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Ran a 10k - Official Thread

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22 minutes ago, ChiefD said:

Took my skirt off and found a Planet Fitness up the street that was open. Got my 10 miles in and actually felt pretty good.

Now if I could just take a good dump I'd be really happy. :toilet:

Nice job!

And thoughts and prayers for a productive future BM.

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7 hours ago, bushdocda said:

Looked at the course, how do you go at something like that with the huge descent and climb a while later. Looks like a 10k, roll down a massive hill, run some more, hike 1500 ft up, run another 10k. 

And add all the mud. 

This was my fifth time at this race, so I know the course and how it runs pretty well.  The first 8 mile loop starts with about a mile on road, a little double track descent down to the first creek crossing, and then rolling single track until you get back to the start.  I've learned to start a little further up in the "corral" than I normally would, and to run the road section just slightly faster than comfortable for me for the start of a 31 mile race as if you get caught too far back when you hit single track the conga line is just going too slow.  In drier years there is a huge backup at the first creek crossing about two miles in as people try to tip-toe across and stay dry.  About year three I just learned to go around it and plow through.  This year, there was no trying to stay dry as it was 3' deep, so while it slowed down as people crossed there wasn't a big line.  The conga line I ended up in after that was just about right, if anything maybe 10 seconds/mile or so faster than I wanted to go, so I stepped off a couple of times to let people by.  There were six or seven creek crossings that hit from mid-calf to over the knee, and that obviously slowed things down.  And some sections were just super sloppy and you had to pick your way through the muck.  Imagine the wettest, muddiest trail you've been on, and then add almost 300 runners going through right before you mucking it up even more.  That was the first loop.  But I was happy with how it went, according to Strava it was my second fastest loop with an 11:09 pace (behind only a 10:38 pace in 2015 which was a dry year).  The only official timing split on the course was at the end of the loop, and I was 282nd out of 641 starters at that point.

We then headed through a meadow and start a pretty good drop down to Highway 49.  I got passed by 5-10 runners on the somewhat technical downhill (which was pretty much a creek in parts), which was a little disappointing.  Downhill isn't necessarily my strong suit, but I was taking it more cautiously than others.  I think the IT band issues I've had over the years have made me tentative and less willing to attack them, but I'm to the point now that my ITs are usually good until sometime after mile 50 so I shouldn't be such a wuss.  I also just need to practice technical downhilling more than I have been.  This two mile section drops about 800', and I ran it in 10:23 pace.

We crossed the highway where Western States legend Tim Twietmeyer and URP's Eric Schranz were cheering on the runners, and then dropped down on fire road to run above the roaring Middle Fork of the American River.  The rain even let up for the first time, and it looked like it might turn into a nice day as I took off my rain shell and stowed it in my pack.  The fire road rolls along here for about 6 miles with a couple of 150'-200' climbs mixed in.  I passed a few, got passed by a few, and chatted up a few runners.  This section was just another reminder that if I really want to cut my time on a course like this, I need to get faster on the runnable sections.  If I can comfortably run along at 9:00 pace instead of 10:00-10:30 on the flats, that will make a big difference.  With those little climbs mixed in, I ran a decent 11:19 pace through here.

I was looking forward to starting the climb out of the canyon, as that is my strong suit relative to most other mid-packers and I knew I'd start making up some ground.  Sure enough, I started chewing people up.  I even got three separate comments about how fast I was power hiking as I plowed past.  This section starts with about an 800' climb over four miles, rolls along for a bit, and then ends at almost exactly 26.2 miles with Goat Hill,  1/4 mile with a 20% grade.   I covered this 10 mile section in 2:09, a 12:53 pace.

Going into the race I had beating my PR of 5:54 as an A goal, and sub-6:00 as my B goal.  But with the weather forecast and trail conditions I decided to just take the day as it came and see where things stood when I got to the top of Goat Hill.  I didn't print out the pace chart, didn't even look at my watch for the first time until the end of the first loop, and rarely checked it throughout the day.  I hit the aid station at the top of the climb in about 5:10, filled a bottle and drank some coke, and kept going.  With five miles to go including the 450' climb from hwy 49 back to Cool still ahead, I knew it wasn't too likely that I could get in sub-6:00.  But I remembered that the course had measured closer to 30 than 31 miles on my GPS in the past.  "So you're telling me there's a chance!"  I decided to just charge on and see what I could do. 

