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11 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

dont matter when, my friend. matters if. you sign on for Paris sex drama w Brando & Bertolucci, you sign on. come what may. plenty victimhood & courageous journeys on casting couches & hotel suites, to be sure, but this is like telling producers of a Western you could ride for a part and suing for getting thrown

ETA: And i partied in NYC same time Ms Schneider did and she werent complaining when it all was getting her the right tables

That’s fair- I don’t know too much about it. Also maybe TCM doesn’t want to show a movie where a guy uses butter as lube while he has anal sex. It’s as risqué as classic cinema gets. 

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13 minutes ago, Walking Boot said:

Today's XKCD comic has a challenge:

Name a movie that...

(1) you genuinely like (not "so bad it's good")

(2) came out in your adult life post-2000, and

(3) is rated below 50% on Rotten Tomatoes

 

Whatcha got?

 

The Majestic with Jim Carrey- 41% critics on RT. Yes it’s very sappy and seems like a clear attempt by JC for an Oscar, it taps into a little of the old Capra- Stewart and I like it. Plus I’m a sucker for movies about movies.

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49 minutes ago, Walking Boot said:

Today's XKCD comic has a challenge:

Name a movie that...

(1) you genuinely like (not "so bad it's good")

(2) came out in your adult life post-2000, and

(3) is rated below 50% on Rotten Tomatoes

 

Whatcha got?

 

Usually for low rated movies I like it's either a horror movie or a stupid comedy.  I will try to find a few tonight.  

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3 hours ago, Walking Boot said:

Today's XKCD comic has a challenge:

Name a movie that...

(1) you genuinely like (not "so bad it's good")

(2) came out in your adult life post-2000, and

(3) is rated below 50% on Rotten Tomatoes

 

Whatcha got?

 

I may have to respond “Eurotrip” for the second time today.

ETA: On the topic of TCM, The Philadelphia Story starting at 8.

Edited by Don Quixote

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1 hour ago, Don Quixote said:

I may have to respond “Eurotrip” for the second time today.

ETA: On the topic of TCM, The Philadelphia Story starting at 8.

The prettiest sight in this fine, pretty world is the privileged class enjoying its privileges.

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Revolutionary Road: damn fine acting but as someone who is a massive fan of the Yates novel, I don't think it fully captured the message of the book. It felt like jist the story of the Wheelers and not a full on takedown of 50s American suburbia. 

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7 hours ago, Walking Boot said:

Today's XKCD comic has a challenge:

Name a movie that...

(1) you genuinely like (not "so bad it's good")

(2) came out in your adult life post-2000, and

(3) is rated below 50% on Rotten Tomatoes

 

Whatcha got?

 

Mostly dumb comedies so far:  Super Troopers, Hot Rod, Waiting, Grandma's Boy.   I think it's going to be harder to find a drama that qualifies, but i will keep thinking.  

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Also Wikkid was talking about the essential movies every American should see in regards to Grapes of Wrath. This got me thinking about what movies would make that list up:

Grapes of Wrath: The Great Depression obviously was an especially significant part of our history, but we all lived through the recent recession so it's easy to see why the themes of this movie won't ever get old. 

Quote

Muley: You mean get off of my own land?
Agent: Now don't go to blamin' me! It ain't my fault.
Muley's son: Who's fault is it?
Agent: You know who owns the land. The Shawnee Land and Cattle Company.
Muley: And who's the Shawnee Land and Cattle Company
Agent: It ain't nobody. It's a company.
Muley's son: They got a President, ain't they? They got somebody who knows what a shotgun's for, ain't they?
Agent: Oh son, it ain't his fault, because the bank tells him what to do.
Muley's son: All right, where's the bank?
Agent: Tulsa. What's the use of pickin' on him? He ain't nothin' but the manager. And he's half-crazy hisself tryin' to keep up with his orders from the East.
Muley: Then who do we shoot?
Agent: Brother, I don't know. If I did, I'd tell ya. I just don't know who's to blame.

 

 

Saving Private Ryan: The Greatest Generation may have saved the free world but they went through hell to do it. I think most of us could benefit to be regularly reminded of the sacrifices they made as the last lights of those men are extinguished forever. We need movies like this to remind us that it was much more than just a couple chapters of history textbook. 

