Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums
dorno

What's your age and the value of your 401k?

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, ghostguy123 said:

Poll option for average net worth of people with kids vs. people without kids.  I would retire at 40 if we didnt have kids.

Then again we may have blown more on other stuff.  Who knows.

Oh, I’d definitely be retired. My wife is a spender and that’s not hard when she’s doing well like now, but with one income and 3 kids, it wasn’t easy and I do well.

Even just small stuff like eating out or even picking up food due to sports after school. With 5 of us, even the local pizza place is $40. Every activity or sport is hundreds of dollars. They go through clothes and shoes (my youngest literally chews through shoes).

Just by being able to invest more of my income earlier to take advantage of this ridiculous bull run, I know I’d be rolling. I know I’ve been more conservative at times in terms of stocks just because I was always worries about being the only source of income.

I only hope I last long enough to enjoy my retirement and hopefully, grandkids.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Capella said:

So I use the tsp for one fund and have part of it a Dow Jones tracker. Dow was up 1.16% today and my index only just posted share prices that jumped about .25%. Anybody have any insight as to why that could be?

What Dow Jones tracker in the TSP? 

C fund was up a little less than 1% today

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, KCitons said:

What fund is the money in the tsp?

C and S but referring to the S here. Shares only went up .16; seems it should have went up around .55

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, -OZ- said:

What Dow Jones tracker in the TSP? 

C fund was up a little less than 1% today

C tracks the S&P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, -OZ- said:

What Dow Jones tracker in the TSP? 

C fund was up a little less than 1% today

The S Fund invests in a stock index fund that tracks the Dow Jones U.S. Completion Total Stock Market Index. 

Edited by Capella

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Capella said:

C and S but referring to the S here. Shares only went up .16; seems it should have went up around .55

I don't have an answer for you. I've tried to look at mine (through Personal Capital) and it's not showing any data. So, maybe there is some type of reporting glitch. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Capella said:

The S Fund invests in a stock index fund that tracks the Dow Jones U.S. Completion Total Stock Market Index. 

I might have read your post wrong. It sounded like you were asking why the TSP didn't match the Dow Jones industrial. The Dow Jones U.S. Completion Total Stock Market Index was up 0.28% today. S fund seems to have matched it (close anyway)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, -OZ- said:

I might have read your post wrong. It sounded like you were asking why the TSP didn't match the Dow Jones industrial. The Dow Jones U.S. Completion Total Stock Market Index was up 0.28% today. S fund seems to have matched it (close anyway)

:bag: seemed to usually match the industrial close enough. Figured it was that. Never paid it that much attention. The share was up 28% on the year so figured it was one and the same. 

Edited by Capella
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
53 minutes ago, wilked said:

I would suggest increasing your retirement savings at that salary level. Back off on 529 if you need to (can borrow for college but can’t borrow for retirement)

 

$19.5x2 = $39k (401k)

$6x2=12k (Backdoor Roth)  you should do 2019 and 2020

any HSA avail for you? 

We max out the HSA as well.  Just got access to that 2yrs ago.

My wife stays home with the kids so there isn't a way to do $19.5 x 2, right?  I am doing the $19.5 on my end but how would I get any pre-tax money in for her?

Edited by FreeBaGeL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you retired folks and those planning to retire early have in mind for health insurance (costs)?

I think I'm on track for retirement at 60, or even early, but this is a huge cost that scares me.

Does anyone have a good model for 65+ medical (care & insurance) costs?

  • Thinking 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Dragons said:

What do you retired folks and those planning to retire early have in mind for health insurance (costs)?

I think I'm on track for retirement at 60, or even early, but this is a huge cost that scares me.

Does anyone have a good model for 65+ medical (care & insurance) costs?

I’ve mentioned before that people worried about medical costs in retirement should consider 5 years of federal government employment. That’s all that’s needed to carry medical insurance through retirement. I assume state governments have similar offers but not sure about that. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, FreeBaGeL said:

We max out the HSA as well.  Just got access to that 2yrs ago.

My wife stays home with the kids so there isn't a way to do $19.5 x 2, right?  I am doing the $19.5 on my end but how would I get any pre-tax money in for her?

Ahh, didn’t realize single income. You are right then, max 401k and max Roth. Max hsa and don’t spend (treat it same as retirement funds) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Walking Boot said:

 

Had an ex who's dad died of a massive coronary the very first day of his retirement. Awful.

That's nuts.  My dad made it a little over a year.   Worked until he was 69 in large part b/c that's all he really did and died a few weeks after his 70th.   

