Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums
tdmills

[Dynasty] Todd Gurley

Recommended Posts

From everything I've read the biggest change is in the rehab which starts earlier and is more aggressive that is was. There's a lot more information on which rehab techniques work and which dont.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The focus today seems to be gaining range of motion to the injured knee as soon as possible, with emphasis on ROM symmetry between both knees. That surprised me because I thought it was regaining strength that was most important but apparently without ROM symmetry it difficult to make 100% recovery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard of some getting rehabbed even before they have the ACL surgery. It's very different than it was 10 years ago.

Surgeons used to rush players into surgery but now they are waiting for swelling to down first and working on range of motion before surgery.

Arthrofibrosis in acute anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The effect of timing of reconstruction and rehabilitation.
Abstract

Arthrofibrosis is a potential complication of acute ACL reconstruction. Arthrofibrosis prevents the patient from regaining full range of motion, particularly the terminal 5 degrees of full extension, postoperatively. We did a retrospective study of 169 acute ACL reconstructions in a population of young athletes (average age, 22 years). We sought to determine the optimal time to perform acute ACL reconstruction with respect to arthrofibrosis and the effects of an accelerated versus conventional rehabilitation program. The short-term results were evaluated by range of motion measurements and 13 week Cybex scores. Patients whose ligaments were reconstructed within the 1st week after injury (Group I) had a statistically significant (P less than 0.05) increased incidence of arthrofibrosis (limited extension, scar tissue) over patients who had ACL reconstruction delayed 21 days or more (Group III). At 13 weeks after the reconstruction procedure, Group III patients scored an average of 70% (compared to 51% for Group I, P less than 0.05) on the Cybex evaluation. They also showed a trend toward more flexion of the knee as well as near full extension.

Patients who had an ACL reconstruction between 8 and 21 days after injury (Group II) had a similar incidence of arthrofibrosis as Group I when they followed a conventional rehabilitation program postoperatively. However, only a small number of cases (approximately 4%) of Group II patients who followed an accelerated postoperative rehabilitation program had any arthrofibrosis--an observation we also made in the Group III patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Gurley had his surgery 11 days after his injury.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think gurley's dynasty rookie draft stock will drop after the nfl draft and him possibly being the 3rd rb taken. i know the guy can play, but i just couldn't risk 1.01 on him like the consensus now.

Edited by beef

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rotoworld:

Georgia RB Todd Gurley should be a target of New England's in Round 1, posits Scouts Inc.'s Kevin Weidl.

"Durability and positional value aside, Gurley is a top-three talent in this class, and New England proved last year with its Easley pick it isn't afraid to draft a player who is an injury risk," Weidl wrote. The Patriots should be on the lookout for a back after losing running back Shane Vereen to the Giants. The 6-foot-1, 236-pound Gurley is no lock to be available when the Patriots pick.
Mar 21 - 5:54 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rotoworld:

Georgia RB Todd Gurley should be a target of New England's in Round 1, posits Scouts Inc.'s Kevin Weidl.

"Durability and positional value aside, Gurley is a top-three talent in this class, and New England proved last year with its Easley pick it isn't afraid to draft a player who is an injury risk," Weidl wrote. The Patriots should be on the lookout for a back after losing running back Shane Vereen to the Giants. The 6-foot-1, 236-pound Gurley is no lock to be available when the Patriots pick.

Source: ESPN Insider

Mar 21 - 5:54 PM

Can't wait for the fantasy reaction the first time Belichick makes Cadet the focus of the game plan instead of Gurley.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My gut feeling is Miami takes him. The big three receivers may be gone at that point and they have been quiet on the RB front. I know Lamar Miller is there but it doesn't seem like they want to give him the full load and they need offensive weapons to go against the strong defenses in their division. I also believe Miller is in the last year of his contract.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My gut feeling is Miami takes him. The big three receivers may be gone at that point and they have been quiet on the RB front. I know Lamar Miller is there but it doesn't seem like they want to give him the full load and they need offensive weapons to go against the strong defenses in their division. I also believe Miller is in the last year of his contract.

