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Austin Seferian-Jenkins - What do you think?

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I am interested to hear what people think about Austin Seferian Jenkins. Watching him the past few years I am very interested in him as a pro, and I am very pleased that he was not able to participate in the combine (as I should be able to get him later on in my rookie draft).

  • What do you think about him as a pro?
  • About what pick do you think he goes in rookie drafts?

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Not real sure what to think about him, but I think there is a chance he ends up this year's Keenan Allen. Great tape as a younger guy. Battled through injuries, suspension and perhaps a case of junior-itis (looking forward to the draft). Will likely fall into the late 2nd or even 3rd round of the NFL draft.

But he is going to have a chance to be an impact player, especially if he lands in a good situation. Like a lot of TEs, his rookie fantasy draft spot will be pretty situation dependent. If he ends up in Buffalo, Cleveland, San Fran, St. Louis, etc. he will fall pretty far. 3rd round of rookie drafts. If he goes to New England or Carolina or some other spot that is perceived to be attractive, he could move up to early 2nd round.

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TE is a tough spot to produce from in year one. For redraft he will likely be overhyped if he goes to a landing spot that is perceived as attractive. Dynasty he would have to be a move TE in a TE friendly system

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I am interested to hear what people think about Austin Seferian Jenkins. Watching him the past few years I am very interested in him as a pro, and I am very pleased that he was not able to participate in the combine (as I should be able to get him later on in my rookie draft).

  • What do you think about him as a pro?
  • About what pick do you think he goes in rookie drafts?

Austin Seferian-Jenkins has some significant NFL potential, as he is a height/weight/speed specimen, and he made some highlight reel plays during his time spent at the University of Washington. ASJ leaves his school with the records in receptions, yards, and touchdowns for the TE position, and he performed well in the red-zone. ASJ needs to continue working on improving his routes, and his blocking, and there are some questions lingering around why his production dropped off from 2012 to 2013.

ASJ has had a few comparisons to Rob Gronkowski; however, that would be a tall order to live up to, given how quickly Gronkowski ascended to Fantasy Football prominence, and how dominant Gronkowski has been (when healthy, of course).

The best guess right now for where he will go in Rookie Drafts can be found in the Shark Pool Rookie polls:

2014 Rookie 2.09 (Post Combine)

The caveat to these polls is that everything will change once we know what teams the rookies are drafted to, so ASJ could rise or fall depending on what unfolds next month.

Or at some of the dynasty rankings web sites (not all of which are currently updated, given that the NFL Draft hasn't occurred yet), or with some of the Shark Pool message board members who publish their rankings (EBF, Xue, CSTU come to mind).

I don't think that FBG has released any of their Rookie Rankings just yet (Bloom 100, etc.)

Edited by Faust

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Davis: Austin Seferian-Jenkins 'more complete' than Eric Ebron

By Bryan Fischer

College Football 24/7 writer

If you happened to be scrolling through NFL Media analyst Daniel Jeremiah's latest mock draft, you probably were surprised to see the presence of Washington tight end Austin Seferian-Jenkins so high up in the first round of the 2014 NFL Draft.

Seferian-Jenkins is generally considered the second- or third-best tight end available, but Jeremiah has him going 21st overall to the Green Bay Packers, the highest he's been on anybody's board in a while. Though he won the Mackey Award as the best tight end in the nation, he was hampered by off the field issues and injuries during his final year at Washington.

But at least one analyst agrees with Jeremiah that a lot of folks are underrating Seferian-Jenkins heading into May's draft.

"I've heard great reports on him lately," NFL Media analyst Charles Davis said on "Path to the Draft." "He's cut weight and looks like he's headed in an upper track and is the number two tight end. He should have always been challenging to be the number one tight end in this draft. I think he's more complete than Eric Ebron when his game is on."

Seferian-Jenkins caught 69 passes his sophomore season but saw his numbers fall off a bit in his final year with the Huskies. That was a red flag for some after he topped just about everyone's draft board heading into the 2013 season. His stock fell as the year went on, but Seferian-Jenkins still was able to haul in eight touchdown passes and keep his name in the NFL conversation.

