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timschochet

Classic Album Discussion Thread: The Kinks-Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Pt. 1

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I wasn't in this crap when it came out, but I admit I will crank up some Wanted Dead or Alive.

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Love Slippery When Wet. Not sure why anyone wouldn't. 

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Slippery When Wet definitely brings back memories - I was 20 when it came out, all the girls loved it, it was on jukeboxes everywhere, etc. Someone else mentioned Def Leppard's Hysteria - those two were the absolute peak of hair metal - it was all downhill from there on out.

Some songs still work, and I get the album's importance to the genre, but it's not an album I'd reach for anytime soon. 

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1 hour ago, bicycle_seat_sniffer said:

Dont be dissin dokken.....

:P

I will say that the song Heaven Sent has held up extremely well. I am a sucker for 80s music I grew up listening to and that one is a mainstay on my 80s playlist.

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On ‎8‎/‎22‎/‎2018 at 8:48 AM, Ilov80s said:

Tremendous actor too. Has there ever been a better dual threat? 

Patrick Swayze?

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3 minutes ago, Soonerman said:

Patrick Swayze?

He might be a quadruple threat: Acting, Dancing, Martial Arting and Abs. 

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28 minutes ago, Ghost Rider said:

:P

I will say that the song Heaven Sent has held up extremely well. I am a sucker for 80s music I grew up listening to and that one is a mainstay on my 80s playlist.

My favorite Dokken song is When Heaven Comes Down.  Lynch nails it.  It is actually cool without a lot of the typical Dokken cheese and is not as wimpy as most Dokken songs.  

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Stevie Wonder- Innervisions (1973)

Too High 

Visions

Living For the City

Golden Lady

Higher Ground

Jesus Children of America

All in Love is Fair

Don’t You Worry ‘Bout a Thing

He’s Misstra Know-It-All

 

Whole lot of brilliance here. Long before Prince there was Stevie writing, playing nearly every instrument, and producing. Most of his work prior to this album had been focused on questions of romantic love, but here he turns to social issues and politics. The sad part is that most of his lyrics are still relevant. “Living for the City” could just as easily describe the urban plight of many black Americans in 2018 as it did in 1973. “Misstra Know-It-All” a song decrying the presidency of Richard Nixon, could apply as easily  our current President. And so on. Wonderful record. 

 

 

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Great record. 

He's Misstra Know It All is easily my favorite Stevie song, and Living for the City is not far behind. 

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Innervisions is outstanding, no two ways about it. That said, I’m a bigger fan of Songs In The Key of Life.

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1 hour ago, timschochet said:

Stevie Wonder- Innervisions (1973)

Greatest solo album of all time.

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1 hour ago, timschochet said:

Stevie Wonder- Innervisions (1973)

Too High 

Visions

Living For the City

Golden Lady

Higher Ground

Jesus Children of America

All in Love is Fair

Don’t You Worry ‘Bout a Thing

He’s Misstra Know-It-All

 

Whole lot of brilliance here. Long before Prince there was Stevie writing, playing nearly every instrument, and producing. Most of his work prior to this album had been focused on questions of romantic love, but here he turns to social issues and politics. The sad part is that most of his lyrics are still relevant. “Living for the City” could just as easily describe the urban plight of many black Americans in 2018 as it did in 1973. “Misstra Know-It-All” a song decrying the presidency of Richard Nixon, could apply as easily  our current President. And so on. Wonderful record. 

 

 

I have no problem defending this as the greatest album of the Boomer/Classic Rock era.

Problem is, that he had at least three others were as good.

Stevie's 15 year run from Music Of My Mind through In Square Circle is unrivaled

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Everybody's got a thing
But some don't know how to handle it
Always reachin' out in vain
Just taking the things not worth having but
Don't you worry 'bout a thing

They say your style of life's a drag
And that you must go other places
But just don't you feel too bad
When you get fooled by smiling faces but
Don't you worry 'bout a thing

When you get it off your trip
Everybody needs a change
A chance to check out the new
But you're the only one to see
The changes you take yourself through but
Don't you worry 'bout a thing

 

Thank you, Stevie.  

