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Venezuela Thread

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24 minutes ago, msommer said:

Frankndore disagrees

Yeah I know hes a fan. We likely see the world very similarly. I cant judge him too hard just for him liking something I don't. Someone set me straight a while ago regarding that.

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3 minutes ago, Dedfin said:

Yeah I know hes a fan. We likely see the world very similarly. I cant judge him too hard just for him liking something I don't. Someone set me straight a while ago regarding that.

Venezuelans deserve to be free. As do we all in my book. 

Unfortunately there is a dictator ruling Venezuela that is deeply indebted to Russia.  He is starving his populace while repressing the popular will.  Russia is fueling a propaganda campaign both here and abroad.  Only his strategic allies like Russia (and their supporters here) will not acknowledge the situation.   Again, there has not been an economic collapse is modern day history like has happened in Venezuela. 

This is a complete disaster, but the anti-american news outlets are using it as some type of point.  Very sad

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4 hours ago, ren hoek said:

You can also see why the US handpicked him.  He’ll be a good little puppet for Abrams and Bolton.  It’s amazing how transparent and blatant this is, yet people still choose to gaslight me and Frank.  

But not for Trump himself? So odd to exclude him from that equation.

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On 3/5/2019 at 2:22 AM, SaintsInDome2006 said:

But not for Trump himself? So odd to exclude him from that equation.

No, Trump too.  I believe I’ve included Trump many times in the equation.  It’s why I said people supporting Guaido’s coup are the real Trump supporters.  

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https://twitter.com/maxblumenthal/status/1103372830144630785?s=21

Washington getting nervous as its coup plot in Venezuela flounders: "The longer Maduro is able to remain in power amid the sanctions, the more likely it is that Caracas will be able to find alternative buyers of its heavy crude oil."

Russian oil imports surge in US as Venezuela’s slow to a trickle

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17 hours ago, ren hoek said:

Isn’t Guaido’s 30 days up? 

This part is confusing. It is supposed to be 30 days, which I think ended this past weekend or the week before. However I believe the presidency of the Assembly is supposed to rotate every year between the 4 major parties, and this year is Guaido's party, so in that respect he is still president of the Assembly, which is the only legally elected leader in the country, still.

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Nationwide! power outage still going since yesterday afternoon. I'm a county without enough food or medicine, the lack of electricity won't help matters.

Let's just hope there's no widespread looting or violent crime.

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This is why Maduro must go. 

Inept and corrupt us no way to go through life, son.

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Still a blackout?

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Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, Bucky86 said:

Still a blackout?

I thought I seen you tube clips of people in Venezuela showing the situation is being overblown.  By people I mean journalists.  Any truth there?

Edited by IC FBGCav

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6 hours ago, IC FBGCav said:

I thought I seen you tube clips of people in Venezuela showing the situation is being overblown.  By people I mean journalists.  Any truth there?

My father in law just checked in after 50+ hours without power. He's says they expect the outage to last 7 days more.

He is without clean water as well. I'm not sure the amount of food he has on hand. 

He is the the chief of medicine at a public hospital (not in Caracas), so I think he knows what the deal is.

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1 minute ago, The Z Machine said:

My father in law just checked in after 50+ hours without power. He's says they expect the outage to last 7 days more.

He is without clean water as well. I'm not sure the amount of food he has on hand. 

He is the the chief of medicine at a public hospital (not in Caracas), so I think he knows what the deal is.

Wow, ty.

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9 minutes ago, The Z Machine said:

My father in law just checked in after 50+ hours without power. He's says they expect the outage to last 7 days more.

He is without clean water as well. I'm not sure the amount of food he has on hand. 

He is the the chief of medicine at a public hospital (not in Caracas), so I think he knows what the deal is.

Is your FIL for a regime change by force?

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One of the things that has happened with the blackout is that no one can buy any of the food that isn't spoiled unless they have hard currency ($USD, maybe Colombian peso if you're near the border). Transactions are being done via credit and debit card, but without power, they can't do any electronic fund transfers.  Good you have dollars, but then you become a target of crime.

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1 minute ago, IC FBGCav said:

Is your FIL for a regime change by force?

I haven't asked honestly. The family talks about safety, food, water and how they can charge their phones, but about regime change right now.