Quote

Capt. Miller: James... I'm here to tell you your brothers were killed in combat.
Pvt. Ryan: Which... which ones, sir?
Capt. Miller: All of them.

 

The Best Years of Our Lives: The story of three WW2 vets returning home. It looks at their challenges dealing with a war that scarred them and a country that had moved on without them. As opposed to a movie like The Deer Hunter that deals with a similar topic, The Best Years of Our Lives eschews bombast for genuine humanity. I don't think the Hollywood studio system ever made a finer film. 

Quote

Fred: Do you remember what it felt like when we went overseas?
Al: As well as I remember my own name.
Fred: I feel the same way now - only more so.

 

The Young Mr. Lincoln: John Ford tells a semi-fictional tale of the great American hero. Before Fords Theater, before Gettysburg and long before he could ever even dream of the White House. This is Abe as a young lawyer. While it may not be completely true in fact, it captures the spirit of Abe better than the facts ever could. Lincoln has become so venerated that he seems no longer like a real person. This movie reminds us that he was funny, that he struggled and loved and above all else, he was a man like any other, unsure of his direction in life. 

Quote

Abe Lincoln: We seem to lose our heads in times like this. We do things together that we'd be mighty ashamed to do by ourselves!

 

 The Social Network: While it plays a bit loose with the truth, it tells the story of the invention of the 21st cenury itself...all spawned out of cruelty, ego and greed.  And it has become more than just entertainment but an acvtive player in history, inspiring the next generation of techy entreprenuers who are reshaping our world without any regard for it. 

Quote

The internet isn't written in pencil, Mark. It's written in ink.

 

I have 5 others that I might post later this weekend. I would love to hear other peoples opinions as well. 

Edited by Ilov80s
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4 hours ago, KarmaPolice said:

I've only seen 2 of 5 on 80s list.  

I assume The Social Network and Saving Private Ryan

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10 hours ago, Ilov80s said:

Also Wikkid was talking about the essential movies every American should see in regards to Grapes of Wrath. This got me thinking about what movies would make that list up:

Grapes of Wrath: The Great Depression obviously was an especially significant part our history, but we all lived through the recent recession so it's easy to see why the themes of this movie won't ever get old. 

 

Saving Private Ryan: The Greatest Generation may have saved the free world but they went through hell to do it. I think most of could benefit to be regularly reminded of the sacrifices they made as the last lights of those men are extinguished forver. We need movies like this to remind us that it was much more than just a couple chapters of history textbook. 

 

The Best Years of Our Lives: The story of three WW2 vets returning to society and their challenges dealing with a war that scarred them and a country that had moved on without them. Unlike a movie like The Deer Hunter that deals with a similar topic, The Best Years of Our Lives eschews bombast for genuine humanity. I don't think the Hollywood studio system ever made a finer film. 

 

The Young Mr. Lincoln: John Ford tells a semi-fictional tale of the great American hero. Before Fords Theater, before Gettysburg and long before he could ever even dream of the White House. This is Abe as a young lawyer. While it may not be completely true in fact, it captures the spirit of Abe better than the facts ever could. Lincoln has become so venerated that he seems no longer like a real person. This movie reminds us that he was funny, that he struggled and loved and above all else, he was a man like any other, unsure of his direction in life. 

 

 The Social Network: While it plays a bit loose with the truth, it tells the story of the invention of the 21st cenury itself...all spawned out of cruelty, ego and greed.  And it has become more than just entertainment but an acvtive player in history, inspiring the next generation of techy entreprenuers who are reshaping our world without any regard for it. 

 

I have 5 others that I might post later this weekend. I would love to hear other peoples opinions as well. 

My adds (i'll hide them so as not to interfere w lov80s processes):

Wizard of Oz - If you want to understand a Boomer, esp on the hippie side, understand that the man behind the screen replaced God for an awful lot of us. Ding dong the witch is dead was our abiding ethic. The most important movie of my life by far

Dr Strangelove - mosta y'all don't get how rare cynicism & sarcasm was for the 1st 30 yrs of the post-war era (and possibly how disposably meta it is). Maybe watch 12 Angry Men before you watch this to get a sense of who & how much Kubrick & Terry Southern were making fun of.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - the rebel. My life dont exist without the story of the wiseass-but-fearless rebel. Nurse Ratched was The Man - the passive-aggressive but omnipotent force that could frustrate the rebel at every turn without a second thought and i'll die to make her think twice.

