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Dynasty and Redraft Duke Johnson Cleveland Browns

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The University of Miami has a pretty nice track record of producing NFL talent, especially at the running back position. Edgerrin James , Clinton Portis, Frank Gore, and Willis McGahee are some of the more recognizable names to make the transition from The U to the NFL.
This list of names have all displayed great talent in college and the NFL. However, the player that has surpassed them all in career rushing yards and total scrimmage yards at Miami has not joined this group of premier NFL talent…..yet.
Duke Johnson has broken many of the records and milestones set by his predecessors at Miami and will look to do the same at the next level as he has declared as a Junior to leave school early and enter this year’s Draft.
Some “draftniks” have Johnson rated as their #1 running back in this draft class due mainly to his elite speed and agility. This same level of athleticism is what got C.J. Spiller drafted as the first running back off the board with the #9 overall pick just 5 years ago. But, like Spiller, Johnson has some durability concerns and questions on whether he can provide more to a team than being just a change-of-pace back.
To get a better feel on how whether he will alleviate or justify these concerns, here is how I break down his skill set and how it should translate into the league for his next team.
Vision – As soon as Johnson gets the ball, he explodes to top gear and races to daylight. On stretch plays, sweeps, or anything to the outside, Johnson excels in finding holes and cutback lanes. But on runs inside the tackles, he hasn’t showed the patience needed to wait for the hole to open up. Instead, he tries to accelerate through any glimpse of daylight in an attempt to power through to the second level. Due to his smaller frame, this tactic has not led to much success.
Speed/Quickness – If you’re a team looking for more explosion in your backfield, Johnson will likely be at the top of your list. Every touch has the potential of going the distance due to his elite speed and elusiveness.
His lateral quickness and cutting ability are also on par with some of the greats in the league, making him a great asset when getting the ball out in space.
Strength/Power – Johnson is tough for his size but does not possess the ability to succeed consistently on inside runs. He does show the determination and drive to be able to break through arm tackles, but when going head-to-head with a defender, it is not a battle that Johnson will win often.
Between his Junior and Senior year, Johnson packed on a few pounds to gain more power and durability and it seemed to help quite a bit. He has the frame to add some more weight but must be sure to not sacrifice too much of his speed and quickness in doing so.
His speed is his best weapon. If he loses a step, he will not be nearly as highly regarded as a prospect as he is right now.
Third-Down Skills – Due to the questionable quarterback play at Miami in recent years, Johnson has been able to showcase his impressive receiving skills when adjusting to poorly thrown balls. He runs good routes and has the natural hands to make an immediate impact for an NFL team as a receiving threat out of the backfield.
His pass blocking, however, does need some work. He seems very disinterested in this part of the game – which is understandable for a back only 5’9″ – but this is a skill that he must improve on if he intends to be a 3-down starter in the NFL.
Ball Security – Fumbles will be another concern with Johnson. He lost 6 fumbles in the last two years and was even demoted in 2013 after fumbling twice near the goal line in a single game.
Durability – An ankle injury forced Johnson out of the final five games of the 2013 season. His 2014 campaign was also hampered by nagging injuries. His 5’9″ and 195 pound frame has poven so far to be unable to shoulder the heavy workload without significant injury.
Summary – The skills that Johnson provides are similar to what both CJ Spiller and Gio Bernard offer to their respective teams. They each provide a massive upgrade to the speed and versatility to the offense. They are icredibly dynamic in space and have the ability to create explosive plays with any carry or reception.
However, they don’t have the frame or strength to carry the load as a complete 3-down back. They must be matched up with a power back to take over in short yardage or goal line situations to limit their carries and the chances of injury.
Johnson will be better suited to go to a tea with a heavy passing attack or one with a predominant zone blocking scheme to allow him to stretch out defenses and find cutback lanes. Some good fits would include the Raiders, Redskins, Falcons, Saints, Dolphins, Texans, Chargers, Cardinals, Ravens, Colts, and Patriots.
Be sure to check out the DFW Film Room for more on Duke Johnson

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Draft Breakdown games

Duke Johnson stats

Edited by Biabreakable

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I like Duke, always have. It seems kind of in vogue to say RB x is better than Gordon recently, though.

