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Otis

When do we go in and wipe out ISIS?

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Due to a limited supply of weapons, volunteers often have to bring their own firearms – usually a basic AK-47 – with the M4 and M16 rifles, BKC—an Iraqi clone of the Soviet PKM machine gun – and the DshK heavy machine gun, called the “doshka” in Iraq, being the staple weapons used in the battle against much better equipped opponents.

What's deal with not giving them arms?

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2015/01/02/iraq-peshmerga-desperate-for-us-arms-in-fight-against-isis/

The article explains why they cant purchase arms.

The US doesn't arm them, because the US views the Iraqi central government much, much, more strategically important and they don't want to piss them off.

Not to mention we need to learn the lesson once and for all that our allies in that area quickly turn to enemies and all of a sudden have a boatload of american military equipment

It is a bit more nuanced than this. It has more to do with learning that the enemy of our enemy isn't necessarily our ally, and it is something we have learned. A year ago+, everyone wanted to arm the rebels in Syria to fight al-Assad. If we did that, we most certainly would have seen weapons get into ISIS' hands. We have to rely on allies in the region but taking a longer term approach, we can ensure our allies are long term and also not abandon them once our goals are reached.

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Due to a limited supply of weapons, volunteers often have to bring their own firearms – usually a basic AK-47 – with the M4 and M16 rifles, BKC—an Iraqi clone of the Soviet PKM machine gun – and the DshK heavy machine gun, called the “doshka” in Iraq, being the staple weapons used in the battle against much better equipped opponents.

What's deal with not giving them arms?

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2015/01/02/iraq-peshmerga-desperate-for-us-arms-in-fight-against-isis/

The article explains why they cant purchase arms.

The US doesn't arm them, because the US views the Iraqi central government much, much, more strategically important and they don't want to piss them off.

Not to mention we need to learn the lesson once and for all that our allies in that area quickly turn to enemies and all of a sudden have a boatload of american military equipment

The Kurds are one of the most moderate allies we have in the region. Women fight in their military and aren't required to wear hijab and Kurds are tolerant of other religions.

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Anonymous is outting ISIS-sympathizers as we speak. Released a guys Facebook/twitter profile. Interesting stuff :popcorn:

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Ohio Man Arrested for Alleged ISIS-Inspired Attack Plot on US Capitol

The FBI has arrested an Ohio man for allegedly plotting an ISIS-inspired attack on the U.S. Capitol, where he hoped to set off a series of bombs aimed at lawmakers, whom he allegedly considered enemies.

Christopher Lee Cornell, of Cincinnati, was arrested today on charges of attempting to kill a U.S. government official, authorities said.

According to government documents, he allegedly planned to detonate pipe bombs at the national landmark and open fire on any employees and officials fleeing after the explosions

The FBI first noticed Cornell several months ago after an informant notified the agency that Cornell was allegedly voicing support for violent “jihad” on Twitter accounts under the alias “Raheel Mahrus Ubaydah,” according to charging documents. In addition, Cornell allegedly posted statements, videos and other content expressing support for ISIS -- the brutal terrorist group also known as ISIL -- that is wreaking havoc in Iraq and Syria.

“I believe that we should just wage jihad under our own orders and plan attacks and everything,” Cornell allegedly wrote in an online message to the informant in August, according to the FBI. “I believe we should meet up and make our own group in alliance with the Islamic State here and plan operations ourselves."

In the message, Cornell said that such attacks “already got a thumbs up” from radical cleric Anwar Awlaki “before his martyrdom.”

Awlaki was killed in a U.S. drone strike in 2011, but his online messages calling for attacks on the West live on.

U.S. officials considered Awlaki an operational leader within al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, the Yemen-based terror group tied to the deadly assault on a satirical magazine in Paris last week.

Cornell and the informant met in Cincinnati over two days in October, and then another two days in November. During the last meeting, Cornell told an FBI informant that members of Congress were enemies and that he wanted to launch an attack on the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., according to charging documents.

