC numbers on the decline, yet still producing. I bet he can't separate anymore.

Hmm....AJ Green: Fairly average.

Larry Fitzgerald: Really poor YAC numbers, get him off my team! How about a "small" WR, Marvin Harrison: 3.3 YAC for his career, no don't want him either. More? Um...Plaxico Burress: 3.2 career YAC; yea he wasn't any good.

Evans likely won't be among the yearly leaders in YAC like Demaryius Thomas, Anquan Boldin, Michael Crabtree, Keenan Allen, Da'Rick Rogers, Julio Jones, Terrell Owens, but that one aspect doesn't make him less of a prospect.

:goodposting::goodposting:

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You'd rather not invest in players who fit the profile of the WRs who dominate the NFL? You know, "big" WRs. You'd rather have the Kendall Wrights and Marqise Lees? I'd rather invest in WRs who can actually play WR and make things happen downfield, not catch short passes all day. I'd rather have the doubles and homerun hitter than the singles hitter who needs to steal bases.

You're acting as if it's an either-or situation. Either you get a big WR or you get a mobile WR. Why not have both? That's what you want.

Guys like Andre Johnson, Larry Fitzgerald, Jimmy Graham, Dez Bryant, Demaryius Thomas, and Julio Jones are special because they combine a big frame with little man mobility. That's the gold standard at WR and TE. Those guys are extremely rare though. If you're lucky, you might get one per draft class.

If I were drawing up the perfect WR prospect, he'd have all of these qualities:

- speed

- height

- strength

- hands

- quickness

- fluidity

- YAC ability

The problem is that you very rarely find someone who checks every box. When you start taking away traits, it becomes like a game of Jenga. Remove too many pieces and the player will collapse. Without question one of the biggest challenges of ranking prospects is trying to understand their flaws and then trying to understand how those flaws will impact their chances of success. When you have a guy with a big body and mediocre movement skills such as Mike Evans, do you take him over a guy with a small frame and inferior hands but better movement skills such as Marqise Lee? These are not easy decisions, but generally I'd rather have a small receiver with great movement than a big body who can't move well.

There's no set formula for answering these questions though and that's why I think it can be hard to differentiate from players with different flaws, but similar draft projections. This year provides no shortage of examples. Donte Moncrief is the biggest height/weight/speed freak in this WR class, but he's also clearly below many of the other receivers in terms of quickness/fluidity/hands and some other categories. Odell Beckham can't come close to matching Moncrief's size or raw speed, but he's a better lateral mover. Better in space and a more crisp route runner. Who has the better career? It is not necessarily an easy call.

A lot of the work I've done on WRs over the past couple years has been trying to establish some kind of hierarchy of traits. That has been helpful, but aside from the occasional can't-miss lock like Dez Bryant, every player is a new puzzle where you have to try to understand how the pieces will work together, if at all. Generally speaking, I tend to value athletic qualities higher than minor aspects of technique. Within that umbrella, I tend to value quickness and economy of movement more than sheer speed (most of the elite WRs in the NFL aren't BLAZING fast). And strength/size play a role as well, because guys like Andre Roberts and Ace Sanders are great athletes, but without the #1 WR size there's a lower cap on what they can become.

My breakdown of Evans would look something like:

- speed - B

- height - A

- strength - A-

- hands - A

- quickness - C+

- fluidity - C+

- YAC ability - C+

I don't know what that equates to, but it's probably not a slam dunk lock elite prospect. Now it might be that I'm just mistaken when it comes to assessing his movement skills, but to my credit there are plenty of other people who see the same things. If you value "hands technique" and catch radius and height above all other traits then you're going to like Evans a lot. If you put movement skills at the top of the pyramid then he's probably not going to be the WR of choice for you. Of the top 5-10 WRs in this draft, he is one of the worst in those categories. So it's question of whether or not his strengths will be enough to offset his deficits.

Edited by EBF
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Yeah Evans is more fluid than you're giving him credit for EBF. He's not Marqise Lee fluid but I'd say he's as fluid as Jimmy Graham for instance. Probably more fluid than Graham. Plus he is nearly as tall, jumps just as high, and is faster.

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Fluidity is a little too subjective for my taste EBF.

You'd rather not invest in players who fit the profile of the WRs who dominate the NFL? You know, "big" WRs. You'd rather have the Kendall Wrights and Marqise Lees? I'd rather invest in WRs who can actually play WR and make things happen downfield, not catch short passes all day. I'd rather have the doubles and homerun hitter than the singles hitter who needs to steal bases.

You're acting as if it's an either-or situation. Either you get a big WR or you get a mobile WR. Why not have both? That's what you want.

Guys like Andre Johnson, Larry Fitzgerald, Jimmy Graham, Dez Bryant, Demaryius Thomas, and Julio Jones are special because they combine a big frame with little man mobility. That's the gold standard at WR and TE. Those guys are extremely rare though. If you're lucky, you might get one per draft class.

If I were drawing up the perfect WR prospect, he'd have all of these qualities:

- speed

- height

- strength

- hands

- quickness

- fluidity

- YAC ability

The problem is that you very rarely find someone who checks every box. When you start taking away traits, it becomes like a game of Jenga. Remove too many pieces and the player will collapse. Without question one of the biggest challenges of ranking prospects is trying to understand their flaws and then trying to understand how those flaws will impact their chances of success. When you have a guy with a big body and mediocre movement skills such as Mike Evans, do you take him over a guy with a small frame and inferior hands but better movement skills such as Marqise Lee? These are not easy decisions, but generally I'd rather have a small receiver with great movement than a big body who can't move well.

There's no set formula for answering these questions though and that's why I think it can be hard to differentiate from players with different flaws, but similar draft projections. This year provides no shortage of examples. Donte Moncrief is the biggest height/weight/speed freak in this WR class, but he's also clearly below many of the other receivers in terms of quickness/fluidity/hands and some other categories. Odell Beckham can't come close to matching Moncrief's size or raw speed, but he's a better lateral mover. Better in space and a more crisp route runner. Who has the better career? It is not necessarily an easy call.

A lot of the work I've done on WRs over the past couple years has been trying to establish some kind of hierarchy of traits. That has been helpful, but aside from the occasional can't-miss lock like Dez Bryant, every player is a new puzzle where you have to try to understand how the pieces will work together, if at all. Generally speaking, I tend to value athletic qualities higher than minor aspects of technique. Within that umbrella, I tend to value quickness and economy of movement more than sheer speed (most of the elite WRs in the NFL aren't BLAZING fast). And strength/size play a role as well, because guys like Andre Roberts and Ace Sanders are great athletes, but without the #1 WR size there's a lower cap on what they can become.

