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Magic_Man

The Car Guy Thread

86 posts in this topic

8 minutes ago, Otis said:

Tempted to walk in and offer 80k and see what happens :unsure:

 

Koon's in Virginia has 26 of them with one as much as 13k off MSRP

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7 minutes ago, tjnc09 said:

Koon's in Virginia has 26 of them with one as much as 13k off MSRP

:shock: 

That's tempting.

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23 hours ago, Redwes25 said:

Amazing. Wish I had the time or knowledge to do something like this. 

 

Really want to pick up an older/classic car but I know little about fixing cars which has me nervous. Family has a Volvo xc90 people mover but that is it as live in Brooklyn but would love to buy something  else just for me. 

 

ETA - had an 86 wrangler back in mid 90s in HS which is my older car experience. 

Thank you.  Honestly it's not rocket science, but it is a lot of work.  If you are serious just get an older car that is less desirable and make sure parts are readily available.  

My first car was a '68 Camaro with a 327/Powerglide.  I bought it for $2,000 and other than running strong it needed a lot of work.  The first thing I did was replace the seat foam so that my butt didn't sag all the way to the floorboards.  Had no idea what I was doing, but went to the library and read some books (this was before YouTube) and got it done.  With the seats out of the car I realized it would be really easy to replace the carpet which was worn, faded, and dirty.  It had a dingy vinyl top that I hated, so I removed it with the idea of just spraying it with rattle-can paint to "match" the white paint on the rest of the car, but then realized I should get out some of the dents on the other body panels and just have it painted by someone who knows what they are doing.  The body work is slow and tedious, but even if mistakes are made they are always correctable.  Next I swapped the automatic trans for a 4-speed, the 70's rallye wheels for 60's rallye wheels, put a spoiler on the trunk lid, and finally actually had it painted.  The car went from being the laughing stock of my HS parking lot to the envy over 2.5 years with really only minimal work done to it.

I've since helped friends and family members on their cars and obviously my own car, but I assure you that you are more knowledgeable about cars now than I was at 16 years old.  I knew nothing, but was willing to learn and get my hands dirty.

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8 minutes ago, Dickies said:

Thank you.  Honestly it's not rocket science, but it is a lot of work.  If you are serious just get an older car that is less desirable and make sure parts are readily available.  

My first car was a '68 Camaro with a 327/Powerglide.  I bought it for $2,000 and other than running strong it needed a lot of work.  The first thing I did was replace the seat foam so that my butt didn't sag all the way to the floorboards.  Had no idea what I was doing, but went to the library and read some books (this was before YouTube) and got it done.  With the seats out of the car I realized it would be really easy to replace the carpet which was worn, faded, and dirty.  It had a dingy vinyl top that I hated, so I removed it with the idea of just spraying it with rattle-can paint to "match" the white paint on the rest of the car, but then realized I should get out some of the dents on the other body panels and just have it painted by someone who knows what they are doing.  The body work is slow and tedious, but even if mistakes are made they are always correctable.  Next I swapped the automatic trans for a 4-speed, the 70's rallye wheels for 60's rallye wheels, put a spoiler on the trunk lid, and finally actually had it painted.  The car went from being the laughing stock of my HS parking lot to the envy over 2.5 years with really only minimal work done to it.

I've since helped friends and family members on their cars and obviously my own car, but I assure you that you are more knowledgeable about cars now than I was at 16 years old.  I knew nothing, but was willing to learn and get my hands dirty.

Older cars are more forgiving and generally you have more room to work with.  Everything isn't crammed on top of each other.  I was 17 when I rebuilt the front end of that Chrysler Laser I smashed up with just a Chilton's manual and some junk yard parts.  Dickies is right that as long as you don't mind getting your hands dirty it isn't too hard to do a lot of it.

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1 hour ago, Otis said:

Tempted to walk in and offer 80k and see what happens :unsure:

 

If I needed an SUV, that's the one I would go for. If you need an SUV & want a fun DD too, do it. If not, buy a sports car or Hellcat Redeye.

Edited by Magic_Man
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On 7/13/2018 at 7:08 PM, Dickies said:

Thank you.  Honestly it's not rocket science, but it is a lot of work.  If you are serious just get an older car that is less desirable and make sure parts are readily available.  

My first car was a '68 Camaro with a 327/Powerglide.  I bought it for $2,000 and other than running strong it needed a lot of work.  The first thing I did was replace the seat foam so that my butt didn't sag all the way to the floorboards.  Had no idea what I was doing, but went to the library and read some books (this was before YouTube) and got it done.  With the seats out of the car I realized it would be really easy to replace the carpet which was worn, faded, and dirty.  It had a dingy vinyl top that I hated, so I removed it with the idea of just spraying it with rattle-can paint to "match" the white paint on the rest of the car, but then realized I should get out some of the dents on the other body panels and just have it painted by someone who knows what they are doing.  The body work is slow and tedious, but even if mistakes are made they are always correctable.  Next I swapped the automatic trans for a 4-speed, the 70's rallye wheels for 60's rallye wheels, put a spoiler on the trunk lid, and finally actually had it painted.  The car went from being the laughing stock of my HS parking lot to the envy over 2.5 years with really only minimal work done to it.

I've since helped friends and family members on their cars and obviously my own car, but I assure you that you are more knowledgeable about cars now than I was at 16 years old.  I knew nothing, but was willing to learn and get my hands dirty.

Thanks for the encouragement. Think the biggest issue might be the time. Not sure I could devote the time needed on a real project.  I am more leaning towards buying something that is in good shape and maintaining it and also use a mechanic for certain more difficult tasks.  Not the cheapest way to do it obviously and I think the hardest part might be picking the right car to start with. 

Edited by Redwes25
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