After another quick climb it was a pretty steep technical descent, losing about 400' in a mile or so.  I did my best to pick my way through the rocks, mud, and water as it started to rain again.  I'm checking my watch as the traffic noises of Highway 49 start to pick up, but it always takes longer than you think it will to finally come out of the clearing and cross the road.  This is the final aid station, and I knew it was over a mile to the finish - and my PR time was already gone, as was the chance at sub-6:00.  So what, let's finish this thing!  I skipped the aid station and kept charging, and began the final climb up to Cool.  I passed another couple of runners on the 250' rocky climb, and then stomped through the mud in the meadow up top.  As I approached the finish I could hear someone splashing behind me, and I kept running hard to try and stay in front.  Around the corner, splashing through the mud while trying not to fall in front of the gathered spectators, and across the line in 6:06:08 chip time.  That was the fastest I've run that segment in my five times here, so I was happy to finish so strong even with my pre-race goals out the window.  This time the course measured the full 31 miles (it's shown exactly 30 miles twice before), which shows how far off gps can be during trail races.

Finished 238th out of 641 starters which means I moved up 44 spots from mile 8 to the finish, almost all of that on the climbs.  In looking at how I did relative to the rest of the field, this was actually my best finish at 37% percentile, with my other finishes ranging from 43%-67%.  So I have to be pretty happy with that.  I stuck to my nutrition plan of gels, electrolyte drink, and coke, and had no issues there.  My knee and my achilles held up. I somehow managed to not fall even once, although I did almost lose it during a late creek crossing.  Afterward it was some chili, burritos, and a couple of IPAs with fellow racers while we commiserated about the conditions out there and tried to get warm.  Good times.

 

Edited by SFBayDuck
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3 hours ago, SFBayDuck said:

 my ITs are usually good until sometime after mile 50 

If I had a nickle for every time ...

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8 hours ago, JAA said:

2 - to the person who said to focus on the exhale. When I’m focusing on breathing through both, focusing on the exhale makes it easier to concentrate and keep it going.  FWIW I think I saw a couple days back someone else thanking for this same reason  

Since it's come up again, I'll fess up to raising this point.  The inhale takes care of itself, but that strong exhale allows a deep, full, productive inhale.  Also, though, I like that a focused exhale tends to reinforce cadence, which can be helpful for maintaining pace.  Glad it's working out for you! 

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I did a poor imitation of Duck on Saturday - 13/14 miles in the Georgia mountains.  Per the map our loop,  Coosa Backcountry Trail, had a little over a mile of elevation.  Took us about 7 hours.  Today we were hiking on sore legs and my knees were shot - we did a small portion of the AT and hiked up Blood Mountain which is the highest peak on the Georgia portion of the AT.  Ended up doing about 6 today.  20 miles over two days - about 1.5 miles of elevation. I’m beat.  

Edited by AAABatteries
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4 hours ago, gianmarco said:

Well if you assume he had to run precisely 500 yards, he averaged a 6:37/mi pace.  

I calculated that he had stopped for about 20 seconds in total to make shots, so deducting that from the time means in "moving time" he averaged a 5:17 pace.  Didn't look like he was running that fast!

And finally, did he tap-in before the ball stopped moving from his first putt?  If so, that's against the rules of golf!

 

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14 hours ago, AAABatteries said:

I did a poor imitation of Duck on Saturday - 13/14 miles in the Georgia mountains.  Per the map our loop,  Coosa Backcountry Trail, had a little over a mile of elevation.  Took us about 7 hours.  Today we were hiking on sore legs and my knees were shot - we did a small portion of the AT and hiked up Blood Mountain which is the highest peak on the Georgia portion of the AT.  Ended up doing about 6 today.  20 miles over two days - about 1.5 miles of elevation. I’m beat.  