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Rotoworld:

Miami RB Duke Johnson "a very explosive player, but durability concerns could hurt his draft stock," wrote ESPN's Todd McShay.
"He's undersized (5-9, 206), and even though he started all 13 games in 2014, he's dealt with some injuries during his Miami career," McShay wrote. "He suffered a season-ending ankle injury in 2013, has dealt with concussion-like symptoms and has a history of migraines." The 5-foot-9, 194-pound Johnson had 1,652 rushing yards on a 6.8 YPC average and 10 touchdowns in 2014, adding 38 receptions for 421 yards and three scores. He finished with 3,519 career rushing yards, passing in the record books elite Hurricane RBs such as Frank Gore, Clinton Portis, Edgerrin James, Willis McGahee and Ottis Anderson. CBS projects him as a Day 2 pick.
Feb 18 - 11:34 AM
The Miami Herald's Barry Jackson spoke with one NFC scout who believes Miami RB Duke Johnson will merely be a third down back "due to his size."
If it is only based on size, that is ridiculous. We will soon see what Johnson weighs, but he was listed at 5'9/200 lbs while with the Hurricanes. There is a major difference between "short" and "small." Also, a number of ball carriers have succeeded at that size, and smaller, on more than just passing downs.
Feb 16 - 10:30 AM
Miami RB Duke Johnson's "times in the 40 and several other drills should be impressive [at the combine]," observes NFL.com.
"Johnson is a good receiver, which adds to his value and is a reason he could be the third back selected," wrote College Football 24/7 writer Mike Huguenin. "He has had some injury issues, and his medical report will be scrutinized." NFL Media draft analyst Lance Zierlein compares Johnson to C.J. Spiller. "Like Spiller, Johnson has ridiculous foot quickness and lateral agility," Zierlein wrote. "He can catch the ball out of the backfield with ease. He is a very natural runner, but like Spiller, Johnson faces questions about whether he can hold up to the pounding he'll take in the NFL." The 5-foot-9, 194-pound Johnson had 1,652 rushing yards on a 6.8 YPC average and 10 touchdowns in 2014, adding 38 receptions for 421 yards and three scores. CBS projects him as a Day 2 pick.
Feb 11 - 1:39 AM
Source: NFL.com
NFL Media draft analyst Lance Zierlein compares Miami RB Duke Johnson to C.J. Spiller.
"Like Spiller, Johnson has ridiculous foot quickness and lateral agility," Zierlein wrote. "He can catch the ball out of the backfield with ease. He is a very natural runner, but like Spiller, Johnson faces questions about whether he can hold up to the pounding he'll take in the NFL." The 5-foot-9, 194-pound Johnson had 1,652 rushing yards on a 6.8 YPC average and 10 touchdowns in 2014, adding 38 receptions for 421 yards and three scores. CBS projects him as a Day 2 pick.
Feb 4 - 10:01 PM
Source: NFL.com

NFL Media draft analyst Lance Zierlein notes that Miami RB Duke Johnson "has lightning in his feet."

"Has hips and feet to stop and start without stalling," Zierlein wrote. "Rare ability on stretch plays to hit cutback lanes that other backs can't get to. Changes direction without breaking stride. Has second gear around the corner and can erase the angles." The 5-foot-9, 194-pound Johnson had 1,652 rushing yards on a 6.8 YPC average and 10 touchdowns in 2014, adding 38 receptions for 421 yards and three scores. He finished with 3,519 career rushing yards, passing in the record books elite Hurricane RBs such as Frank Gore, Clinton Portis, Edgerrin James, Willis McGahee and Ottis Anderson.
Source: NFL.com
Feb 3 - 11:49 PM

Miami junior RB Duke Johnson "is dynamic in space" and will compete with Nebraska's Ameer Abdullah as the "elite 'air back' in the 2015 draft," wrote CBS Sports' Rob Rang.

The 5-foot-9, 194-pound Johnson had 1,652 rushing yards on a 6.8 YPC average and 10 touchdowns in 2014, adding 38 receptions for 421 yards and three scores. "Though perhaps shorter and slighter than ideal for a traditional franchise back, Johnson proved precisely that for the Hurricanes, a program well known for producing elite runners," Rang wrote. "Johnson leaves Miami as the most productive back in school history, overtaking the likes of Frank Gore, Clinton Portis, Edgerrin James, Willis McGahee and Ottis Anderson, among others with 3,519 career rushing yards, including the 132 he ran for Saturday." On Sunday, Johnson officially declared for the 2015 NFL Draft. CBS projects him as a Day 2 pick. "Johnson is a natural runner with light feet and greasy knees which help him slither through gaps with a gait that looks almost effortless," Rang wrote.
Source: CBS Sports
Sun, Dec 28, 2014 06:33:00 PM

Miami junior RB Duke Johnson possesses "great quickness, and he runs with surprising power," said an AFC executive.