Malcolm X - To be on the wrong side of discrimination is a special burden. It is a gift from God that forces one to be ever mindful, always better and STILL be a prohibitive favorite to lose. Liberation struggles have only seen their plight as burdens because, amassed, they are. Brother Malcolm saw it as a challenge, as the challenge - to get better&better&better until you can't be stopped. Watch & learn, #####es.

Last Tango in Paris - Like. Get. Keep. That's as complicated as the War between the Sexes was until women got to make their own way. This film is indeed frustratingly male-centric but was one of the first to try to envision a land between males & females

The Imitation Game - We dont exist as we do because of tribes, nations, societies. We exist as we do because we kick out geniuses every once in a while. Meself having just a wee bit of it makes me acutely aware how difficult is the wrangling of special knowledge. This film understands The Code of Life better than any other

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40 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

My adds (i'll hide them so as not to interfere w lov80s processes):

 

I considered 12 Angry Men and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. Both are similar- cycnical America vs. a lone idealist. While it's certainly a core of the American myth, I just think that the outcomes of those movies are unrealistic. 30 years ago, I think one or both make the list easily, but times have changed. Maybe I will add them as honorable mentions just to understand who we were or at least once thought we were...hmmm....

You did list one move that is absolutely on my list though. 

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28 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

I considered 12 Angry Men and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. Both are similar- cycnical America vs. a lone idealist. While it's certainly a core of the American myth, I just think that the outcomes of those movies are unrealistic. 30 years ago, I think one or both make the list easily, but times have changed. Maybe I will add them as honorable mentions just to understand who we were or at least once thought we were...hmmm....

You did list one move that is absolutely on my list though. 

thing is, though, those opponents of the idealist weren't cynical. they were certain & sure. they had the rules on their side. they were capable of running you over, cutting you out of the herd if you stood any ground against them, no matter how right you was and wrong they were. Lee J Cobb and Ed Begley Sr have regular fits without consequence in 12 because THEY were the stalwarts, pillars of the community, not a stick in their way nor an ounce of doubt in their hearts. my grandad wasnt a big man, never provided well (subsistence farmer, partially disabled in the Great War) for his 10 kids, didnt discipline them especially hard, considered himself a gentleman more than a scrapper, but all he had to do was look up w a hint of disdain and his wife and all his giant, successful, adult children stopped in their tracks cuz..........THAT'S THE WAY IT WAS. nothing more than that. no reason given, needed. this is a very important thing - the 'cuz i said so', the 'won't hire you because your second cousin across town had an affair or your uncle went to a meeting once' world - for you young folk to understand. long before the long hair, the freakouts, the sit-ins, the sin of sarcasm was the individual's greatest comfort in that world and sarcastic/cynical art was our canary.

Edited by wikkidpissah

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1 hour ago, wikkidpissah said:

My adds (i'll hide them so as not to interfere w lov80s processes):

  Reveal hidden contents

 

Wizard of Oz - If you want to understand a Boomer, esp on the hippie side, understand that the man behind the screen replaced God for an awful lot of us. Ding dong the witch is dead was our abiding ethic. The most important movie of my life by far

Dr Strangelove - mosta y'all don't get how rare cynicism & sarcasm was for the 1st 30 yrs of the post-war era (and possibly how disposably meta it is). Maybe watch 12 Angry Men before you watch this to get a sense of who & how much Kubrick & Terry Southern were making fun of.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - the rebel. My life dont exist without the story of the wiseass-but-fearless rebel. Nurse Ratched was The Man - the passive-aggressive but omnipotent force that could frustrate the rebel at every turn without a second thought and i'll die to make her think twice.

Malcolm X - To be on the wrong side of discrimination is a special burden. It is a gift from God that forces one to be ever mindful, always better and STILL be a prohibitive favorite to lose. Liberation struggles have only seen their plight as burdens because, amassed, they are. Brother Malcolm saw it as a challenge, as the challenge - to get better&better&better until you can't be stopped. Watch & learn, #####es.