My breakdown of Evans would look something like:

- speed - B

- height - A

- strength - A-

- hands - A

- quickness - C+

- fluidity - C+

- YAC ability - C+

I don't know what that equates to, but it's probably not a slam dunk lock elite prospect. Now it might be that I'm just mistaken when it comes to assessing his movement skills, but to my credit there are plenty of other people who see the same things. If you value "hands technique" and catch radius and height above all other traits then you're going to like Evans a lot. If you put movement skills at the top of the pyramid then he's probably not going to be the WR of choice for you. Of the top 5-10 WRs in this draft, he is one of the worst in those categories. So it's question of whether or not his strengths will be enough to offset his deficits.

So what's his overall grade for you? I was close to google'n a GPA calculator lol jk

It's not that easy to tell which grades are actually significant either. YPR is a much better indicator of future performance in the NFL than YAC. I can tell you that for sure. YAC is already factored into the equation. A receiver, statistically, is quantified by yards and receptions pretty much. TDs are high variance.

I gave Evans strength a solid 'A' based on his size alone. If he's in the weight room this summer he will be impossible to jam at the line or fight for balls in the air. His arms are so dam long (freakishly long) that benching might be hard for him. A real head scratcher. He's not an "A+' physically, but he's an 'A-'. If he adds more muscle definition he's definitely a solid 'A' in that department considering his height/weight/length.

I see an WR who could be elite on film. I don't throw that around often. I wish I could rage against the machine here, but he is everything people say he is.

Edited by ShaHBucks

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Yeah Evans is more fluid than you're giving him credit for EBF. He's not Marqise Lee fluid but I'd say he's as fluid as Jimmy Graham for instance. Probably more fluid than Graham. Plus he is nearly as tall, jumps just as high, and is faster.

Graham is pretty sneaky for a guy his size. I wouldn't say he's elusive, but he can move around a bit. Probably more than Evans.

If you want to compare them directly as athletes based on the measurables we have:

Mike Evans

Height - 6'4.6"

Weight - 231

40 - 4.53

Vertical - 37"

3 Cone - 7.08

Bench - 12

20 yard shuttle - 4.26

Jimmy Graham

Height - 6'6.2"

Weight - 260

40 - 4.53

Vertical - 38.5"

3 Cone - 6.90

Bench - 15

20 yard shuttle - 4.39-4.45

Evans was better in exactly one drill: the 20 yard shuttle. Graham jumped higher, benched more, had a faster three cone time, and an identical 40 time despite having ~1.5 inches and 30 pounds on Evans. When a 6'6" 260 pound TE is putting up numbers on par with a WR who everyone expects to go in the first round, that's how you know you might be dealing with a rare athlete.

Evans was not a top performer in any drill at the combine. The only thing that's special about him is his height/weight, whereas even if you took that out of the equation for Graham he would still rank near the top of his position in several combine drills compared to any recent draft class. In other words, Graham = special athlete + special size whereas Evans = mediocre athlete + special size.

Edited by EBF
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I gave Evans strength a solid 'A' based on his size alone. If he's in the weight room this summer he will be impossible to jam at the line or fight for balls in the air. His arms are so dam long (freakishly long) that benching might be hard for him. A real head scratcher. He's not an "A+' physically, but he's an 'A-'. If he adds more muscle definition he's definitely a solid 'A' in that department considering his height/weight/length.

That might be how it plays out. I think the question here is pretty clear: Can his height/length/hands compensate for his otherwise pedestrian athleticism? The fact that everyone has him projected as a first round pick suggests that a lot of people think the answer to that question is yes. They might be right.

On the other hand, I've seen some other big-bodied WRs flop hard in the NFL in recent years. I already mentioned Reggie Williams, Mike Williams Matt Jones, and Jon Baldwin. Those flops would give me a little bit of pause before going all-in on another tall guy who doesn't have great separation skills.

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I gave Evans strength a solid 'A' based on his size alone. If he's in the weight room this summer he will be impossible to jam at the line or fight for balls in the air. His arms are so dam long (freakishly long) that benching might be hard for him. A real head scratcher. He's not an "A+' physically, but he's an 'A-'. If he adds more muscle definition he's definitely a solid 'A' in that department considering his height/weight/length.

That might be how it plays out. I think the question here is pretty clear: Can his height/length/hands compensate for his otherwise pedestrian athleticism? The fact that everyone has him projected as a first round pick suggests that a lot of people think the answer to that question is yes. They might be right.

On the other hand, I've seen some other big-bodied WRs flop hard in the NFL in recent years. I already mentioned Reggie Williams, Mike Williams Matt Jones, and Jon Baldwin. Those flops would give me a little bit of pause before going all-in on another tall guy who doesn't have great separation skills.

But what about the chance of drafting Dez Bryant, Brandon Marshall, D. Thomas or M. Colston? The risk of drafting Jon Baldwin comes with the territory, though Evans is much better on the field.

You might just see Evans as having decent speed and agility, but or his size he is very athlete. You have to take all that he brings to the table into consideration, not just the facts that support your case.

Edited by ShaHBucks

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You'd rather not invest in players who fit the profile of the WRs who dominate the NFL? You know, "big" WRs. You'd rather have the Kendall Wrights and Marqise Lees? I'd rather invest in WRs who can actually play WR and make things happen downfield, not catch short passes all day. I'd rather have the doubles and homerun hitter than the singles hitter who needs to steal bases.

You're acting as if it's an either-or situation. Either you get a big WR or you get a mobile WR. Why not have both? That's what you want.

Guys like Andre Johnson, Larry Fitzgerald, Jimmy Graham, Dez Bryant, Demaryius Thomas, and Julio Jones are special because they combine a big frame with little man mobility. That's the gold standard at WR and TE. Those guys are extremely rare though. If you're lucky, you might get one per draft class.

I don't know why you label him a pedestrian. He burned a CB who runs a 10.46 100m.

Evans isn't and doesn't need to be on those guys' level. Being on Brandon Marshall's, Vincent Jackson's, and Michael Floyd's level is just fine.

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Evans probably won't and shouldn't be asked to run square ins/outs or comebacks a lot in the NFL.

This really struck me as an odd evaluation. Is your position that he's incapable of running these parts of the route tree or that a team would truncate its route tree significantly for its presumable WR1 because those routes don't have value in their offensive scheming?

Not taking issue with your overall evaluation, though I do see where player evaluations do become personal with you. Just wondering what your basis of thought is in this case.