I'm meeting up a friend and we're gonna tackle 2-3 days of the AT.  Thinking about starting at the true beginning and making it to Blood Mt.  

@SFBayDuck awesome race.  I soon as I looked at Strava I thought you considered Sanding a 50K.  Sanding a race is still a thing here right?  

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1 hour ago, Zasada said:

Well if you assume he had to run precisely 500 yards, he averaged a 6:37/mi pace.  

I calculated that he had stopped for about 20 seconds in total to make shots, so deducting that from the time means in "moving time" he averaged a 5:17 pace.  Didn't look like he was running that fast!

And finally, did he tap-in before the ball stopped moving from his first putt?  If so, that's against the rules of golf!

 

Yeah, I realized after seeing that he really had to move to cover that distance (which is what prompted me to put it here).

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1 hour ago, gianmarco said:

For @SFBayDuck 

KT82 Solo race

And to give an idea for those of you joining...

@gruecd, @ChiefD, @JShare87, @Juxtatarot, @tri-man 47

That looked an awful lot like all road. No thanks. 

Funny enough I’ve met the French dude (the pacer). Sat next to him at breakfast after Grindstone last October. 

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Just posted in the national parks thread about my week in Utah.  Stunning geography and the weather cooperated for all of the photography stuff I was looking to do. Very happy with the trip.  With my schedule and how my left knee had been doing, I laid off  the running for several days.  I posted one run Thursday last week from Moab, UT.  Even though it was next to the main highway, it was a paved path without ice that was tough to come by, (Chicago or Moab actually).  It was still awesome to run next  to the rock formation.  

Unfortunately, knee pain started around mile 4 or 5 of that 6 mile run. For the run, it wasn't so bad.  But, man after that, every hike had pain on every step.  I've never felt so old.  I didn't let it stop me from doing any of the hikes I had planned, but they were just a little less enjoyable.

I'm following up with an Orthopedic this week for my thumb.  I will double up and ask about my left knee.  It's painfully obvious where the pain points are.  The good/bad news on that left knee is that the pain dissipates pretty darn fast after running.  Hopefully this means the diagnosis is straightforward.

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6 hours ago, jb1020 said:

I'm meeting up a friend and we're gonna tackle 2-3 days of the AT.  Thinking about starting at the true beginning and making it to Blood Mt.  

@SFBayDuck awesome race.  I soon as I looked at Strava I thought you considered Sanding a 50K.  Sanding a race is still a thing here right?  

Nice - that’s about 30 miles so definitely doable.  Blood Mountain had some awesome views - kind of foggy on one side but pretty amazing.  My buddy I went with has done a few trips out on the AT - I’m still not sold on the overnight on the trail.  

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20 hours ago, AAABatteries said:

I did a poor imitation of Duck on Saturday - 13/14 miles in the Georgia mountains.  Per the map our loop,  Coosa Backcountry Trail, had a little over a mile of elevation.  Took us about 7 hours.  Today we were hiking on sore legs and my knees were shot - we did a small portion of the AT and hiked up Blood Mountain which is the highest peak on the Georgia portion of the AT.  Ended up doing about 6 today.  20 miles over two days - about 1.5 miles of elevation. I’m beat.  

Sounds awesome, good stuff. 

6 hours ago, jb1020 said:

I'm meeting up a friend and we're gonna tackle 2-3 days of the AT.  Thinking about starting at the true beginning and making it to Blood Mt.  

@SFBayDuck awesome race.  I soon as I looked at Strava I thought you considered Sanding a 50K.  Sanding a race is still a thing here right?  

I’d love to get some miles in on any of the long trails - AT, Colorado, PCT, Sierra High Route, TRT, etc. I’ve done sections of the PCT during races but that’s about it. But doing some backpacking trips is hopefully something I’ll still get to in the next few years. 

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11 hours ago, gianmarco said:

Bead Kearns (former professional triathlete, podcast host, and author of The Primal Blueprint), actually broke this guy’s record last year.  