Last Tango in Paris - Like. Get. Keep. That's as complicated as the War between the Sexes was until women got to make their own way. This film is indeed frustratingly male-centric but was one of the first to try to envision a land between males & females

The Imitation Game - We dont exist as we do because of tribes, nations, societies. We exist as we do because we kick out geniuses every once in a while. Meself having just a wee bit of it makes me acutely aware how difficult is the wrangling of special knowledge. This film understands The Code of Life better than any other

That's thumbs up to both for the lists. One that keeps resonating with me as I get older and older is the third on wikkid's list.  She was indeed -- and still is -- the symbolic Man. The second movie I've seen and didn't love as much as many of the others, though I loved the though of Southern's Blue Movie really becoming a movie. Maybe wikkid can flesh out about cynicism and irony first thirty years post-war for all us young guns here (I among the older of the younger).  

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I would say Mr. Smith shows cynicism existed before the Baby Boomers but maybe where things changed from Smith or Strangelove was our idea about which side would win. 

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4 minutes ago, rockaction said:

That's thumbs up to both for the lists. One that keeps resonating with me as I get older and older is the third on wikkid's list.  She was indeed -- and still is -- the symbolic Man. The second movie I've seen and didn't love as much as many of the others, though I loved the though of Southern's Blue Movie really becoming a movie. Maybe wikkid can flesh out about cynicism and irony first thirty years post-war for all us young guns here (I among the older of the younger).  

Maybe i can, maybe i cant - there's some of it in my last post.

Winning a world war on two fronts touched every person, cost untold life & treasure, influenced every decision & sensibility at home. How much sugar & salt you used on your firkkin food. Whether to have a car. Whether spare time was a sin. Whether or not to open your mail. Whether to trust that guy at the same time you were going out of your way to help people you didnt even know.

The citizen wanted a payoff to that when all was said & done. Education, liberty, mobility, a chance to dream. NONE of that was easy nor breezy. It was serious stuff and most people worked as hard to win their new lives as they did to win the war. Because the old codes i addressed above were in play, the young soldiers & their wives were damned if they werent gonna use em against somebody like they were used against them. Then, because of the bomb, and the Russkies, they were in a hurry to win their dream before the End of the World. The funny could only be silly, never relevant. No doubt - doubt was still a ration book item and the slightest unnecessary use of it could let the Red Menace in the door. You did NOT want to be the Typhoid Mary of doubt.

Then Kennedy. And hope. Hope overtook one immediately & fully as soon as it was embraced and had almost a fascism of its own. You cleaned your plate because people were starving in Europe. You didnt trick or treat without your Unicef box. Your wore robes and rang the bell for the priest cuz God's house was huge and it made your fam smile. I brought darkies home a lot cuz it made me Ma fuss & me Da fume. Irony was luxury and the only luxury we could afford were the kinds that suggested to strangers that we might be better than them. Memorial Day folding a flag with a Scout uniform on and holding back a tear when the bugle blew was as real as it ever got. I started using the funny almost as soon as i used breath, but there was tons o' #### i didn't even consider being funny about. NOTHING was disposable.

Then darkies started getting burned in their churches, we started burning darkies overseas. Outrage after outrage, all them rules started to cause. We couldnt do anything about that til we got to college and then we had to do it against the people who were paying our way to college. That became hilarious. TV wouldnt allow even the mildest protest unless it was funny so we got sarcastic. Our music got loud and crazy cuz it drove peeps nutz. And it began.....

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29 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

Maybe i can, maybe i cant - there's some of it in my last post.

Winning a world war on two fronts touched every person, cost untold life & treasure, influenced every decision & sensibility at home. How much sugar & salt you used on your firkkin food. Whether to have a car. Whether spare time was a sin. Whether or not to open your mail. Whether to trust that guy at the same time you were going out of your way to help people you didnt even know.

The citizen wanted a payoff to that when all was said & done. Education, liberty, mobility, a chance to dream. NONE of that was easy nor breezy. It was serious stuff and most people worked as hard to win their new lives as they did to win the war. Because the old codes i addressed above were in play, the young soldiers & their wives were damned if they werent gonna use em against somebody like they were used against them. Then, because of the bomb, and the Russkies, they were in a hurry to win their dream before the End of the World. The funny could only be silly, never relevant. No doubt - doubt was still a ration book item and the slightest unnecessary use of it could let the Red Menace in the door. You did NOT want to be the Typhoid Mary of doubt.