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Just now, The Z Machine said:

I haven't asked honestly. The family talks about safety, food, water and how they can charge their phones, but about regime change right now.

Those are the most important things it seems by far now.

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There was even talk about how to get him across the border into Colombia if it comes to that.

I can't believe he decided to go back...

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1 hour ago, IC FBGCav said:

Those are the most important things it seems by far now.

True, but at some point people will grow even more desperate and then regime change will be inevitable if they feel like thats the only way they'll survive.

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, Bucky86 said:

True, but at some point people will grow even more desperate and then regime change will be inevitable if they feel like thats the only way they'll survive.

Unfortunately I am ignorant to why there this a blackout.  Care to sum things up for me.  I saw a video of people shopping in Caracas a week ago in a grocery store filled with food, streamed that day, with many people shopping.  Unfortunately that is all I have recently.  TIA.

Edited by IC FBGCav

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1 minute ago, IC FBGCav said:

Unfortunately I am ignorant to why there this a backout.  Care to sum things up for me.  I saw a video of people shopping in Caracas a week ago in a grocery store filled with food, streamed that day, with many people shopping.  Unfortunately that is all I have recently.  TIA.

Good question. Everyone is the blaming the other side. 

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29 minutes ago, Bucky86 said:

Good question. Everyone is the blaming the other side. 

The situation in Caracas is different than in the rest of the country. While my wife ha has cousins in Caracas, her father lives in Maracaibo.  Even in these terrible times, if you had access to dollars in Caracas you could buy food and live ok. In other parts of the country, it wasn't so easy.

While I don't know the root cause of the blackout, it's likely due to poor maintenance and investment in the infrastructure. Venezuela gets most of its electricity from hydro power, and the turbines that beverage the electricity have become more and more unreliable. The government can't afford replacement parts and the experts that know the equipment have likely fled the country like many with transferable skills and means to leave.

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2 minutes ago, The Z Machine said:

The situation in Caracas is different than in the rest of the country. While my wife ha has cousins in Caracas, her father lives in Maracaibo.  Even in these terrible times, if you had access to dollars in Caracas you could buy food and live ok. In other parts of the country, it wasn't so easy.

While I don't know the root cause of the blackout, it's likely due to poor maintenance and investment in the infrastructure. Venezuela gets most of its electricity from hydro power, and the turbines that beverage the electricity have become more and more unreliable. The government can't afford replacement parts and the experts that know the equipment have likely fled the country like many with transferable skills and means to leave.

Wow, incredible amount of information here.  Didn't know the workers bailed on the country.  Brutal.

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2 minutes ago, The Z Machine said:

The situation in Caracas is different than in the rest of the country. While my wife ha has cousins in Caracas, her father lives in Maracaibo.  Even in these terrible times, if you had access to dollars in Caracas you could buy food and live ok. In other parts of the country, it wasn't so easy.

While I don't know the root cause of the blackout, it's likely due to poor maintenance and investment in the infrastructure. Venezuela gets most of its electricity from hydro power, and the turbines that beverage the electricity have become more and more unreliable. The government can't afford replacement parts and the experts that know the equipment have likely fled the country like many with transferable skills and means to leave.

Yeah, I read Maduro is blaming the U.S. and it's allies. While Guaido was blaming the current corrupt government. 

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49 minutes ago, IC FBGCav said:

Wow, incredible amount of information here.  Didn't know the workers bailed on the country.  Brutal.

When your pay is worth 1/2 of what is was at the end of each week there should be no surprise highly skilled workers are finding other places to be.  Somewhat related - I was in Inverness a couple years ago and learned that there is a pretty big enclave of Venezuelans there - highly skilled oilfield workers.  I wouldn't be surprised that was true in a lot of other oil patches.

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Posted (edited)
19 minutes ago, Sand said:

When your pay is worth 1/2 of what is was at the end of each week there should be no surprise highly skilled workers are finding other places to be.  Somewhat related - I was in Inverness a couple years ago and learned that there is a pretty big enclave of Venezuelans there - highly skilled oilfield workers.  I wouldn't be surprised that was true in a lot of other oil patches.

While many workers may be skilled, it can't be easy to just pick up your whole family and leave.  We know those workers won't be coming here, so is there other big oil in the area?