I think you might be right on this. Miami was also kicking the tires on Ben Tate last week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My gut feeling is Miami takes him. The big three receivers may be gone at that point and they have been quiet on the RB front. I know Lamar Miller is there but it doesn't seem like they want to give him the full load and they need offensive weapons to go against the strong defenses in their division. I also believe Miller is in the last year of his contract.

I think you might be right on this. Miami was also kicking the tires on Ben Tate last week.

Coach this morning:

– The Dolphins might still add a power back to compliment Lamar Miller but Philbin said it would have to be someone who can compete elsewhere, including special teams.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The focus today seems to be gaining range of motion to the injured knee as soon as possible, with emphasis on ROM symmetry between both knees. That surprised me because I thought it was regaining strength that was most important but apparently without ROM symmetry it difficult to make 100% recovery.

I've heard of some getting rehabbed even before they have the ACL surgery. It's very different than it was 10 years ago.

Again, I did all this in 1994. I'm not trying to argue or act like I know more than everyone else. I just really don't think much has changed except the expectations.

The whole "year 2" thing is psychological healing. It takes one year for the surgery/bone/graft to completely heal, but you can physically achieve full speed well before that. The reason that players are "full speed" in year 2 is because it takes that long to get over the injury psychologically.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My gut feeling is Miami takes him. The big three receivers may be gone at that point and they have been quiet on the RB front. I know Lamar Miller is there but it doesn't seem like they want to give him the full load and they need offensive weapons to go against the strong defenses in their division. I also believe Miller is in the last year of his contract.

I think you might be right on this. Miami was also kicking the tires on Ben Tate last week.

Coach this morning:

– The Dolphins might still add a power back to compliment Lamar Miller but Philbin said it would have to be someone who can compete elsewhere, including special teams.

Coach speak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The focus today seems to be gaining range of motion to the injured knee as soon as possible, with emphasis on ROM symmetry between both knees. That surprised me because I thought it was regaining strength that was most important but apparently without ROM symmetry it difficult to make 100% recovery.

I've heard of some getting rehabbed even before they have the ACL surgery. It's very different than it was 10 years ago.

Again, I did all this in 1994. I'm not trying to argue or act like I know more than everyone else. I just really don't think much has changed except the expectations.

The whole "year 2" thing is psychological healing. It takes one year for the surgery/bone/graft to completely heal, but you can physically achieve full speed well before that. The reason that players are "full speed" in year 2 is because it takes that long to get over the injury psychologically.

Appreciate the first hand account.

I always heard it had to do with proprioception (perception external, proprioception refers to our internal bodily sense). It made sense that with the nerve network cut, it would have to reroute, and in some cases (or actually commonly) it could take more than a year for this process to happen, where the body relearns, so to speak, how to move the joint naturally.

Not to question you, but genuinely curious, NFL RBs make hard cuts that can put a lot of stress on the knee, I didn't read through the whole thread, were you doing anything as a layperson that would simulate that kind of activity and motion, or coordinated sequences of motions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The focus today seems to be gaining range of motion to the injured knee as soon as possible, with emphasis on ROM symmetry between both knees. That surprised me because I thought it was regaining strength that was most important but apparently without ROM symmetry it difficult to make 100% recovery.

I've heard of some getting rehabbed even before they have the ACL surgery. It's very different than it was 10 years ago.

Again, I did all this in 1994. I'm not trying to argue or act like I know more than everyone else. I just really don't think much has changed except the expectations.

The whole "year 2" thing is psychological healing. It takes one year for the surgery/bone/graft to completely heal, but you can physically achieve full speed well before that. The reason that players are "full speed" in year 2 is because it takes that long to get over the injury psychologically.

Appreciate the first hand account.

I always heard it had to do with proprioception (perception external, proprioception refers to our internal bodily sense). It made sense that with the nerve network cut, it would have to reroute, and in some cases (or actually commonly) it could take more than a year for this process to happen, where the body relearns, so to speak, how to move the joint naturally.

Not to question you, but genuinely curious, NFL RBs make hard cuts that can put a lot of stress on the knee, I didn't read through the whole thread, were you doing anything as a layperson that would simulate that kind of activity and motion, or coordinated sequences of motions?

