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timschochet

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I think Annie Hall has aged better than many other 70s and 80s films.  It definitely has a very specific milieu but it's one that few viewers are intimately familiar with, so the cultural references don't lose a lot in translation.  The scenes set in LA seem the most dated but they bordered on parody when originally made.

One of the biggest problems for modern audiences is Allen himself.   The artist, the man and the characters he's played are so intertwined that it's hard for some people to get past the creepiness of his pedophilia. 

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53 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

Easily the most important Boomer movie - 

Not sure about this. I love it, but I think most people would choose The Graduate (not on my list). 

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1 minute ago, timschochet said:

Not sure about this. I love it, but I think most people would choose The Graduate (not on my list). 

Early boomers, yeah. Not sure about the boomers both in the 60s though. Generations as we label them are too broad to attach to 1 film.

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1 hour ago, wikkidpissah said:

Easily the most important Boomer movie - as big as Star Wars to GenX.

Funny that the two movies were released six weeks apart in 1977.   I realize Allen and Lucas were targeting different audiences but probably not different generations.

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I'm positive that I will go to my grave without having ever seen Cabaret or Annie Hall.

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8. Aliens (1986)

Directed by: James Cameron

Starring: Sigourney Weaver, Michael Biehn, Paul Reiser, Bill Paxton

Alien was an excellent horror movie, set in outer space. The key to Alien was not that it was in outer space, but that it was in an isolated place; it would have worked equally well in the artic (see John Carpenter's The Thing) or deep underwater (see The Abyss, though that was not a horror film). They were alone- hence the advertising line, "In space, no one can hear you scream."

This sequel is NOT a horror movie, per se- it's a science fiction shoot 'em up action movie, and IMO, the very best of it's genre, which includes all of the Star Wars movies and, with all apologies to my friend Yankee2fan, The Wrath of Khan (Yankee complained that I didn't rank that film higher.) What makes it so great? Let's discuss the various ways:

First of course, we get to know the characters involved before the main action starts happening. This is a simple thing in film, but it's amazing how often it's overlooked in action movies that involve large ensemble casts. It's true that Cameron only provides us stereotypical glimpses of personality traits (Vasquez is tough, Hudson is a joker, Gorman is inexperienced, etc.)but it's enough, enough so that we feel like we know them once the aliens attack, and that makes their struggles all the more enjoyable and exciting.

As I wrote Vasquez is tough, one of the toughest women ever on screen (which is why people continue to talk about this character even 30 years later) but she can't hold a candle to Weaver's Ripley, who manages to be not only of the the strongest female personalities in the history of cinema but at the same time to retain her humanity. The character of Newt is provided to cement this, but it is apparent all throughout the movie, beginning with her reluctance to go to the planet in the first place (the "reluctant hero" being in the finest Hollywood tradition- Weaver is Gary Cooper here). Perhaps the most pivotal demonstration of Ripley's imperfections come late in the film- when, after having reached an agreement with the main alien that Newt will be released in exchange for the lives of the alien babies, Ripley decides to kill them anyhow. This is such a key moment in the movie: showing us Ripley's rage, the amoral (or immoral) nature of her act (she is aware that a nuclear explosion is going to kill all of the aliens anyhow, but she wants the alien mother to suffer.) At least to my knowledge, this scene of Ripley murdering the alien children is unique in Hollywood filmmaking.

There is a sleight of hand early in the film in which the viewer is made aware that there will be a non-alien villain, but we are made to believe it is likely to be Bishop, the android. The actual villain, Paul Reiser, does a great job at being a weasel from his first appearance on screen. Of course Bill Paxton is excellent and he is given the most memorable one-liners in the entire movie (and some of the best in film history.) The direction expertly avoids showing the aliens close up very often, giving them glimpses and portraying them in shadow, which adds to their terror (it is also because of the special effects limitations at the time this film was made- if it had been made today, it would have likely been a very different movie in terms of special effects- and perhaps not as good.) Despite this not really being a horror movie like the first one, there are scenes of sheer terror as great as any horror movie- for instance, Newt lost in the water as the alien rises behind her.

I'm sure that this movie is considered flawed by those fans who are so consumed with the "logic" of stuff that they can find holes in the plot. Any movie with this much action is going to no doubt strain believability at times (though this movie apparently doesn't come close to another of my picks, Independence Day, in this regard.) But I never subscribe to such silliness; when I am watching a Hollywood action epic like this one I simply suspend my disbelief from the very beginning, and rarely if ever question the plot. That allows me to enjoy the movie that much more, though this particular film doesn't need the help- it's truly one of the most entertaining Hollywood movies ever made.

Up next: Josef Peters! Nobody hits a pure bred German woman in the face!

 

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13 hours ago, Andy Dufresne said:

I'm positive that I will go to my grave without having ever seen Cabaret or Annie Hall.

Well that's too bad.

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8 minutes ago, timschochet said:

Up next: Josef Peters! Nobody hits a pure bred German woman in the face!

 

Great a bunch of Jew/Nazi movies :rolleyes:

J/k Timmy - can't wait to see the write-up on Victory!

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4 minutes ago, AAABatteries said:

Great a bunch of Jew/Nazi movies :rolleyes:

J/k Timmy - can't wait to see the write-up on Victory!

Did you miss it? That came in at # 43.

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lessee...............Cabaret..............#7................................. Figured it out. Yentl #1! *lalala* Timmy, can you hear me?

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4 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

lessee...............Cabaret..............#7................................. Figured it out. Yentl #1! *lalala* Timmy, can you hear me?

