OrtonToOlsen

American Dialect Survey/Map (again)

How accurate were your results?   103 members have voted

  1. 1. On a scale of 1-5 with 5 being the most accurate.

    • 5...almost dead on
      67
    • 4...very close but a little off
      23
    • 3...somewhat close but not great
      5
    • 2...not very close at all
      6
    • 1....way way off
      2

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229 posts in this topic

1 minute ago, Doug B said:

The Wiki article for these things is under "woodlouse", and I've run across that usage before. Who calls them woodlice -- the British?

I believe Woodlouse is the larger family and that sow bugs and pill bugs are distinct species.

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Grew up in Boston, college in Worcester, working in Providence. 

Three for three.  Voted 5.  

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11 hours ago, Henry Ford said:

Yeah, that's a normal use of it.  Same as "akimbo."

What is "a martial art practiced by southern drunks?"

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Even though my three cities were too far north (Aurora, Rockford, Madison), the darkest red part cut a swath through west central Illinois, which is where I've lived 95% of my life.  Uncanny.  

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I got Fremont, Corona, San Jose. :lol: Corona is an odd distinction.

West Coaster pretty much all my life. And I didn't see a lot of the questions "you guys" got.

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1 hour ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

What's weird is that very few people around here even know there's a name for "frontage roads".  The only reason I called them that is that back when I delivered pizzas we used olde tyme gas station maps.  A lot of them used the term "frontage road". :shrug: 

I had never even seen an access road/frontage road until I moved to Texas. We don't really have them here. In Texas, there are access roads running parallel to almost all Interstates and major highways.

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Apparently it doesn't work on Canadians ;)

It's dark red for most of the map for me. California, Nevada, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, Wyoming, Minnesota, New York,  and Florida are the most densely red. The three cities it picked for me are Aurora, Colorado, and Jacksonville and Orlando. The cities least like me included Akron and Cleveland and yet I live just across the lake from them.

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Posted (edited)

35 minutes ago, cap'n grunge said:

You have a lot of bugs in that post. But the grey/dark grey ones are the ones the survey is referring to. Otherwise known as roly poly's to me. :)

 

https://www.google.ca/search?client=ms-android-verizon&biw=1536&bih=736&tbm=isch&sa=1&q=roly+poly&oq=roly+poly&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0i67k1l2j0l2.89444.90746.0.91193.9.9.0.0.0.0.103.816.7j2.9.0....0...1.1.64.psy-ab..0.9.815.ywALULW3ysU

Edited by SkyRattlers
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17 minutes ago, SkyRattlers said:

Apparently it doesn't work on Canadians ;)

It's dark red for most of the map for me. California, Nevada, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, Wyoming, Minnesota, New York,  and Florida are the most densely red. The three cities it picked for me are Aurora, Colorado, and Jacksonville and Orlando. The cities least like me included Akron and Cleveland and yet I live just across the lake from them.

What do you call a large piece of furniture that sits in the family room or living room? A) Couch, B) Davenport, C) Chesterfield

How do pronounce the word "about"? A) Rhymes with "out" or "lout", B) rhymes with "boot" or "loot".

What do you call the first year of school after Kindergarten? A) First Grade, B) Grade 1.

 

If you answered anything but A to all of the above, you are Canadian.

 

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Spot on

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Quiz said I was from the area around DC.

I was born just outside Chicago and have lived most of my life in northern Georgia. 

My parents were both from New York. 

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I answere3ed as I was raised and it nailed my location.  The thing is, I know not to say "bubbler" or "davenport" in Upstate N.Y or Colorado, of Minnesota.  Today my common usages would have me in Colorado.  there was a time when I would have recorded upstate N.Y. and at a different time Minnesota.  I'm adaptable to my environment. 

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Grew up in central NJ and lived the last 25 or so years in upstate NY (Ithaca).  My three cities are Philadelphia, Newark/Paterson, and Rochester, with me pretty much right in the middle of the red.  Impressive.

It's also interesting to me that I've picked up some things from my wife from Michigan while some things I would never change (and she does the same thing - adjusting only some language).  I think the way I used to pronounce "water" sounds pretty stupid now, but it'll always be soda instead of pop, sneakers instead of tennis shoes, and merry/Mary/marry are three different words with three different pronunciations, dammit.  That's the one I'm always the most surprised at for being basically only a NJ thing.

 

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4 minutes ago, jhib said:

Grew up in central NJ and lived the last 25 or so years in upstate NY (Ithaca).  My three cities are Philadelphia, Newark/Paterson, and Rochester, with me pretty much right in the middle of the red.  Impressive.

It's also interesting to me that I've picked up some things from my wife from Michigan while some things I would never change (and she does the same thing - adjusting only some language).  I think the way I used to pronounce "water" sounds pretty stupid now, but it'll always be soda instead of pop, sneakers instead of tennis shoes, and merry/Mary/marry are three different words with three different pronunciations, dammit.  That's the one I'm always the most surprised at for being basically only a NJ thing.

 

Really? Those sound the same to some people?

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1 minute ago, Gamma1210 said:

Really? Those sound the same to some people?

:yes:

Weird, huh?  I guess it's some other places in the northeast that are there with NJ, but we're in the minority on this one.