It's been tough for Seferian-Jenkins to truly make a run at Ebron for the title of the draft's best tight end, however. Seferian-Jenkins didn't perform at the NFL Scouting Combine and missed his pro day in early April as he continues to deal with a pesky foot injury. With a late personal pro day and a handful of private workouts in the lead up to the draft, though, he still has a shot to make up some ground and show teams he has what it takes to be an impact player at the next level.

"When you talk about last season and his lack of production, Washington went to a different offense, too," NFL Network's Curtis Conway said. "He's 6-foot-6, 265 pounds, and he does remind me of Rob Gronkowski. The X-factor for me between Seferian-Jenkins and Ebron is in the red zone.

"Seferian-Jenkins in his career has 21 touchdowns. Ebron? Eight."

It would be a surprise if Seferian-Jenkins went ahead of Ebron in the draft, but he has the physical tools and ability on tape to develop into a better player at the next level for some team. Ebron will win every category related to athleticism and yards after the catch, but Seferian-Jenkins' ability to block and score near the goal line will have a number of tight-end coaches around the league begging to have him on their team.

One thing is certain: Seferian-Jenkins' size and mismatch ability will probably make him the best friend of whatever quarterback he finds himself playing with in the fall.

Follow Bryan Fischer on Twitter @BryanDFischer.

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SI 64, Nos. 54-50: Carlos Hyde, Kyle Fuller, Bradley Roby and more

Doug Farrar

Excerpt:

No. 52: Austin Seferian-Jenkins, TE, Washington

Seferian-Jenkins was a top-30 national high school prospect who caught 41 passes for 538 yards as a true freshman, 69 for 852 yards in 2012. And in a way, that was his undoing. When the Huskies moved to more of a spread offense in 2013, Seferian-Jenkins was the odd man out — he’s not the kind of player who’s going to benefit from wide splits as much as a more athletic tight end would. The failures of Washington’s offense became Seferian-Jenkins’ failures to a degree, as he dropped to 36 catches for 450 yards. However, he did set a career mark with eight touchdowns.

All in all, he’s a tough evaluation. At 6-6, 262 pounds, he’s a tweener in a league full of tweener tight ends.

“I think there are a lot of talented guys in this draft class at every position, and specifically at the tight end position you’ve got a lot of great players,” he said at the scouting combine in February. “But what I think I do is if you watched me play, I split out and played receiver. I’ve done fullback. I’ve played inline. I think I have showed I’m very capable of being a playmaker down the seam and run regular routes as a receiver. I’ve shown the capability of being a blocker and I’m an every-down guy who can get out there immediately on the field.”

That much is true — it’s just that NFL teams will have to cool their jets a bit when they look at what Seferian-Jenkins can do in their offenses.

Strengths: Optimal traditional inline tight end who can get open in short spaces and move up to the next level in option routes. Convincing blocker who puts a lot of effort into it — will charge up to meet defenders and actually has a decent kick-slide when asked to guard the pocket. Can make plays lining up everywhere from inline to flex to wide. Seferian-Jenkins is very effective when running seam routes from the flex — that’s where he can use his height and size to great effect against second-level defenders.

Has an obvious and effective understanding of an NFL-level route tree. Gets physical against, and beats, press coverage with his hands and an understanding of angles, especially on slants and drags. Will most likely exceed his 2013 college stats in the right NFL system, because he ran a lot of open routes as quarterback Keith Price was bailing out due to Washington’s sub-par pass protection.

Weaknesses: While he can be a mismatch in the passing game, Seferian-Jenkins doesn’t have the kind of open-field burn you’d see from the new generation of big receivers at the position (i.e., Jimmy Graham) — it takes him a while to get up to speed. At times, he looks positively awkward when he’s running. Goes down on contact more easily than you’d like for a player his size. Can be wildly inconsistent from one game to the next.

Conclusion: Were he a little faster on the field, or played in a slightly more congruent offense, or had lived a bit more up to expectations, Seferian-Jenkins might be thought of as a first-round prospect. And that was the case after his 2012 season. The truth is, Seferian-Jenkins is a good player with the potential to be great in the right system. He’s not a world-beater, but teams looking for a tight end who can run multiple routes in a power offense will be happy with their return on investment if he’s a second-day pick.