The food on the dishes, it's all so delicious! 

How can I not love Yentl, which such awesome lyrics as that? 

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On ‎8‎/‎11‎/‎2015 at 2:17 PM, Yankee23Fan said:

Andrew Johnson (1865-1869)

Public Acumen/Persuasion

If Johnson was half the man Lincoln was there is a chance that he could have had an effective time in office. But he wasn’t close. Johnson seemed to believe that when he talked to anyone he should remain supportive of whatever they were talking about, and then do whatever he wanted after the fact. This angered just about everyone. Bills that were thought to have his support were vetoed, he completely miscalculated the effects of the civil war on the country and how the north would deal with reconstruction, and he ultimately alienated his party, the other party, the whole of Congress, most of the states and just about everyone in between. The depths of his failures here are so massive that it would take too long to get through, but let’s just say that giving him a 1 here is being nice.

The guy even tried to talk directly to the people when he wanted to run for re-election and just about every speech backfired considerably.

War & Crisis

Johnson’s main crisis upon taking office after the death of Abraham Lincoln was reconstruction. With Congress out of session until the end of the year, the initial 6 months of rebuilding the country were his sole responsibility. Johnson set out to reform the state governments by appointing governors to write new constitutions that demanded the south to basically come back on bended knee. His plans were going to be much harsher than Lincoln’s. Except for some reason that is hard to explain in history, he backed down almost immediately on many of his threats and began pardoning a ton of people, including leaders of the south. At the same time while he demanded the new state constitutions to be anti-slavery almost all of them had ‘black codes’ that were a small step above slavery and Johnson just kept working with them.

When Congress came back into session they attacked almost every aspect of his plan. Radical republicans wanted the south punished. Moderates tried to find some common ground to make it all work, and Johnson believed that the black question was more left to the states and got in the way of any progress. Johnson tried to block voting rights for blacks until his last days in office and it resulted in his facing impeachment.

When the impeachment crisis started it looked fairly clear that Johnson was going to be removed from office. But he eventually made a deal with congressional republicans to stay away from fighting them on reconstruction if they didn’t vote to convict. In that deal, Johnson hamstrung future presidents as Congress acted with more formal power than they had in the face of the executive – something that was feared to have happened with Harrison died 40 years earlier.

Economy

He so mishandled reconstruction that he had no economic policy to speak of. Congress eventually began running the country and he was a figurehead at best. Was the economy better when he left? Not really. It’s about the nicest thing you can say about Johnson.

Foreign Policy

Giving Johnson credit for any foreign policy acts while he was in office is an affront to William Seward. Facing massive problems at home and an inability to do anything with it, Seward was basically our Prime Minister. He negotiated with Russia, got Johnson to send troops to Mexico to stop fighting there with France, and made peace with England over civil war claims. Johnson didn’t have the ability to do any of this without Seward, had no true set policy and left the foreign affairs of his time to a better man. If he handled foreign affairs the way he handled his own country, we would have been invaded by every country under the sun.

Executive Skills/Congress

He had one shining moment in his first week when the cabinet supported him. Then all hell broke loose. He fought with congress, he fired Stanton, he went to war with republicans, supported democrats, thought he was better than all of them, and made enemies in every single corridor of power in the country. The result was the impeachment movement that almost removed him from power. Good rule of thumb for all Presidents – look at how Johnson handled congress and then do the opposite. You are pretty much guaranteed a 7 or more in this category.

Justice/Rights

Johnson was an unapologetic racist. He allowed black codes throughout the south, regarded the slavery question as a waste of time, vetoed the Freedman’s Bureau, fought the amendments to the Constitution that were making their way through the country, and did everything in his power to stop blacks from having equal footing – or any footing – in the country after the war.

Context

It would have been hard for anyone to follow Lincoln. Though he won the war, the smoke was still rising from the battles. It required a political skill to work within the rebuilding of the nation that few had. Lincoln would have managed it. Johnson couldn’t. His personal failures were immense, his political failures were worse. Congress basically stripped executive power from the President just 3 years after our greatest President rules so well simply because Johnson was so bad. And his failures led to an awful 30 years of reconstruction that result in the racism problems this country has even today. The black codes that he ignored and allowed to fester turned the south into an anti-black zone for decades. In every measure, Andrew Johnson was an awful President.

Conclusion

Lincoln’s corpse could have been a better President, Weekend at Bernie’s style. At least then, Seward and Stanton could have run the country for a few years. On persuasion he gets a 1, on crisis a 1, economy 1, foreign policy 2, congress 1, civil rights 1, context 1. 8 total points. And only because the lowest is 7. We are still feeling the effects of the great failure of Andrew Johnson in this country. Future Presidents had a helluva time trying to fix everything. And unlike Buchanan and Pierce, there is nothing you can point to, however small, and say that at least Johnson did that right. He did nothing right.

It is really remarkable how I can really just replace the names here and be pretty close to dead on balls accurate at the moment for the current occupant of the White House.  Obviously, things change over time, but the trajectory we are seeing unfold here has happened before, to President Johnson, and it didn't end well for anyone.

Johnson was a miserable drunk though.  So there is that difference.

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7. Europa Europa (1990)

Directed by: Agniezska Holland

Starring: Marco Hofschneider, Julie Delpy

It's a good guess that this will be the least seen movie in my top ten- it's the only foreign film on my entire list, it was made in 1990, and it has no recognizable stars (although Julie Delpy did have a certain independent career thanks to the Before Sunrise/Before Sunset films. Yet Europa Europa is easily one of my favorite movies of all time, since it's the best film I've ever seen about Nazi Germany. I need to make that distinction up front here: this movie is not about the rise of Nazi Germany (as is Cabaret), nor is it about the Holocaust (which is the main topic of a film yet to be ranked)- it's about life among the Nazis themselves, and they're not dancing, like the execrable Swing Kids. 