Edited by IC FBGCav

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19 minutes ago, Sand said:

When your pay is worth 1/2 of what is was at the end of each week there should be no surprise highly skilled workers are finding other places to be.  Somewhat related - I was in Inverness a couple years ago and learned that there is a pretty big enclave of Venezuelans there - highly skilled oilfield workers.  I wouldn't be surprised that was true in a lot of other oil patches.

A few years ago, Venezuelans in the US had the highest income and education levels per capita of any Latin American immigrant group, and it wasn't close. It was a middle income country in the 80s.

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5 minutes ago, IC FBGCav said:

While many workers may be skilled, it can't be easy to just pick up your whole family and leave.  We know those workers won't be coming here, so is there other big oil in the area?

Mexico is a big exporter.

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Just now, Sand said:

Mexico is a big exporter.

Doesn't seem many open slots there since they are all trying to get in here.

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Aaron Maté @aaronjmate

Last month, US & Venezuelan coup plotters made false claims, amplified by US media, that Maduro gov't forces burnt aid. 

@MaxBlumenthal & other independent journos immediately pushed back. 

Two weeks later, NYT follows suit.

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Posted (edited)
49 minutes ago, ren hoek said:

Aaron Maté @aaronjmate

Last month, US & Venezuelan coup plotters made false claims, amplified by US media, that Maduro gov't forces burnt aid. 

@MaxBlumenthal & other independent journos immediately pushed back. 

Two weeks later, NYT follows suit.

Quote

 

Unpublished footage obtained by The New York Times and previously released tapes — including footage released by the Colombian government, which has blamed Mr. Maduro for the fire — allowed for a reconstruction of the incident. It suggests that a Molotov cocktail thrown by an antigovernment protester was the most likely trigger for the blaze.

At one point, a homemade bomb made from a bottle is hurled toward the police, who were blocking a bridge connecting Colombia and Venezuela to prevent the aid trucks from getting through.

But the rag used to light the Molotov cocktail separates from the bottle, flying toward the aid truck instead.

Half a minute later, that truck is in flames.

The same protester can be seen 20 minutes earlier, in a different video, hitting another truck with a Molotov cocktail, without setting it on fire.

...Many of Mr. Maduro’s critics claim that he ordered medication set on fire during the border standoff — even though many of his people have died of medicine shortages in hospitals.

Yet the claim about a shipment of medicine, too, appears to be unsubstantiated, according to videos and interviews.

The United States Agency for International Development, the principal supplier of the aid at the bridge, did not list medicine among its donations. A top opposition official on the bridge that day told The New York Times that the burned shipment contained medical supplies like face masks and gloves, but not medicine. And video clips reviewed by The Times show some of the boxes contained hygiene kits, which the Americans identified as containing supplies like soap and toothpaste.

...

The aid shipment created a showdown unlike any on the border between Colombia and Venezuela in years.

On Feb. 23, Venezuela’s opposition planned to pierce a military blockade by Mr. Maduro, hoping that the president’s security forces would break with him rather than stop much-needed aid. They argued that a cascade of defections in the military would follow, eventually toppling the government.

Instead, Mr. Maduro’s security forces, along with government-aligned gangs, attacked protesters, who came armed with rocks and Molotov cocktails. One of the aid trucks burned in the melee, igniting the bitter war of words over who was responsible.

Mr. Maduro’s government has also made unsubstantiated claims, starting with its longstanding insistence that there are no food shortages in Venezuela.

It also claimed that the aid shipment contained expired supplies or American weapons....

 

- NYT

Edited by SaintsInDome2006

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Posted (edited)
Quote

 

On the Santander bridge this February 23, the guarimberos rained down a hail of rocks and molotov cocktails on Venezuelan national guardsmen holding the line against the USAID trucks. Suddenly, the trucks caught fire and the masked youth began unloading boxes of aid before they burned. Within minutes, pro-opposition media reported that the Venezuelan national guard forces were responsible for the fires.

A reporter for the private anti-government channel NTN24 claimed without evidence that the Venezuelan security forces had caused the fires with tear gas...

 

- Blumenthal.