Edited by NutterButter
  • Sad 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, dgreen said:

I’ve mentioned before that people worried about medical costs in retirement should consider 5 years of federal government employment. That’s all that’s needed to carry medical insurance through retirement. I assume state governments have similar offers but not sure about that. 

I think its just the pre-medicare years that are really the big unknown.  Once you're on medicare along with supplemental, you have a pretty solid idea. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, James Daulton said:

One other thing.  If I keel over before I get to really enjoy retirement I'm going to be royally pissed.

:rant:

Yep. I’ve never understood why people with good paying jobs insist on working themselves to death while they’re young and able-bodied; better to accumulate experiences through travel, etc. before you get too old. Retiring with all the money in the world won’t buy back your youth/health.

I’d rather work part time and delay retirement.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Terminalxylem said:

Yep. I’ve never understood why people with good paying jobs insist on working themselves to death while they’re young and able-bodied; better to accumulate experiences through travel, etc. before you get too old. Retiring with all the money in the world won’t buy back your youth/health.

I’d rather work part time and delay retirement.

I've never understood how often people who don't really have a good excuse fail to take care of their health. You can save all the money you want for the future, but you might want to do what you can to increase the odds that you'll have a future. 

Things happen sure, and people have diseases and disabilities.  but the average person in the US is far less healthy than they could be if they just tried. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, -OZ- said:

I've never understood how often people who don't really have a good excuse fail to take care of their health. You can save all the money you want for the future, but you might want to do what you can to increase the odds that you'll have a future. 

Things happen sure, and people have diseases and disabilities.  but the average person in the US is far less healthy than they could be if they just tried. 

Being healthy isn’t easy for everyone.  It takes quite a bit of will power 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, dgreen said:

I’ve mentioned before that people worried about medical costs in retirement should consider 5 years of federal government employment. That’s all that’s needed to carry medical insurance through retirement. I assume state governments have similar offers but not sure about that. 

Interesting.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, -OZ- said:

I've never understood how often people who don't really have a good excuse fail to take care of their health. You can save all the money you want for the future, but you might want to do what you can to increase the odds that you'll have a future. 

Things happen sure, and people have diseases and disabilities.  but the average person in the US is far less healthy than they could be if they just tried. 

Agreed. And many of the same people killing themselves at work are eating, drinking and not exercising themselves to death.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, fred_1_15301 said:

Being healthy isn’t easy for everyone.  It takes quite a bit of will power 

Being healthy isn’t easy for anyone. It takes discipline and hard work to maximize your odds of staving off disease.

Edited by Terminalxylem
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, fred_1_15301 said:

Being healthy isn’t easy for everyone.  It takes quite a bit of will power 

 

19 minutes ago, Terminalxylem said:

Being healthy isn’t easy for anyone. It takes discipline and hard work to maximize your odds of staving off disease.

It's very similar to investing for the future financially. 

It can be hard to see the benefits in any one day, it takes time, things can still go wrong, and it's hard at times. But when you build the habits / system, it becomes easier and can be rewarding. 

Both are necessary to a good long life. 

  • Like 2
  • Love 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing to factor into the future cost of healthcare is assisted living care as you get really old.  Medicare doesn't pay much for this service and it's extremely expensive.

Whether you go into a senior living type of housing, have a nurse/assistant or visits daily, etc it's really expensive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know lots of smart people with good jobs/solid health insurance and plenty in retirement savings who never go to the doctor...the "I'd rather not know" mentality. It costs nothing to get an annual physical and to stay on top of regular screenings (mammograms, colonoscopies, etc.) but too many otherwise level-headed folks wait until the #### hits the fan to get checked out. If you're one of those people and you're looking for a New Year's resolution it's a pretty easy one to win.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Nigel said:

I know lots of smart people with good jobs/solid health insurance and plenty in retirement savings who never go to the doctor...the "I'd rather not know" mentality. It costs nothing to get an annual physical and to stay on top of regular screenings (mammograms, colonoscopies, etc.) but too many otherwise level-headed folks wait until the #### hits the fan to get checked out. If you're one of those people and you're looking for a New Year's resolution it's a pretty easy one to win.

:eek:

  • Like 2
  • Laughing 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Nigel said:

I know lots of smart people with good jobs/solid health insurance and plenty in retirement savings who never go to the doctor...the "I'd rather not know" mentality. It costs nothing to get an annual physical and to stay on top of regular screenings (mammograms, colonoscopies, etc.) but too many otherwise level-headed folks wait until the #### hits the fan to get checked out. If you're one of those people and you're looking for a New Year's resolution it's a pretty easy one to win.