Cornell then allegedly saved money to finance the attack and researched how to build bombs, the FBI said.

Earlier today, while also taking “final steps” to travel to Washington for the attack, Cornell allegedly bought two semi-automatic rifles and 600 rounds of ammunition from a store in Ohio, authorities said.

Within hours of Cornell’s arrest, the FBI and Department of Homeland Security issued a bulletin to law enforcement agencies across the country notifying them of the case.

"The alleged activities of Cornell highlight the continued interest of US-based violent extremists to support designated foreign terrorist organizations overseas, such as ISIL, by committing terrorist acts in the United States,” the bulletin read. “Terrorist group members and supporters will almost certainly continue to use social media platforms to disseminate English language violent extremist messages."

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His father is talking to Erin Burnett now on CNN. Son never spoke of Isis or terrorism at all but did show some interest in Islam. Poor father. He's in shock. :(

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Okay, so while we're "here"- what's to be made of what I take to be questionable "news" outlets and these kind of articles touting jihad training camps all over the U.S...?? :oldunsure:

22 Jihad Training Camps

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Still don't get why we aren't doing this.

Sweep the leg.

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Ohio Man Arrested for Alleged ISIS-Inspired Attack Plot on US Capitol

The FBI has arrested an Ohio man for allegedly plotting an ISIS-inspired attack on the U.S. Capitol, where he hoped to set off a series of bombs aimed at lawmakers, whom he allegedly considered enemies.

Christopher Lee Cornell, of Cincinnati, was arrested today on charges of attempting to kill a U.S. government official, authorities said.

According to government documents, he allegedly planned to detonate pipe bombs at the national landmark and open fire on any employees and officials fleeing after the explosions

The FBI first noticed Cornell several months ago after an informant notified the agency that Cornell was allegedly voicing support for violent “jihad” on Twitter accounts under the alias “Raheel Mahrus Ubaydah,” according to charging documents. In addition, Cornell allegedly posted statements, videos and other content expressing support for ISIS -- the brutal terrorist group also known as ISIL -- that is wreaking havoc in Iraq and Syria.

“I believe that we should just wage jihad under our own orders and plan attacks and everything,” Cornell allegedly wrote in an online message to the informant in August, according to the FBI. “I believe we should meet up and make our own group in alliance with the Islamic State here and plan operations ourselves."

In the message, Cornell said that such attacks “already got a thumbs up” from radical cleric Anwar Awlaki “before his martyrdom.”

Awlaki was killed in a U.S. drone strike in 2011, but his online messages calling for attacks on the West live on.

U.S. officials considered Awlaki an operational leader within al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, the Yemen-based terror group tied to the deadly assault on a satirical magazine in Paris last week.

Cornell and the informant met in Cincinnati over two days in October, and then another two days in November. During the last meeting, Cornell told an FBI informant that members of Congress were enemies and that he wanted to launch an attack on the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., according to charging documents.

Cornell then allegedly saved money to finance the attack and researched how to build bombs, the FBI said.

Earlier today, while also taking “final steps” to travel to Washington for the attack, Cornell allegedly bought two semi-automatic rifles and 600 rounds of ammunition from a store in Ohio, authorities said.

Within hours of Cornell’s arrest, the FBI and Department of Homeland Security issued a bulletin to law enforcement agencies across the country notifying them of the case.

"The alleged activities of Cornell highlight the continued interest of US-based violent extremists to support designated foreign terrorist organizations overseas, such as ISIL, by committing terrorist acts in the United States,” the bulletin read. “Terrorist group members and supporters will almost certainly continue to use social media platforms to disseminate English language violent extremist messages."

His father is talking to Erin Burnett now on CNN. Son never spoke of Isis or terrorism at all but did show some interest in Islam. Poor father. He's in shock. :(

Soooooo... it's a white guy.

Pretty much the brass ring for these sickos.