NFL player comparison: Kyle Rudolph, Minnesota Vikings (2nd round, 2011, Notre Dame)

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Rotoworld:

An AFC personnel executive told NJ.com that he doesn't "want any part of" Washington TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins.
The decision maker, who earlier in the story said UNC's Eric Ebron was "completely overrated" and "a pain in the (butt)," shredded ASJ as well. "He’s more overrated and a bigger pain in the (butt) than the other guy," the personnel man said. "And he blocks like a wide receiver. I don’t want any part of him." An NFC scout quoted in the story said Seferian-Jenkins was "not a first-round pick" but accepted the usage of a second- or third-round pick as "not bad." The AFC personnel executive added that he believed ASJ was "lazy."
Mar 30 - 11:55 PM
Source: NJ.com
Washington TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins possesses "impressive" size and movement, says NFL Films' Greg Cosell.
Seferian-Jenkins has got "a more complete skill set" than UNC's Eric Ebron, according to Cosell, due to his blocking ability. Seferian-Jenkins underwent surgery late last month to stabilize a stress fracture in his left foot and probably won't be ready to participate in Washington's pro day on April 2nd. Although ASJ didn't work out at the NFL Combine, he measured in at 6 foot 5 and 1/2 inch and 262 pounds. He also has 33 3/4 inch arms and an 80-inch wingspan.
Mar 19 - 6:37 PM

Washington TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins measured in at 6 foot 5 and 1/2 inch and 262 pounds at the NFL Combine.

Seferian-Jenkins also has 33 3/4 inch arms with an 80 inch wingspan. Rotoworld contributor Greg Peshek recently summarized ASJ's time at Washington, noting the limited yards after catch skill despite his utilization in those areas of the field. Seferian-Jenkins had the best drop rate of the five tight ends charted and he is a beast in the red zone.

CBS Sports' Dane Brugler notes that, from an evaluation perspective, Washington TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins leaves him wanting more.

Brugler did add that the "athletic and physical traits are there" for ASJ to succeed. Our own Josh Norris considers Seferian-Jenkins a top-40 talent at this point in the process, and he could flourish in an inline role while offering some versatility.
Feb 18 - 11:39 AM

Washington junior TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins drew a third-round grade from draft insider Tony Pauline.

Jace Amaro and Eric Ebron predictably were assigned the only first-round ranks amongst tight ends. Pauline also gave Notre Dame's Troy Niklas a third-round grade, while Iowa's C.J. Fiedorowicz is in the 3-4 range. We think Seferian-Jenkins will go in the second round.
Jan 30 - 5:14 PM

One NFL scout believes Washington junior TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins is close to Rob Gronkowski from a talent perspective.

"Now he's lazy," the scout added. "Like there's always something with him. But he can be on the line and block." Seferian-Jenkins reportedly received a second-round tag from the Draft Advisory Board, and that projection will likely land him in the top-40 in May.
Sun, Dec 22, 2013 09:37:00 AM

Washington coach Steve Sarkisian described junior TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins' play as "just a little bit out of sync, a little bit out of sorts."

"It hasn't been without trying," Sarkisian said on Tuesday. "I think Austin is working extremely hard." Sarkisian complimented Seferian-Jenkins' blocking, an improvement to his game that should aid his draft stock. "He is becoming more of an overall complete football player," Sarkisian said. "But believe me, we'd like to get him the football more that he has gotten the ball in his hands because he is a very good weapon for us." The 6-foot-6, 276 pound tight end is one of the most physically gifted players in college football, but Seferian-Jenkins has ceded "his title as the top tight end in college football to Eric Ebron of North Carolina," according to NFL.com writer Dan Greenspan, due to a "combination of his offseason DUI arrest and lack of production on the field."
Source: NFL.com
Tue, Oct 22, 2013 07:42:00 PM

NFL.com writer Dan Greenspan writes that Washington junior TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins "has been largely invisible in the Huskies' new up-tempo offense."