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I gave Evans strength a solid 'A' based on his size alone. If he's in the weight room this summer he will be impossible to jam at the line or fight for balls in the air. His arms are so dam long (freakishly long) that benching might be hard for him. A real head scratcher. He's not an "A+' physically, but he's an 'A-'. If he adds more muscle definition he's definitely a solid 'A' in that department considering his height/weight/length.

That might be how it plays out. I think the question here is pretty clear: Can his height/length/hands compensate for his otherwise pedestrian athleticism? The fact that everyone has him projected as a first round pick suggests that a lot of people think the answer to that question is yes. They might be right.

On the other hand, I've seen some other big-bodied WRs flop hard in the NFL in recent years. I already mentioned Reggie Williams, Mike Williams Matt Jones, and Jon Baldwin. Those flops would give me a little bit of pause before going all-in on another tall guy who doesn't have great separation skills.

I feel like I'm in the Manziel thread where people haven't watched the player.

He creates space in a way I haven't noticed many others doing. He "boxes out" better than and more often than I recall anyone else doing so. Not just in the end zone, but a common strategy by him anywhere on the field. He isn't a fluid and natural body control guy, but he dominates and creates his own space in his own way. He can move well enough, but when the ball is in the air he does a great job preventing the defender from playing the ball.

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Some people really outthink themselves in evaluating players. It's almost as if they are trying to create a foolproof formula for quantifying risk, and IMO it can't be done. The unknown variable of the human factor is simply too great.

As such, I try to simply my evaluationing process. In WRs I don't worry so much about measurables as I do about 3 things at the NFL level - 1) can they get separation? 2) Are their hands reliable? And 3) are they intelligent enough to think beyond the assigned route?

2 things create reliable separation in pro WRs - suddenness and fear. Pro CBs know the tricks of the trade when it comes to reading body movement and fakes, and know how to be physical enough to take guys off their routes - either pressing at the line, a subtle tug or hip as the WR slows, or putting their body where the WR wants to go before he gets there. Sudden ability means a WR can get into the CB and then get away from him before he can recover - and recovery for pro CBs is everything. If a WR doesn't have suddenness, then he has to create fear in the CB - that if the CB misses him he can't recover. That comes in two forms: raw speed or YAC. Either one makes a pro CB adjust their coverage to avoid big plays, and consequently creates separation. Without separation, a WR can be the biggest and most athletic guy in the world, but his catch window for the QB is only what the CB can't get to - meaning predominantly high throws to the far shoulder. That's too small for a QB to throw to often and be able to rely on.

Once a guy creates the window that a QB wants to throw into often, he has to be able to reliably hand catch the ball. Pro CBs are masters at getting a hand on an arm or tip the ball just after it arrives. A reliable target catches the ball away from his body, secures it quickly, and has good enough hands to hang onto the ball when conditions aren't perfect - the ball flutters or is tipped, someone is tugging at one arm, vision get screened for an instant, etc.

Then the WR has to be able to get on the same page as the QB. When to break off a route because the CB overplays or overcommits to the designed catch area, when to break off for the back shoulder throw, how to get past the down marker and still create room in order to get the first down. It's not necessarily high IQ as much as it is street smarts - football IQ if you will - and willingness to communicate with the QB.

Give me a WR with those three qualities and the rest is all gravy. It's why I was high on Keenan Allen last year and Lee this year. Take all your combine BS and use it as you will, I'll take the guy who knows how to get open, catches the football when he does, and is on the same page as the QB. That's the guy the QB wants to target a lot. After that, I'll look for all the shiny baubles that might make him special.

With Evans, I see a real problem with his separation ability. He definitely does not have suddenness, and he doesn't have the deep speed or YAC ability that creates fear. Because he can beat a real fast college CB doesn't mean that he'll reliably beat pro CBs who have technique, knowledge, experience, and catch up speed. So I worry about his ability to be a top pro WR. It doesn't mean with his great hands and his size that he won't have value. I just don't see where he is going to excel as a WR1 in the NFL.

Edited by Bronco Billy
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No way I have him over Watkins. To be quite honest, Vincent Jackson in his upside but he seems a lot less sudden than Jackson. I worry he's more Malcolm Floyd than Vincent Jackson.

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Separation is overrated when you're 6'4, with long arms, and can jump out of the gym. Evans is always open.

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Separation is overrated when you're 6'4, with long arms, and can jump out of the gym. Evans is always open.

If that's your criteria, so be it. I'll respectfully disagree. We'll see who is right in a couple of years.

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Yeah Evans is more fluid than you're giving him credit for EBF. He's not Marqise Lee fluid but I'd say he's as fluid as Jimmy Graham for instance. Probably more fluid than Graham. Plus he is nearly as tall, jumps just as high, and is faster.

Graham is pretty sneaky for a guy his size. I wouldn't say he's elusive, but he can move around a bit. Probably more than Evans.

If you want to compare them directly as athletes based on the measurables we have:

Mike Evans

Height - 6'4.6"

Weight - 231

40 - 4.53

Vertical - 37"

3 Cone - 7.08

Bench - 12

20 yard shuttle - 4.26

Jimmy Graham

Height - 6'6.2"

Weight - 260

40 - 4.53

Vertical - 38.5"

3 Cone - 6.90

Bench - 15

20 yard shuttle - 4.39-4.45

Evans was better in exactly one drill: the 20 yard shuttle. Graham jumped higher, benched more, had a faster three cone time, and an identical 40 time despite having ~1.5 inches and 30 pounds on Evans. When a 6'6" 260 pound TE is putting up numbers on par with a WR who everyone expects to go in the first round, that's how you know you might be dealing with a rare athlete.

Evans was not a top performer in any drill at the combine. The only thing that's special about him is his height/weight, whereas even if you took that out of the equation for Graham he would still rank near the top of his position in several combine drills compared to any recent draft class. In other words, Graham = special athlete + special size whereas Evans = mediocre athlete + special size.

How old was Graham when he did his combine? Evans is pretty young. I wouldn't be surprised if his metrics got a little bit better in 2 years.

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I don't want to say this is Matt Jones all over again because, without the off the field issues, there may have been something there but I'll relate it to say that, while he has the physical tools, I don't think he has that suddeness to shake defenders.

Can he win a jump ball? Sure.

Are there teams out there that will play into that? Sure.

Are there MANY teams out there that will not play into that and expect him to be more refined? Yes.