Video

Article (w video embedded)

 Seems like a sport that would be comical to practice.  I’d imagine an inordinate amount of time just sitting at the next tee box waiting after you finished a hole in two minutes.  More time for drinking, I guess. :banned:

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On 3/3/2019 at 2:10 PM, SFBayDuck said:

Around the corner, splashing through the mud while trying not to fall in front of the gathered spectators, and across the line in 6:06:08 chip time.  That was the fastest I've run that segment in my five times here, so I was happy to finish so strong even with my pre-race goals out the window.  This time the course measured the full 31 miles (it's shown exactly 30 miles twice before), which shows how far off gps can be during trail races.

Finished 238th out of 641 starters which means I moved up 44 spots from mile 8 to the finish, almost all of that on the climbs.  In looking at how I did relative to the rest of the field, this was actually my best finish at 37% percentile, with my other finishes ranging from 43%-67%.  So I have to be pretty happy with that.  I stuck to my nutrition plan of gels, electrolyte drink, and coke, and had no issues there.  My knee and my achilles held up. I somehow managed to not fall even once, although I did almost lose it during a late creek crossing.  Afterward it was some chili, burritos, and a couple of IPAs with fellow racers while we commiserated about the conditions out there and tried to get warm.  Good times.

 

Looks epic!  Congrats Duck!  That’s a gutty performance in those types of conditions.  All things considered, looks as though it may have very well been your best run at that race.  Well done. :thumbup:

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8 minutes ago, SayWhat? said:

Bead Kearns (former professional triathlete, podcast host, and author of The Primal Blueprint), actually broke this guy’s record last year.  

Video

Article (w video embedded)

 Seems like a sport that would be comical to practice.  I’d imagine an inordinate amount of time just sitting at the next tee box waiting after you finished a hole in two minutes.  More time for drinking, I guess. :banned:

Speedgoat Karl Meltzer has competed in this as well.

I’m thinking if we could combine this with the beer mile concept and slam a beer at each tee, then we might have something. 

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7 minutes ago, SayWhat? said:

Looks epic!  Congrats Duck!  That’s a gutty performance in those types of conditions.  All things considered, looks as though it may have very well been your best run at that race.  Well done. :thumbup:

Thanks man. I do feel pretty good about it, all things considered.

Legs and feet a little sore today, but worked things out with a nice 5 mile hike with the pup, with a little easy running sprinkled in. 

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1 minute ago, SFBayDuck said:

Legs and feet a little sore today, but worked things out with a nice 5 mile hike with the pup, with a little easy running sprinkled in. 

:whistle:

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On 3/3/2019 at 2:10 PM, SFBayDuck said:

 

Finished 238th out of 641 starters which means I moved up 44 spots from mile 8 to the finish, almost all of that on the climbs.  In looking at how I did relative to the rest of the field, this was actually my best finish at 37% percentile, with my other finishes ranging from 43%-67%.  So I have to be pretty happy with that.  I stuck to my nutrition plan of gels, electrolyte drink, and coke, and had no issues there.  My knee and my achilles held up. I somehow managed to not fall even once, although I did almost lose it during a late creek crossing.  Afterward it was some chili, burritos, and a couple of IPAs with fellow racers while we commiserated about the conditions out there and tried to get warm.  Good times.

 

Congrats on a great run!!!  No hallucinations though?  Did you really try then?

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5 hours ago, Brony said:

Congrats on a great run!!!  No hallucinations though?  Did you really try then?

It’s almost like it never happened......