 

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Wow, some really high praise for Stevie. I've always liked what I've heard from him on the radio but admittedly haven't heard much beyond that. Looks like I'll have to check some out.

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1 hour ago, jamny said:

Wow, some really high praise for Stevie. I've always liked what I've heard from him on the radio but admittedly haven't heard much beyond that. Looks like I'll have to check some out.

Here's the thing about Stevie Wonder:

He's.....complicated

He had a HOF's worth of hits before he turned 21 (Springsteen - born around the same time - was still busing tables). I'm pretty certain he wrote most of them, but didn't get credit because he was a kid and because Berry Gordy was an ####### who doled out composing credits to his other slaves. 

Like a lot of his peers (& there ain't but a few on Stevie's level), he had no filter. He recorded what he wanted to and sometimes that led to schlock (that sold 8 gazillion records).

He got himself locked in on his previous album - Talking Book  where he only played the most famous drum intro in rock history on "Superstition"- but this is the record where he turned it loose.

"Living For The City" is the greatest anthem of the '70s - it's not a fairy tale by guys who dropped too many tabs of acid and immersed themselves in Tolkien. This was real life for millions of folks. Stevie's "Voice Of God" vocals after the bridge rank with anything any singer has done, ever.

Every song on this album is layered and brilliant.

Then, he did it again on the next album (after almost getting killed by a tree hitting him in the head) and AGAIN on Songs In The Key Of Life. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Velvet Underground & Nico (1967)

Sunday Morning

I’m Waiting for the Man

Femme Fatale

Venus In Furs

Run Run Run

All Tomrrow’s Parties

Heroin

There She Goes Again

I’ll Be Your Mirror

Black Angel’s Death Song

European Son

 

Arguably the most influential rock album of all time. Extraordinary for its era- this album was produced in 1966, and artists back then did not talk about death and drugs, much less the ravages of heroin. While McCartney and Lennon were singing “I’m in love with her and I feel fine”, Lou Reed was feeling “sick and dirty, more dead than alive” while waiting for his dealer. 

Even so, despite Reed’s avante-garde lyrics, despite the steady drumming of Tucker and the innovative electronic work of Cale, despite the famous banana cover by Warhol and the ice queen vocals by Nico (often imitated, never duplicated), what makes this album work are the beautiful pop melodies. “Sunday Morning”, “Femme Fatale”, “Heroin”, “Venus In Furs”, “All Tomorrow’s Parties” are all memorable classics because they are so melodic. 

Edited by timschochet

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19 hours ago, Uruk-Hai said:

Here's the thing about Stevie Wonder:

He's.....complicated

He had a HOF's worth of hits before he turned 21 (Springsteen - born around the same time - was still busing tables). I'm pretty certain he wrote most of them, but didn't get credit because he was a kid and because Berry Gordy was an ####### who doled out composing credits to his other slaves. 

Like a lot of his peers (& there ain't but a few on Stevie's level), he had no filter. He recorded what he wanted to and sometimes that led to schlock (that sold 8 gazillion records).

He got himself locked in on his previous album - Talking Book  where he only played the most famous drum intro in rock history on "Superstition"- but this is the record where he turned it loose.

"Living For The City" is the greatest anthem of the '70s - it's not a fairy tale by guys who dropped too many tabs of acid and immersed themselves in Tolkien. This was real life for millions of folks. Stevie's "Voice Of God" vocals after the bridge rank with anything any singer has done, ever.

Every song on this album is layered and brilliant.

Then, he did it again on the next album (after almost getting killed by a tree hitting him in the head) and AGAIN on Songs In The Key Of Life. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

?:hot:

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44 minutes ago, timschochet said:

The Velvet Underground & Nico (1967)

 

Never needed, rarely heeded the hard, bleak, true-to-life & depressive art - not in literature, movies, music, painting. Even within the madness of VanGogh (aside: do NOT let your life go by without seeing a VvG up close, i implore you) the crows and rear views of churches ached for light. I'm at my most commonly American in that way. I want universality, deep feeling, hope, imaginative puzzles & clever answers from the expressive forms of communication.

That said, great articulation is great articulation and this is great articulation.