And will that limit him on certain teams because he's not going to be moved around a lot ? Yes

I have two dogs that like to chase squirels, rabbits, and birds. The one that everyone always thinks is the fast one never comes close. The one that is extremely sudden in his movements is dangerous. He's got separation skillz :)

Its kind of the same with Evans. Definitely a role but that's the danger; it's a role versus a dominanting physical presence such as Calvin or Andre Johnson back in his prime that can do it all anywhere on the field. I think Evans will be more limited, more like VJAX. Ok, so people say "well VJAX is awesome". Yeah, but he is also feast or famine and it took him a handful of years to get to where he was and, in the beginning, he was greatly benefited by being on a team that had a terrific deep-ball thrower.

He is absolutely a valuable FF commodity but I think it may be year 4 before we ever see what we are expecting right away.

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Evans has grown on me over the offseason. He is more athletic than I thought based on the combine and that is a positive. Still, I've got concerns about his stiffness from watching his real game action. He isn't very polished WR as well. He was able to muscle thru college DBs and also has enough speed to run by them, when given the chance. He was a very difficult draw for college CBs because of his size/speed combo. In reality however he doesn't posses great speed, just great size. No college CBs dared to jam him because he was simply too powerful. That won't happen in the NFL. Actually, I think NFL CBs will eat him up at the LOS because he doesn't use his hands efficiently and really survived on that raw power and size. That's not intended to be ultra negative, many WRs have this transitional gap. I think it will be a bigger learning curve than normal for Evans, though. On top of that I worry about his stiffness in making that transition. This same attribute trickled over to him boxing out severely undersized sized CBs on deep passes down field where at times it looked like a C boxing out a G on a basketball court. NFL DBs won't be such easy prey. I don't think he's particularly good at tracking the ball in the air, one of my big pet peeves in watching WRs. The good thing is although he's not great at it, he isn't bad at it either. He's no Baldwin but he's no AJ Green, in other words. He's body and physicality allow him easier corrections to this which is a good thing. Maybe I'm being overly critical of Evans but I think there is a high amount of hype surrounding him so I'm going to be critical.

Entering the offseason I had Evans out of my top 5 and now he's clearly in it. Big guys who can run and catch as well as him are always going to have a place in the NFL. I hope he lands in a situation with a good WR coach because he has natural ability and can improve on many of the things I'm concerned about if taught properly and a willingness to work are there.

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Evans has grown on me over the offseason. He is more athletic than I thought based on the combine and that is a positive. Still, I've got concerns about his stiffness from watching his real game action. He isn't very polished WR as well. He was able to muscle thru college DBs and also has enough speed to run by them, when given the chance. He was a very difficult draw for college CBs because of his size/speed combo. In reality however he doesn't posses great speed, just great size. No college CBs dared to jam him because he was simply too powerful. That won't happen in the NFL. Actually, I think NFL CBs will eat him up at the LOS because he doesn't use his hands efficiently and really survived on that raw power and size. That's not intended to be ultra negative, many WRs have this transitional gap. I think it will be a bigger learning curve than normal for Evans, though. On top of that I worry about his stiffness in making that transition. This same attribute trickled over to him boxing out severely undersized sized CBs on deep passes down field where at times it looked like a C boxing out a G on a basketball court. NFL DBs won't be such easy prey. I don't think he's particularly good at tracking the ball in the air, one of my big pet peeves in watching WRs. The good thing is although he's not great at it, he isn't bad at it either. He's no Baldwin but he's no AJ Green, in other words. He's body and physicality allow him easier corrections to this which is a good thing. Maybe I'm being overly critical of Evans but I think there is a high amount of hype surrounding him so I'm going to be critical.

Entering the offseason I had Evans out of my top 5 and now he's clearly in it. Big guys who can run and catch as well as him are always going to have a place in the NFL. I hope he lands in a situation with a good WR coach because he has natural ability and can improve on many of the things I'm concerned about if taught properly and a willingness to work are there.

You bring out a good point in terms of the press coverage. A few years ago I did a little research on what the heck was slowing down the development of guys like Dez Bryand and Michael Crabtree and I saw that it was because in that conference, NOBODY ever pressed them and it took each of them some time to learn it in the NFL. I bought on Dez and got in at the right time BUT the moral of that story is it took even the great Dez Bryant and Michael Crabtree multiple seasons to get into their groove.

That is, in part, why I say temper the expectations and it may take a while because lots of guys can be big like Ramses Barden (remember when everyone said he would be a nightmare?). But some of these guys have the Jimmy Graham athleticism to use it. Some don't. And I look at Evans and I think all the things everyone else does but I don't see the suddeness and I know he hasn't learn to beat the press yet.

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Some people really outthink themselves in evaluating players. It's almost as if they are trying to create a foolproof formula for quantifying risk, and IMO it can't be done. The unknown variable of the human factor is simply too great.

As such, I try to simply my evaluationing process. In WRs I don't worry so much about measurables as I do about 3 things at the NFL level - 1) can they get separation? 2) Are their hands reliable? And 3) are they intelligent enough to think beyond the assigned route?

2 things create reliable separation in pro WRs - suddenness and fear. Pro CBs know the tricks of the trade when it comes to reading body movement and fakes, and know how to be physical enough to take guys off their routes - either pressing at the line, a subtle tug or hip as the WR slows, or putting their body where the WR wants to go before he gets there. Sudden ability means a WR can get into the CB and then get away from him before he can recover - and recovery for pro CBs is everything. If a WR doesn't have suddenness, then he has to create fear in the CB - that if the CB misses him he can't recover. That comes in two forms: raw speed or YAC. Either one makes a pro CB adjust their coverage to avoid big plays, and consequently creates separation. Without separation, a WR can be the biggest and most athletic guy in the world, but his catch window for the QB is only what the CB can't get to - meaning predominantly high throws to the far shoulder. That's too small for a QB to throw to often and be able to rely on.

Once a guy creates the window that a QB wants to throw into often, he has to be able to reliably hand catch the ball. Pro CBs are masters at getting a hand on an arm or tip the ball just after it arrives. A reliable target catches the ball away from his body, secures it quickly, and has good enough hands to hang onto the ball when conditions aren't perfect - the ball flutters or is tipped, someone is tugging at one arm, vision get screened for an instant, etc.

Then the WR has to be able to get on the same page as the QB. When to break off a route because the CB overplays or overcommits to the designed catch area, when to break off for the back shoulder throw, how to get past the down marker and still create room in order to get the first down. It's not necessarily high IQ as much as it is street smarts - football IQ if you will - and willingness to communicate with the QB.

Give me a WR with those three qualities and the rest is all gravy. It's why I was high on Keenan Allen last year and Lee this year. Take all your combine BS and use it as you will, I'll take the guy who knows how to get open, catches the football when he does, and is on the same page as the QB. That's the guy the QB wants to target a lot. After that, I'll look for all the shiny baubles that might make him special.