There is a lot of work done on proprioception. The two things I can think of would be standing on one leg and throwing a weight ball against a trampoline, and sliding side-to-side (like skating) while having a ball thrown at/to you. Things like that, which force you to do two things at once, are designed to improve your proprioception. But I never really found it to be a problem, so I can't comment on how big of a factor it is supposed to be in the recovery. I've never really heard it mentioned before outside of PT.

Like I said earlier, I'm no professional athlete, but I think it's mostly relative. The doctor won't release a player if the graft isn't physically strong enough to withstand the stress. Maybe that takes a little longer for an NFL RB than an everyday Joe. But by the same token, the NFL guy will have had more time to fully recover strength and range of motion. I was playing basketball 4.5 months after surgery in 1994. Also had ACL reconstruction in 2008 and 2010, and was back at it in about 3.5 months after those surgeries. 7-8 months should be plenty of time for an NFL athlete in 2015.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unlike Beckham, however, he's not from a position that normally produces big rookie seasons.

Jeremy Hill says "Hello". :bye:

Sure. So do many rookie backs throughout the years. In case it wasn't clear my point is their comment seems way off base.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The focus today seems to be gaining range of motion to the injured knee as soon as possible, with emphasis on ROM symmetry between both knees. That surprised me because I thought it was regaining strength that was most important but apparently without ROM symmetry it difficult to make 100% recovery.

I've heard of some getting rehabbed even before they have the ACL surgery. It's very different than it was 10 years ago.

Again, I did all this in 1994. I'm not trying to argue or act like I know more than everyone else. I just really don't think much has changed except the expectations.

The whole "year 2" thing is psychological healing. It takes one year for the surgery/bone/graft to completely heal, but you can physically achieve full speed well before that. The reason that players are "full speed" in year 2 is because it takes that long to get over the injury psychologically.

Appreciate the first hand account.

I always heard it had to do with proprioception (perception external, proprioception refers to our internal bodily sense). It made sense that with the nerve network cut, it would have to reroute, and in some cases (or actually commonly) it could take more than a year for this process to happen, where the body relearns, so to speak, how to move the joint naturally.

Not to question you, but genuinely curious, NFL RBs make hard cuts that can put a lot of stress on the knee, I didn't read through the whole thread, were you doing anything as a layperson that would simulate that kind of activity and motion, or coordinated sequences of motions?

There is a lot of work done on proprioception. The two things I can think of would be standing on one leg and throwing a weight ball against a trampoline, and sliding side-to-side (like skating) while having a ball thrown at/to you. Things like that, which force you to do two things at once, are designed to improve your proprioception. But I never really found it to be a problem, so I can't comment on how big of a factor it is supposed to be in the recovery. I've never really heard it mentioned before outside of PT.

Like I said earlier, I'm no professional athlete, but I think it's mostly relative. The doctor won't release a player if the graft isn't physically strong enough to withstand the stress. Maybe that takes a little longer for an NFL RB than an everyday Joe. But by the same token, the NFL guy will have had more time to fully recover strength and range of motion. I was playing basketball 4.5 months after surgery in 1994. Also had ACL reconstruction in 2008 and 2010, and was back at it in about 3.5 months after those surgeries. 7-8 months should be plenty of time for an NFL athlete in 2015.

Everyone is different. while I'm not sure the comparison between normal healthy people and professional athletes is a strong one, my wife had ACL surgery 3 months ago and still can't straighten her leg, she's extremely unlikely to be running in the next few months. Doc said its not get fault, some people just have a longer road despite being active and healthy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The focus today seems to be gaining range of motion to the injured knee as soon as possible, with emphasis on ROM symmetry between both knees. That surprised me because I thought it was regaining strength that was most important but apparently without ROM symmetry it difficult to make 100% recovery.

I've heard of some getting rehabbed even before they have the ACL surgery. It's very different than it was 10 years ago.

Again, I did all this in 1994. I'm not trying to argue or act like I know more than everyone else. I just really don't think much has changed except the expectations.

The whole "year 2" thing is psychological healing. It takes one year for the surgery/bone/graft to completely heal, but you can physically achieve full speed well before that. The reason that players are "full speed" in year 2 is because it takes that long to get over the injury psychologically.

Appreciate the first hand account.

I always heard it had to do with proprioception (perception external, proprioception refers to our internal bodily sense). It made sense that with the nerve network cut, it would have to reroute, and in some cases (or actually commonly) it could take more than a year for this process to happen, where the body relearns, so to speak, how to move the joint naturally.