Then Kennedy. And hope. Hope overtook one immediately & fully as soon as it was embraced and had almost a fascism of its own. You cleaned your plate because people were starving in Europe. You didnt trick or treat without your Unicef box. Your wore robes and rang the bell for the priest cuz God's house was huge and it made your fam smile. I brought darkies home a lot cuz it made me Ma fuss & me Da fume. Irony was luxury and the only luxury we could afford were the kinds that suggested to strangers that we might be better than them. Memorial Day folding a flag with a Scout uniform on and holding back a tear when the bugle blew was as real as it ever got. I started using the funny almost as soon as i used breath, but there was tons o' #### i didn't even consider being funny about. NOTHING was disposable.

Then darkies started getting burned in their churches, we started burning darkies overseas. Outrage after outrage, all them rules started to cause. We couldnt do anything about that til we got to college and then we had to do it against the people who were paying our way to college. That became hilarious. TV wouldnt allow even the mildest protest unless it was funny so we got sarcastic. Our music got loud and crazy cuz it drove peeps nutz. And it began.....

Ah, I think anecdotally I get what you're saying. Liberty was hard won and had its costs and promises. Then, liberty's overall hold as a concept was used and bastardized as excuses to more war and pillage -- or its machinations towards freedom in the South in the form of segregation as previously being acknowledgement of some sort of humanity which was then used as levers of restraint -- and the protest against this misapplication of theory was a wellspring of liberty spent flushed by boomer children, for sure. 

Personally, I remember a little more of that immediate post-WWII spirit filtering through down to my childhood also. I grew up in a small town, in an older neighborhood, and those values and tensions were nominally still intact in our household, too. My parents weren't down with the boomer spirit, and were more, while still a product of their time, anachronistic like the rest of our neighborhood largely was, too. I'm a little too young to have gotten the boomer or even the post-boomer stuff, but it only came through pop culture for me. I was raised away from it all, so to speak, the excesses of post WWII and the boomer spirit that was to run away with the late sixties and early seventies in many neighborhoods.  

Edited by rockaction

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"tension" is a good word there, mf. positive tension, negative tension, familiar tension, fugitive tension fogging the whole neighbahood

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I'd honestly have to learn more about HUAC to post appropriately about On The Waterfront. I'm looking forward to Karl Malden and Eva St. Marie tonight, along with Brando, obviously. This was generally a movie I would get drunk to and have a real piss about life a decade or two ago. I wonder if I'll even watch if it's on tonight. If I watch, I'll post reactions here.   

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Good points there. Freedom was hard fought and thus incredibly valuable. Things of value are defended great lengths. The vigilance to defend that freedom ultimately eroded it.

Edited by Ilov80s

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I’ve watched a couple of the Henry Fonda movies that I recorded.

“Grapes of Wrath” was great.  I think it was the highest movie on the AFI 100 list that I had not seen.  It lives up to its billing, and what 80s and wikkid were saying about it.  Fonda is great, and (while I was not around for it) it seems to really capture the time and place.

I was a bit more down on “Young Mr. Lincoln.”  I love Presidential history and Lincoln in particular.  Lincoln was almost certainly our funniest President, but they seemed to reduce him to some kind of midwestern My Cousin Vinny.  I can’t imagine him telling a witness on the stand in court, “I’ll just call you Jack Cass then.”  It makes Lincoln seem like a bit of a “Jack Cass” himself.  The movie felt a bit flat before the courtroom scene too.  Worth watching, but I just did not think as great as it could have been.

Edited by Don Quixote
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35 minutes ago, Don Quixote said:

I’ve watched a couple of the Henry Fonda movies that I recorded.

“Grapes of Wrath” was great.  I think it was the highest movie on the AFI 100 list that I had not seen.  It lives up to its billing, and what 80s and wikkid were saying about it.  Fonda is great, and (while I was not around for it) it seems to really capture the time and place.

About 10 years ago I recorded and put it on dvd when TCM played it. 
Pop in in about once a year

I no longer get TCM and haven't for 3 years

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1 hour ago, Don Quixote said:

I’ve watched a couple of the Henry Fonda movies that I recorded.

“Grapes of Wrath” was great.  I think it was the highest movie on the AFI 100 list that I had not seen.  It lives up to its billing, and what 80s and wikkid were saying about it.  Fonda is great, and (while I was not around for it) it seems to really capture the time and place.