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On 3/3/2019 at 3:10 PM, SFBayDuck said:

This was my fifth time at this race, so I know the course and how it runs pretty well.  The first 8 mile loop starts with about a mile on road, a little double track descent down to the first creek crossing, and then rolling single track until you get back to the start.  I've learned to start a little further up in the "corral" than I normally would, and to run the road section just slightly faster than comfortable for me for the start of a 31 mile race as if you get caught too far back when you hit single track the conga line is just going too slow.  In drier years there is a huge backup at the first creek crossing about two miles in as people try to tip-toe across and stay dry.  About year three I just learned to go around it and plow through.  This year, there was no trying to stay dry as it was 3' deep, so while it slowed down as people crossed there wasn't a big line.  The conga line I ended up in after that was just about right, if anything maybe 10 seconds/mile or so faster than I wanted to go, so I stepped off a couple of times to let people by.  There were six or seven creek crossings that hit from mid-calf to over the knee, and that obviously slowed things down.  And some sections were just super sloppy and you had to pick your way through the muck.  Imagine the wettest, muddiest trail you've been on, and then add almost 300 runners going through right before you mucking it up even more.  That was the first loop.  But I was happy with how it went, according to Strava it was my second fastest loop with an 11:09 pace (behind only a 10:38 pace in 2015 which was a dry year).  The only official timing split on the course was at the end of the loop, and I was 282nd out of 641 starters at that point.

We then headed through a meadow and start a pretty good drop down to Highway 49.  I got passed by 5-10 runners on the somewhat technical downhill (which was pretty much a creek in parts), which was a little disappointing.  Downhill isn't necessarily my strong suit, but I was taking it more cautiously than others.  I think the IT band issues I've had over the years have made me tentative and less willing to attack them, but I'm to the point now that my ITs are usually good until sometime after mile 50 so I shouldn't be such a wuss.  I also just need to practice technical downhilling more than I have been.  This two mile section drops about 800', and I ran it in 10:23 pace.

We crossed the highway where Western States legend Tim Twietmeyer and URP's Eric Schranz were cheering on the runners, and then dropped down on fire road to run above the roaring Middle Fork of the American River.  The rain even let up for the first time, and it looked like it might turn into a nice day as I took off my rain shell and stowed it in my pack.  The fire road rolls along here for about 6 miles with a couple of 150'-200' climbs mixed in.  I passed a few, got passed by a few, and chatted up a few runners.  This section was just another reminder that if I really want to cut my time on a course like this, I need to get faster on the runnable sections.  If I can comfortably run along at 9:00 pace instead of 10:00-10:30 on the flats, that will make a big difference.  With those little climbs mixed in, I ran a decent 11:19 pace through here.

I was looking forward to starting the climb out of the canyon, as that is my strong suit relative to most other mid-packers and I knew I'd start making up some ground.  Sure enough, I started chewing people up.  I even got three separate comments about how fast I was power hiking as I plowed past.  This section starts with about an 800' climb over four miles, rolls along for a bit, and then ends at almost exactly 26.2 miles with Goat Hill,  1/4 mile with a 20% grade.   I covered this 10 mile section in 2:09, a 12:53 pace.

Going into the race I had beating my PR of 5:54 as an A goal, and sub-6:00 as my B goal.  But with the weather forecast and trail conditions I decided to just take the day as it came and see where things stood when I got to the top of Goat Hill.  I didn't print out the pace chart, didn't even look at my watch for the first time until the end of the first loop, and rarely checked it throughout the day.  I hit the aid station at the top of the climb in about 5:10, filled a bottle and drank some coke, and kept going.  With five miles to go including the 450' climb from hwy 49 back to Cool still ahead, I knew it wasn't too likely that I could get in sub-6:00.  But I remembered that the course had measured closer to 30 than 31 miles on my GPS in the past.  "So you're telling me there's a chance!"  I decided to just charge on and see what I could do. 

After another quick climb it was a pretty steep technical descent, losing about 400' in a mile or so.  I did my best to pick my way through the rocks, mud, and water as it started to rain again.  I'm checking my watch as the traffic noises of Highway 49 start to pick up, but it always takes longer than you think it will to finally come out of the clearing and cross the road.  This is the final aid station, and I knew it was over a mile to the finish - and my PR time was already gone, as was the chance at sub-6:00.  So what, let's finish this thing!  I skipped the aid station and kept charging, and began the final climb up to Cool.  I passed another couple of runners on the 250' rocky climb, and then stomped through the mud in the meadow up top.  As I approached the finish I could hear someone splashing behind me, and I kept running hard to try and stay in front.  Around the corner, splashing through the mud while trying not to fall in front of the gathered spectators, and across the line in 6:06:08 chip time.  That was the fastest I've run that segment in my five times here, so I was happy to finish so strong even with my pre-race goals out the window.  This time the course measured the full 31 miles (it's shown exactly 30 miles twice before), which shows how far off gps can be during trail races.