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Saudi Arabia Is Building A 600-Mile 'Great Wall' To Shield Itself From ISIS

When a raiding party from Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant attacked a Saudi border post last week, it was no mere hit on a desert outpost.

The jihadists were launching an assault on the new, highest-profile effort by Saudi Arabia to insulate itself from the chaos engulfing its neighbours.

The Saudis are building a 600-mile-long “Great Wall” — a combined fence and ditch — to separate the country from Iraq to the north.


[picture in link]

Much of the area on the Iraqi side is now controlled by Isil, which regards the ultimate capture of Saudi Arabia, home to the “Two Holy Mosques” of Mecca and Medina, as a key goal.

The proposal had been discussed since 2006, at the height of the Iraqi civil war, but work began in September last year after Isil’s charge through much of the west and north of the country gave it a substantial land border with the Kingdom to the south.

The border zone now includes five layers of fencing with watch towers, night-vision cameras, and radar cameras.

Riyadh also sent an extra 30,000 troops to the area.


It is not the only fence with which Saudi Arabia has chosen to surround itself. Despite the difficulty of access to westerners, the country is relatively open to fellow Muslim nations, particularly during the Haj season when pilgrims from across the world come to Mecca and Medina.

However, that is changing in changing times.

It has also created a physical barrier along parts of the even longer, 1,000-mile border with Yemen to the south.

The attack last week is the sort of incident the Saudis hope to avoid. Three border guards, including General Oudah al-Belawi, commander of border operations in Saudi Arabia’s northern zone, were killed.

All four attackers also died.px.gif?key=YXJ0aWNsZT1iMDRiNTEwOTFmZGZkN

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Let's Play Match That Headline! Four Headlines listed on Google News from four different New Organization for the same story. Match them to the correct one.

A. Fox Nexs

B. Los Angeles Times

C. CNN

D. Boston Herald

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Haven't the Saudis been proponents of radicalism for a long time now?

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Haven't the Saudis been proponents of radicalism for a long time now?

As far as I know they've always allowed the religious order in their kingdom to spread the wahabism/salafism strain of Islam... as long as they can continue ruling the kingdom. And some in the royal family do indeed give money to support the spread of these teachings (i.e. Pakistani madrassas).

But a main goal of ISIS is to rule over SA because of the Mecca/Medina, thus the fear from the royal family.

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Let's Play Match That Headline! Four Headlines listed on Google News from four different New Organization for the same story. Match them to the correct one.

A. Fox Nexs

B. Los Angeles Times

C. CNN

D. Boston Herald

C

A

D

B

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Let's Play Match That Headline! Four Headlines listed on Google News from four different New Organization for the same story. Match them to the correct one.

A. Fox Nexs

B. Los Angeles Times

C. CNN

D. Boston Herald

C

A

D

B

2 are correct.

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Islamic State group reaches for Afghanistan and Pakistan

CAMP SHORABAK, Afghanistan (AP) — Afghanistan and Pakistan, home to al-Qaida and Taliban militants and the focus of the longest war in U.S. history, face a new, emerging threat from the Islamic State group, officials have told The Associated Press.

Disenchanted extremists from the Taliban and other organizations, impressed by the Islamic State group's territorial gains and slick online propaganda, have begun raising its black flag in extremist-dominated areas of both countries.

In Pakistan, an online video purportedly shows militants beheading a man while pledging their allegiance to the IS. In Afghanistan, there have even been reports of militant rivalries, with clashes erupting between Taliban fighters and Islamic State militants.

Analysts and officials say the number of IS supporters in the Afghan-Pakistan region remains small and that the group faces resistance from militants with strong tribal links. However, the rise of even a small Islamic State affiliate could further destabilize the region and complicate U.S. and NATO efforts to end the 13-year Afghan war.