"I think this is shaping up to be a very good crop of running backs," the exec said. "A guy I really like is Duke Johnson." Earlier this year, Cincinnati coach Tommy Tuberville compared Johnson's style -- accelerating through the hole and changing direction -- to Walter Payton and Barry Sanders. The 5-foot-9, 194-pound Johnson has said it's "50-50" whether he declares for the draft. He will announce his decision on December 28th.
Source: NFL.com
Wed, Dec 17, 2014 11:24:00 PM

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He's too light and doesn't have the big thick thighs and bursting calves that accompany most successful small backs into the league.

I don't see Walter or Barry, if any one he has some Faulk qualities.

A quick google shows he has only put on 5 pounds from hs to college.

I wouldn't draft him and I wouldn't have drafted Tiki either but I'd bet having a RB body is a better indicator of success than not and be comfy with him having success elsewhere and passing on him.

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Rotoworld:

NFL Media analyst Bucky Brooks believes Miami RB Duke Johnson would "be the best fit" to replace Lesean McCoy in the draft for Philadelphia.

"Duke Johnson in my mind would probably be the best fit. He's a carbon copy of Shady McCoy stylistically, the way he runs inside and outside," Brooks said. The Hurricane prospect offers a versatile skill-set and is the perfect weapon coming out of the backfield. Johnson shows ton of explosiveness and may fit the profile of what Chip Kelly is looking for in a future back.
Source: NFL.com
Mar 4 - 2:00 PM

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Rotoworld:

NFL Media analyst Bucky Brooks notes that scouts have "raved about" Miami RB Duke Johnson's "footwork, quickness and creativity."

"The scouts also touted Miami RB Duke Johnson as a playmaker. They raved about his footwork, quickness and creativity. Impressed with IQ, too," Brooks tweeted. The 5-foot-9, 194-pound Johnson possesses a ton of explosiveness, which should translate well to the next level. However, the Miami prospect will have to continue to improve in pass-protection, in order to see valuable time on the field. NFL teams looking for a back with game-changing ability in the open field, will look to grab him on day 2 of the draft.
Mar 18 - 2:33 PM

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Been raving about his feet for years. Bout time somebody else does. It was beginning to feel weird.

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Rotoworld:

NFL Media draft analyst Lance Zierlein believes Miami RB Duke Johnson's "lack of protection skills and his injury concerns could force him into a committee situation."

"One of the most explosive runners in college football during his time at Miami, Johnson doesn't need much of a crease to make defenses pay," Zierlein wrote. "His explosive quickness and elusiveness should help him adapt quickly to NFL speed and his feel and courage as a one-cut runner should earn him instant playing time." The analyst compares Johnson to C.J. Spiller. "Explosive burst and plays with suddenness," his scouting report reads. "Elusive in tight quarters. Has lightning in his feet. Has hips and feet to stop and start without stalling. Rare ability on stretch plays to hit cutback lanes that other backs can't get to. Runs with patience and a well-timed burst." The 5-foot-9, 194-pound Johnson had 1,652 rushing yards on a 6.8 YPC average and 10 touchdowns in 2014, adding 38 receptions for 421 yards and three scores.
Source: NFL.com
Mar 18 - 2:42 AM

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Rotoworld:

NFL Media draft analyst Lance Zierlein believes Miami RB Duke Johnson's "lack of protection skills and his injury concerns could force him into a committee situation."

"One of the most explosive runners in college football during his time at Miami, Johnson doesn't need much of a crease to make defenses pay," Zierlein wrote. "His explosive quickness and elusiveness should help him adapt quickly to NFL speed and his feel and courage as a one-cut runner should earn him instant playing time." The analyst compares Johnson to C.J. Spiller. "Explosive burst and plays with suddenness," his scouting report reads. "Elusive in tight quarters. Has lightning in his feet. Has hips and feet to stop and start without stalling. Rare ability on stretch plays to hit cutback lanes that other backs can't get to. Runs with patience and a well-timed burst." The 5-foot-9, 194-pound Johnson had 1,652 rushing yards on a 6.8 YPC average and 10 touchdowns in 2014, adding 38 receptions for 421 yards and three scores.
Source: NFL.com
Mar 18 - 2:42 AM

Why is it so difficult for Rotoworld to get correct weights down? These guys participated in the combine almost a month ago and the knowledge is one google search away.

Duke is 207 lbs, not 194 lbs. That's almost 15 lbs off and a SIGNIFICANT difference.