Finished 238th out of 641 starters which means I moved up 44 spots from mile 8 to the finish, almost all of that on the climbs.  In looking at how I did relative to the rest of the field, this was actually my best finish at 37% percentile, with my other finishes ranging from 43%-67%.  So I have to be pretty happy with that.  I stuck to my nutrition plan of gels, electrolyte drink, and coke, and had no issues there.  My knee and my achilles held up. I somehow managed to not fall even once, although I did almost lose it during a late creek crossing.  Afterward it was some chili, burritos, and a couple of IPAs with fellow racers while we commiserated about the conditions out there and tried to get warm.  Good times.

 

Nicely executed Duck.

Gotta feel good with that beast looming in 7 months.

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Congrats on a great run, @SFBayDuck!  As a (mostly) road guy, all that mud and water sounds miserable to me, but kudos to you for grinding it out!

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9 hours ago, BassNBrew said:

Nicely executed Duck.

Gotta feel good with that beast looming in 7 months.

With Miwok in 8 weeks and San Diego 5 weeks after that, I’m not even thinking about Wasatch yet. Once I get through those I can bust out the wizard sticks and start doing technical hill repeats every weekend while looking for opportunities to get up to altitude. 

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@Juxtatarot, 21k on the treadmill this morning!  That's dedication.  Anything over an hour on the torture machine makes me want to eat a bullet.  Nice work.

 

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On 3/2/2019 at 2:18 PM, JAA said:

I don’t use Zwift, but some of the others here do. I prefer amazon prime

huh?

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Vacation to LA/SF came at a really nice time for life reasons but a really bad time for race reasons.  When I left last week, I was a few pounds heavier than my goal race weight (due partly, I think, due to more time in the gym), and when I got up this morning after the trip, I was a few pounds heavier than when we left.  :bag:  It doesn't seem to be affecting my running at all, but it's definitely messing with my head.  I hate the idea of trying to shed pounds when I'm gonna be tapering starting next week, but it is what it is...

Anyway, it was good to get outside for a few runs out there, even if 2/3 of them were in the pouring rain.  I guess it beats sub-zero wind chills.  :shrug: Yesterday morning I got up early and ran 8 miles from my hotel along San Francisco Bay and across the Golden Gate Bridge.  Got to the other side and snagged an Uber back to the hotel.  Cool run.

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4 minutes ago, gruecd said:

Vacation to LA/SF came at a really nice time for life reasons but a really bad time for race reasons.  When I left last week, I was a few pounds heavier than my goal race weight (due partly, I think, due to more time in the gym), and when I got up this morning after the trip, I was a few pounds heavier than when we left.  :bag:  It doesn't seem to be affecting my running at all, but it's definitely messing with my head.  I hate the idea of trying to shed pounds when I'm gonna be tapering starting next week, but it is what it is...

Anyway, it was good to get outside for a few runs out there, even if 2/3 of them were in the pouring rain.  I guess it beats sub-zero wind chills.  :shrug: Yesterday morning I got up early and ran 8 miles from my hotel along San Francisco Bay and across the Golden Gate Bridge.  Got to the other side and snagged an Uber back to the hotel.  Cool run.

This happens on almost every travel I take. And, it usually goes away after a few days. It's almost certainly temporary and will return to normal soon.

Edited by gianmarco

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On 3/3/2019 at 12:29 PM, SFBayDuck said:

 

And thoughts and prayers for a productive future BM.

I don't know who you prayed to but THANK YOU!!

:thumbup:

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Vacations are why I'm not making any fall racing plans until after they're passing us by.  Two week-long ones within seven weeks of each other and at least one long weekend wedged in between.  Could do all the right things between them and still be in a worse spot on the other side than going into them.  The whole point of a vacation is to recharge, so stressing myself out about decisions while vacationing wrt a race X weeks in the future strikes me as counter productive.

