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NotSmart

Hip Replacement Guys - *** OFFICIAL *** thread

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So I'm in my mid 50's and will be getting my left hip replaced bright and early tomorrow morning.  :topcat:

I'm on the young side of needing a hip replacement, and I chalk it up to all the basketball I played through my 30's.

With a little luck, most of you may never need one - other than one cousin, I'm the only one in my family that I know of that has needed one.

Both of my hips have advanced arthritis, so my right hip is eventually ticketed for a replacement as well - I'm just hoping it holds out for a few years longer than the left one did.

I'm getting the posterior surgery, the anterior method is still relatively new and not done by a large number of doctors yet.  I'm hoping that when it comes time to get my right hip done, anterior may be more common and more clearly proven as superior with minimal drawbacks.

I've planned for 1.5 weeks off of work, then 1-2 weeks working from home, then back into the office.

At the orthopedic's office, I've seen people that could barely walk due to hip pain... mine just started causing problems a few months ago, and I decided to get it replaced now before it gets too bad, and also because it works best for my work schedule. 

I'm definitely interested in recovery advice and pro tips from anyone that has had this done.

I'll keep this updated with my experiences and will be happy to answer any questions as well.

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I don’t have a lot of advice, but wanted to wish you luck. A former co-worker/ friend of mine had both of his hips replaced within 2 years of each other over 10 years ago, and he’s still going strong. Good luck. 

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I can't give you any advice, but I am interested in what others have to say.  I am 55 and need two new knees and one new hip.  I go through joints like Bob Marley! GL!!!

Edited by worrierking
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Rehab, rehab, regab.  

Curious, did your doctor recommend a replacement or did you decide to “get it early”?   

Have you thoroughly discussed activity restrictions with your doctor?

What implant are you getting?

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I have bilateral knee osteoarthritis that started with a car accident and then a fall on both knees. Right hip is a bit bothersome.

I'm 54. They say do it when it's affecting your quality of life. 50s is early but good metal (titanium) on plastic implants like zimmer last around 20 years or more. 

I used to be the surgery coordinator for Dr. Alexander Sah and Dr. John Dearborn at the center for joint institute. I'll be seeing Dr. Sah soon.

Dr. Sah does the anterior hip replacement if you're willing to come to Fremont Ca. Both docs are excellent and that's all they do, hip and knee replacements. It's in it's own building so staff works only with their pts and you have a private room. 

If anyone is interested,

http://www.sahortho.com

http://dearbornassoc.com

Surgery time for both docs.

Hip replacement, 45 min.

Single knee,  45 min.

Bilateral knees, 1 hour and half.

Best wishes to you notsmart.. Xx

Edited by CurlyNight
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3 hours ago, NotSmart said:

So I'm in my mid 50's and will be getting my left hip replaced bright and early tomorrow morning.  :topcat:

I'm on the young side of needing a hip replacement, and I chalk it up to all the basketball I played through my 30's.

With a little luck, most of you may never need one - other than one cousin, I'm the only one in my family that I know of that has needed one.

Both of my hips have advanced arthritis, so my right hip is eventually ticketed for a replacement as well - I'm just hoping it holds out for a few years longer than the left one did.

I'm getting the posterior surgery, the anterior method is still relatively new and not done by a large number of doctors yet.  I'm hoping that when it comes time to get my right hip done, anterior may be more common and more clearly proven as superior with minimal drawbacks.

I've planned for 1.5 weeks off of work, then 1-2 weeks working from home, then back into the office.

At the orthopedic's office, I've seen people that could barely walk due to hip pain... mine just started causing problems a few months ago, and I decided to get it replaced now before it gets too bad, and also because it works best for my work schedule. 

I'm definitely interested in recovery advice and pro tips from anyone that has had this done.

I'll keep this updated with my experiences and will be happy to answer any questions as well.

Recovery from hip is generally faster and easier than knee. They'll get you up and walking a few hours after surgery. One doc I know recently started doing it as outpatient surgery for those in good shape, even single knee. One night stay is still common. For hips, no home PT. You may not even go to outpatient PT. You'll be shown any restrictive movements and precautions and exercises to do at home. PO is 10 - 14 days out,  then 6 week out, 3 mo then 1 year.  Then every other year after that. That's how the center here works. Your place msy do it a little different.

Again, best wishes. 

Edited by CurlyNight
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3 hours ago, Nigel said:

Smart to get ahead of it, most people wait too long it seems. Best of luck.

The timing depends on if it's affecting your quality of life. Many people are ok and wait until it's no longer ok. The surgery is the same, the recovery the same whenever you have it done. 