This film is a black comedy based on the astonishing true story of Solomon Perel, a Jewish teenager who survived World War II by pretending he was a German soldier, and then became a member of the Hitler Youth. Yet Perel's own story is secondary in the film to the people he encounters during his strange journey: the German soldiers who will shoot Russian and Jewish men, women, and children at the drop of a hat, yet otherwise are just normal, ordinary homesick guys. The colonel who patiently explains to Jupp (Solomon) that the real war the Germans are fighting is not against Russia or America but the Jews, and then adopts him as a son. The middle aged lady who escorts Jupp to the Hitler Youth school and has sex with him on the train, screaming "Mein Fuhrer!" (this was a particularly nice touch.) And most disturbing of all, Julie Delpy's portrayal as the Hitler Youth girl eager to bear children for the Third Reich. 

As I wrote, this is not a Holocaust movie, though it does feature some unnerving Holocaust scenes, particularly when Jupp travels through the Krakow Ghetto on a closed trolley car, trying to get a glimpse of his parents. There is also some early scenes in the film before Perel assumes his German identity, which are fascinating and dreamlike, particularly his time in a Communist orphanage (Comrade Stalin bests God in giving candy to the kids), a movie sequence in which Perel is accompanied by a strange Polish humpback woman, and a nightmare in which Hitler and Stalin dance a waltz together.

As described, this astonishing movie is filled with visual delights and amazing narrative sequences and acting, and as absurd as it's true storyline is, it's believable as well. Unfortunately is not available on Amazon Prime, or Netflix; you have to order the DVD. There are two versions, subtitled and dubbed, and the subtitled is the one worth seeing.

Up next: I value my neck a lot more than three thousand bucks, chief. I'll find him for three, but I'll catch him, and kill him, for ten.

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I rarely post in any of your threads but this is spot on. Don't want to do any spoilers but the Poles and the Germans
meeting each other in the Rhine? is a movie at it's best(for me) and war at it's worst.

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On 3/31/2017 at 8:43 AM, Yankee23Fan said:

It is really remarkable how I can really just replace the names here and be pretty close to dead on balls accurate at the moment for the current occupant of the White House.  Obviously, things change over time, but the trajectory we are seeing unfold here has happened before, to President Johnson, and it didn't end well for anyone.

...

Thank you, I've been saying this as well.

AJ  is a comp for Trump.

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3 hours ago, timschochet said:

7. Europa Europa (1990)

Directed by: Agniezska Holland

Starring: Marco Hofschneider, Julie Delpy

It's a good guess that this will be the least seen movie in my top ten- it's the only foreign film on my entire list, it was made in 1990, and it has no recognizable stars (although Julie Delpy did have a certain independent career thanks to the Before Sunrise/Before Sunset films. Yet Europa Europa is easily one of my favorite movies of all time, since it's the best film I've ever seen about Nazi Germany. I need to make that distinction up front here: this movie is not about the rise of Nazi Germany (as is Cabaret), nor is it about the Holocaust (which is the main topic of a film yet to be ranked)- it's about life among the Nazis themselves, and they're not dancing, like the execrable Swing Kids. 

This film is a black comedy based on the astonishing true story of Solomon Perel, a Jewish teenager who survived World War II by pretending he was a German soldier, and then became a member of the Hitler Youth. Yet Perel's own story is secondary in the film to the people he encounters during his strange journey: the German soldiers who will shoot Russian and Jewish men, women, and children at the drop of a hat, yet otherwise are just normal, ordinary homesick guys. The colonel who patiently explains to Jupp (Solomon) that the real war the Germans are fighting is not against Russia or America but the Jews, and then adopts him as a son. The middle aged lady who escorts Jupp to the Hitler Youth school and has sex with him on the train, screaming "Mein Fuhrer!" (this was a particularly nice touch.) And most disturbing of all, Julie Delpy's portrayal as the Hitler Youth girl eager to bear children for the Third Reich. 

As I wrote, this is not a Holocaust movie, though it does feature some unnerving Holocaust scenes, particularly when Jupp travels through the Krakow Ghetto on a closed trolley car, trying to get a glimpse of his parents. There is also some early scenes in the film before Perel assumes his German identity, which are fascinating and dreamlike, particularly his time in a Communist orphanage (Comrade Stalin bests God in giving candy to the kids), a movie sequence in which Perel is accompanied by a strange Polish humpback woman, and a nightmare in which Hitler and Stalin dance a waltz together.

As described, this astonishing movie is filled with visual delights and amazing narrative sequences and acting, and as absurd as it's true storyline is, it's believable as well. Unfortunately is not available on Amazon Prime, or Netflix; you have to order the DVD. There are two versions, subtitled and dubbed, and the subtitled is the one worth seeing.

Up next: I value my neck a lot more than three thousand bucks, chief. I'll find him for three, but I'll catch him, and kill him, for ten.

Though your every word colors you more a humorless prig, your honesty and thoroughgoing picture of the world makes you an authetically fascinating individual.

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On 3/28/2017 at 3:03 PM, timschochet said:

I like the chess scenes a lot. The rest of the film is really dull for me. 

You should give it more effort/time...the chess scenes were easy...