With Evans, I see a real problem with his separation ability. He definitely does not have suddenness, and he doesn't have the deep speed or YAC ability that creates fear. Because he can beat a real fast college CB doesn't mean that he'll reliably beat pro CBs who have technique, knowledge, experience, and catch up speed. So I worry about his ability to be a top pro WR. It doesn't mean with his great hands and his size that he won't have value. I just don't see where he is going to excel as a WR1 in the NFL.

Technique creates separation more than anything else. Technique is the only reason guys like Wayne and Boldin can be effective well after their physical tools have eroded.

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Then the WR has to be able to get on the same page as the QB. When to break off a route because the CB overplays or overcommits to the designed catch area, when to break off for the back shoulder throw, how to get past the down marker and still create room in order to get the first down. It's not necessarily high IQ as much as it is street smarts - football IQ if you will - and willingness to communicate with the QB.

This is something Evans does extremely well. He made Manziel look great by knowing how to get open again after he started scrambling.

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Jeremiah: Mike Evans will be better rookie than Sammy Watkins

By Bryan Fischer

College Football 24/7 writer

If you're on Twitter or walking around Southern California and happen to run into NFL Media analyst Daniel Jeremiah, it's ok if you stop him to tease him a little about how highly he thinks of Clemson wide receiver Sammy Watkins.

Jeremiah lists the speedy pass catcher as the second best prospect in the 2014 NFL Draft and has been regularly touting Watkins as a solution for teams picking very early in the first round. That's what makes his statement on Wednesday's "Path to the Draft" on NFL Network all the more shocking.

"I do love Sammy Watkins, but I think Year 1 we're going to be talking more about Mike Evans just because the touchdown numbers will be higher," Jeremiah said. "If you come into the NFL, you're going to have to learn an NFL offense and he'll need to continue to develop as a route runner. But I think immediately he'll be a red zone presence and you will see touchdowns."

Take note fantasy football players.

Evans will have the spotlight on him Thursday at Texas A&M as he goes through his much publicized pro day with quarterback Johnny Manziel. Known for his size at 6-foot-5 and 231 pounds, Evans will be looking to show scouts he is more than just the big numbers he put up in college and that he has the acceleration to be a threat anywhere on the field.

A number of teams could be landing spots for the productive receiver early in the first round with mock drafts slotting him everywhere from the Buffalo Bills and the ninth overall selection to the New York Giants at pick No. 12.

The Lions have not so quietly emerged as a possible landing spot as well based on recent talk. The team might just be trying to scare every defensive coordinator in the league with the threat of Evans complimenting Calvin Johnson, but Detroit hasn't exactly hid their lust for the elite receivers in this year's draft.

"His catch radius is unbelievable," NFL Media analyst Charles Davis said about Evans. "But I still think Sammy Watkins is the clearer choice here (for best rookie). I can do all the things you can with Mike Evans with Sammy Watkins faster and quicker. He goes up and competes for the football and when he does, he'll drop a shoulder on you."

Based on those scouting reports, a team will clearly be happy if it can land either guy. If you're the general manger of a fantasy team though, Evans should be your pick first.

"Getting me to say something negative about Sammy Watkins will not happen," Jeremiah said. "Just talking pure touchdowns in year one, I think Mike Evans is going to have bigger numbers. That size you cannot coach, you'll see cornerbacks having a difficult time matching up with him in the red zone.

"I don't think it's out of the possibility that he gets double-digit touchdowns in Year 1."

Follow Bryan Fischer on Twitter @BryanDFischer.

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Brandt: Mike Evans has best hands since Calvin Johnson

By Bryan Fischer

College Football 24/7 writer

Listen, it's hard to be overshadowed if you're a first-round pick in the 2014 NFL Draft.

On Thursday, at least, former Texas A&M receiver Mike Evans was swallowed up by Manziel Mania. While most of the focus from media and fans centered on who was throwing the ball at Texas A&M's second pro day, one of the receivers catching it turned a few heads as well.

Gil Brandt @Gil_Brandt Follow

Mike Evans has the best hands I've seen since Calvin Johnson.

NFL Media analyst Gil Brandt has been around the game of football for a long time and has seen a lot of receivers enter the draft, so he's not making that comment lightly. Evans is generally considered the second-best receiver in the draft behind Clemson's Sammy Watkins, but it's clear the former Aggie has plenty of momentum behind him to push him into the conversation for the top spot.

Evans (6-foot-5, 231 pounds) led the SEC in touchdowns last year as he presented a nightmare matchup issue for teams with his size and speed. In the latest NFL.com mock drafts, Evans has been slotted anywhere from ninth overall to the Bills to the Giants at No. 12. The Lions have also expressed serious interest in the pass-catcher as well.

Fellow analyst and former NFL scout Daniel Jeremiah even remarked on "Path to the Draft" on Wednesday it will be Evans who posts the better numbers between the two in their rookie year. Double-digit touchdowns? That has to be appealing for a team looking for a big red-zone threat.

It's clear most of the crowd in College Station was there to see Manziel throw, but Evans certainly had a good enough workout to solidify himself as a top 10 pick. We're sure a few quarterbacks around the league sent a text to their general manager saying they would be delighted to throw to Evans in the future after watching him run routes on NFL Network.

Follow Bryan Fischer on Twitter @BryanDFischer.

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Mike Evans impresses during pro day with Johnny Manziel

By Chase Goodbread

College Football 24/7 writer

COLLEGE STATION, Texas -- Mike Evans didn't need Johnny Manziel to look good on Thursday at his pro-day workout; he did that on his own.

But the SEC's most dynamic quarterback-receiver duo over the last two years couldn't have been more in tune in front of representatives from 30 NFL clubs, and by all accounts, the 6-foot-5, 231-pound wide receiver did nothing to hurt his draft stock.

"The comment I've gotten from a lot of (NFL) people is that he ran faster at the combine than they thought, and he's bigger than they thought," said Texas A&M coach Kevin Sumlin, "and his video speaks for itself."

Evans declined to speak to the media afterward, but his performance did plenty of talking on its own. Other than a post route, which was surprisingly not a big part of the menu for Manziel's passes, Evans ran all sorts of routes. And it was the shorter ones that NFL scouts wanted to see most. Evans' penchant for catching deep balls in traffic in college couldn't be put on display without defensive backs playing in coverage anyway. And while Evans did run a few deep routes, it was his technique on shorter routes that may require the biggest adjustment at the pro level.