"Even though he still draws major attention from opposing defenses, a player of his immense physical talents (6-foot-6, 276 pounds) should be able to best any coverage," Greenspan wrote. "Seferian-Jenkins has plenty of quality tape, and his blocking has helped running back Bishop Sankey's great play, but he needed to be the All-America difference-maker he can be to elevate UW up to the same level as Oregon and Stanford." Seferian-Jenkins has collected only 16 receptions for 185 yards and three touchdowns in 2013.
Source: NFL.com
Fri, Oct 18, 2013 09:39:00 PM

Washington junior TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins "does not seem to have improved as a blocker or route runner" this season, according to NFL.com's Gil Brandt.

"Right now he is teetering toward the end of the first round, possibly into the second, but because of the importance of tight ends he could very easily move up as high as the middle of the first round if he picks up his play," Brandt adds. We think Seferian-Jenkins is one of the better inline tight ends in the country because of his combination of reliable blocking and body control as a receiver. he doesn't possess the same quickness as others, but the junior is still an impressive receiving target.
Source: NFL.com
Fri, Oct 18, 2013 09:56:00 AM

Scouts Inc.'s Kevin Weidl noted Washington junior TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins plays a key role in the school's successful running game.

Weidl calls the tight end an "effective inline blocker" that can seal the edge. Junior running back Bishop Sankey has put forth a breakout season, showing nice balance and vision. Seferian-Jenkins' numbers have dipped a little, but he is still impressing on the field. We don't consider him the top receiving tight end, however, with that distinction going to Texas Tech's Jace Amaro.
Tue, Oct 1, 2013 10:28:00 AM

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This is overly simplistic, but his failure to thrive in Washington's more pass focused offense makes me think he doesn't have what it takes to be difference making FF TE. Good NFL player ... absolutely. Red zone threat ...probably. High end FF TE potential ... probably not. And isn't that all we really care about? Mid second round dynasty rookie pick sounds about right

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Rotoworld:

An AFC personnel executive told NJ.com that he doesn't "want any part of" Washington TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins.

The decision maker, who earlier in the story said UNC's Eric Ebron was "completely overrated" and "a pain in the (butt)," shredded ASJ as well. "He’s more overrated and a bigger pain in the (butt) than the other guy," the personnel man said. "And he blocks like a wide receiver. I don’t want any part of him." An NFC scout quoted in the story said Seferian-Jenkins was "not a first-round pick" but accepted the usage of a second- or third-round pick as "not bad." The AFC personnel executive added that he believed ASJ was "lazy."

Mar 30 - 11:55 PM

Source: NJ.com

LOL. What a surprise a NY Jet scout dissing Ebron and ASJ. The interview was likely cut short because there was too much smoke filling the room. Edited by Donnybrook

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I think ASJ is going to be a top 5 TE in the NFL for the majority of his career. Great athlete with great size.

My guess is that he will be a value in rookie drafts with all of the depth out there.... The earliest you'd see him go is about pick 14 and the latest will be about pick 24 (maybe a little later)... I would jump at him at that price!!!!

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Rotoworld:

An AFC personnel executive told NJ.com that he doesn't "want any part of" Washington TE Austin Seferian-Jenkins.

The decision maker, who earlier in the story said UNC's Eric Ebron was "completely overrated" and "a pain in the (butt)," shredded ASJ as well. "He’s more overrated and a bigger pain in the (butt) than the other guy," the personnel man said. "And he blocks like a wide receiver. I don’t want any part of him." An NFC scout quoted in the story said Seferian-Jenkins was "not a first-round pick" but accepted the usage of a second- or third-round pick as "not bad." The AFC personnel executive added that he believed ASJ was "lazy."

Mar 30 - 11:55 PM

Source: NJ.com

LOL. What a surprise a NY Jet scout dissing Ebron and ASJ. The interview was likely cut short because there was too much smoke filling the room.

Triggered sprinkler system I'll bet.

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Not real sure what to think about him, but I think there is a chance he ends up this year's Keenan Allen. Great tape as a younger guy. Battled through injuries, suspension and perhaps a case of junior-itis (looking forward to the draft). Will likely fall into the late 2nd or even 3rd round of the NFL draft.