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This is a odd list for sure (in a good way).  I absolutely love about every other pick, and scratch my head on the others.  1000% on board for #6.  I need to buy that damn movie (maybe tomorrow when I pick up Rogue One for the son). 

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9 hours ago, timschochet said:

7. Europa Europa (1990)

Directed by: Agniezska Holland

Starring: Marco Hofschneider, Julie Delpy

It's a good guess that this will be the least seen movie in my top ten- it's the only foreign film on my entire list, it was made in 1990, and it has no recognizable stars (although Julie Delpy did have a certain independent career thanks to the Before Sunrise/Before Sunset films. Yet Europa Europa is easily one of my favorite movies of all time, since it's the best film I've ever seen about Nazi Germany. I need to make that distinction up front here: this movie is not about the rise of Nazi Germany (as is Cabaret), nor is it about the Holocaust (which is the main topic of a film yet to be ranked)- it's about life among the Nazis themselves, and they're not dancing, like the execrable Swing Kids. 

This film is a black comedy based on the astonishing true story of Solomon Perel, a Jewish teenager who survived World War II by pretending he was a German soldier, and then became a member of the Hitler Youth. Yet Perel's own story is secondary in the film to the people he encounters during his strange journey: the German soldiers who will shoot Russian and Jewish men, women, and children at the drop of a hat, yet otherwise are just normal, ordinary homesick guys. The colonel who patiently explains to Jupp (Solomon) that the real war the Germans are fighting is not against Russia or America but the Jews, and then adopts him as a son. The middle aged lady who escorts Jupp to the Hitler Youth school and has sex with him on the train, screaming "Mein Fuhrer!" (this was a particularly nice touch.) And most disturbing of all, Julie Delpy's portrayal as the Hitler Youth girl eager to bear children for the Third Reich. 

As I wrote, this is not a Holocaust movie, though it does feature some unnerving Holocaust scenes, particularly when Jupp travels through the Krakow Ghetto on a closed trolley car, trying to get a glimpse of his parents. There is also some early scenes in the film before Perel assumes his German identity, which are fascinating and dreamlike, particularly his time in a Communist orphanage (Comrade Stalin bests God in giving candy to the kids), a movie sequence in which Perel is accompanied by a strange Polish humpback woman, and a nightmare in which Hitler and Stalin dance a waltz together.

As described, this astonishing movie is filled with visual delights and amazing narrative sequences and acting, and as absurd as it's true storyline is, it's believable as well. Unfortunately is not available on Amazon Prime, or Netflix; you have to order the DVD. There are two versions, subtitled and dubbed, and the subtitled is the one worth seeing.

Up next: I value my neck a lot more than three thousand bucks, chief. I'll find him for three, but I'll catch him, and kill him, for ten.

I love Swing kids

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1 hour ago, shader said:

I love Swing kids

I probably shouldn't have used the word "execrable". There is a great dance sequence in that movie, and some good acting by Kenneth Branaugh (he plays a fine Nazi, did you ever see the HBO film Conspiracy?) But over all it's a really disappointing movie, not coming close to living up to it's potential.

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7 hours ago, timschochet said:

I probably shouldn't have used the word "execrable". There is a great dance sequence in that movie, and some good acting by Kenneth Branaugh (he plays a fine Nazi, did you ever see the HBO film Conspiracy?) But over all it's a really disappointing movie, not coming close to living up to it's potential.

In fairness, I first saw it when I was 16.  I thought Robert Sean Leonard was awesome at the time..just wanted to emulate him.  I remember a "swing party" I went to and I tried to dress in all the gear...fun times :lmao:

I

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6. Jaws (1975)

Directed by: Steven Spielberg

Starring: Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss

The final 6 films on my list have all been seen by so many people, and written about at length by critics and Hollywood fans alike, that it's almost an insult to them for me to describe them or to explain why they are such great and entertaining films. Instead, for each of these I'll just offer some random thoughts: 

1. This is really two movies. In the first movie, the heroes (Brody and Hooper) face the beach threat of a shark, and a villain, Mayor Vaughn (Murray Hamilton). The second movie, which is the one most fans concentrate on, is the story of 3 men (Quint, Hooper, and Brody) on a small boat trying to kill a great white shark. The first movie has a theme that is very familiar to the filmmaking of the 1970s- man gets greedy with nature and disaster ensues. Two famous examples (among many) are The Towering Inferno and The Poseidon Adventure. In each of these movies, and in Jaws, businessmen are too eager to make money and something terrible happens that could easily have been prevented. The message is don't screw with Mother Nature! But, of course, there is a difference in this movie: in the other two I mentioned, once the disaster happens, the films focus on surviving the disaster. In this movie, the heroes seek to kill the source of the disaster. They decide, in essence, to screw with mother nature after all. 

2. The book that this movie is based on, by Peter Benchley, is just awful. I do not understand why so many people seem to love this book, it is nothing like the movie. It's unexciting and dully written. Brody's wife Ellen has an affair with Hooper (thankfully the film omitted this nonsense.) 

3. Robert Shaw's screen presence is actually quite limited. In the first half he only appears in one (very memorable) scene. He stars in the second half, but it's of shorter length. Even so, he offers one of the all-time great performances. Scheider and Dreyfuss are better for playing off of him. Actually, the tension, camaraderie, and humor between these three men might be the best ever in movies for a threesome. 

4. I first saw this movie at age 10 in the theater. My folks would not take me; my brother who was older went with a friend and snuck me in. For some reason the first 3 quarters of the film didn't scare me, even the scene early on when the head pops out. But when the engine of the boat dies, and they start to build the shark cage- then I was scared. I still believe that it was the most scared I've even been watching a movie. Even now, watching it, knowing how it's all going to come out, it's still very suspenseful and unnerving. 