The Taliban remain the region's pre-eminent insurgency, with nearly 20 years of experience battling Afghan warlords and international troops. But the Taliban are "not a particularly sexy ideology or military force, and the risk lies in the Taliban looking increasingly out of date," said a Western diplomat, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss intelligence matters.

"It could be that young Afghans look to the more extreme tactics and the great glitzy publicity of IS," the diplomat said. "They might find it attractive, or the Taliban might feel the need to compete and therefore become a bit more extreme and start carrying out horrific acts the way you see IS doing."

The Islamic State group controls a third of both Syria and Iraq, where it declared a caliphate governed by a harsh interpretation of Islamic law, or Sharia, and demanded the allegiance of the world's Muslims. The Taliban, by contrast, are focused on Afghanistan and Pakistan, and some leaders have even responded to past peace overtures.

Smaller militant groups in Libya, Egypt, Lebanon and elsewhere have pledged allegiance to the IS group's leader and self-proclaimed caliph Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, with some referring to themselves as "provinces."

In Afghanistan's southern Helmand province, residents say a former Taliban commander named Mullah Abdul Rauf has begun recruiting fighters for the Islamic State group.

"People are saying that he has raised black flags and even has tried to bring down white Taliban flags in some areas," said Saifullah Sanginwal, a tribal leader in Sangin district. "There are reports that 19 or 20 people have been killed" in fighting between the Taliban and the IS, he added.

Pakistan's Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan said in November there was no Islamic State group presence, only militants using its name. However, a government letter written a month earlier and later obtained by the AP warns local officials that the Islamic State group has begun courting area militants and that the extremists claim the support of up to "12,000 followers" in northwest Pakistan.

A video released in December showed female students and teachers at Islamabad's Red Mosque, which holds great sway with Pakistan's militants, sitting under an Islamic State flag, pledging support to al-Baghdadi as cleric Maulana Abdul Aziz said it would welcome the group. Last week, an online video released by the IS showed a former Pakistani Taliban spokesman pledging his support with more than a dozen others, before beheading a man they identified as a soldier.

The Pak Institute for Peace Studies, an Islamabad-based organization tracking militant groups, also issued a report calling the Islamic State group a "real and emerging threat for Pakistan."

"It has created a major survival challenge for the main militant actors who could now act to prove their operational credentials," the report said.

Taliban militants in Afghanistan and Pakistan owe their allegiance to Mullah Omar, a cleric who has led the Taliban since the 1990s but has not been seen or heard in public for years. Officials fear that an Islamic State push into the region could bring an infusion of guns and money, sparking brutal competition among local militants disenchanted with Mullah Omar's silence and eager to prove themselves with escalating atrocities.

One former Taliban commander pledged allegiance to the Islamic State group "because he felt alienated from the Taliban leadership," said Graeme Smith, an analyst focusing on Afghanistan for the International Crisis Group.

"He seems to be doing better as a result," Smith added. "He seems to have more money and weapons than before and people are noticing that maybe there is some actual link that is more than symbolic."

A senior U.S. State Department official, speaking this week in Pakistan on condition of anonymity to discuss diplomatic talks, said both Afghan and Pakistani officials shared their concerns with America about the Islamic State group seeking a regional foothold.

"There's no daylight between us in terms of wanting to be coordinated in efforts to thwart" the IS, the official said.

At the same time, the IS would struggle to mount a real challenge to the Taliban, which is deeply enmeshed in tribal Pashtun society, said Borhan Osman, a researcher with the Afghanistan Analysts Network.

But with NATO forces and U.S. troops now focused on training Afghans, as opposed to conducting combat operations, some worry the Islamic State group could gain ground and pose a serious threat in the future.

"We need to be very watchful," said Nasir Khan Durrani, police chief of Pakistan's Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, which borders the lawless tribal region and militant haven. "We need to be careful."