The reason why people wait is because the life of the implant. Generally over 20 years but it can be different for each of us. So people figure how long they think they'll live and factor that into the timing as well.

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19 minutes ago, CurlyNight said:

The timing depends on if it's affecting your quality of life. Many people are ok and wait until it's no longer ok. The surgery is the same, the recovery the same whenever you have it done. 

This isn’t entirely true.  Surgery can be more difficult on late-stage arthritis patients because quality of bone stock can be more deteriorated.   Waiting too long can lead to sooner complications post-surgery. 

 

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30 minutes ago, shuke said:

This isn’t entirely true.  Surgery can be more difficult on late-stage arthritis patients because quality of bone stock can be more deteriorated.   Waiting too long can lead to sooner complications post-surgery. 

 

Arthritis is when the cushion between the joint is worn, called cartilage. Some people are bone on bone and have no symptoms for the longest time.

For hips, if there's poor bone quality, they use cement. Many older people get cemented hips. Otherwise it's uncemented and your bone will grow into it to provide stability.

I really haven't seen many po complications in my 10 years dealing with these patients. Blood clot could be one but you get a blood thinner and they get you moving quick. Infection could be another but that's like less than 1% at this center and it could just be your body. Rejection of implant is not common. I've seen 1 case of thousands.

The key is the person needs to have a good bmi for the implant to work well, or at all, and to be willing to work on the rehab end of it, especially for the knees.

The advice is to see the specialist when you notice joint stiffness, pain, problems walking.. You can discuss timing specific to your situation at that time, but you need to consider the possible minus of doing it too soon when you are doing ok while you are on the younger side. 

Edited by CurlyNight

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No need for the lesson, thanks. I’ve been designing orthopedic implants for over 20 years.  

My point is that there is potential for decreased outcomes for waiting too long and It’s not true that the surgery and recovery are the same no matter when you have it done.

You can definitely have it done too early or too late.  My advice to NotSmart is to have this discussion with his doctor about the pros/cons of waiting.   If that discussion isn’t happening I recommend a second opinion.  

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2 minutes ago, shuke said:

No need for the lesson, thanks. I’ve been designing orthopedic implants for over 20 years.  

My point is that there is potential for decreased outcomes for waiting too long and It’s not true that the surgery and recovery are the same no matter when you have it done.

You can definitely have it done too early or too late. My advice to NotSmart is to have this discussion with his doctor about the pros/cons of waiting.   If that discussion isn’t happening I recommend a second opinion.  

...which is ultimately what I said. Get the opinion of the surgeon for your situation. No need to be mean. I'm just providing info from my experience at the center I worked for.

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2 hours ago, shuke said:

Rehab, rehab, regab.  

Curious, did your doctor recommend a replacement or did you decide to “get it early”?   

Have you thoroughly discussed activity restrictions with your doctor?

What implant are you getting?

My hip started aching at the beginning of the summer after playing disc golf - it's ached a little for a long time but been perfectly manageable.  But once it got sore this time, it never stopped hurting to some degree, and there were a couple of weeks where I wasn't sure I'd be able to go to work (long walk from the parking lot, decent amount of walking around inside the building).

When I finally went to the doctor, the x-rays showed advanced arthritis in both hips, with some bone on bone on the left one.

The doctor told me the same thing, "You'll know when it's time".  Initially I hoped maybe to get another year out of it, but once I realized I couldn't play disc golf, or even on some days walk around the neighborhood, I realized it was time.  I also decided that I didn't see any upside to letting it get worse and worse to the point where I'd want it ASAP and would probably have to wait a few weeks to get scheduled for it.  There were also nights where the left leg just kind of ached in general at night time, enough to keep me from sleeping or wake me up frequently.

As a side note, I had to stop playing softball a couple of years ago (which was a tough decision), due to losing flexibility in my legs, and a persistent groin pain on my left side that just wouldn't go away.  I figured it was a groin pull, but it just never healed.  I now realize that was due to the hip, the pain radiates out and can affect other areas.  At the bitter end, I moved from 3B to Catcher voluntarily to try to keep playing, but I couldn't even get down in the Catcher squat and had to get down on one knee.  I just chalked it up to getting older and losing mobility, but I'm assuming now it was due quite a bit to the arthritis.

As far as equipment, the manufacturer is Stryker:

Trident II cup

Cross linked poly liner in cup

Accolade II wedge

We have discussed the hip restrictions that will be in place for the first 30 days to prevent a displacement, and I can tell they are going to be a little tough to be diligent about.