5. All of the top 6 films on my list have great, memorable music attached to them. These movies would simply not be the same without the music, which is an integral part of the filmmaking. In this case John Williams may have given us his greatest score, as he almost effortlessly captures the fear, speed, and suspense of the great white shark. 

Up next: This is for Allah. And it's goin' way out there, sucka.

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14 hours ago, timschochet said:

and some good acting by Kenneth Branaugh (he plays a fine Nazi, did you ever see the HBO film Conspiracy?)

Fantastic film -- I was simultaneously in disgust and awe in the way the actors brought forth that cavalierness/lack of apprehension in what they were planning/doing. I've watched it a few times and wondered why I would do that other than to enjoy what the actors bring to it.

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2 hours ago, higgins said:

Fantastic film -- I was simultaneously in disgust and awe in the way the actors brought forth that cavalierness/lack of apprehension in what they were planning/doing. I've watched it a few times and wondered why I would do that other than to enjoy what the actors bring to it.

Yeah there are some really good actors in that, a lot of guys who became well known on TV later. It's an all star cast. 

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Jaws stands up really well too

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2 minutes ago, need2know said:

Jaws stands up really well too

Not really - it doesn't even have legs.

:rimshot:

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Sometimes that shark, he looks right into ya. Right into your eyes. Y'know the thing about a shark, he's got... lifeless eyes, black eyes, like a doll's eyes. When he comes at ya, doesn't seem to be livin'... until he bites ya. And those black eyes roll over white, and then... oh, then you hear that terrible high-pitch screamin', the ocean turns red, and spite of all the poundin' and the hollerin', they all come in and they... rip you to pieces 

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7 minutes ago, Dan Lambskin said:

Sometimes that shark, he looks right into ya. Right into your eyes. Y'know the thing about a shark, he's got... lifeless eyes, black eyes, like a doll's eyes. When he comes at ya, doesn't seem to be livin'... until he bites ya. And those black eyes roll over white, and then... oh, then you hear that terrible high-pitch screamin', the ocean turns red, and spite of all the poundin' and the hollerin', they all come in and they... rip you to pieces 

Wrong forum...

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7 hours ago, timschochet said:

6. Jaws (1975)

Directed by: Steven Spielberg

Starring: Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss

The final 6 films on my list have all been seen by so many people, and written about at length by critics and Hollywood fans alike, that it's almost an insult to them for me to describe them or to explain why they are such great and entertaining films. Instead, for each of these I'll just offer some random thoughts: 

1. This is really two movies. In the first movie, the heroes (Brody and Hooper) face the beach threat of a shark, and a villain, Mayor Vaughn (Murray Hamilton). The second movie, which is the one most fans concentrate on, is the story of 3 men (Quint, Hooper, and Brody) on a small boat trying to kill a great white shark. The first movie has a theme that is very familiar to the filmmaking of the 1970s- man gets greedy with nature and disaster ensues. Two famous examples (among many) are The Towering Inferno and The Poseidon Adventure. In each of these movies, and in Jaws, businessmen are too eager to make money and something terrible happens that could easily have been prevented. The message is don't screw with Mother Nature! But, of course, there is a difference in this movie: in the other two I mentioned, once the disaster happens, the films focus on surviving the disaster. In this movie, the heroes seek to kill the source of the disaster. They decide, in essence, to screw with mother nature after all. 

2. The book that this movie is based on, by Peter Benchley, is just awful. I do not understand why so many people seem to love this book, it is nothing like the movie. It's unexciting and dully written. Brody's wife Ellen has an affair with Hooper (thankfully the film omitted this nonsense.) 

3. Robert Shaw's screen presence is actually quite limited. In the first half he only appears in one (very memorable) scene. He stars in the second half, but it's of shorter length. Even so, he offers one of the all-time great performances. Scheider and Dreyfuss are better for playing off of him. Actually, the tension, camaraderie, and humor between these three men might be the best ever in movies for a threesome. 

4. I first saw this movie at age 10 in the theater. My folks would not take me; my brother who was older went with a friend and snuck me in. For some reason the first 3 quarters of the film didn't scare me, even the scene early on when the head pops out. But when the engine of the boat dies, and they start to build the shark cage- then I was scared. I still believe that it was the most scared I've even been watching a movie. Even now, watching it, knowing how it's all going to come out, it's still very suspenseful and unnerving. 

5. All of the top 6 films on my list have great, memorable music attached to them. These movies would simply not be the same without the music, which is an integral part of the filmmaking. In this case John Williams may have given us his greatest score, as he almost effortlessly captures the fear, speed, and suspense of the great white shark. 

Up next: This is for Allah. And it's goin' way out there, sucka.

This is the best movie ever.

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7 hours ago, timschochet said:

6. Jaws (1975)

Directed by: Steven Spielberg

Starring: Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss

The final 6 films on my list have all been seen by so many people, and written about at length by critics and Hollywood fans alike, that it's almost an insult to them for me to describe them or to explain why they are such great and entertaining films. Instead, for each of these I'll just offer some random thoughts: 

1. This is really two movies. In the first movie, the heroes (Brody and Hooper) face the beach threat of a shark, and a villain, Mayor Vaughn (Murray Hamilton). The second movie, which is the one most fans concentrate on, is the story of 3 men (Quint, Hooper, and Brody) on a small boat trying to kill a great white shark. The first movie has a theme that is very familiar to the filmmaking of the 1970s- man gets greedy with nature and disaster ensues. Two famous examples (among many) are The Towering Inferno and The Poseidon Adventure. In each of these movies, and in Jaws, businessmen are too eager to make money and something terrible happens that could easily have been prevented. The message is don't screw with Mother Nature! But, of course, there is a difference in this movie: in the other two I mentioned, once the disaster happens, the films focus on surviving the disaster. In this movie, the heroes seek to kill the source of the disaster. They decide, in essence, to screw with mother nature after all. 