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Brittany Spear's ex bf pilot died when Taliban missile hit his helicopter. Sad. He really helped her get out of her addictions.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2915013/Britney-Spears-British-pilot-ex-boyfriend-coached-alcohol-fuelled-public-meltdown-shot-dead-Taliban-Afghanistan.html

Edited by CurlyNight

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Islamic State group reaches for Afghanistan and Pakistan

CAMP SHORABAK, Afghanistan (AP) — Afghanistan and Pakistan, home to al-Qaida and Taliban militants and the focus of the longest war in U.S. history, face a new, emerging threat from the Islamic State group, officials have told The Associated Press.

Disenchanted extremists from the Taliban and other organizations, impressed by the Islamic State group's territorial gains and slick online propaganda, have begun raising its black flag in extremist-dominated areas of both countries.

In Pakistan, an online video purportedly shows militants beheading a man while pledging their allegiance to the IS. In Afghanistan, there have even been reports of militant rivalries, with clashes erupting between Taliban fighters and Islamic State militants.

Analysts and officials say the number of IS supporters in the Afghan-Pakistan region remains small and that the group faces resistance from militants with strong tribal links. However, the rise of even a small Islamic State affiliate could further destabilize the region and complicate U.S. and NATO efforts to end the 13-year Afghan war.

The Taliban remain the region's pre-eminent insurgency, with nearly 20 years of experience battling Afghan warlords and international troops. But the Taliban are "not a particularly sexy ideology or military force, and the risk lies in the Taliban looking increasingly out of date," said a Western diplomat, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss intelligence matters.

"It could be that young Afghans look to the more extreme tactics and the great glitzy publicity of IS," the diplomat said. "They might find it attractive, or the Taliban might feel the need to compete and therefore become a bit more extreme and start carrying out horrific acts the way you see IS doing."

The Islamic State group controls a third of both Syria and Iraq, where it declared a caliphate governed by a harsh interpretation of Islamic law, or Sharia, and demanded the allegiance of the world's Muslims. The Taliban, by contrast, are focused on Afghanistan and Pakistan, and some leaders have even responded to past peace overtures.

Smaller militant groups in Libya, Egypt, Lebanon and elsewhere have pledged allegiance to the IS group's leader and self-proclaimed caliph Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, with some referring to themselves as "provinces."

In Afghanistan's southern Helmand province, residents say a former Taliban commander named Mullah Abdul Rauf has begun recruiting fighters for the Islamic State group.

"People are saying that he has raised black flags and even has tried to bring down white Taliban flags in some areas," said Saifullah Sanginwal, a tribal leader in Sangin district. "There are reports that 19 or 20 people have been killed" in fighting between the Taliban and the IS, he added.

Pakistan's Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan said in November there was no Islamic State group presence, only militants using its name. However, a government letter written a month earlier and later obtained by the AP warns local officials that the Islamic State group has begun courting area militants and that the extremists claim the support of up to "12,000 followers" in northwest Pakistan.

A video released in December showed female students and teachers at Islamabad's Red Mosque, which holds great sway with Pakistan's militants, sitting under an Islamic State flag, pledging support to al-Baghdadi as cleric Maulana Abdul Aziz said it would welcome the group. Last week, an online video released by the IS showed a former Pakistani Taliban spokesman pledging his support with more than a dozen others, before beheading a man they identified as a soldier.

The Pak Institute for Peace Studies, an Islamabad-based organization tracking militant groups, also issued a report calling the Islamic State group a "real and emerging threat for Pakistan."

"It has created a major survival challenge for the main militant actors who could now act to prove their operational credentials," the report said.

Taliban militants in Afghanistan and Pakistan owe their allegiance to Mullah Omar, a cleric who has led the Taliban since the 1990s but has not been seen or heard in public for years. Officials fear that an Islamic State push into the region could bring an infusion of guns and money, sparking brutal competition among local militants disenchanted with Mullah Omar's silence and eager to prove themselves with escalating atrocities.

One former Taliban commander pledged allegiance to the Islamic State group "because he felt alienated from the Taliban leadership," said Graeme Smith, an analyst focusing on Afghanistan for the International Crisis Group.