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Rotoworld:

Miami RB Duke Johnson "compares favorably to [shane] Vereen from a size, style and versatility standpoint," points out Scouts Inc.'s Kevin Weidl.

It's an interesting observation, because New England lost Vereen to the Giants and might now seek out his replacement in the draft. Johnson, a newer make of a similar sports car, should hold great interest because of that. "He has a strong combination of vision, quickness and burst to create yards as a runner and after the catch, and he is dangerous in space," Weidl wrote. "In addition, Johnson brings the versatility to create mismatches in the passing game with experience both out of the backfield and flexed out in the slot." The 5-foot-9, 194-pound Johnson had 1,652 rushing yards on a 6.8 YPC average and 10 touchdowns in 2014, adding 38 receptions for 421 yards and three scores.
Mar 21 - 4:46 PM

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Poor man's Sankey.

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I won't draft him in any league, that's for sure.

Why not?

He's a slightly better Ka'Deem Carey, or a poor man's Sankey like cstu said. If he goes to a great O-line he can be average at best but he is nothing special. His supporters are talking about taking him late 1st or early 2nd, that's a big reach in my mind for him.

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Poor man's Sankey.

In what way?

He's nothing like Sankey IMO.

Edited by jurb26

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Poor man's Sankey.

In what way?

He's nothing like Sankey IMO.

He damn near a clone, right down to getting arm tackled too easily. I do think he's a more consistent blocker though.

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Poor man's Sankey.

In what way?

He's nothing like Sankey IMO.

He damn near a clone, right down to getting arm tackled too easily. I do think he's a more consistent blocker though.

I don't think we're watching thd same guy.
  • Like 1

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Poor man's Sankey.

In what way?

He's nothing like Sankey IMO.

He damn near a clone, right down to getting arm tackled too easily. I do think he's a more consistent blocker though.

I don't think we're watching thd same guy.
Agree. Completely different running styles. I see more Gio in him

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Poor man's Sankey.

In what way?

He's nothing like Sankey IMO.

He damn near a clone, right down to getting arm tackled too easily. I do think he's a more consistent blocker though.

I don't think we're watching thd same guy.
Agree. Completely different running styles. I see more Gio in him

Ronnie Hillman

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Poor man's Sankey.

In what way?

He's nothing like Sankey IMO.

He damn near a clone, right down to getting arm tackled too easily. I do think he's a more consistent blocker though.

I don't think we're watching thd same guy.
Agree. Completely different running styles. I see more Gio in him

Ronnie Hillman

He's a tad bigger but I can see that.

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Poor man's Sankey.

In what way?

He's nothing like Sankey IMO.

He damn near a clone, right down to getting arm tackled too easily. I do think he's a more consistent blocker though.

I don't think we're watching thd same guy.
Agree. Completely different running styles. I see more Gio in him
Ronnie Hillman

He's a tad bigger but I can see that.
As a Hillman owner and Miami homer, I think Duke is a lot stronger than Ronnie. He is most likely a COP, but I could see him surprise between the tackles at the next level a la Warrick Dunn. Definitely a first rounder for me despite his injury history.

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Poor man's Sankey.

In what way?

He's nothing like Sankey IMO.

He damn near a clone, right down to getting arm tackled too easily. I do think he's a more consistent blocker though.

I don't think we're watching thd same guy.
Agree. Completely different running styles. I see more Gio in him

gio or frank gore... guy looks good but not better then Gordon, sorry... He will be a great pick from 1.7-1.10 in your annual rook drafts.

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agreed, he has been sippin on to much of that Booze :ph34r::shock:

I think it is fair to question the legitimacy of Matt Millers claim. Furthermore Miller isn't technically a NFL draft scout. He is a draftnik and a fairly well known and respected one.

I don't agree with his assessment that Duke Johnson is a better RB than Melvin Gordon. But I always like to hear outliers from the consensus of opinion and I respect Miller's work.

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Poor man's Sankey.

In what way?

He's nothing like Sankey IMO.

He damn near a clone, right down to getting arm tackled too easily. I do think he's a more consistent blocker though.

X2

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agreed, he has been sippin on to much of that Booze :ph34r::shock:

I think it is fair to question the legitimacy of Matt Millers claim. Furthermore Miller isn't technically a NFL draft scout. He is a draftnik and a fairly well known and respected one.

I don't agree with his assessment that Duke Johnson is a better RB than Melvin Gordon. But I always like to hear outliers from the consensus of opinion and I respect Miller's work.