Not to question you, but genuinely curious, NFL RBs make hard cuts that can put a lot of stress on the knee, I didn't read through the whole thread, were you doing anything as a layperson that would simulate that kind of activity and motion, or coordinated sequences of motions?

There is a lot of work done on proprioception. The two things I can think of would be standing on one leg and throwing a weight ball against a trampoline, and sliding side-to-side (like skating) while having a ball thrown at/to you. Things like that, which force you to do two things at once, are designed to improve your proprioception. But I never really found it to be a problem, so I can't comment on how big of a factor it is supposed to be in the recovery. I've never really heard it mentioned before outside of PT.

Like I said earlier, I'm no professional athlete, but I think it's mostly relative. The doctor won't release a player if the graft isn't physically strong enough to withstand the stress. Maybe that takes a little longer for an NFL RB than an everyday Joe. But by the same token, the NFL guy will have had more time to fully recover strength and range of motion. I was playing basketball 4.5 months after surgery in 1994. Also had ACL reconstruction in 2008 and 2010, and was back at it in about 3.5 months after those surgeries. 7-8 months should be plenty of time for an NFL athlete in 2015.

Same knee? Maybe that's proof you started back too soon?

FWIW, I have also had ACL reconstructions on my (left) knee. The first in 1987 (old school type of operation with multiple zippers and some cut nerves) and the second in 2006. Wasn't close to coming back in as short a time as 7-8 months from either. It's not like we can devote the rehab time a professional athlete can; nor do we have the resources available to us that they do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The focus today seems to be gaining range of motion to the injured knee as soon as possible, with emphasis on ROM symmetry between both knees. That surprised me because I thought it was regaining strength that was most important but apparently without ROM symmetry it difficult to make 100% recovery.

I've heard of some getting rehabbed even before they have the ACL surgery. It's very different than it was 10 years ago.

Again, I did all this in 1994. I'm not trying to argue or act like I know more than everyone else. I just really don't think much has changed except the expectations.

The whole "year 2" thing is psychological healing. It takes one year for the surgery/bone/graft to completely heal, but you can physically achieve full speed well before that. The reason that players are "full speed" in year 2 is because it takes that long to get over the injury psychologically.

Appreciate the first hand account.

I always heard it had to do with proprioception (perception external, proprioception refers to our internal bodily sense). It made sense that with the nerve network cut, it would have to reroute, and in some cases (or actually commonly) it could take more than a year for this process to happen, where the body relearns, so to speak, how to move the joint naturally.

Not to question you, but genuinely curious, NFL RBs make hard cuts that can put a lot of stress on the knee, I didn't read through the whole thread, were you doing anything as a layperson that would simulate that kind of activity and motion, or coordinated sequences of motions?

There is a lot of work done on proprioception. The two things I can think of would be standing on one leg and throwing a weight ball against a trampoline, and sliding side-to-side (like skating) while having a ball thrown at/to you. Things like that, which force you to do two things at once, are designed to improve your proprioception. But I never really found it to be a problem, so I can't comment on how big of a factor it is supposed to be in the recovery. I've never really heard it mentioned before outside of PT.

Like I said earlier, I'm no professional athlete, but I think it's mostly relative. The doctor won't release a player if the graft isn't physically strong enough to withstand the stress. Maybe that takes a little longer for an NFL RB than an everyday Joe. But by the same token, the NFL guy will have had more time to fully recover strength and range of motion. I was playing basketball 4.5 months after surgery in 1994. Also had ACL reconstruction in 2008 and 2010, and was back at it in about 3.5 months after those surgeries. 7-8 months should be plenty of time for an NFL athlete in 2015.

Everyone is different. while I'm not sure the comparison between normal healthy people and professional athletes is a strong one, my wife had ACL surgery 3 months ago and still can't straighten her leg, she's extremely unlikely to be running in the next few months. Doc said its not get fault, some people just have a longer road despite being active and healthy.

There are many varibles that need to be considered regarding the recovery time of injuries such as these. The rehab is more important now and most of these athletes have access to therapy and in some cases technique that the average person does not. This can have a tremendous effect on the recovery process and time frame.