I'm one of those people. Although I do have see my Dr twice a year due to being on BP medicine. And I did have my first colonoscopy last month. Everything else, I tend to wait until one of those bi annual visits to discuss.

My wife says I'm not going to die from a disease, I'm going to die from waiting too long. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Nigel said:

I know lots of smart people with good jobs/solid health insurance and plenty in retirement savings who never go to the doctor...the "I'd rather not know" mentality. It costs nothing to get an annual physical and to stay on top of regular screenings (mammograms, colonoscopies, etc.) but too many otherwise level-headed folks wait until the #### hits the fan to get checked out. If you're one of those people and you're looking for a New Year's resolution it's a pretty easy one to win.

Yeah, that’s me. I’m 53 and have been to the doctor once in the past 15 years. It’s dumb, but I just never get sick and always feel pretty good.

I did resolve to get a physical by my 54th birthday which is in February, so that should be interesting.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, -OZ- said:

 

It's very similar to investing for the future financially. 

It can be hard to see the benefits in any one day, it takes time, things can still go wrong, and it's hard at times. But when you build the habits / system, it becomes easier and can be rewarding. 

Both are necessary to a good long life. 

I did not save as much as I should have when I was younger. I don't regret the decision to prioritize kids, but it will come with consequences. It's one of the reasons my health became such a priority in my 20's. I will probably need to work a bit longer than others, so I need to prioritize health to a) get there 2) enjoy everything between now and then and d) enjoy retired life once I am there. 

My experience is also why I will be opening investment accounts for our kids and contributing towards that rather than allocating additional dollars to their tuition.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, kutta said:

Yeah, that’s me. I’m 53 and have been to the doctor once in the past 15 years. It’s dumb, but I just never get sick and always feel pretty good.

I did resolve to get a physical by my 54th birthday which is in February, so that should be interesting.

You have done all that saving brother, make sure you enjoy it. It's just like anything else that you work for, study for. They'll give you your numbers and you work to keep the bad ones from going up.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, James Daulton said:

One thing to factor into the future cost of healthcare is assisted living care as you get really old.  Medicare doesn't pay much for this service and it's extremely expensive.

Whether you go into a senior living type of housing, have a nurse/assistant or visits daily, etc it's really expensive.

This is truly the biggest unknown cost.   With healthcare, you can ballpark the pre-medicare years and the medicare years you have  a pretty good idea.  But with assisted living between in home came and full blown nursing home, you really have no idea how much you'll need.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, NutterButter said:

This is truly the biggest unknown cost.   With healthcare, you can ballpark the pre-medicare years and the medicare years you have  a pretty good idea.  But with assisted living between in home came and full blown nursing home, you really have no idea how much you'll need.   

I'm confident by the time I'm at that age we will have a pull the plug option. And I'm pulling it when nursing home is necessary. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, MAC_32 said:

I'm confident by the time I'm at that age we will have a pull the plug option. And I'm pulling it when nursing home is necessary. 

Most people in nursing homes aren't maintained on machines, so there is no plug to pull. And euthanasia is still pretty taboo in this country.

But to add to the future planning, we all should have a meaningful advance healthcare directive (many of the standard ones are lacking, IMO) and designated healthcare proxy who understands your wishes.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

 

19 minutes ago, Terminalxylem said:

Most people in nursing homes aren't maintained on machines, so there is no plug to pull. And euthanasia is still pretty taboo in this country.

But to add to the future planning, we all should have a meaningful advance healthcare directive (many of the standard ones are lacking, IMO) and designated healthcare proxy who understands your wishes.

Especially for something like dementia where your deterioration is so gradual and by time you're at a state where you probably wouldn't want to be living, you'd no longer be considered competent enough to even make that decision.  

Edited by NutterButter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, James Daulton said:

One thing to factor into the future cost of healthcare is assisted living care as you get really old.  Medicare doesn't pay much for this service and it's extremely expensive.

Whether you go into a senior living type of housing, have a nurse/assistant or visits daily, etc it's really expensive.

buy long term care when you're still young enough (and healthy) enough to qualify for it.  I made my parents do it. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Dragons said:

What do you retired folks and those planning to retire early have in mind for health insurance (costs)?

I think I'm on track for retirement at 60, or even early, but this is a huge cost that scares me.