I was a bit more down on “Young Mr. Lincoln.”  I love Presidential history and Lincoln in particular.  Lincoln was almost certainly our funniest President, but they seemed to reduce him to some kind of midwestern My Cousin Vinny.  I can’t imagine him telling a witness on the stand in court, “I’ll just call you Jack Cass then.”  It makes Lincoln seem like a bit of a “Jack Cass” himself.  The movie felt a bit flat before the courtroom scene too.  Worth watching, but I just did not think as great as it could have been.

Perhaps but he was a notorious story teller and jokester so much so that it hurt him politically as much it helped. He turned off a lot of important people with it and there were even books of his jokes published while he was in office.

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@rockaction too bad you are missing On the Waterfront. I haven't seen it in awhile. I forgot how good it was. Obviously Kazan put his heart into directing, the best writing of Bud Schulberg's career, the great Leonard Bernstein score  and the acting from Brando, Malden, Eva St. Marie, Lee J Cobb and Rod Steiger is just electric. Without a doubt this is on my list of movies every American needs to see. 

Edited by Ilov80s
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6 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

@rockaction too bad you are missing On the Waterfront. I haven't seen it in awhile. I forgot how good it was. Obviously Kazan put his heart into directing, the best writing of Bud Schulberg's career, the great Leonard Bernstein score  and the acting from Brando, Malden, Eva St. Marie, Lee J Cobb and Rod Steiger is just electric. Without a doubt this is on my list of movies every American needs to see. 

Oh, man. That's okay. Yet here I am sending Bud Light commercials to strangers while you get to catch the one of the great feats of cinema on the DeeVee. 

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4 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Oh, man. That's okay. Yet here I am sending Bud Light commercials to strangers while you get to catch the one of the great feats of cinema on the DeeVee. 

Crazy part is it's not Brando or Steiger's best performance, definitely not Bernstein's best score and maybe not Elia Kazan's best movie. I am pro-union (though obviously not the unions of this time/place) and don't think anyone should have turned over names to HUAC but the movie still wins me over everytime. 

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Night and the City (1950). another great noir by Jules Dassin who later admitted he never read the book that the film was based on.
Richard Widmark, and Gene Tierney starred along with familiar actors Herbert Lom, Hugh Marlowe and Mike Mazurki among others.

8/10

 

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14 hours ago, Ilov80s said:

Perhaps but he was a notorious story teller and jokester so much so that it hurt him politically as much it helped. He turned off a lot of important people with it and there were even books of his jokes published while he was in office.

Definitely. He was a great storyteller. He knew how to use humor effectively though.  I’m not sure he would be hamming it up like that at a murder trial with capital punishment on the line. And, again, while some other stuff came out about that character, I’m not sure the first line of questioning to a witness to a friend’s death being “can I call you jackass” would generate the uproarious laughter portrayed.

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16 minutes ago, Don Quixote said:

Definitely. He was a great storyteller. He knew how to use humor effectively though.  I’m not sure he would be hamming it up like that at a murder trial with capital punishment on the line. And, again, while some other stuff came out about that character, I’m not sure the first line of questioning to a witness to a friend’s death being “can I call you jackass” would generate the uproarious laughter portrayed.

From what i understand, the Great Emancipator was a joke nerd. One would fly into his head and fairly possess him until he could scree it out in the high, scratchy voice with which he talked when excited. Many found it off-putting, they say.

Edited by wikkidpissah
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23 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

From what i understand, the Great Emancipator was a joke nerd. One would fly into his head and fairly possess him until he could scree it out in the high, scratchy voice with which he talked when excited. Many found it off-putting, they say.

Yes, he often joked around when discussing the Civil War and the potential downfall of the Union. Many senior politicians stormed out on him or were incredibly offended by him. He would joke or tell these rural homespun stories during the most inappropriate times.

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1 hour ago, wikkidpissah said:

From what i understand, the Great Emancipator was a joke nerd. One would fly into his head and fairly possess him until he could scree it out in the high, scratchy voice with which he talked when excited. Many found it off-putting, they say.

Yeah, I’ve read several biographies on Lincoln, and that is right.  I’m not sure if he would do that in a courtroom, but, even if so, it is hard for me to take a movie seriously when they depict the judge, jury, and crowd all laughing hysterically when Lincoln calls someone who just finished testifying about witnessing his friend’s death a jackass.  If they portrayed it as an off-putting joke that would be an entirely different thing. I don’t want to belabor the point though, as I guess I’m on an island here.