But he is going to have a chance to be an impact player, especially if he lands in a good situation. Like a lot of TEs, his rookie fantasy draft spot will be pretty situation dependent. If he ends up in Buffalo, Cleveland, San Fran, St. Louis, etc. he will fall pretty far. 3rd round of rookie drafts. If he goes to New England or Carolina or some other spot that is perceived to be attractive, he could move up to early 2nd round.

Buffalo would not necessarily be a bad situation. If Buffalo drafted hi he'd likely still be a 1st round rookie pick in a TE required league.

And I'm not sure why Carolina would be perceived to be attractive. They would be one of the worst landing spots for one of the top 3TE's.

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What's not stated is the weight gain. He gained 20-30 pounds to reprise his role in the spread, and be more of a blocker.

If/when he cuts the weight, and plays in a more traditional offense, you will truly see his potential emerge. He had lower number of targets and lower number of catches. All it means is less of, and an easier sample size of his last year to evaluate, plus going forward the weight loss will allow him to be more explosive. My number 1 TE in this class and he will be a tremendous value in rookie drafts.

Everyone cites baggage on the DUI. So be it, he paid the price and has otherwise been a model teammate.

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2014 NFL Draft: AJ McCarron more than a game manager

Pat Kirwan

Excerpt:

Washington tight end Austin Seferian-Jenkins: Everyone talks about Eric Ebron and Jace Amaro when tight ends are the draft subject, but lurking in the third spot and a solid second-round player is Seferian-Jenkins. He was an impressive interview.

After watching the UCLA and Oregon State games, where he had eight receptions, I came away thinking he may be the most complete and dangerous tight end in the class. His college basketball skills are obvious and unlike most former hoopsters he can block.

If your team needs an all-in-one tight end that can line up next to a tackle or out as a slot or wide receiver this guy is a bargain in the second round. His route running is good enough to play early in the NFL.

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Honestly I don't think ASJ is nearly as athletic as some seem to think he is. Much more lumbering. Could be a nice redzone target though for sure.

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Honestly I don't think ASJ is nearly as athletic as some seem to think he is. Much more lumbering. Could be a nice redzone target though for sure.

I watched him play for a couple of years up here in the NW. This is where I am at with regard to his athleticism. He's athletic for his size, but not so much that he will be a big difference maker in the NFL. I don't see him being any more productive than an average NFL TE.

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I watched him play for a couple of years up here in the NW. This is where I am at with regard to his athleticism. He's athletic for his size, but not so much that he will be a big difference maker in the NFL. I don't see him being any more productive than an average NFL TE.

I think he is a special athlete. He played at 275 last season. If he put on 15 pounds and moved to tackle--we'd surely being calling him a freak athlete. At 6'6" and 275, he won't need to run by people to be a major threat.

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I watched him play for a couple of years up here in the NW. This is where I am at with regard to his athleticism. He's athletic for his size, but not so much that he will be a big difference maker in the NFL. I don't see him being any more productive than an average NFL TE.

I think he is a special athlete. He played at 275 last season. If he put on 15 pounds and moved to tackle--we'd surely being calling him a freak athlete. At 6'6" and 275, he won't need to run by people to be a major threat.

I think he's too stiff to be a "special athlete". Guys like Heap, Gronk, and Graham have a fluidity to their movement. I haven't see that in ASJ.

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I think he's too stiff to be a "special athlete". Guys like Heap, Gronk, and Graham have a fluidity to their movement. I haven't see that in ASJ.

He's more fluid than Gronk, to my eyes. He's extremely smooth and fluid for a TE. Explosiveness is the potential concern, IMO.

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I watched him play for a couple of years up here in the NW. This is where I am at with regard to his athleticism. He's athletic for his size, but not so much that he will be a big difference maker in the NFL. I don't see him being any more productive than an average NFL TE.

I think he is a special athlete. He played at 275 last season. If he put on 15 pounds and moved to tackle--we'd surely being calling him a freak athlete. At 6'6" and 275, he won't need to run by people to be a major threat.

I think he's too stiff to be a "special athlete". Guys like Heap, Gronk, and Graham have a fluidity to their movement. I haven't see that in ASJ.

Those guys above are in the 260 range. 10-15 pounds on an athlete can make a big difference, heck 5 lbs makes a difference.

i think you have to see how well he moves at 275, then envision how it will be enhanced once he sheds some excess weight.