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New Clifton 1 arrived yesterday. Only 8 grams heavier than my Kinvara 10.  Way more cushion.  Way more ugly.  The upper is far less comfortable in the Clifton.  We'll see how they break in.  Was really dissappointed in how quickly the Kinvara wore down. 

 

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3 hours ago, MAC_32 said:

Vacations are why I'm not making any fall racing plans until after they're passing us by.  Two week-long ones within seven weeks of each other and at least one long weekend wedged in between.  Could do all the right things between them and still be in a worse spot on the other side than going into them.  The whole point of a vacation is to recharge, so stressing myself out about decisions while vacationing wrt a race X weeks in the future strikes me as counter productive.

#firstworldproblems

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####.

Did something this morning (I think it was picking up my little one) and got a sudden flank/abdominal strain.  Can barely move now or bend over. Wtf? 

Hopefully I can still run with this. :angry:

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2 hours ago, Brony said:

#firstworldproblems

Ha...too true #perspective

And speaking of #firstworldproblems, that weather today - ####### hell.  16, 20-25 mph wind, felt like -1, while snowing, but not hard enough for the annual ice beard pic.  There's one run per winter that's just miserable from beforehand until after and today was it.

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6 minutes ago, MAC_32 said:

There's one run per winter that's just isn't miserable from beforehand until after and today was it. I'm still waiting for it.

FYP.

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16 minutes ago, MAC_32 said:

Ha...too true #perspective

And speaking of #firstworldproblems, that weather today - ####### hell.  16, 20-25 mph wind, felt like -1, while snowing, but not hard enough for the annual ice beard pic.  There's one run per winter that's just miserable from beforehand until after and today was it.

Hoping tonight is my last true bad one. 22 degrees with 10 mph wind from the NW. Gotta go my 3x2 miles at MP - 10, and I just can't go on a treadmill again for this speed work. Some lady last night got on the treadmill next to me and proceeded to drop mud for the next hour. :censored:

Warming trend coming here for this weekend. Supposed to be upper 40's and low 50's by the weekend. This warm weather better Hurry The Fooook Up. 

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27 minutes ago, MAC_32 said:

Ha...too true #perspective

And speaking of #firstworldproblems, that weather today - ####### hell.  16, 20-25 mph wind, felt like -1, while snowing, but not hard enough for the annual ice beard pic.  There's one run per winter that's just miserable from beforehand until after and today was it.

'round these parts we just call that winter, pard. and it lasts 16 months a year.

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11 hours ago, matttyl said:

huh?

I watch movies/series while on my trainer. None of the group ride stuff

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Tonight was a good run. 1.5 mile warm up, then 3x2 miles at MP-10 seconds. So my marathon pace to get under 4 hours would be 9:09. So these segments should be around 8:59 pace. It was really cold tonight. Segments were GREAT.

Segment 1: 8:26 pace. 162 HR

Segment 2: 8:38 pace. 162 HR

Segment 3: 8:43 pace. 161 HR

That heart rate jives with my marathon data from the previous two marathons. So this was a good day. Been eating everything in sight for the last week - this is a huge component for me. That has been my bugaboo in the past. Trying to ramp this up big time, and it does make a difference.

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8 hours ago, ChiefD said:

Tonight was a good run. 1.5 mile warm up, then 3x2 miles at MP-10 seconds. So my marathon pace to get under 4 hours would be 9:09. So these segments should be around 8:59 pace. It was really cold tonight. Segments were GREAT.

Segment 1: 8:26 pace. 162 HR

Segment 2: 8:38 pace. 162 HR

Segment 3: 8:43 pace. 161 HR

That heart rate jives with my marathon data from the previous two marathons. So this was a good day. Been eating everything in sight for the last week - this is a huge component for me. That has been my bugaboo in the past. Trying to ramp this up big time, and it does make a difference.

What’s your nutrition plan for marathon week? Have you tested it during a regular week?  I’m going to shift to mostly carbs the last few days like I did last year. 