According to my therapist and surgeon, rebuilding stregnth, ROM, and symetry are very important to avoiding another injury. I'm going through it presently with a ruptuerd achilles, >130% in my right leg. The basic jist from my doctors are that the recovery process starts with the individual's natural ability to heal from the trauma brought on by the injury, surgery, and then pt. Then it comes down to that person's commitment to pt. However the bottleneck in this process is the persons natural ability to heal, and their commitment.

I would assume that Gurley has access to a therapist, and facilties everyday, or most days and has the competitve desire to overcome his injury and get back to playing. Taking that into account it would not surprise me if he is ready to play at the start of the season and is recovered.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I'm in the minority but I can't see an NFL team buying into Gurley too early. Moreno and Ridley are still on the FA market and those guys have had far more time to recover, are of reasonable age and have had some decent success in the league. I understand his ceiling is higher but to think that teams will just ignore an ACL injury on a RB is ignoring what the NFL has become. Combine that with the depth of RB's in this class... Guess we'll just see what happens. McGahee got talked into the first with his horrific injury but was clearly never the same despite having some good NFL seasons. Yes there have been medical advancements but it's still a major injury.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I'm in the minority but I can't see an NFL team buying into Gurley too early. Moreno and Ridley are still on the FA market and those guys have had far more time to recover, are of reasonable age and have had some decent success in the league. I understand his ceiling is higher but to think that teams will just ignore an ACL injury on a RB is ignoring what the NFL has become. Combine that with the depth of RB's in this class... Guess we'll just see what happens. McGahee got talked into the first with his horrific injury but was clearly never the same despite having some good NFL seasons. Yes there have been medical advancements but it's still a major injury.

- devaluing of RB's

- ACL

- deep class

I've said before that both Gurley and Gordon could slip into the 2nd round.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I'm in the minority but I can't see an NFL team buying into Gurley too early. Moreno and Ridley are still on the FA market and those guys have had far more time to recover, are of reasonable age and have had some decent success in the league. I understand his ceiling is higher but to think that teams will just ignore an ACL injury on a RB is ignoring what the NFL has become. Combine that with the depth of RB's in this class... Guess we'll just see what happens. McGahee got talked into the first with his horrific injury but was clearly never the same despite having some good NFL seasons. Yes there have been medical advancements but it's still a major injury.

Gurley suffers his injury on November 15.

Ridley suffers his injury on October 12.

Moreno suffers his injury on October 12.

Gurley will be 21 by the start of the season.

Ridley will be 26.

Moreno will be 28.

Far more time = 1 month?

Reasonable age is 26-28?

This doesn't even cover the production issue, where in 10 combined seasons Ridley + Moreno have 2 more 1,000 yard rushing campaigns than Gurley does.

I didn't read much past that part. Good luck this year to you, sir.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I'm in the minority but I can't see an NFL team buying into Gurley too early. Moreno and Ridley are still on the FA market and those guys have had far more time to recover, are of reasonable age and have had some decent success in the league. I understand his ceiling is higher but to think that teams will just ignore an ACL injury on a RB is ignoring what the NFL has become. Combine that with the depth of RB's in this class... Guess we'll just see what happens. McGahee got talked into the first with his horrific injury but was clearly never the same despite having some good NFL seasons. Yes there have been medical advancements but it's still a major injury.

McGahee tore his ACL, MCL, LCL

Gurley tore his ACL

McGahee had a major injury, Gurley didn't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I'm in the minority but I can't see an NFL team buying into Gurley too early. Moreno and Ridley are still on the FA market and those guys have had far more time to recover, are of reasonable age and have had some decent success in the league. I understand his ceiling is higher but to think that teams will just ignore an ACL injury on a RB is ignoring what the NFL has become. Combine that with the depth of RB's in this class... Guess we'll just see what happens. McGahee got talked into the first with his horrific injury but was clearly never the same despite having some good NFL seasons. Yes there have been medical advancements but it's still a major injury.

McGahee tore his ACL, MCL, LCL

Gurley tore his ACL

McGahee had a major injury, Gurley didn't.

McGahee was the worst knee injury I've ever seen. Horrifically bad. It should pretty much never be brought up in relation to anyone else.
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A common thing I have read this spring is that the 1st round isn't deep, there aren't 32 first round prospects, etc.