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I watched him play for a couple of years up here in the NW. This is where I am at with regard to his athleticism. He's athletic for his size, but not so much that he will be a big difference maker in the NFL. I don't see him being any more productive than an average NFL TE.

I think he is a special athlete. He played at 275 last season. If he put on 15 pounds and moved to tackle--we'd surely being calling him a freak athlete. At 6'6" and 275, he won't need to run by people to be a major threat.

I think he's too stiff to be a "special athlete". Guys like Heap, Gronk, and Graham have a fluidity to their movement. I haven't see that in ASJ.

Those guys above are in the 260 range. 10-15 pounds on an athlete can make a big difference, heck 5 lbs makes a difference.

i think you have to see how well he moves at 275, then envision how it will be enhanced once he sheds some excess weight.

I agree with this. Look what Allen Robinson did between the combine and his pro day. He dropped 12 lbs, and it made a huge difference.

Combine Results

Pro Day Results

Combine Invite: Yes

Height: 6025

Weight: 220

40 Yrd Dash: 4.60

20 Yrd Dash:

10 Yrd Dash: 225 Lb. Bench Reps:

Vertical Jump: 39

Broad Jump: 10'07"

20 Yrd Shuttle: 4.00

3-Cone Drill: 7.00

Dates: 04/08/14

Height: 6025

Weight: 208

40 Yrd Dash: 4.47

20 Yrd Dash: 2.59

10 Yrd Dash: 1.53 225 Lb. Bench Reps:

Vertical Jump: 42

Broad Jump: 10'11"

20 Yrd Shuttle:

3-Cone Drill: 6.54

40 Time Range: 4.47-4.49

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He reminds me of a Martellus Bennett/Kyle Rudolph kind of guy. Big target with a large catch radius. Not the most sudden or explosive athlete. He's not fast and he doesn't seem to have great fast-twitch explosiveness, but he's nimble and light on his feet for such a big player. I thought he was overrated when he was mocked as a top 10-15 pick in the offseason, but now he may be a little bit underrated IMO. No reason why he can't be a solid starter and maybe more.

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Been seeing a bunch of stuff on Twitter the past little while about ASJ and his 40 time during his workout with the Jets, so did some searching...

Sefarian Jenkins Healthy and Fast

In about four-and-a-half seconds, the Green Bay Packers’ hopes of drafting tight endAustin Seferian-Jenkins in the second round perhaps disappeared.

Seferian-Jenkins, by far the best all-around tight end in this year’s class, had been sidelined since a stress fracture was found in his foot during the Scouting Combine. The injury prevented him from testing at the Combine, and the surgery prevented him from performing at Washington’s pro day.

The injury had Seferian-Jenkins’ draft stock falling, perhaps even into the third round. However, on Friday, he got medical clearance and went through an individual workout with the Jets. At 6-foot-6 and 271 pounds, he ran a blazing 4.56 in the 40-yard dash, with a 37.5-inch vertical jump, NFL scout Dave-Te’ Thomas told Packer Report on Saturday.

With the medical problems behind him, it’s considered a pretty good bet that Seferian-Jenkins doesn’t last past No. 40 or No. 45. The Packers hold the 21st selection of the first round and the 53rd overall selection of the second.

Seferian-Jenkins won the Mackey Award as the nation's top tight end in 2013. He caught 36 passes for 450 yards and eight touchdowns.

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Been seeing a bunch of stuff on Twitter the past little while about ASJ and his 40 time during his workout with the Jets, so did some searching...

Sefarian Jenkins Healthy and Fast

In about four-and-a-half seconds, the Green Bay Packers’ hopes of drafting tight endAustin Seferian-Jenkins in the second round perhaps disappeared.

Seferian-Jenkins, by far the best all-around tight end in this year’s class, had been sidelined since a stress fracture was found in his foot during the Scouting Combine. The injury prevented him from testing at the Combine, and the surgery prevented him from performing at Washington’s pro day.

The injury had Seferian-Jenkins’ draft stock falling, perhaps even into the third round. However, on Friday, he got medical clearance and went through an individual workout with the Jets. At 6-foot-6 and 271 pounds, he ran a blazing 4.56 in the 40-yard dash, with a 37.5-inch vertical jump, NFL scout Dave-Te’ Thomas told Packer Report on Saturday.