Edited by Don Quixote

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4 minutes ago, Don Quixote said:

Yeah, I’ve read several biographies on Lincoln, and that is right.  I’m not sure if he would do that in a courtroom, but, even if so, it is hard for me to take a movie seriously when they depict the judge, jury, and crowd all laughing hysterically when Lincoln calls someone who just finished testifying about witnessing his friend’s death a jackass.  If they portrayed it as an off-putting joke that would be an entirely different thing. I don’t want to belabor the point though, as I guess I’m on an island here.

no, he was definitely still history-class Lincoln in YML whether they thought it was a fresh look or not. Movies were doing the opposite back then - looking to legendize over over humanize. as 80s said, the spirit is what carries

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15 hours ago, Ilov80s said:

@rockaction too bad you are missing On the Waterfront. I haven't seen it in awhile. I forgot how good it was. Obviously Kazan put his heart into directing, the best writing of Bud Schulberg's career, the great Leonard Bernstein score  and the acting from Brando, Malden, Eva St. Marie, Lee J Cobb and Rod Steiger is just electric. Without a doubt this is on my list of movies every American needs to see. 

This my pick for the best movie before 1960 (The Treasure of The Sierra Madre and Casablanca, are close behind)

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58 minutes ago, Mr. Mojo said:

This my pick for the best movie before 1960 (The Treasure of The Sierra Madre and Casablanca, are close behind)

The only fault I can tell is how poor an attempt Kazan made at exonerating himself for naming names. Giving names/evidence for politics is a far cry from giving names/evidence for murder. That and those damn blinds in the back of the cab because the cheap producer refused to pay for rear projection. 

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IIRC, Hollywood begrudged Kazan less for naming names than any of the others for most of his career because his work remained heroic in its way and folks didn't want to be reverse black-ballers. This issue didn't really come to a head until he was picked for some kind of lifetime achievement award and then the roof caved in on it w people piling on in a way that would have made today's wokesters proud ("hey - i didn't get harumph from that guy"). Kazan responded pompously and it all build to the point that it was a first-line-of-obit thing by the end

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33 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

IIRC, Hollywood begrudged Kazan less for naming names than any of the others for most of his career because his work remained heroic in its way and folks didn't want to be reverse black-ballers. This issue didn't really come to a head until he was picked for some kind of lifetime achievement award and then the roof caved in on it w people piling on in a way that would have made today's wokesters proud ("hey - i didn't get harumph from that guy"). Kazan responded pompously and it all build to the point that it was a first-line-of-obit thing by the end

It definitely caused tension between Kazan and Arthur Miller. Miller wrote the original screenplay for On the Waterfront but he refused to change the union mob to communists despite pressure and accusations of being un-American. He didn't want to make it an Amerian propaganda picture. I think you are right that it mostly came up publically when the liftetime Oscar, Though when it happened, it was difficult to speak up publically against Kazan as it would draw the attention of HUAC anc accusations of anti-American bias. The Karina Longworth podcast You Must Remember This had an amazing season on it. It's incrediby fascinating. 

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10 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

It definitely caused tension between Kazan and Arthur Miller. Miller wrote the original screenplay for On the Waterfront but he refused to change the union mob to communists despite pressure and accusations of being un-American. He didn't want to make it an Amerian propaganda picture. I think you are right that it mostly came up publically when the liftetime Oscar, Though when it happened, it was difficult to speak up publically against Kazan as it would draw the attention of HUAC anc accusations of anti-American bias. The Karina Longworth podcast You Must Remember This had an amazing season on it. It's incrediby fascinating. 

been listening to her Manson stuff. will check that out too

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On 3/25/2019 at 7:03 AM, On The Rocks said:

 

 

Widows

I liked it.  It was a little anti climatic, but it had it's somewhat unique story line.  My wife who isn't a fan of the action, violent, bullets flying movies, loved it, which makes me a little nervous.  Viola Davis is pretty amazing at that whole acting thing.

 

 

This is on HBO now. Saw it this weekend. I liked it a lot. Its a good movie with, as OTR wrote, a unique story line.