Edited by wikkidpissah
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Probably one of the most important pop/rock albums of the century. The Velvet Underground were so special, so unique, so on the edges of everything great musically and lyrically that it defies description. 

A worthy choice for a "classic" album, that's for sure. 

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Nico was overrated as a singer and didn't belong in the VU. Her songs were the low points of that album, and the live versions of those songs (performed by the later lineups of the group) are much, much better.

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Just now, [scooter] said:

Nico was overrated as a singer and didn't belong in the VU. Her songs were the low points of that album, and the live versions of those songs (performed by the later lineups of the group) are much, much better.

I’m not a Nico guy either 

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7 minutes ago, rockaction said:

Nor am I

She was hot and she had a moody supermodel attitude. Those seem to be the sole reasons why she had any involvement in the music business at all.

Although I must admit that I do have a soft spot in my heart for her 1965 debut single, which was largely the construction of Jimmy Page and Stones manager Andrew Oldham.

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I love the Velvet Underground, and I love their debut. Nico being on it doesn't bother me - it makes it even more unique than it already was. That said, I'm glad she was one and done here, because her voice doesn't work all that well. Gonna go play this now.

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1 hour ago, [scooter] said:

Although I must admit that I do have a soft spot in my heart for her 1965 debut single

That is indeed a pretty good song, IMO. 

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4 minutes ago, rockaction said:

That is indeed a pretty good song, IMO. 

Gordon Lightfoot. Later on he merged it with another of his early tunes, “Ribbon of Darkness”. 

Nico’s first solo album, in which she covers a number of people including Dylan and her then 16 year old boyfriend Jackson Browne, is actually quite good. 

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12 hours ago, timschochet said:

Arguably the most influential rock album of all time. Extraordinary for its era- this album was produced in 1966, and artists back then did not talk about death and drugs, much less the ravages of heroin. While McCartney and Lennon were singing “I’m in love with her and I feel fine”, Lou Reed was feeling “sick and dirty, more dead than alive” while waiting for his dealer. 

 

I Feel Fine is from 1964, not 1966.  By 1966, the Beatles were giving us songs like Tomorrow Never Knows and Doctor Robert, both of which were about drugs, nearly a year before the release of the Velvet Underground record.  

If you want to talk this album up, by all means, but let's avoid the revisionist history. 

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15 minutes ago, Ghost Rider said:

I Feel Fine is from 1964, not 1966.  By 1966, the Beatles were giving us songs like Tomorrow Never Knows and Doctor Robert, both of which were about drugs, nearly a year before the release of the Velvet Underground record.  

If you want to talk this album up, by all means, but let's avoid the revisionist history. 

Several of the songs that Reed sung were written in 64 and 65. 

But I think you missed my point anyhow. It wasn’t that these songs were about drugs, it was their tone. The album was actually banned from the radio and several record stores because of that tone. 

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Adele- 21- (2011)

Rolling In the Deep

Rumour Has It

Turning Tables

Don’t You Remember

Set Fire to the Rain

He Won’t Go

Take It All

I’ll Be Waiting

One and Only

Lovesong

Someone Like You

I Found a Boy 

 

If there is one modern popular artist still credited with having great albums, this is probably she. Like some of the other notable singer-songwriters we have already touched upon, Adele’s music seems to be quite personal- and also, I think, timeless. I have a feeling that 40 or 50 years from now, “Rolling In the Deep” and “Someone Like You” will continue to be standards. 

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1 hour ago, dutch said:

Not sure I know a single song off this album

I don't think that is possible. 

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Adele is amazing. Great album- pretty much everything she does is fantastic. 

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On 8/26/2018 at 0:12 PM, wikkidpissah said:

Never needed, rarely heeded the hard, bleak, true-to-life & depressive art - not in literature, movies, music, painting. Even within the madness of VanGogh (aside: do NOT let your life go by without seeing a VvG up close, i implore you) the crows and rear views of churches ached for light. I'm at my most commonly American in that way. I want universality, deep feeling, hope, imaginative puzzles & clever answers from the expressive forms of communication.

That said, great articulation is great articulation and this is great articulation.