With the medical problems behind him, it’s considered a pretty good bet that Seferian-Jenkins doesn’t last past No. 40 or No. 45. The Packers hold the 21st selection of the first round and the 53rd overall selection of the second.

Seferian-Jenkins won the Mackey Award as the nation's top tight end in 2013. He caught 36 passes for 450 yards and eight touchdowns.

OMG - If these numbers are true he is going to go in the first round.

Also, if those numbers are true - What an absolute physical/athletic specimen:

4.56 - 40 yard dash

37.5 inch vertical

At 6 foot 6 inches, 271 pounds

Plus he is a basketballer like many studs before him...

Gonna be a difference-maker!

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If he really ran a 4.5 at that size, I'd be surprised to see him slide out of the first round.

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I think ASJ is going to be a top 5 TE in the NFL for the majority of his career. Great athlete with great size.

My guess is that he will be a value in rookie drafts with all of the depth out there.... The earliest you'd see him go is about pick 14 and the latest will be about pick 24 (maybe a little later)... I would jump at him at that price!!!!

It looks like the term great athlete with great size applies - now we have to add great speed and jumping ability as well!

He actually is very fast and explosive! CHECK!

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Sounds like he's explosive now, but his tape shows him being very slow off the line.

He's a work in progress, again, envision a lighter ASJ = More explosive. It's kind of like the NBA drafting 75% on potential all these young guys. He'll ball out even more once he gets in the 260 range. He's the number one TE in this class. Have fun with Ebron, I will be banking on ASJ cheaper...

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He's the Alshon Jeffery of his position.

The complete opposite? I thought Jeffery had terrible workouts compared to his play on the field. Am I wrong here?

With regard to the term "explosive", I saw a Bloom tweet yesterday that put it best...

Austin Seferian-Jenkins is not a particularly fast or explosive player and no workout numbers will convince me otherwise

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He isn't fast or explosive, but I agree with other posters that he's very, very fluid. His lower body movement is excellent and he's got the knotted calves/tapered look of a big WR. He has always been a soft body in terms of physique, but underneath that is a pretty good athlete with very light feet. He's a huge target and his sheer mass will make him tricky to deal with at the catch point. Mike Evans doesn't separate very well and isn't nearly as massive as ASJ, yet people love him because he wins at the catch point. ASJ is slower than Evans, but more nimble with perhaps even more potential to dominate in jump ball situations.

I agree with Jeffery comment in the sense of being a guy with unanimous round 1 talent going into his final college season who then was scrutinized and picked apart in favor of newer, trendier options. I think this a pretty safe NFL prospect and potentially a very good FF value if he slides out of the first round of rookie drafts. I like him a lot more than Amaro (sloppy athlete with shoddy movement). Ebron is certainly more precise and explosive, but also a bit smaller with less red zone potential. I rate Ebron higher, but think it's conceivable that ASJ could turn into the better FF performer.

Edited by EBF

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He's the Alshon Jeffery of his position.

The complete opposite? I thought Jeffery had terrible workouts compared to his play on the field. Am I wrong here?

With regard to the term "explosive", I saw a Bloom tweet yesterday that put it best...

Jeffery dominated and was a top 1-3 devy prospect after his sophmore year. His stock dropped when he put on weight as a Junior and his production was hindered by poor QB play. He shed the weight prior to the combine, and put up a very solid 40 time--faster than most expected.

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Jeffery dominated and was a top 1-3 devy prospect after his sophmore year. His stock dropped when he put on weight as a Junior and his production was hindered by poor QB play. He shed the weight prior to the combine, and put up a very solid 40 time--faster than most expected.

Thanks. I appreciate the clarification.

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I was happy about all the negative news about ASJ prior to the 40 time news that I posted earlier... Was hoping to snag him in the mid 20s in my TE prem league... Might not make it that far anymore :(

Edited by eNdblu

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I too am a HUGE ASJ supporter. In FF I want to grab him with my 2.3 pick and IRL I want to see my Pats grab him. Of course if they do, I will probably need to get him earlier

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