I will say, though, that I predicted the twist from the moment I first saw the trailer. I'm sure I'm not the only one.

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Watched The Favourite which is now on HBO. It’s funny and looks amazing but I was a little disappointed since I had such high hopes as it was right in my wheelhouse. Holy cow did it remind me of The Draughtsman’s Contract. Also this is the 2nd Yorgos movie that disappointed me. I did like this better than The Lobster tho.

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17 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Watched The Favourite which is now on HBO. It’s funny and looks amazing but I was a little disappointed since I had such high hopes as it was right in my wheelhouse. Holy cow did it remind me of The Draughtsman’s Contract. Also this is the 2nd Yorgos movie that disappointed me. I did like this better than The Lobster tho.

i enjoyed hating that more than any other Greenaway picture, except possibly the Helen-Mirren-screwing-around-garbage one, of course

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3 hours ago, Ilov80s said:

Watched The Favourite which is now on HBO. It’s funny and looks amazing but I was a little disappointed since I had such high hopes as it was right in my wheelhouse. Holy cow did it remind me of The Draughtsman’s Contract. Also this is the 2nd Yorgos movie that disappointed me. I did like this better than The Lobster tho.

I didn't like it much. A bunch of unlikable characters, a strange ending and what was that awful music?

The performances were very good, though.

Edited by Mr. Mojo

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11 minutes ago, Mr. Mojo said:

I didn't like it much. A bunch of unlikable characters, a strange ending and what was that awful music?

The performances were very good, though.

The music? It was Bach and Purcell and Schubert and Schumann. Couldn’t disagree more on the quality of the music!

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3 hours ago, wikkidpissah said:

i enjoyed hating that more than any other Greenaway picture, except possibly the Helen-Mirren-screwing-around-garbage one, of course

It’s the only Greenaway movie I’ve seen and I liked it. The score was fantastic and I loved how the movie was blocked/framed. 

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Wtaching Guys and Dolls which was an intersting choice for Brando day on TCM since he is so far out of his element here. I like the movie but it would have been 100x better with Gene Kelly instead of Marlon. 

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18 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Wtaching Guys and Dolls which was an intersting choice for Brando day on TCM since he is so far out of his element here. I like the movie but it would have been 100x better with Gene Kelly instead of Marlon. 

Think i've told this before, but the movie musical my director cousin most wanted to follow his Chicago with was a remake of Guys & Dolls. Even with all of Hollywood saying yes to the reigning director of the Best Picture, NObody would back him in this because it's such an anachronism. He only mentioned this to me after he'd accepted Memoirs of a Geisha as his next project. Being a poker boss at the time, i suggested updating it to the present day, changing Nathan Detroit's focus from a floating crap game to the WSOP (this was right after Chris Moneymaker's victory had launched the tournament's popularity into the stratosphere) and replacing the Times Sq opening scene with one under the digital canopy of the Fremont Street Experience. He was instantly fascinated and i wasted months trying to update his vision without ultimate result, but it caused me to have to watch Brando sing & dance like a cat thrown into a swimming pool about 40 times over 6 months.

Edited by wikkidpissah
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1 minute ago, wikkidpissah said:

Think i've told this before, but the movie musical my director cousin most wanted to follow his Chicago with was a remake of Guys & Dolls. Even with all of Hollywood saying yes to the reigning director of the Best Picture, NObody would back him in this because it's such an anachronism. He only mentioned this to me after he'd accepted Memoirs of a Geisha as his next project. Being a poker boss at the time, i suggested updating it to the present day, changing Nathan Detroit's focus from a floating crap game to WSOP (this was right after Chirs Moneymaker's victory had launched poker's popularity into the stratosphere) and replacing the Times Sq opening scene with one under the digital canopy of the Fremont Street Experience. He was instantly fascinated and i wasted months trying to update his vision without ultimate result, but it caused me to have to watch Brando sing & dance like a cat thrown into a swimming pool about 40 times over 6 months.

The laughing is only at the Brando singing part. Pretty quickly from starting this I thought it should be done again in the vein of a Chicago. The Texas Hold'em Part in Vegas makes a ton of sense. That could have worked really well IMO- probably still could with some updated music. LaLa Land, Bohemian Rhapsody, Rocketman, Greatest Showman have shown their is still a big market for well done musicals. 

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