"He showed range, he showed speed, he came in and out of breaks. Then he showed some versatility," said Manziel's quarterback coach George Whitfield, who has had Evans working with Manziel in San Diego earlier this offseason. "We tried to move him inside, get him to both sides. Here at A&M, he only lined up on one side. So even just the subtleties of that, let's get over here, over there. He showed some intermediate stuff. It doesn't always have to be home-run throws. He had just as much to come out and address to his position, just like (Manziel) did."

Evans bobbled one accurate pass as he was going out of bounds that resulted in one of three Manziel incompletions, but on several passes, he was the one who made Manziel look good by making an adjustment to catch passes that were thrown a bit behind him or a bit high. NFL Media senior analyst Gil Brandt had perhaps the highest praise for Evans, likening his hands to those of the NFL's best wide receiver, Calvin Johnson of the Detroit Lions.

Evans is projected as a first-round pick, and one team thought to be strongly interested in him is the Lions, who hold the draft's No. 10 overall choice. In fact, the two men who have the most say in who the Lions will choose came directly from the NFL Annual Meeting in Orlando to College Station. With quarterback Matthew Stafford being a centerpiece of the club's offense, it's no secret which of the two head coach Jim Caldwell and general manager Martin Mayhew were there to see.

Evans, for his part, left the Lions and 29 other clubs with a strong impression.

Follow Chase Goodbread on Twitter @ChaseGoodbread.

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Scout: Mike Evans made Johnny Manziel, not other way around

By Dan Parr

Excerpt:

It was somewhat lost in the immediate aftermath of Johnny Manziel Mania coming off last week's pro day at Texas A&M, but wide receiver Mike Evans might have put on an even more impressive performance than his teammate during the workout.

NFL Media senior analyst Gil Brandt, who was on hand for the event, had the highest praise for Evans, tweeting that Evans had the best hands he had seen since Calvin Johnson. The reactions to Evans' showing only reinforced the notion that he might be picked before Manziel, the player who has overshadowed Evans and every other prospect this year given his celebrity status.

Evans might not be getting overshadowed by Manziel much on the draft boards of NFL teams, though.

One NFC scout apparently is much more impressed with Evans than Johnny Football, saying that Manziel has been the bigger beneficiary in the QB-WR relationship.

"In my opinion, (Evans) made Johnny Manziel, not the other way around," the unnamed scout told NJ.com "A lot of times, Manziel just ran around and threw it up for grabs, and (Evans) came down with it."

The two combined to form one of college football's most dominant QB-WR connections over the past two seasons, and it's true that Evans' rare combination of size, leaping ability and sure-handedness made him a perfect target to make plays on jump-balls thrown by Manziel that other receivers wouldn't have been able to make. It's also true that Evans wouldn't have had an opportunity to make many of those plays if Manziel didn't have the arm and improvisational skills to make the throws.

Neither Evans or Manziel totally "made" the other. The two complemented each other well, but there certainly are fewer questions about Evans' game translating to the NFL than there are for Manziel's. Barring them somehow ending up on the same NFL team, the question of who was the bigger beneficiary of the connection could be settled before long.

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Some people really outthink themselves in evaluating players. It's almost as if they are trying to create a foolproof formula for quantifying risk, and IMO it can't be done. The unknown variable of the human factor is simply too great.

As such, I try to simply my evaluationing process. In WRs I don't worry so much about measurables as I do about 3 things at the NFL level - 1) can they get separation? 2) Are their hands reliable? And 3) are they intelligent enough to think beyond the assigned route?

2 things create reliable separation in pro WRs - suddenness and fear. Pro CBs know the tricks of the trade when it comes to reading body movement and fakes, and know how to be physical enough to take guys off their routes - either pressing at the line, a subtle tug or hip as the WR slows, or putting their body where the WR wants to go before he gets there. Sudden ability means a WR can get into the CB and then get away from him before he can recover - and recovery for pro CBs is everything. If a WR doesn't have suddenness, then he has to create fear in the CB - that if the CB misses him he can't recover. That comes in two forms: raw speed or YAC. Either one makes a pro CB adjust their coverage to avoid big plays, and consequently creates separation. Without separation, a WR can be the biggest and most athletic guy in the world, but his catch window for the QB is only what the CB can't get to - meaning predominantly high throws to the far shoulder. That's too small for a QB to throw to often and be able to rely on.

Once a guy creates the window that a QB wants to throw into often, he has to be able to reliably hand catch the ball. Pro CBs are masters at getting a hand on an arm or tip the ball just after it arrives. A reliable target catches the ball away from his body, secures it quickly, and has good enough hands to hang onto the ball when conditions aren't perfect - the ball flutters or is tipped, someone is tugging at one arm, vision get screened for an instant, etc.

Then the WR has to be able to get on the same page as the QB. When to break off a route because the CB overplays or overcommits to the designed catch area, when to break off for the back shoulder throw, how to get past the down marker and still create room in order to get the first down. It's not necessarily high IQ as much as it is street smarts - football IQ if you will - and willingness to communicate with the QB.

Give me a WR with those three qualities and the rest is all gravy. It's why I was high on Keenan Allen last year and Lee this year. Take all your combine BS and use it as you will, I'll take the guy who knows how to get open, catches the football when he does, and is on the same page as the QB. That's the guy the QB wants to target a lot. After that, I'll look for all the shiny baubles that might make him special.

With Evans, I see a real problem with his separation ability. He definitely does not have suddenness, and he doesn't have the deep speed or YAC ability that creates fear. Because he can beat a real fast college CB doesn't mean that he'll reliably beat pro CBs who have technique, knowledge, experience, and catch up speed. So I worry about his ability to be a top pro WR. It doesn't mean with his great hands and his size that he won't have value. I just don't see where he is going to excel as a WR1 in the NFL.

Technique creates separation more than anything else. Technique is the only reason guys like Wayne and Boldin can be effective well after their physical tools have eroded.

Agreed, but technique can be taught if a WR is raw. Suddenness cannot. All the technique in the world will only create slight separation if a player can't then break away quickly.

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Scout: Mike Evans made Johnny Manziel, not other way around

By Dan Parr

Excerpt:

It was somewhat lost in the immediate aftermath of Johnny Manziel Mania coming off last week's pro day at Texas A&M, but wide receiver Mike Evans might have put on an even more impressive performance than his teammate during the workout.

NFL Media senior analyst Gil Brandt, who was on hand for the event, had the highest praise for Evans, tweeting that Evans had the best hands he had seen since Calvin Johnson. The reactions to Evans' showing only reinforced the notion that he might be picked before Manziel, the player who has overshadowed Evans and every other prospect this year given his celebrity status.

Evans might not be getting overshadowed by Manziel much on the draft boards of NFL teams, though.