Does anyone have a good model for 65+ medical (care & insurance) costs?

Mind breaking your question down a bit further?  I'm a health insurance agent.  With healthcare where it is today, you literally have no idea what it will be tomorrow, much less 5-10 years away, or even the next administration away.

With where things stand now, I assume you mean what will you do for coverage after (early) retirement, and up until age 65 when you'll just be on Medicare?  If that's the question, the ACA (Obamacare) still exists for individual coverage.  See what's available in the county you live in (could very well be different offerings from what's available in the next county over).  Realize these offerings can change drastically from year to year.  It may seem very expensive from folks between ages 60-64, and it is.  If you can monkey with your income a bit (getting your MAGI - Modified Adjusted Gross Income - under 400% of the poverty line) you can qualify for huge subsidies for that coverage.  I have clients who literally have free individual coverage because their subsidy is more than enough to cover the full premium for a bronze tier plan.  They then have enough in their HSA accounts to cover the larger deductibles these plans have. 

I'm sure things will change between now and when I'm at that age, but if I were there now, that's exactly what I'd do.  Live off of mainly off of non-taxable income for those years and get free or nearly free coverage bridging the gap till I'm just on Medicare and all the youngsters are paying for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Terminalxylem said:

Most people in nursing homes aren't maintained on machines, so there is no plug to pull. And euthanasia is still pretty taboo in this country.

But to add to the future planning, we all should have a meaningful advance healthcare directive (many of the standard ones are lacking, IMO) and designated healthcare proxy who understands your wishes.

And along those lines, something my family learned the hard way - there is a difference between a DNR (do not resuscitate) and a DNI (do not intubate). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quick question on a back door Roth. 
 

if I open an IRA today for $6000 with post tax money and convert it a Roth tomorrow will I have to pay tax on the $6000?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, The Flying Turtle said:

Quick question on a back door Roth. 
 

if I open an IRA today for $6000 with post tax money and convert it a Roth tomorrow will I have to pay tax on the $6000?

No tax.  Sometimes the account can make a small gain (ie by the time you converted it the account is now $6002).  You would owe a small tax on that $2.  

 

IMPORTANT: If you have an existing IRA be careful...  Google pro-rata backdoor roth if so

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, wilked said:

No tax.  Sometimes the account can make a small gain (ie by the time you converted it the account is now $6002).  You would owe a small tax on that $2.  

 

IMPORTANT: If you have an existing IRA be careful...  Google pro-rata backdoor roth if so

Thanks,

I do have an old Roth and rollover in one account  

I would open a new IRA and then Roth with a different company just for this conversion.


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, FreeBaGeL said:

My wife and I are both 36 and we have $256k in our 401k, which seems a little low after reading through this thread.  How are you all getting yours juiced up so fast?  We make pretty good money (about $300k/yr) but you're limited to $19.5k per year going into the 401k, right?

Apparently our investment portfolio sucks because our 401k's didn't get nearly the bump this past year that most seem to be seeing.

As to the kids we put 5k for each into a 529 when they were born and add $300/month to each as well.  Hopefully that will at least put a big dent in college expenses (still 13 years off).

When I was 35 I had $20K in my 401K. I'm married with three kids, but my wife doesn't work. I've invested the max and had a good match (100% up to 5% for a while, and now 150% up to 8%). I'm 54 now and have $1.1M in my 401K.

Just keep putting in the max and getting your match (whatever that is). It will grow faster than you think.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, The Flying Turtle said:

Thanks,

I do have an old Roth and rollover in one account  

I would open a new IRA and then Roth with a different company just for this conversion.


 

Thanks Wilked,

If I am reading this right my rollover 401k would be counted in the calculation for taxable percentage.  Thanks for the heads-up.

 

1 hour ago, The Flying Turtle said:

Thanks,

I do have an old Roth and rollover in one account  

I would open a new IRA and then Roth with a different company just for this conversion.


 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, matttyl said:

Mind breaking your question down a bit further?  I'm a health insurance agent.  With healthcare where it is today, you literally have no idea what it will be tomorrow, much less 5-10 years away, or even the next administration away.

With where things stand now, I assume you mean what will you do for coverage after (early) retirement, and up until age 65 when you'll just be on Medicare?  If that's the question, the ACA (Obamacare) still exists for individual coverage.  See what's available in the county you live in (could very well be different offerings from what's available in the next county over).  Realize these offerings can change drastically from year to year.  It may seem very expensive from folks between ages 60-64, and it is.  If you can monkey with your income a bit (getting your MAGI - Modified Adjusted Gross Income - under 400% of the poverty line) you can qualify for huge subsidies for that coverage.  I have clients who literally have free individual coverage because their subsidy is more than enough to cover the full premium for a bronze tier plan.  They then have enough in their HSA accounts to cover the larger deductibles these plans have. 