I've already scheduled my first rehab assessment for 2 weeks out, then twice a week rehab sessions start a week later.  I'll do the rehab as long as it seems like its helping and needed, at some point I'm guessing I'll be able to continue at home on my own.

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Thanks for all the well wishes, I genuinely appreciate them.

And my best wishes in return to everyone that's dealing with something similar.

The good news is that we are living in an era when there are truly amazingly good solutions and treatments for these ailments.

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9 hours ago, CurlyNight said:

The timing depends on if it's affecting your quality of life. Many people are ok and wait until it's no longer ok. The surgery is the same, the recovery the same whenever you have it done. 

The reason why people wait is because the life of the implant. Generally over 20 years but it can be different for each of us. So people figure how long they think they'll live and factor that into the timing as well.

I understand all of that, but there are no guarantees in life.

I've seen people limp around for years unable to do the things they love to do, waiting because of "life of the implant" angle. In the meantime health fails in other ways, muscle wastes away, etc because of a lack of activity. My dad played the waiting game and was dead two years after he had it done. I'd rather stay ahead of it, enjoy 20 years with the new/good hip, and worry about the next phase when/if it comes.

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8 hours ago, NotSmart said:

once I realized I couldn't play disc golf, or even on some days walk around the neighborhood, I realized it was time. 

Sounds right.  I initially got the impression that you weren't this bad.

Good to see you actually know what product you're getting. 

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I had mine replaced five years ago at age 36. It was due to a childhood injury. Best thing I’ve done. I was back to work within 4 weeks. Just take your time to let everything heal, don’t rush it  but within a few months you should be feeling really good and start getting somewhat active again  

The worst part is that you’ll feel like you can do anything with it. I play tennis now pretty regularly with no pain or discomfort. That’s the sport I picked up to try and get cardio. My doc told me absolutely no jogging/distance running type sports and no jumping. 

The one time it freaked me out I played easy b-ball with my kids. Did a short hop for ball and felt a scary pop in it. It’s fine but I won’t be doing that ever again. Tennis is perfect. 

Watch out for the painkillers they give you. That stuff is dangerously addictive. 

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3 minutes ago, boofatty said:

I had mine replaced five years ago at age 36. It was due to a childhood injury. Best thing I’ve done. I was back to work within 4 weeks. Just take your time to let everything heal, don’t rush it  but within a few months you should be feeling really good and start getting somewhat active again  

The worst part is that you’ll feel like you can do anything with it. I play tennis now pretty regularly with no pain or discomfort. That’s the sport I picked up to try and get cardio. My doc told me absolutely no jogging/distance running type sports and no jumping. 

The one time it freaked me out I played easy b-ball with my kids. Did a short hop for ball and felt a scary pop in it. It’s fine but I won’t be doing that ever again. Tennis is perfect. 

Watch out for the painkillers they give you. That stuff is dangerously addictive. 

Did the doc say anything about biking?  That's my go to sport and I'm sure I'll be due for a new hip or two at some point.

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2 minutes ago, NutterButter said:

Did the doc say anything about biking?  That's my go to sport and I'm sure I'll be due for a new hip or two at some point.

I used to bike a lot more than before replacement (not in a “serious” way though like some). Since replacement I’ve noticed difficulty finding good seating position that is comfortable. I haven’t spent much time trying to solve that issue though so there may be a simple fix. Other than that when I’ve biked it’s been fine. Seat comfort has been only issue for me. 

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Thanks for everyone's comments, I appreciate all the information. I'm in the recovery room now, the surgery went well this morning and lasted a little over an hour. Still waiting for the anesthesia to fully wear off of my right leg (which is now my cheap leg, i e not the $6 million Dollar one). Once the anesthesia wears off, I'll be seeing the physical therapist here and then headed home. Sounds like I'll have about 6-8  different medicines to take at varying durations over the next month. Oxycontin will be the heavy duty pain med, to be used if needed. I'm going to try not to, but won't hesitate to use it if needed.  Interesting experience so far.

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My father has had both of his hips replaced in the last 8 years.  He said immediately that he was sorry he hadn't done it sooner.  

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3 hours ago, boofatty said:

 Watch out for the painkillers they give you. That stuff is dangerously addictive. 

 

Seeing my normally "all-business" dad in the recovery bed with the morphine drip ... cracking jokes, unaware his sack was spilling out of his little hospital gown was a really special moment in our relationship.   :unsure: 

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I had my right hip replaced almost two years ago at 46 and I can have the left replaced anytime I want.  "simple" osteoarthritis was diagnosed but prolly some bad genetics and lots of pounding are the culprits.  