This was one reason given that the Graham trade was rationalized from Seattle's side.

If Gurley is the highest ranked player on their board, there's a lot of good teams that could use a back in the back half of the first round.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Lattimore's knee injury was worse than McGahee IMHO.

Very similar injury, ACL, MCL and PCL. Forgot about him. Then again that one is burned in my memory from seeing his leg dangle on national TV.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A common thing I have read this spring is that the 1st round isn't deep, there aren't 32 first round prospects, etc.

This was one reason given that the Graham trade was rationalized from Seattle's side.

If Gurley is the highest ranked player on their board, there's a lot of good teams that could use a back in the back half of the first round.

Teams in the back half also more likely to have the talent and depth across their roster to effectively redshirt him if needed.

Than maybe you have a perennial Pro Bowler starting year two. Teams with GM/HC stability and job security could also make a move like this, geared more towards the future than immediate need.

I'll be surprised if Gurley makes it to the second, Gordon not as much.

* Late first round pick also gives the team-friendly extra fifth year option (as opposed to an early second).

** Pats took DT Domique Easley 1.29 last year, after suffering his second torn ACL in 2013 (albeit a position not as devalued as RB - OTOH Gurley arguably a far more rare prospect at his respective position).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man you guys are babies. I mentioned McGahee as a plus in Gurleys favor. And 26-28 is a RB's prime. SMH. You guys want to ignore an ACL injury and think he'll have some magical impact next year so be it. If you're drafting him at 1.01 to 1.03 that's what you'll expect and you'll be sitting on him for at least half a season. Teams haven't even got to see him run, workout, hell I'm not even sure if they've got to examine his knee

Edit to add: 1 month of rehab is a long time in football terms. That's 4 to 5 games in season. So tell me how my statement is false again.

Edited by Bojang0301

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man you guys are babies. I mentioned McGahee as a plus in Gurleys favor. And 26-28 is a RB's prime. SMH. You guys want to ignore an ACL injury and think he'll have some magical impact next year so be it. If you're drafting him at 1.01 to 1.03 that's what you'll expect and you'll be sitting on him for at least half a season. Teams haven't even got to see him run, workout, hell I'm not even sure if they've got to examine his knee

Edit to add: 1 month of rehab is a long time in football terms. That's 4 to 5 games in season. So tell me how my statement is false again.

If 1 month of rehab is a long time then Gurley should be extra good to go since Gronk and Welker started in week 1 following their December/January ACL tears.

But yea, it's pretty ridiculous to compare Ridley/Moreno to Gurley. Those guys wouldn't be anything more than veteran depth or committee guys at this point even without their injuries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not saying I don't like Gurley. I just don't know when ACL injuries became afterthoughts. Ajayi, Gordon, Abdullah and Coleman look like capable talents and if placed in the right position could be gold mines next season. If Gordon is in Dallas, Atlanta, Detroir or NE I think then his long term prospects may be shiny enough to keep him at his already perceived value. What if Miami, Carolina or San Francisco take him thogh or Seattle? Then the ACL and a muddled situation. I just think people should be more cautious with Gurley.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not saying I don't like Gurley. I just don't know when ACL injuries became afterthoughts. Ajayi, Gordon, Abdullah and Coleman look like capable talents and if placed in the right position could be gold mines next season. If Gordon is in Dallas, Atlanta, Detroir or NE I think then his long term prospects may be shiny enough to keep him at his already perceived value. What if Miami, Carolina or San Francisco take him thogh or Seattle? Then the ACL and a muddled situation. I just think people should be more cautious with Gurley.

I hope most in my leagues take this cautious approach with him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man you guys are babies. I mentioned McGahee as a plus in Gurleys favor. And 26-28 is a RB's prime. SMH. You guys want to ignore an ACL injury and think he'll have some magical impact next year so be it. If you're drafting him at 1.01 to 1.03 that's what you'll expect and you'll be sitting on him for at least half a season. Teams haven't even got to see him run, workout, hell I'm not even sure if they've got to examine his knee

Edit to add: 1 month of rehab is a long time in football terms. That's 4 to 5 games in season. So tell me how my statement is false again.