Miller had Coleman over Gordon because he questions Gordon's ability to translate to the NFL. Yet he seems to ignore Coleman's reliance on big plays translating.

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agreed, he has been sippin on to much of that Booze :ph34r::shock:

I think it is fair to question the legitimacy of Matt Millers claim. Furthermore Miller isn't technically a NFL draft scout. He is a draftnik and a fairly well known and respected one.

I don't agree with his assessment that Duke Johnson is a better RB than Melvin Gordon. But I always like to hear outliers from the consensus of opinion and I respect Miller's work.

Miller had Coleman over Gordon because he questions Gordon's ability to translate to the NFL. Yet he seems to ignore Coleman's reliance on big plays translating.

I do not think he has ignored Colemans big plays. I think that is a big part of why he likes Coleman, but I am not Miller so I don't want to speak for him.

Miller isn't the only draftnik out there to think Coleman is the best RB in this draft class. Greg Gabriel has Coleman as his number one RB also. Link

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agreed, he has been sippin on to much of that Booze :ph34r::shock:

I think it is fair to question the legitimacy of Matt Millers claim. Furthermore Miller isn't technically a NFL draft scout. He is a draftnik and a fairly well known and respected one.

I don't agree with his assessment that Duke Johnson is a better RB than Melvin Gordon. But I always like to hear outliers from the consensus of opinion and I respect Miller's work.

Miller had Coleman over Gordon because he questions Gordon's ability to translate to the NFL. Yet he seems to ignore Coleman's reliance on big plays translating.

I do not think he has ignored Colemans big plays. I think that is a big part of why he likes Coleman, but I am not Miller so I don't want to speak for him.

Miller isn't the only draftnik out there to think Coleman is the best RB in this draft class. Greg Gabriel has Coleman as his number one RB also. Link

I said "ignore ability to translate" not "ignore ability".

Coleman's big play ability will be harder to translate because he's going to need a certain level of blocking in the NFL to produce similarly.

Here are Miller's exact words: https://twitter.com/nfldraftscout/status/552658376854085632

Honestly though, I like Gordon but worry about him translating to the NFL. Don't think he's as athletic as stats might suggest @16carter

Edited by Xue

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Yeah it is sort of the same doubt or observation than Gabriel makes. They doubt the RB because of the outstanding blocking.

I don't think Indiana's offensive line was as good at run blocking as Wisconsin's either. But I haven't spent any time really looking at that. This is just based off of historical trends.

I find myself skeptical of Alabama, Nebraska, LSU running backs as well because they often have had very good offensive lines.

I don't agree with Coleman being the best RB but I do have him as the fourth best. I believe his pro day is on the 25th. So we should get some new information regarding his injury. If that does turn into a bigger concern I could see myself moving him down. I don't see much causing me to value Coleman over Ayaji, Gordon or Gurley. But I don't have a huge issue with people who like Coleman the best.

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Reminds me of Lamar Miller / Shady McCoy / Giovanni Bernard. If he can catch, he'll be productive.

Shifty, one of the more interesting backs because he can actually run between the tackles.

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Rotoworld:

CBS Sports Dane Brugler reports that Miami RB Duke Johnson (hamstring) is expected to be a full participant at Wednesday's pro day.

In other words, Johnson intends to take part in all tests in addition to position drills. Priority No. 1 for the talented runner is improving upon his combine 40-yard dash after posting a disappointing 4.54 in Indianapolis. That number, of course, could have been affected by a right hamstring strain. Because of that injury, Johnson didn't run the shuttles or the three-cone drill at the combine. Expect all 32 teams to simply migrate south after taking in FSU's pro day on Thursday. They'll also check out OT Ereck Flowers, LB Denzel Perryman, TE Clive Walford, DE Anthony Chickillo, WR Phillip Dorsett, DB Ladarius Gunter and OL Jon Feliciano.
Source: CBS Sports
Mar 31 - 5:43 PM

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SI 64: Nos. 59-55: Duke Johnson, Phillip Dorsett, Tyler Lockett, more

Excerpt:

57. Duke Johnson, RB, Miami

Bio: Johnson leaves Miami as the team's all-time leader in all-purpose yardage, proving over three seasons that he is one of the most impressive and versatile backs in this draft class. Despite injuries throughout his time with the Hurricanes, Johnson averaged an amazing 6.7 yards per carry and scored 32 total touchdowns. While he doesn't fit the profile of an every-down back in the NFL, teams with unique ways of using running backs should be watching his tape very closely.