One NFC scout apparently is much more impressed with Evans than Johnny Football, saying that Manziel has been the bigger beneficiary in the QB-WR relationship.

"In my opinion, (Evans) made Johnny Manziel, not the other way around," the unnamed scout told NJ.com "A lot of times, Manziel just ran around and threw it up for grabs, and (Evans) came down with it."

The two combined to form one of college football's most dominant QB-WR connections over the past two seasons, and it's true that Evans' rare combination of size, leaping ability and sure-handedness made him a perfect target to make plays on jump-balls thrown by Manziel that other receivers wouldn't have been able to make. It's also true that Evans wouldn't have had an opportunity to make many of those plays if Manziel didn't have the arm and improvisational skills to make the throws.

Neither Evans or Manziel totally "made" the other. The two complemented each other well, but there certainly are fewer questions about Evans' game translating to the NFL than there are for Manziel's. Barring them somehow ending up on the same NFL team, the question of who was the bigger beneficiary of the connection could be settled before long.

The oline made both. Funny how the best oline in college football never gets mentioned, though. No buzz to talking about that.

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would love across from a Josh gordon type, where he always catches the no2 corner.

that's the type of system he'd be monsterous in

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Rotoworld:

CBS Sport's Pete Prisco spoke to one GM at the owner's meetings who was "not that impressed" with Texas A&M WR Mike Evans.
This is a noteworthy statement, since it breaks the theme of evaluators believing Evans could be worth a top 10 pick. In fact, CBS Sports' Dane Brugler has spoken with two teams who rank Evans over Sammy Watkins. The Bills at No. 9 seem like a good match, but it is obviously too early to even come up with an educated guess.
Mar 27 - 5:00 PM
ESPN's Todd McShay said he would "really be surprised" if Texas A&M WR Mike Evans is still on the board at No. 11.
In other words, the Aggies' star isn't falling any further than the Lions at No. 10. Detroit is rumored to be heavily interested in the 6-foot-5, 225-pounder as a nightmarish complement to Calvin Johnson. Whether he'll still be on the board when they pick is another question entirely.
Mar 26 - 7:41 PM
At least two teams have Texas A&M's Mike Evans as their top WR, according to CBS Sports' Dane Brugler.
Some have questioned if this was possible, citing the league's size bias for top receiver prospects, but it still is a bit of a surprise. Sammy Watkins, despite his 6-foot-1 frame, fights for the ball at the catch point better than most and offers explosiveness after the catch. Evans has a few veteran traits, specifically his willingness to work back towards his quarterback and win in contested situations. Both prospects could be top-10 selections.
Mar 24 - 9:20 AM

An NFC scout thinks Texas A&M WR Mike Evans could bulk up to 250 and become a hybrid tight end.

Evans will be a matchup nightmare wherever he lines up, and this comment speaks more to that than reality. At 6-foot-5 and 225 pounds, Evans wouldn't have to gain much weight to possess TE dimensions, but he's better off on the outside where he can torment shorter CBs, navigate through less traffic on long balls, and not waste excess energy taking on larger humans as a blocker. Scout Inc.'s Todd McShay says Evans is "one of the best receivers at coming down with 50-50 balls that I've ever evaluated, and he's the most accomplished downfield receiving threat in this class."
Source: NFL.com
Mar 10 - 12:03 AM

Texas A&M WR Mike Evans needs to work on his route running, says NFL Films' Greg Cosell.

Cosell said Evans ran "about three routes" with the Aggies and will need to work on the technical aspects of his game at the next level. "I think he has a lot of work to do," Cosell said. "I like Mike Evans, but in that offense, receivers need a lot of work when they get to the NFL." Evans is likely to land in the top-10 picks.

Texas A&M WR Mike Evans said he is hearing more and more that he could be a top-10 pick in the draft.

With some prospects, we might question this revelation, but in Evans' case, we've been hearing the same thing. Evans has seen his draft stock soar since the season ended and he dispelled whispers that his athleticism wasn't up to snuff for an elite No. 1 WR. At 6-foot-5 and 225 pounds, Evans ran a 4.53 forty at the combine. It would be a shock if he slipped past the Giants at No. 12.
Source: Brian Smith
Mar 5 - 4:16 PM

Texas A&M WR Mike Evans posted unofficial forty times of 4.47 and 4.50 seconds at the NFL Combine.

Evans also had two 10 yard splits of 1.57 and 1.59 seconds. These are obviously great times but not exactly a huge surprise, since Evans produced very good yards after catch numbers last season. He has a chance to be a top 10 pick.
Feb 23 - 10:27 AM

CBS Sports' Bruce Feldman would select Texas A&M's Mike Evans as the top WR in the 2014 class.

Feldman prefaces the decision by saying he has spent plenty of time around Evans in recent months for an upcoming book. "Evans has great size at 6-4, 232 and underrated athleticism," Feldman writes. "He should vertical around 37-38 inches and clock in the high 4.4s, if not faster. He also has fantastic hands and toughness." Some seemingly expect a slow forty time for Evans in Indy, but he has great build up speed and is much better after the catch than given credit for. Feldman does not Evans is still raw as a route runner.
Source: CBS Sports
Jan 28 - 10:11 AM

Draft insider Tony Pauline ranks Texas A&M redshirt sophomore Mike Evans as his top draft-eligible WR.

"Large, game impacting receiver that physically beats defenders in the middle of the field or outraces opponents down the flanks," Pauline writes. "Has all the necessary talents to be a big time number one wide out in the NFL." We worry Evans might be unfairly dropped during the process because of a potentially slower forty time, but his savvy tendency to work back towards the quarterback, win at the catch point, and pick up yards after the catch is excellent.
Thu, Nov 14, 2013 02:43:00 PM

Texas A&M redshirt sophomore WR Mike Evans is averaging 8.53 yards after the catch this season.

Evans's catches average 14.72 yards down field, bringing the total to 23.25 yards per reception. Greg Peshek then went on to break down specific routes Evans runs, with comebacks totaling 41.30 percent. This is a great sign that Evans works back towards his quarterback, something that is obvious when Johnny Manziel escapes the pocket. Also, Evans only drops 3.51 percent of passes thrown his way.
Tue, Nov 12, 2013 12:13:00 PM

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I swear, there is no person known as Faust. There is a computer program created by a higher intelligence that sifts thru millions of random sports articles and somehow posts them at FBG.

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I swear, there is no person known as Faust. There is a computer program created by a higher intelligence that sifts thru millions of random sports articles and somehow posts them at FBG.