I'm sure things will change between now and when I'm at that age, but if I were there now, that's exactly what I'd do.  Live off of mainly off of non-taxable income for those years and get free or nearly free coverage bridging the gap till I'm just on Medicare and all the youngsters are paying for me.

I've read this tip before in one of these threads (maybe it from you) and its such a unique idea to consider.   400% of poverty is still a nice chunk of change in retirement if you can supplement that with a little roth money and you no longer have any major house/education/retirement saving expenses.     For those of us leading a simpler retirement, that shouldn't be terribly difficult to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, The Flying Turtle said:

Thanks Wilked,

If I am reading this right my rollover 401k would be counted in the calculation for taxable percentage.  Thanks for the heads-up.

 

 

Do you have an existing 401K?

 

I had a rollover IRA, same as you (old 401K).  I rolled it into my 401K (so no more IRA balance) and then was able to do backdoor Roth.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, matttyl said:

buy long term care when you're still young enough (and healthy) enough to qualify for it.  I made my parents do it. 

What age would you recommend starting to pay for such a plan?   This is one area where I've done little research besides just making sure I have enough to pay out of pocket for an above average length of care.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, wilked said:

Do you have an existing 401K?

 

I had a rollover IRA, same as you (old 401K).  I rolled it into my 401K (so no more IRA balance) and then was able to do backdoor Roth.  

Thanks, I saw that idea. I have to look into my existing plan to see if they allow it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something to consider for you married folks is that if you do require long term care (especially if its at a younger age), that's going to knock a significant chunk out of the retirement money that's left for your spouse who may have a lot of years left to live. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, NutterButter said:

I've read this tip before in one of these threads (maybe it from you) and its such a unique idea to consider.   400% of poverty is still a nice chunk of change in retirement if you can supplement that with a little roth money and you no longer have any major house/education/retirement saving expenses.     For those of us leading a simpler retirement, that shouldn't be terribly difficult to do.

400% is the max allowed to still be eligible for subsidies.  Having a MAGI of less than that means you'd be eligible for larger subsidies.  For a married couple filing jointly, 100% of the poverty line is just a bit under $17k.  Means 400% is just over $67k.  If you can live a few years off savings, ROTH, whole life insurance loans and other tax free sources and have a MAGI under these numbers, you can qualify for literally up to $2k a month in subsides for individual health insurance. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, matttyl said:

Mind breaking your question down a bit further?  I'm a health insurance agent.  With healthcare where it is today, you literally have no idea what it will be tomorrow, much less 5-10 years away, or even the next administration away.

With where things stand now, I assume you mean what will you do for coverage after (early) retirement, and up until age 65 when you'll just be on Medicare?  If that's the question, the ACA (Obamacare) still exists for individual coverage.  See what's available in the county you live in (could very well be different offerings from what's available in the next county over).  Realize these offerings can change drastically from year to year.  It may seem very expensive from folks between ages 60-64, and it is.  If you can monkey with your income a bit (getting your MAGI - Modified Adjusted Gross Income - under 400% of the poverty line) you can qualify for huge subsidies for that coverage.  I have clients who literally have free individual coverage because their subsidy is more than enough to cover the full premium for a bronze tier plan.  They then have enough in their HSA accounts to cover the larger deductibles these plans have. 

I'm sure things will change between now and when I'm at that age, but if I were there now, that's exactly what I'd do.  Live off of mainly off of non-taxable income for those years and get free or nearly free coverage bridging the gap till I'm just on Medicare and all the youngsters are paying for me.

Thanks, that's basically what I was asking. I was assuming we would have to go to the exchange, but had forgotten about the income based subsidy. We're on high deductible plans now and we've been packing an HSA, so it is an interesting idea. I would need to bolster ROTH holdings over the next 10 years to make this work. 

Once we hit 65, is Medicare sufficient care for most people?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, kutta said:

Yeah, that’s me. I’m 53 and have been to the doctor once in the past 15 years. It’s dumb, but I just never get sick and always feel pretty good.

I did resolve to get a physical by my 54th birthday which is in February, so that should be interesting.

Have you ever seen the movie Fletch? Can you sing "Moon River?"

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   1 member