If 1 month of rehab is a long time then Gurley should be extra good to go since Gronk and Welker started in week 1 following their December/January ACL tears.

But yea, it's pretty ridiculous to compare Ridley/Moreno to Gurley. Those guys wouldn't be anything more than veteran depth or committee guys at this point even without their injuries.

They were/are capable starters. Ridley had fumbling issues but has a 1200yd season on the books and Moreno had some good years with Manning and looked excellent in his one game in Miami. I think them not being able to latch on with a team when a lot of teams have questionable RB depth says a lot about the value of RB's in the NFL and how teams feel about guys coming off the ACL injury. Rookies are in a different ballpark, I'll admit. That's why I mentioned McGahee initially because teams looked past his catastrophic injury and made him a first and then someone brought up Easley last year so it is entirely possible I am overselling the situation. Just wouldn't surprise me with as hush hush as Gurley has been he falls on the other side of the coin. Teams like honesty and like to have as much info as possible. Guys that hide things usually tend to fall in the draft. Gurley is a pretty complex situation. I'm sure he won't be passed out of fear he could be the next AD but it may be more beneficial to take a back plenty capable in a good situation if Gurley falls into a bad one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How has Gurley been hush hush about his situation? Seems like he's has been the exact opposite of that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wouldn't let teams inspect him at the combine. First time that's happened.

He wasn't willing to let them poke and prod and bend his knee around, there's a precedent for that. The initial reports were dumb and wrong. What he did was totally normal. Teams will get a chance to see his knee for themselves when he goes back to Indy for a physical later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rotoworld:

NFL Media analyst Charles Davis mocked Georgia RB Todd Gurley to the Falcons at No. 8.

"Surprise! Expected choice of a much-needed edge rusher doesn’t materialize," Davis wrote. "When Falcons were at their recent best, Michael Turner ate carries and the offense rolled." As the analyst notes, his mock exercise had Dante Fowler, Randy Gregory, Vic Beasley and Shane Ray off the board by the time it was Atlanta's turn to pick. That would be a nightmare situation for a pass rush badly in need of fortification, though Gurley would be one heck of a consolation prize, even if some think this is a bit early to pull the trigger.
Source: NFL.com
Mar 26 - 1:29 AM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man you guys are babies. I mentioned McGahee as a plus in Gurleys favor. And 26-28 is a RB's prime. SMH. You guys want to ignore an ACL injury and think he'll have some magical impact next year so be it. If you're drafting him at 1.01 to 1.03 that's what you'll expect and you'll be sitting on him for at least half a season. Teams haven't even got to see him run, workout, hell I'm not even sure if they've got to examine his knee

Edit to add: 1 month of rehab is a long time in football terms. That's 4 to 5 games in season. So tell me how my statement is false again.

You're kind of a moron. Prime years as a RB does not mean prime recovery years. Prime recovery years will put you back to being 100% during your prime years as a RB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rotoworld:

NFL Media analyst Charles Davis mocked Georgia RB Todd Gurley to the Falcons at No. 8.

"Surprise! Expected choice of a much-needed edge rusher doesn’t materialize," Davis wrote. "When Falcons were at their recent best, Michael Turner ate carries and the offense rolled." As the analyst notes, his mock exercise had Dante Fowler, Randy Gregory, Vic Beasley and Shane Ray off the board by the time it was Atlanta's turn to pick. That would be a nightmare situation for a pass rush badly in need of fortification, though Gurley would be one heck of a consolation prize, even if some think this is a bit early to pull the trigger.
Source: NFL.com
Mar 26 - 1:29 AM

Even if those guys are gone, it would be a mistake to pass on Kevin White for Gurley.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bucky Brooks article about potential team fits (NFL.com).

Excerpt - "... I firmly believe he's a transcendent talent, an impact playmaker with all of the blue-chip characteristics typically found in perennial Pro Bowlers."

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000481638/article/todd-gurleys-nfl-fits-include-chargers-ravens-cowboys

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazingly there are still people out there who will try and tell you Gurley isn't fast.