-This gets a little Benghaziish, and I don't mean that in a bad way. I mean it in the sense it was confusing on the ground in real time. Sounds like the protesters were hurling molotovs and rocks at the VZ guard force, and the guard force was by the trucks, and they hit the trucks.

Edited by SaintsInDome2006

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Only in America!  :lmao:

 

Quote

 

Marco Rubio‏Verified account @marcorubio

Today another transformer explosion at the German Dam in Bolivar State caused another massive blackout. The result? Critically ill patients have died, the #Caracas metro remains out of service & few if any flights have arrived at or departed from Caracas in over 20 hours.

 

 

Quote

 

Germán Dam‏Verified account @GEDV86

Germán Dam Retweeted Marco Rubio

Senator @marcorubio, an important transformer exploded in Bolívar and that, in part, again collapsed the Venezuelan Electric System; however it was not in a dam, much less german. My name is Germán Dam, I am one of the journalists who published the information.

 

 

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That's actually petty funny.

My father in law has been working to get small generators set up in the hospital so that his patients can get dialysis.

He actually thinks the number of deaths reported is too high, suspects it's like 100 country wide.

However, he thinks that the outage might last "weeks" in Maracaibo. Without electricity they can't run pumps to move gasoline. Without gasoline they cannot even use small generators. And as I said before unless you have access to hard currency, you're not buying anything.  I can't imagine going weeks like that. Horrific.

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Today was mission Sunday at our church and we had a Venezuelan missionary talk about how horrific things were.  I can't imagine living in such an environment.

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I looked at cnn and foxnews and neither had anything on this.  Ridiculous.

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25 minutes ago, rascal said:

I looked at cnn and foxnews and neither had anything on this.  Ridiculous.

A true humanitarian crisis. Check out Reuters: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-venezuela-politics/nerves-fray-tempers-flare-as-venezuela-blackout-hits-fourth-day-idUSKBN1QR0M8

  • Authorities have managed to provide only patchy access to power since the outage began on Thursday in what President Nicolas Maduro called an act of U.S.-backed sabotage, but critics insist it is the result of incompetence and corruption.
  • “The food we had in our refrigerators has spoiled, businesses are closed, there’s no communication, not even by cell phone,” Ana Cerrato, 49, a merchant, standing in front of a pile of razor wire and debris.
  • Families stood under the sun to buy potable water, which is unavailable for most residents whose homes do not have power.
  • State oil company PDVSA said on Sunday that fuel supplies were guaranteed. But only around 100 of the country’s 1,800 service stations were operating due to the blackout, according to gas station industry sources.
  • Merchants unable to keep refrigerators working began giving away cheese, vegetables and meat to clients.
  • One supermarket in southeastern Caracas was looted on Sunday evening, triggering a shootout with police and National Guard troops, according to Reuters witnesses and an employee who was present. The looters took food including pasta, rice and tomato sauce.
  • At Venezuelan hospitals, the blackout combined with the absence or poor performance of backup generators led to the death of 17 patients across the country, non-governmental organization Doctors for Health said on Saturday.
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Footage Contradicts U.S. Claim That Maduro Burned Aid Convoy - The New York Times. It appears to have been an accident caused by the opposition's Molotov cocktail. Maduro is a bad guy, no need to enhance the narrative.

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1 hour ago, SoBeDad said:

Footage Contradicts U.S. Claim That Maduro Burned Aid Convoy - The New York Times. It appears to have been an accident caused by the opposition's Molotov cocktail. Maduro is a bad guy, no need to enhance the narrative.

Agreed.

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15 hours ago, SoBeDad said:
  • At Venezuelan hospitals, the blackout combined with the absence or poor performance of backup generators led to the death of 17 patients across the country, non-governmental organization Doctors for Health said on Saturday.

Surprised it isn't way more.  Mind boggling the damage Chavez/Maduro has inflicted on this country.

On top of all this the claims against the country keep mounting - a new 8B ruling against it by Conoco due to the nationalization of its assets.

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37 minutes ago, gianmarco said:

:lmao:

If this was a movie - Rubio would simply be the running gag

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Anyway, if you care about the Venezuelan people, this Saturday

@answercoalition

is leading a protest against the coup and sanctions in DC. 92% of Venezuelans are not in favor of military invasion and 86.5% rejected US sanctions.

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