As always, interesting post. I enjoy the dark as much as the light and I don't think a band ever captured the American underbelly so well. At least for a time when music wasn't really paying attention to it. Music seemed to be the last American art form to really embrace the underbelly of America. 

Also, yes being able to stand face to face with a Van Gogh is a very special experience. I am lucky to live so close to the Detroit Institute of Arts. It's free to enter and I like to go a few times a year- standing inches from Van Gogh's self portrait gives one a true sense of awe. 

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2 hours ago, timschochet said:

If there is one modern popular artist still credited with having great albums, this is probably she. Like some of the other notable singer-songwriters we have already touched upon, Adele’s music seems to be quite personal- and also, I think, timeless. I have a feeling that 40 or 50 years from now, “Rolling In the Deep” and “Someone Like You” will continue to be standards. 

:lmao: In what world. :lmao:

 

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I like the Adele record - she can sing and the songs are all well written. I don't like most of the music on hit radio but Adele is an exception.

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1 hour ago, timschochet said:

Adele- 21- (2011)

Rolling In the Deep

Rumour Has It

Turning Tables

Don’t You Remember

Set Fire to the Rain

He Won’t Go

Take It All

I’ll Be Waiting

One and Only

Lovesong

Someone Like You

I Found a Boy 

 

If there is one modern popular artist still credited with having great albums, this is probably she. Like some of the other notable singer-songwriters we have already touched upon, Adele’s music seems to be quite personal- and also, I think, timeless. I have a feeling that 40 or 50 years from now, “Rolling In the Deep” and “Someone Like You” will continue to be standards. 

Adele reminds me, personally & artistically, of the first great singer i ever worked with - Bonnie Raitt.

Keene, NH, Thanksgiving week, i remember, 1973, i think. Cold, rainy night. Band & crew are in the some 3rd floor rooms in the local theater before a show. Folks are chatting, goofing, getting properly loaded. I was essentially in charge, but i'm new and certainly don't feel like it and i really dont know Miss Raitt - who i'd 1st seen in a coffeehouse when i was 16 & adored - all that well, so i'm watching her as she's in & out of the room doing this & that. 

The outside wall of the room was actually part of this flume up the building above the marquee. Bonnie, as quiet before a show as she was boisterous after, had found a spot leaning against a wall looking out a window. She seems a little down, i figure i should pep her up since i represent her mgmt, so i saunter over. As i get to her, i see streams of tears coursing down her cheeks.

"You OK?"

Miss Raitt bobs her head toward the window, so i look out and down upon 100 or so people standing in the rain, waiting in line to be let into the theater. Bonnie, daughter of one of Broadway's great stars of the 50s, a showbiz vet with a gold record, is overwhelmed that people would stand in the rain to see li'l ol' her.

I get the same vibe from Adele - an immense strength, a vulnerability she'd really rather not have but can't help herself from and a tendency to groove her work toward what her audience wants more than what her tremendous creative fire can achieve. I hope she's carefully & courageously guided along her path, which i'm kinda not seeing so far.

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Just now, Raging weasel said:

I like Adele and especially this album but isn't it kind of new to be in a classic album thread?

Yes. It’s probably the newest album that will be discussed here. 

But- it’s already 7 years old. By 1980, Dark Side of the Moon was already regarded as a classic. 

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Just now, timschochet said:
14 minutes ago, Northern Voice said:

:lmao: In what world. :lmao:

 

Well, let’s start with popularity: 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/mobile.reuters.com/article/amp/idUSKCN0T22BH20151114

But by and large the critics seem to agree. She consistently gets high marks, probably the highest of any current artist. 

So, I guess in the whitest world possible (that article references The Sound of Music sountrack and Taylor Swift as well). She does not get reviewed favorably to Kendrick Lamar, Kanye West, Radiohead, etc, etc, etc...

In fact, on aggregate her albums get very middling reviews.

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From VU to Adele - interesting. Don't really know much about Adele, so I can't opine. 

VU, however, is as unique an album as you'll find. Innovative, groundbreaking, and just out there. It's hardly an album for the musicians, but so creepy that it just works. "Venus In Furs" alone must have scared the beejebus out of '60s suburban parents.

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