"He seems to be doing better as a result," Smith added. "He seems to have more money and weapons than before and people are noticing that maybe there is some actual link that is more than symbolic."

A senior U.S. State Department official, speaking this week in Pakistan on condition of anonymity to discuss diplomatic talks, said both Afghan and Pakistani officials shared their concerns with America about the Islamic State group seeking a regional foothold.

"There's no daylight between us in terms of wanting to be coordinated in efforts to thwart" the IS, the official said.

At the same time, the IS would struggle to mount a real challenge to the Taliban, which is deeply enmeshed in tribal Pashtun society, said Borhan Osman, a researcher with the Afghanistan Analysts Network.

But with NATO forces and U.S. troops now focused on training Afghans, as opposed to conducting combat operations, some worry the Islamic State group could gain ground and pose a serious threat in the future.

"We need to be very watchful," said Nasir Khan Durrani, police chief of Pakistan's Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, which borders the lawless tribal region and militant haven. "We need to be careful."

Them infighting is glorious. Them aligning, not so much.

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Final sentence of that article is odd. "Iraq beat Jordan 1-0 in the Jan. 12 match, which took place in Brisbane, Australia."

I know this is likely just thorough reporting, but I have to wonder who the readers are that got to the end of that article saying, "I wonder who won that soccer match..."

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Now Japan.

These guys have made enemies of the entire planet. Can someone explain why we're still letting these beheadings happen on a weekly basis?

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Now Japan.

These guys have made enemies of the entire planet. Can someone explain why we're still letting these beheadings happen on a weekly basis?

Think of it this way Otis...

We can't even keep prisoners -- people who are literally controlled in every way 24/7/365 -- from buying drugs or killing each other.

So stopping every nut job a half a world away from doing bad #### is kind of a reach.

Edited by wdcrob

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Now Japan.

These guys have made enemies of the entire planet. Can someone explain why we're still letting these beheadings happen on a weekly basis?

Think of it this way Otis...

We can't even keep prisoners -- people who are literally controlled in every way 24/7/365 -- from buying drugs or killing each other.

So stopping every nut job a half a world away from doing bad #### is kind of a reach.

Good point. We can't even keep Suge Knight from killing folks. So much for American Might. Pretty incompetent.

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So, when we wipe out ISIS, do we wipe front-to-back, or back-to-front?

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A single US Army Group with Armoured divisions and Air support could remove ISIS from the planet in 3-4 days.

But 1., it's not our war to fight; no one has appointed the US head of some UN command to destroy them with full force.

2. We alienate many of the currently pro-American Muslim countries, and totally alienate those on the fence.

3. We encite more home grown terror attacks.

I think ISIS would need to commit a serious attack on US individuals somewhere (many, like 100's or 1000's) or invade a country we have major vested interests in to get a full on war. I doubt either happens, but if we do engage, they stand 0% chance of any tactical or strategic success.

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Now Japan.

These guys have made enemies of the entire planet. Can someone explain why we're still letting these beheadings happen on a weekly basis?

Think of it this way Otis...

We can't even keep prisoners -- people who are literally controlled in every way 24/7/365 -- from buying drugs or killing each other.

So stopping every nut job a half a world away from doing bad #### is kind of a reach.

Then we'd better double the defense budget to keep Otis safe.

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I'm sure most have heard but the 2nd Japanese guy was beheaded. These are just the ones we know about. Right at this moment, someone else is probably being beheaded or some little girl is being raped. I don't see how a multi-national coalition can't be formed to wipe these savages out. Will no one step up?

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Now Japan.

These guys have made enemies of the entire planet. Can someone explain why we're still letting these beheadings happen on a weekly basis?

Think of it this way Otis...

We can't even keep prisoners -- people who are literally controlled in every way 24/7/365 -- from buying drugs or killing each other.