I think to most people, all three are like how you most likely pronounce "Mary."  At least that's how it is with my wife's family.

 

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3 minutes ago, jhib said:

:yes:

Weird, huh?  I guess it's some other places in the northeast that are there with NJ, but we're in the minority on this one.

I think to most people, all three are like how you most likely pronounce "Mary."  At least that's how it is with my wife's family.

 

I can't think of any other way to pronounce it.

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26 minutes ago, Gamma1210 said:

Really? Those sound the same to some people?

They are all exactly the same.

Do you say "Meeeeery Christmas?"   "Will you mahrr-ee me?"  "Mahry had a little lamb?"

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3 hours ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

They are all exactly the same.

Do you say "Meeeeery Christmas?"   "Will you mahrr-ee me?"  "Mahry had a little lamb?"

No, it's much more straight forward than that (in my mind, anyway).

Mary: a like in "mare" or "care"

Merry: short e, like in "net"

Marry: short a, like in "cat"

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19 hours ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

I  used catty-corner when I was a kid sometimes.

 

19 hours ago, Steve Tasker said:

Catty-corner is an old-person saying here.  I usually say diagonal.

Yep. Checks out.

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Mine came back Fort Wayne, Rockford, Overland Park.  Grew up near Fort Wayne, but there's a pretty wide band of red across Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri.

Least similar were all in Mass: Springfield, Worcester and Boston

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32 minutes ago, jhib said:

No, it's much more straight forward than that (in my mind, anyway).

Mary: a like in "mare" or "care"

Merry: short e, like in "net"

Marry: short a, like in "cat"

Weird. All are pronounced like the first.

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my computer shut down when one of the questions said "rhymes with dawn" :mellow:  

 

3 different ways to say mary/merry/marry :lmao:  

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7 minutes ago, cap'n grunge said:

Weird. All are pronounced like the first.

Yeah, that's why my in-laws look at me like I'm crazy when the topic comes up. But I still think it's much weirder that they would all be pronounced the same way. 

By the way, it's the same with ferry and fairy - two different pronunciations (ferry like my merry, fairy like my Mary).

My little niece on my wife's side just recently showed us something she wrote that included "chairy pie." I told my wife she'd have had a better chance of spelling it right if she pronounced it like I do.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Most similar were Newark, NJ, Lancaster, PA, and Springfield, Massachusetts. 

My band of red was the Northeast, which is where I grew up. The article said my use of the word "rotary" gave my Hartford/SPFLD roots away. 

Edited by rockaction

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1 hour ago, jhib said:

No, it's much more straight forward than that (in my mind, anyway).

Mary: a like in "mare" or "care"

Merry: short e, like in "net"

Marry: short a, like in "cat"

Sounds tedious. 

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Detroit, Toledo, Grand Rapids.  100% accurate.

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Overland Park

Omaha

Aurora 

 

i voted 5

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Just now, Nugget said:

Overland Park

Omaha

Aurora 

 

i voted 5

Did New Granada show up?

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It picked a couple of cities about 50 miles from my hometown.

Close enough.

 

I guess "yard sale" was the determining factor.

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37 minutes ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

Did New Granada show up?

No.  But I did grow up on Granada St in Prairie Village and I am currently in a hotel in Grenada, MS. 

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6 minutes ago, Nugget said:

No.  But I did grow up on Granada St in Prairie Village and I am currently in a hotel in Grenada, MS. 

A kid who tells on another kid is a dead kid.

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3 minutes ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

A kid who tells on another kid is a dead kid.

I watched Breaking Away last week. 

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Nailed it. Nailed my wife too you bastage.

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got me in milwaukee perfectly bromigo im pretty sure it was the word bubbler take that to the bank brohan

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11 hours ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

A kid who tells on another kid is a dead kid.

i've been jokingly reinforcing this with my kids since they were little

my 6 year old might be taking it a little too literally :oldunsure: 

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14 hours ago, jhib said:

No, it's much more straight forward than that (in my mind, anyway).

Mary: a like in "mare" or "care"

Merry: short e, like in "net"

Marry: short a, like in "cat"

Around here, "Mary" and "merry" are the same:

Mary: short e, like in "net"

Merry: short e, like in "net"

Marry: short a, like in "cat"

...

I only noticed as an adult that anyone pronounced "Mary" as how I'd pronounce "mare-ee". "Fairy" and "dairy" also use the short "e" in "net". Yet our "hairy" is different -- it's like your "Mary".

 

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14 hours ago, cap'n grunge said:

Weird. All are pronounced like the first.

So the words all sound the same in this sentence

Merry Christmas! Did you hear your Aunt (ant) Mary got married lat week?

 

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9 minutes ago, Gamma1210 said:

So the words all sound the same in this sentence

Merry Christmas! Did you hear your Aunt (ant) Mary got married lat week?

 

Don't be ridiculous.

Christmas sounds nothing like "got", for instance.

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I've never knowingly heard "marry" pronounced like "mare-ee", even though I work with people from all over the U.S. It could well have slipped past me. Might need to get cap'n grunge or OrtonToOlsen on the horn and hear this for myself.

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