2. The book that this movie is based on, by Peter Benchley, is just awful. I do not understand why so many people seem to love this book, it is nothing like the movie. It's unexciting and dully written. Brody's wife Ellen has an affair with Hooper (thankfully the film omitted this nonsense.) 

3. Robert Shaw's screen presence is actually quite limited. In the first half he only appears in one (very memorable) scene. He stars in the second half, but it's of shorter length. Even so, he offers one of the all-time great performances. Scheider and Dreyfuss are better for playing off of him. Actually, the tension, camaraderie, and humor between these three men might be the best ever in movies for a threesome. 

4. I first saw this movie at age 10 in the theater. My folks would not take me; my brother who was older went with a friend and snuck me in. For some reason the first 3 quarters of the film didn't scare me, even the scene early on when the head pops out. But when the engine of the boat dies, and they start to build the shark cage- then I was scared. I still believe that it was the most scared I've even been watching a movie. Even now, watching it, knowing how it's all going to come out, it's still very suspenseful and unnerving. 

5. All of the top 6 films on my list have great, memorable music attached to them. These movies would simply not be the same without the music, which is an integral part of the filmmaking. In this case John Williams may have given us his greatest score, as he almost effortlessly captures the fear, speed, and suspense of the great white shark. 

Up next: This is for Allah. And it's goin' way out there, sucka.

Oh and yes, the book is terrible.

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Just watched a doc about the USS Indianapolis and all I could picture was that scene with Quint.  What an amazing scene.

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On 3/27/2017 at 11:10 AM, timschochet said:

11. Inglorious Basterds (2009)

Directed by: Quentin Tarantino

Starring: Brad Pitt, Christoph Waltz, Melanie Laurent

Just a fantastic, entertaining film in so many ways. There are a number of great Hollywood WWII movies that I love but was forced to leave off my list, including, in no particular order, The Great Escape, The Dirty Dozen, The Guns of Navarone, The Eagle Has Landed, Where Eagles Dare, Stalag 17. Tarantino borrows from all of these and from numerous other sources as well in order to tell his fantasy story about killing Hitler. And that's awesome, because everything works in this movie: the tension, suspense, humor, acting, directing, is all top notch. 

Christoph Waltz has the role of a lifetime here, for which he'll no doubt always be remembered. Brad Pitt is fine in a caricature role. Michael Fassbinder is only on screen for a few minutes but is extremely memorable, as is Eli Roth. And then there's Til Schweiger, so ####### awesome. I'm going to have to watch this movie again. So great. 

Up next: I'm going to be a great film star! That is, if booze and sex don't get me first.

My favorite Tarantino film, with Jackie Brown a close second.

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5. The Bad News Bears (1976)

Directed by: Michael Ritchie

Starring: Walter Matthau, Tatum O'Neal, Vic Morrow

The greatest sports movie of all time. The greatest movie about kids of all time. Near perfect from beginning to end. 

If it's at all dated, it's only because we're probably stricter as as a society now than we were in the 1970s. At the end of the movie Buttermaker gives beer to all the kids, and this would never happen today of course. I imagine the cursing would also be strictly prohibited (this might have happened with the recent remake,  I haven't dared watch that.) But even so the relationships between the kids and Matthau are timeless and unforgettable. And one of the best aspects of this film is that they lose the game at the end. That makes it into a much better film than if they had won (we would have missed out on Tanner's epic closing line as well, one of the greatest lines in movie history.) That's also what ruined the sequels- this team is not supposed to win. 

I mentioned in my review of Jaws that my top 6 films all had great music. This one is particularly brilliant, because Ritchie (I assume it was the director) realized how apt it would be to use the score of Carmen, with it's unforgettable moments of tragedy and soaring triumph, to illustrate the joys and hurts of little league baseball. Again, every bit of this music is used perfectly in this film, and it simply would not be the same movie without it. 

Tatum O' Neal is at her best here and also in the delightful Paper Moon, as the spunky cynical young girl with the heart of gold inside down deep. Walter Matthau, Vic Morrow, and particularly Joyce Van Patton were never better, and Jackie Earle Haley, a strange dude, at his most effective. All the kids were great, especially Tanner, Ogilvie, Engelberg, and Lupus. Oh, and Joey Turner, who wouldn't give up the ball. 

This movie could easily be my #1 favorite. Some days, often, it is. 

Up next: What was I supposed to do - call him for cheating better than me, in front of the others?

 

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41 minutes ago, timschochet said:

5. The Bad News Bears (1976)

Directed by: Michael Ritchie

Starring: Walter Matthau, Tatum O'Neal, Vic Morrow

The greatest sports movie of all time. The greatest movie about kids of all time. Near perfect from beginning to end. 

If it's at all dated, it's only because we're probably stricter as as a society now than we were in the 1970s. At the end of the movie Buttermaker gives beer to all the kids, and this would never happen today of course. I imagine the cursing would also be strictly prohibited (this might have happened with the recent remake,  I haven't dared watch that.) But even so the relationships between the kids and Matthau are timeless and unforgettable. And one of the best aspects of this film is that they lose the game at the end. That makes it into a much better film than if they had won (we would have missed out on Tanner's epic closing line as well, one of the greatest lines in movie history.) That's also what ruined the sequels- this team is not supposed to win. 