"All your base are belong to us"

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I gave Evans strength a solid 'A' based on his size alone. If he's in the weight room this summer he will be impossible to jam at the line or fight for balls in the air. His arms are so dam long (freakishly long) that benching might be hard for him. A real head scratcher. He's not an "A+' physically, but he's an 'A-'. If he adds more muscle definition he's definitely a solid 'A' in that department considering his height/weight/length.

That might be how it plays out. I think the question here is pretty clear: Can his height/length/hands compensate for his otherwise pedestrian athleticism? The fact that everyone has him projected as a first round pick suggests that a lot of people think the answer to that question is yes. They might be right.

On the other hand, I've seen some other big-bodied WRs flop hard in the NFL in recent years. I already mentioned Reggie Williams, Mike Williams Matt Jones, and Jon Baldwin. Those flops would give me a little bit of pause before going all-in on another tall guy who doesn't have great separation skills.

But what about the chance of drafting Dez Bryant, Brandon Marshall, D. Thomas or M. Colston? The risk of drafting Jon Baldwin comes with the territory, though Evans is much better on the field.

You might just see Evans as having decent speed and agility, but or his size he is very athlete. You have to take all that he brings to the table into consideration, not just the facts that support your case.

This is how i feel about the subject. I would rather shoot for the stud guy, even if it comes with more risk, than take the "safe" guy with less upside. Id rather get Vjax or Jon Baldwin than Torrey Smith or Brian Hartline.

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Unless Evans has a cocaine problem(matt Jones) or is lazy(BMW) or has an attitude problem(Jon Baldwin) I'm not sure why they're compared :shrug:

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Scout's Take Blog: Draft observations by an ex-NFL player, scout

Excerpts:

While most observers frequently cite the obvious size advantages "big" receivers enjoy over the smallish cornerbacks doting most NFL rosters, the league's implementation of rules restricting contact downfield has empowered big, physical pass-catchers on the perimeter.

Consequently, NFL executives are scouring the collegiate ranks looking for big, athletic playmakers with the potential to wreak havoc on opponents with their superior physical dimensions and athleticism.

Now, it's important to note that each of the aforementioned pass-catchers posted impressive measurements in the 40-yard dash, vertical jump and broad jump at the NFL Scouting Combine and pro-day workouts. These three drills showcase a player's explosiveness, which is critical to gaining separation from defenders in tight quarters. Additionally, the vertical jump and broad jump highlight the potential for a big-bodied receiver to expand the strike zone with outstanding leaping ability.

Of course, the numbers recorded at the combine and workouts are not necessarily indicative of a prospect's playing speed or athleticism, but as a scout, I was taught by a wily coach that big men who run 4.5 or better and post outstanding measurements in the jumps (35-inch or better vertical jump; 10-foot or better broad jump) possesses the necessary explosiveness to thrive on the perimeter. Thus, I hold those measurements as benchmarks when evaluating "big" receivers in workouts.

Looking at the 2014 WR class, I believe there are several big-bodied receivers with the size-strength combinations needed to dominate the NFL. Texas A&M's Mike Evans and Florida State's Kelvin Benjamin are frequently cited as the crown jewels of the class due to their superior physical dimensions and on-field dominance. Evans, in particular, is an extraordinary playmaker with a game that is ideally suited to excel at the pro level. He played a key role in Johnny Manziel's success as an improvisational playmaker by routinely coming down with contested balls in a crowd.

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I like Mike Evans, but I can't tell if he is more Vincent Jackson or more Brandon Marshall. What I mean by that is Marshall has proven to be an elite guy that no matter situation or qb he is a guy that can catch 100 balls put up 1300 yards and double digit TD's.

Vincent Jackson has been great but rarely elite. I think Evans will translate to have numbers similar to Jackson which are still very good. I have him ranked number 2 behind Watkins who I think will be that guy that catches 90 plus balls every year and is more consistent game in and game out and year in and year out.

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By the way this thread got me looking at some superior athletes that are big and have come out recently.

I don't want to hijack but Jordan Cameron's combine from 2011 is/was ridiculous.

Cameron 6'5 and 254 pounds

40 time: 4.53

3 cone: 6.82

Vertical: 37 1/2

Bench: 23 reps

20 yard s: 4.03

Broad: 9 foot 11

He was better than Evans in everything at 25 pounds heavier. Wow.

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By the way this thread got me looking at some superior athletes that are big and have come out recently.

I don't want to hijack but Jordan Cameron's combine from 2011 is/was ridiculous.

Cameron 6'5 and 254 pounds

40 time: 4.53

3 cone: 6.82

Vertical: 37 1/2

Bench: 23 reps

20 yard s: 4.03

Broad: 9 foot 11

He was better than Evans in everything at 25 pounds heavier. Wow.

That's crazy. It's easy to forget the Cameron is that elite because he plays TE. But the positions are moving closer together with players like Finley, Gronk, Graham, and others who are used in WR alignments. I could see Cameron going 90-1000-10+ next year.

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I like Mike Evans, but I can't tell if he is more Vincent Jackson or more Brandon Marshall. What I mean by that is Marshall has proven to be an elite guy that no matter situation or qb he is a guy that can catch 100 balls put up 1300 yards and double digit TD's.

Vincent Jackson has been great but rarely elite. I think Evans will translate to have numbers similar to Jackson which are still very good. I have him ranked number 2 behind Watkins who I think will be that guy that catches 90 plus balls every year and is more consistent game in and game out and year in and year out.

I agree. Seems closer to Jackson than Marshall.

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I like Mike Evans, but I can't tell if he is more Vincent Jackson or more Brandon Marshall. What I mean by that is Marshall has proven to be an elite guy that no matter situation or qb he is a guy that can catch 100 balls put up 1300 yards and double digit TD's.

Vincent Jackson has been great but rarely elite. I think Evans will translate to have numbers similar to Jackson which are still very good. I have him ranked number 2 behind Watkins who I think will be that guy that catches 90 plus balls every year and is more consistent game in and game out and year in and year out.

I'm a big fan of Marshall but you may want to check out his years in Miami.

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I like Mike Evans, but I can't tell if he is more Vincent Jackson or more Brandon Marshall. What I mean by that is Marshall has proven to be an elite guy that no matter situation or qb he is a guy that can catch 100 balls put up 1300 yards and double digit TD's.

Vincent Jackson has been great but rarely elite. I think Evans will translate to have numbers similar to Jackson which are still very good. I have him ranked number 2 behind Watkins who I think will be that guy that catches 90 plus balls every year and is more consistent game in and game out and year in and year out.

I'm a big fan of Marshall but you may want to check out his years in Miami.

Yeah but I think that had a lot to do with off the field issues too.

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