So stopping every nut job a half a world away from doing bad #### is kind of a reach.

Then we'd better double the defense budget to keep Otis safe.

:rolleyes:

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Now Japan.

These guys have made enemies of the entire planet. Can someone explain why we're still letting these beheadings happen on a weekly basis?

Think of it this way Otis...

We can't even keep prisoners -- people who are literally controlled in every way 24/7/365 -- from buying drugs or killing each other.

So stopping every nut job a half a world away from doing bad #### is kind of a reach.

Then we'd better double the defense budget to keep Otis safe.

:rolleyes:

I don't know how to interpret your smiley. I was obviously jabbing Otis with sarcasm here.

Doubling the defense budget won't keep us safer. Halving it won't make us less safe, either.

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For all the people that complain how Muslims don't stand up against the terrorists and just allow the terrorists to control Islam, I hope this finally puts an end to that line of thought. There are Muslims fighting and dying against extremists everyday. It is mostly Muslims fighting on the front lines.

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No reason for ISIS to kill that pilot. They showed they we're negotiating in bad faith, and they just drew Jordanian Intel into this in a more direct role. Jordanian intelligence is no ####### joke.

They have no end game, this is all short-term destruction and barbarianism. Even Al-Qaeda has more defined goals.

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Burning someone alive is also forbidden by Islam, only "the creator" has that power.

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Don't watch the video its brutal. Jordan said they would execute all Isis prisoners if their pilot was killed. Let's see if that happens.

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No reason for ISIS to kill that pilot. They showed they we're negotiating in bad faith, and they just drew Jordanian Intel into this in a more direct role. Jordanian intelligence is no ####### joke.

They have no end game, this is all short-term destruction and barbarianism. Even Al-Qaeda has more defined goals.

Hasn't there been major dissension amongst ISIS leaders recently. I thought I read about mass purgings inside ISIS- even at high levels. Are they imploding or just consolidating? Edited by Ilov80s

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No reason for ISIS to kill that pilot. They showed they we're negotiating in bad faith, and they just drew Jordanian Intel into this in a more direct role. Jordanian intelligence is no ####### joke.

They have no end game, this is all short-term destruction and barbarianism. Even Al-Qaeda has more defined goals.

Hasn't there been major dissection amongst ISIS leaders recently. I thought I read about mass purgings inside ISIS- even at high levels. Are they imploding or just consolidating?
I think it just shows that they are/were nothing more than splinter groups coming under one flag. I'm not sure how anyone on the ground in Suria even knows who is on their side, or even what side they are really on. It's the Assad government, and hundreds of armed gangs who fly a different flag every day.

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Burning someone alive is also forbidden by Islam, only "the creator" has that power.

Interesting...

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Jordan scheduling the execution of all 6 ISIS prisoners tomorrow. Starting with the woman ISIS was trying to swap the pilot for, I believe.

Drown the garbage

I see your one fire and raise you six waters

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Jordan scheduling the execution of all 6 ISIS prisoners tomorrow. Starting with the woman ISIS was trying to swap the pilot for, I believe.

I'm not sure if I'm a bad person for thinking that that is ####### awesome.

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I'm genuinely hoping this kind of atrocity helps incite locals against the loons.

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Jordan scheduling the execution of all 6 ISIS prisoners tomorrow. Starting with the woman ISIS was trying to swap the pilot for, I believe.

I'm not sure if I'm a bad person for thinking that that is ####### awesome.

They didn't mess around.

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They put the Jordanian pilot in a cage and burned him to death...

http://www.buzzfeed.com/davidmack/isis-jordan-pilot#.riZ18QZ7L

And Obama still doesn't call them a terrorist group?

They have been designated as a terror group by the State Department. He's called them "pure evil" and today said "barbaric organization."

He's not giving them status is all, nor should he.

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Wasn't Jordan planning on doing the prisoner exchange?

I must've somehow found out that the pilot had already been killed.

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