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Perspective (to a runner). When your (insert body part) feels ‘better’ bc another body part is now talking to you.  In my case last week or so I’ve had a right glute that overtook my left groin for niggle of the month I need to manage. Had to cancel PT last week with snow and school and work stuff so going today, hoping for the needles, cups and the kitchen sink treatment. 

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12 hours ago, JAA said:

I watch movies/series while on my trainer. None of the group ride stuff

oh, ok.  You nearly just blew my mind thinking that Amazon had some bike trainer program via prime or something.  I occasionally will do a netflix show or a podcast while I'm riding. 

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11 hours ago, ChiefD said:

Tonight was a good run. 1.5 mile warm up, then 3x2 miles at MP-10 seconds.

I have a "Strength Interval" training run next Tuesday which calls for 6x1.5km (~1mi) at MP-10.  

10 seconds off a mile equates to about 7 seconds off a KM.  There is no way I can run that precisely.  Best I can differentiate between generally is around 20 seconds/km (30 seconds/mile).  Maybe I can be this precise on the treadmill, but with the prescribed 3km WU and 3km CD, that's 18km (~11mi).  And anything over 10km on the treadmill makes me go insane.  

Can anyone run this precisely by feel or with a watch?   My watch isn't even that precise.  It'll bounce around +/- 10sec/km just from random variation...

Edited by Zasada

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3 minutes ago, Zasada said:

Can anyone run this precisely by feel or even with a watch?   

I think I'm in the minority, but in the long run I think you'd be best off trying to figure it out without the assistance of technology.  You'll screw them up on occasion, going both ways, but those are just learning experiences.  Don't spend your time and energy worrying about a device mid-workout, spend it focusing on the actual workout then let the data and your body tell the story afterwards.

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4 minutes ago, Zasada said:

 

Can anyone run this precisely by feel or even with a watch?   My watch isn't even that precise.  It'll bounce around +/- 10sec/km just from random variation...

The secret is using an average pace field on a watch.  You're right that there is random variation in real time but it starts getting pretty accurate as an average over distance.  A lot of us set up auto lap every mile and focus on average lap pace.  I don't worry about it much in the first few tenths of a mile as that will be somewhat inaccurate anyway but after that I know if I should speed up a little or can slow down a little depending on what the average has been.  You can hit goal paces pretty accurately this way.

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2 hours ago, Juxtatarot said:

What’s your nutrition plan for marathon week? Have you tested it during a regular week?  I’m going to shift to mostly carbs the last few days like I did last year. 

I will start carb loading probably on Tuesday. Then will lay off the fibers (salads and such) starting on Wednesday.

Thursday: Travel day for me. We will stop for lunch somewhere on the way. Also my wife's birthday, so we are going to St. Elmo's for a nice steak dinner. So that will be a good protein and carb load with a nice steak and baked potato.

Friday lunch: Heavy pasta load.

Friday dinner: Light pasta or possibly some chicken breast/baked potato or rice

Been doing a similar eating pattern since I started base building last summer. So it has worked pretty good. With my stomach issues I feel good about my diet and how my GI trac will respond.

Just need to make sure I eat enough of it. 

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Just now, Juxtatarot said:

The secret is using an average pace field on a watch.  You're right that there is random variation in real time but it starts getting pretty accurate as an average over distance.  A lot of us set up auto lap every mile and focus on average lap pace.  I don't worry about it much in the first few tenths of a mile as that will be somewhat inaccurate anyway but after that I know if I should speed up a little or can slow down a little depending on what the average has been.  You can hit goal paces pretty accurately this way.

Yeah on long runs I can manage this but when a run calls for segments as short as 1.5km at a given pace, followed by a 500m jog, the averages don't help too much.  By the time I get my first km of feedback, I'm almost done that segment.  

Also I'm not sure why my run is calling for intervals at (basically) MP.  I could do the whole run at MP-10 easily without requiring mid-run jogs.  :shrug:

I'll just continue to trust the plan and do what it tells me, I guess!

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