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000481389/article/five-rb-prospects-with-best-gamebreaking-speed

I think Brooks pointed out he is in Auburn's top 10 ever for hurdles (60 m.?), which I didn't know. Good point about being a returner, indication of COD and movement skills for a player close to 225 lbs. While he may not be RG3, borderline Olympic-caliber fast in the hurdles, still very fast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a lot of work done on proprioception. The two things I can think of would be standing on one leg and throwing a weight ball against a trampoline, and sliding side-to-side (like skating) while having a ball thrown at/to you. Things like that, which force you to do two things at once, are designed to improve your proprioception. But I never really found it to be a problem, so I can't comment on how big of a factor it is supposed to be in the recovery. I've never really heard it mentioned before outside of PT.

Like I said earlier, I'm no professional athlete, but I think it's mostly relative. The doctor won't release a player if the graft isn't physically strong enough to withstand the stress. Maybe that takes a little longer for an NFL RB than an everyday Joe. But by the same token, the NFL guy will have had more time to fully recover strength and range of motion. I was playing basketball 4.5 months after surgery in 1994. Also had ACL reconstruction in 2008 and 2010, and was back at it in about 3.5 months after those surgeries. 7-8 months should be plenty of time for an NFL athlete in 2015.

Everyone is different. while I'm not sure the comparison between normal healthy people and professional athletes is a strong one, my wife had ACL surgery 3 months ago and still can't straighten her leg, she's extremely unlikely to be running in the next few months. Doc said its not get fault, some people just have a longer road despite being active and healthy.

Not trying to be smart, but is she trying? It's definitely a lot of work and if you don't do the work you aren't going to improve.

There is a lot of work done on proprioception. The two things I can think of would be standing on one leg and throwing a weight ball against a trampoline, and sliding side-to-side (like skating) while having a ball thrown at/to you. Things like that, which force you to do two things at once, are designed to improve your proprioception. But I never really found it to be a problem, so I can't comment on how big of a factor it is supposed to be in the recovery. I've never really heard it mentioned before outside of PT.

Like I said earlier, I'm no professional athlete, but I think it's mostly relative. The doctor won't release a player if the graft isn't physically strong enough to withstand the stress. Maybe that takes a little longer for an NFL RB than an everyday Joe. But by the same token, the NFL guy will have had more time to fully recover strength and range of motion. I was playing basketball 4.5 months after surgery in 1994. Also had ACL reconstruction in 2008 and 2010, and was back at it in about 3.5 months after those surgeries. 7-8 months should be plenty of time for an NFL athlete in 2015.

Same knee? Maybe that's proof you started back too soon?

FWIW, I have also had ACL reconstructions on my (left) knee. The first in 1987 (old school type of operation with multiple zippers and some cut nerves) and the second in 2006. Wasn't close to coming back in as short a time as 7-8 months from either. It's not like we can devote the rehab time a professional athlete can; nor do we have the resources available to us that they do.

Different knees. The 2008 surgery was the same knee as the 1994 reconstruction and I was unfortunate enough to do the other knee in 2010.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazingly there are still people out there who will try and tell you Gurley isn't fast. http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000481389/article/five-rb-prospects-with-best-gamebreaking-speed

I think Brooks pointed out he is in Auburn's top 10 ever for hurdles (60 m.?), which I didn't know. Good point about being a returner, indication of COD and movement skills for a player close to 225 lbs. While he may not be RG3, borderline Olympic-caliber fast in the hurdles, still very fast.

Pretty amazing for him to be 7 in UGA history and also find time to get top 10 at Auburn as well.... :lol:

I kid.

Yes, this kid is fast. Very fast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's his post ACL 40 time?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rotoworld:

Todd Gurley - RB - Player

AzCardinals.com believes "there's a chance" the team uses the No. 24 overall pick on a running back.

Coach Bruce Arians has already professed his desire for a "bigger back," and at 6-foot-1, 222 pounds, Georgia's Todd Gurley would tower over Andre Ellington. There's also the matter of him being the draft's best back. As a whole, Arians has liked what he's seen out of the 2015 running-back class. "This might be the best group (of running backs) top to bottom that I’ve seen in about 10 years," Arians said. "There are 15 really quality running backs in this draft." Although the Cardinals will continue to get linked to Adrian Peterson, the draft is their most likely avenue of finding a hammer to pair with Ellington's lightning.

Related: Cardinals

Source: azcardinals.com
Mar 26 - 3:11 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.