I mentioned in my review of Jaws that my top 6 films all had great music. This one is particularly brilliant, because Ritchie (I assume it was the director) realized how apt it would be to use the score of Carmen, with it's unforgettable moments of tragedy and soaring triumph, to illustrate the joys and hurts of little league baseball. Again, every bit of this music is used perfectly in this film, and it simply would not be the same movie without it. 

Tatum O' Neal is at her best here and also in the delightful Paper Moon, as the spunky cynical young girl with the heart of gold inside down deep. Walter Matthau, Vic Morrow, and particularly Joyce Van Patton were never better, and Jackie Earle Haley, a strange dude, at his most effective. All the kids were great, especially Tanner, Ogilvie, Engelberg, and Lupus. Oh, and Joey Turner, who wouldn't give up the ball. 

This movie could easily be my #1 favorite. Some days, often, it is. 

Up next: What was I supposed to do - call him for cheating better than me, in front of the others?

 
Quote

Hey Yankees... you can take your apology and your trophy and shove 'em straight up your a$$!

 

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4. The Sting (1973)

Directed by: George Roy Hill

Starring: Robert Redford, Paul Newman, Robert Shaw

You have to watch this film carefully, or you miss stuff. Actually I've seen it over a dozen times, and I think I see something new each time. No matter how many times I watch it, the cons are still great. This is a tremendously satisfying movie to experience, and there are 3 great "con" scenes: the first is at the beginning of the film, when Shaw's henchman is in the back of the taxi, gloating about how much money he's just taken, only to open up his wallet and discover it full of tissue paper. The second scene, and possibly my favorite single moment in all of movies, is when Paul Newman reveals 4 Jacks, to the astonishment of Shaw and his associate. And finally, of course, near the end of the movie as Shaw is dragged out of the fake gambling house by Charles Durning, having lost $500,000 to the grifters, and Redford wipes the blood off his face and sports a big grin. Does moviemaking get much better than this? I think not.

If The Bad News Bears brilliantly uses Bizet's Carmen, then The Sting's use of Scott Joplin's ragtime classic tunes is even more brilliant. Of course, Joplin's music was written for a different era, around three decades prior to when this movie takes place, and thus it's use is decidedly anachronistic- and yet it absolutely works somehow to express the Great Depression as well as the grifting that is at the center of this film. Like millions of other people who grew up in the 70s, I was first exposed to Joplin thanks to this movie and it's soundtrack- "The Entertainer" was the first piano lesson I ever received, while "Solace" remains one of my all time favorite pieces of music. (I only learned years later that the "Solace" that is played in the movie, as beautiful as it is, is only the second half of a larger piece of music, which is absolutely worth listening to in case you haven't done so.) 

Up next: What can you expect when you're on top? You know? It's like Napoleon. When he was the king, you know, people were just constantly trying to conquer him, you know, in the Roman Empire. So, it's history repeating itself all over again.

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39 minutes ago, timschochet said:

4. The Sting (1973)

Directed by: George Roy Hill

Starring: Robert Redford, Paul Newman, Robert Shaw

You have to watch this film carefully, or you miss stuff. Actually I've seen it over a dozen times, and I think I see something new each time. No matter how many times I watch it, the cons are still great. This is a tremendously satisfying movie to experience, and there are 3 great "con" scenes: the first is at the beginning of the film, when Shaw's henchman is in the back of the taxi, gloating about how much money he's just taken, only to open up his wallet and discover it full of tissue paper. The second scene, and possibly my favorite single moment in all of movies, is when Paul Newman reveals 4 Jacks, to the astonishment of Shaw and his associate. And finally, of course, near the end of the movie as Shaw is dragged out of the fake gambling house by Charles Durning, having lost $500,000 to the grifters, and Redford wipes the blood off his face and sports a big grin. Does moviemaking get much better than this? I think not.

If The Bad News Bears brilliantly uses Bizet's Carmen, then The Sting's use of Scott Joplin's ragtime classic tunes is even more brilliant. Of course, Joplin's music was written for a different era, around three decades prior to when this movie takes place, and thus it's use is decidedly anachronistic- and yet it absolutely works somehow to express the Great Depression as well as the grifting that is at the center of this film. Like millions of other people who grew up in the 70s, I was first exposed to Joplin thanks to this movie and it's soundtrack- "The Entertainer" was the first piano lesson I ever received, while "Solace" remains one of my all time favorite pieces of music. (I only learned years later that the "Solace" that is played in the movie, as beautiful as it is, is only the second half of a larger piece of music, which is absolutely worth listening to in case you haven't done so.) 

Love this film.

I saw it in the theater with a friend during its first run when I was 11 and we both thought it was the coolest thing ever. Caught it again about a week ago, and still think it's very good. 

That cast was loaded - Newman, Redford, Brennan, Shaw, Durning, Gould, Walston, plus about a million "oh - I remember that guy!"s from 60s/70s cinema. 

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"Lace, give me the sheet"

Suitcase Murphy and The Big Alabama are in town.