Strengths: Ideally-sized speed back (5'9", 207 pounds) with outstanding acceleration as his primary attribute. Ran a 4.54 40 at the combine, but is much faster than that on the field. Once he gets past the first point of contact, he hits another gear entirely. True one-cut-and-go runner. Very agile in trash and has the raw power to escape arm tackles. Stronger than his size may indicate. Has speed to the edge and the ability to cut back quickly into other gaps. Good receiver with multi-route awareness; can make plays everywhere from out of the backfield to the slot to out wide. Dynamic return man when given the opportunity, averaging 33 yards per kick return and scoring two touchdowns in 2012.

Weaknesses: Not a downhill runner; limited when facing inside contact and struggles to create in short spaces. Not an outstanding blocker and needs to square up and do the dirty work instead of dithering at times. Injury concerns throughout his career. Not likely to be an every-down back, but a creative coaching staff could bring out his best.

Conclusion: The extent to which Johnson will be seen as valuable to NFL teams is tied to the needs those teams may have. No, he's not scheme-transcendent, and no, he's not an every-down back—unless you're a team that defines "every-down back" as a player who can be used all over the field. The Bush comparison makes sense because Bush was at his best when the Saints used him as a hybrid back/receiver weapon who frequently shifted out of the backfield to the slot, creating major disadvantages for opposing base defenses. And this is not to say that Johnson will dry up and blow away every time a linebacker lays a hit on him—he's strong enough to deal with that. Ideally, Johnson would be both a rotational player and an every-down weapon—rotated around the formation to set defenses up for failure.

Pro Comparison: Reggie Bush, 49ers (Round 1, 2006)

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Rotoworld:

An NFL scout speaking to ESPN's Todd McShay raised concerns about Miami RB Duke Johnson's ability to stay on the field.

The scout questioned Johnson's toughness and frame. "If teams are worried he could miss multiple games each year, that will certainly hurt his stock," McShay wrote. "When he's on the field, he provides a lot in terms of his third-down capabilities and big-play ability." The 5-foot-9, 194-pound Johnson had 1,652 rushing yards on a 6.8 YPC average and 10 touchdowns in 2014, adding 38 receptions for 421 yards and three scores. "Among the running back prospects in this year's class, Johnson offers some of the best skills as a pass-catcher, and that was on display Wednesday [at his pro day]," wrote McShay. "He looked really good running routes and was very comfortable catching the ball."
Apr 6 - 6:08 PM

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Rotoworld:

An NFL scout speaking to ESPN's Todd McShay raised concerns about Miami RB Duke Johnson's ability to stay on the field.

The scout questioned Johnson's toughness and frame. "If teams are worried he could miss multiple games each year, that will certainly hurt his stock," McShay wrote. "When he's on the field, he provides a lot in terms of his third-down capabilities and big-play ability." The 5-foot-9, 194-pound Johnson had 1,652 rushing yards on a 6.8 YPC average and 10 touchdowns in 2014, adding 38 receptions for 421 yards and three scores. "Among the running back prospects in this year's class, Johnson offers some of the best skills as a pass-catcher, and that was on display Wednesday [at his pro day]," wrote McShay. "He looked really good running routes and was very comfortable catching the ball."
Apr 6 - 6:08 PM

Once again, they're only ~15 lbs off his weight.

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Yeah it is sort of the same doubt or observation than Gabriel makes. They doubt the RB because of the outstanding blocking.

I don't think Indiana's offensive line was as good at run blocking as Wisconsin's either. But I haven't spent any time really looking at that. This is just based off of historical trends.

I find myself skeptical of Alabama, Nebraska, LSU running backs as well because they often have had very good offensive lines.

I don't agree with Coleman being the best RB but I do have him as the fourth best. I believe his pro day is on the 25th. So we should get some new information regarding his injury. If that does turn into a bigger concern I could see myself moving him down. I don't see much causing me to value Coleman over Ayaji, Gordon or Gurley. But I don't have a huge issue with people who like Coleman the best.

You can take us off the list. We haven't had consistently good offensive line play in probably a decade. Surely since Bo came on campus and rotated through a cadre of promoted graduate assistants at the position 7 years ago.

Wisconsin, though, has consistently had an excellent line for years now. Big reason why I'm a Gordon doubter. He got 400+ of those yards against the Huskers, and that was largely because they gave all the carries to one guy this year instead of splitting them between White, Ball, and Gordon last time (they gashed us for just as many yards without Gordon carrying the load).

Edited by mcintyre1

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