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4 hours ago, timschochet said:

4. The Sting (1973)

Directed by: George Roy Hill

Starring: Robert Redford, Paul Newman, Robert Shaw

 

 

Love this film. From imdb:

"When George Roy Hill first approached composer Marvin Hamlisch to adapt Scott Joplin's music for the score, Hamlisch was reluctant. He was a composer of original music, after all, and not in the habit of adapting other musicians' work. "I agreed to see a first cut in the screening room," said Hamlisch in his 1992 autobiography The Way I Was. "I quickly realized that this was one of the best pictures I had seen in years...David Ward had written a witty, stylish script, George Roy Hill had directed it faultlessly, and Newman and Redford were the best screen couple in years...One of the things that drew me to The Sting was that George had been shrewd enough to leave little oases without dialogue for the music. He built montages and sequences into the picture for this purpose. Whenever I see patches in a film that are talkless, I'm in heaven." Hamlisch agreed to take on the job."

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Luther said I could learn some things from you. I already know how to drink.

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3. Boogie Nights (1997)

Directed by: Paul Thomas Anderson

Starring: Mark Wahlberg, Julianne Moore, Burt Reynolds

This movie has possibly more great and memorable scenes than any other I can remember. Off the top of my head, in no particular order:

1. Dirk's time at the recording studio, and Reed's insistence that they need the recordings because it's an obvious hit- rivalling perhaps only This Is Spinal Tap in utter hilarity.

2. Scotty's scene alone in his car after he tried to kiss Dirk - "I'm a ####### idiot".

3. The initial pool sequence as the camera pans from guest to guest.

4. The initial sequence of the film as the soundtrack (remarkable) begins with the Emotions "Best of My Love".

5. Amber's court scene, and her crying afterwards.

6. Jack and Rollergirl attack Rollergirl's old schoolmate. This scene is particularly brutal, with tremendous acting. The anger, the sheer rage on the faces of Burt Reynolds and Heather Graham is palpable.

7. Dirk's changes in attitude and expression as he collects award after award- his transformation from newcomer to star.

8. Amber and Rollergirl doing coke and Rollergirl asks Amber to be her mother. Both pathetic, tragic, and deeply moving.

9. All scenes involving Don Cheadle, particularly at the bank, and at the donut shop.

10. And of course, the sequence in which Dirk, Reed, and Todd attempt to scam the drug dealer. Thomas Jane, who plays Todd, does an amazing acting job with a small amount of time on screen here. Again, the soundtrack is awesomely selected, with the music adding to the tension of the scene (especially "Sister Christian" and "Jessie's Girl".) The camera work focusing on Dirk's face is great- where is he, and how did he get here?

There's a lot I'm leaving out of course. Such an incredible, memorable film.

Up next: My father was fond of saying you need three things in life - a good doctor, a forgiving priest, and a clever accountant. The first two, I've never had much use for.

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Rollergirl...................................................................................................................................................................................i'm out.

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15 minutes ago, timschochet said:

3. Boogie Nights (1997)

Directed by: Paul Thomas Anderson

Starring: Mark Wahlberg, Julianne Moore, Burt Reynolds

This movie has possibly more great and memorable scenes than any other I can remember. Off the top of my head, in no particular order:

1. Dirk's time at the recording studio, and Reed's insistence that they need the recordings because it's an obvious hit- rivalling perhaps only This Is Spinal Tap in utter hilarity.

2. Scotty's scene alone in his car after he tried to kiss Dirk - "I'm a ####### idiot".

3. The initial pool sequence as the camera pans from guest to guest.

4. The initial sequence of the film as the soundtrack (remarkable) begins with the Emotions "Best of My Love".

5. Amber's court scene, and her crying afterwards.

6. Jack and Rollergirl attack Rollergirl's old schoolmate. This scene is particularly brutal, with tremendous acting. The anger, the sheer rage on the faces of Burt Reynolds and Heather Graham is palpable.

7. Dirk's changes in attitude and expression as he collects award after award- his transformation from newcomer to star.

8. Amber and Rollergirl doing coke and Rollergirl asks Amber to be her mother. Both pathetic, tragic, and deeply moving.

9. All scenes involving Don Cheadle, particularly at the bank, and at the donut shop.

10. And of course, the sequence in which Dirk, Reed, and Todd attempt to scam the drug dealer. Thomas Jane, who plays Todd, does an amazing acting job with a small amount of time on screen here. Again, the soundtrack is awesomely selected, with the music adding to the tension of the scene (especially "Sister Christian" and "Jessie's Girl".) The camera work focusing on Dirk's face is great- where is he, and how did he get here?

There's a lot I'm leaving out of course. Such an incredible, memorable film.

Up next: My father was fond of saying you need three things in life - a good doctor, a forgiving priest, and a clever accountant. The first two, I've never had much use for.

Featuring my good buddy, John Doe.  http://www.hotflick.net/flicks/1997_Boogie_Nights/fhd997BGN_John_Doe_001.jpg

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I wouldn't have it nearly this high, but Boogie Nights is an excellent flick.  Two of my favorite long takes ever (the opening shot and then the pool party shot that ends underwater).  And the music in this is absolutely perfect. 

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5 minutes ago, timschochet said:

Love love LOVE John Doe. I didn't even make the connection that it was him.

Do you really know him?

I chatted with him for about half an hour about 10 years ago.  So that makes him a very close friend in my book.

ETA it was in 2000.  Yeesh.

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1 minute ago, Reg Lllama of Brixton said:

I chatted with him for about half an hour about 10 years ago.  So that makes him a very close friend in my book.

That is awesome. X is one of my all time favorite bands. :thumbup:

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2 hours ago, Reg Lllama of Brixton said:

I chatted with him for about half an hour about 10 years ago.  So that makes him a very close friend in my book.

ETA it was in 2000.  Yeesh.

So, a very close lifelong friend.

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