Went with a top guy in Boston after shopping around.  I was very concerned about cup positioning and leg length, having listened to two uncles kvetch about theirs, and the woman who taught ortho at Harvard Med essentially said, "meh, we'll just wing it with some x-rays in surgery."  My guy took an MRI weeks in advance, built a computer model, and had invented his own fixturing for getting the cup drilling just right.  Easy choice, imo, although an extra $3500 out of pocket.  Stryker implants, his name on the patents.  

I echo the "rehab rehab rehab" sentiment.  Lots of walking too.  Although no help to NotSmart, do the prehab too.  Do the exercises heading into the surgery.  Lose a few pounds.  

I walked the day of, discharged in under 24 hours, and out of work about 4 weeks.  I was on the pain meds about two weeks and was motivated to quit because of the constipation.  Be a hero during the day, take the meds at night so you can sleep and recover, imo.  YMMV.

I limped for almost two years, "life of the implant" for sure ringing in my ears.  I've given up all running and jumping but I still golf and bike and even did some waterskiing this summer.  No restrictions from the surgeon.  Gentle skiing this winter, if my daughter's hockey season allows it.  

"Follow your dreams.  You can reach your goals.  I'm living proof."

Edited by munga30
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1 hour ago, NotSmart said:

Thanks for everyone's comments, I appreciate all the information. I'm in the recovery room now, the surgery went well this morning and lasted a little over an hour. Still waiting for the anesthesia to fully wear off of my right leg (which is now my cheap leg, i e not the $6 million Dollar one). Once the anesthesia wears off, I'll be seeing the physical therapist here and then headed home. Sounds like I'll have about 6-8  different medicines to take at varying durations over the next month. Oxycontin will be the heavy duty pain med, to be used if needed. I'm going to try not to, but won't hesitate to use it if needed.  Interesting experience so far.

Mine is called the hipthruster3000 for maximum “satisfaction”. Lol

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i have had both of mine replaced here is some rare serious swc advice stay ahead of the pain they will probably do a block and when that wears off the pain will hit like a truck when you start feeling it wear off call your nurse and get the pain meds going but with that said try to get off of the narcos as quick as you can they mess up your bowels really bad and the worst part of both of mine was the first time i had to go to the bathroom afterwards because the narcos stop you up so badly so to that end get on miralax and prune juice in the hospital and early talk to your nurse they will probably get it finally use that dumb breathing machine they give you and do it like religion the knock out gas makes your lungs all messed up and that machine helps you get back to breathing normal which you will want when they stand you up and you start moving around i wish you luck and with mine i wish i had done it earlier it is like getting your life back i could hardly walk and now well i am not going to run any marathons at least i can get on an eliptical and walk around to go fishing without pain so life is pretty damned good take that to the bank brochacho

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also get a grabber stick to use after the procedure to use to reach stuff you wont be able to for a while dont cross your legs listen to them about that and get a sock putter onner thing which is a big white slide with a rope on it your nurse will know it really helps and also one of the long handle shoehorns listen brohan best of luck take that to the bank 

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I work with many orthopedic surgeons and have been in 100's if not thousands of total knee and total hip surgeries.   If you have any questions just post them here or pm.   I worked with a surgeon who used to do between 8 to 12 total joints a day.  He would go from operating room #1 to start his day with pt 1.   Go to OR #2 when his PA was closing pt 1, by the time he was done with pt 2 his PA would come in and close the wound.  He would then go to OR #3 to start on Pt #3 while OR #1 was getting cleaned and ready for pt #4.   He would be finished with his day around 3pm.   From opening incision to close was around 55 minutes for a total knee.  A little longer for a total hip maybe 60 minutes.     If you have your surgery early in the day you are doing rehab that afternoon.   

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how are you doing brohan i hope that you are feeling as good as you can take that to the bank

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13 hours ago, SWC said:

how are you doing brohan i hope that you are feeling as good as you can take that to the bank

I'm doing relatively pretty good, thanks brohan.

I'll write an update tomorrow on my misadventures and experiences so far.

ETA: I'll probably be doing my banking online for a few weeks though.

Edited by NotSmart
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Good luck and please keep us posted. I am in my mid 40s and was told a long time ago I would need a replacement at some point due to playing football. 

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Looking forward to the update.  55 and may be needing this sooner rather than later, unfortunately.

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4 guys in my golf league have had hip replacement over the last couple of years.  One guy late 40s, the others early 50s.

You might want to rethink your time frame for returning to work unless someone is driving you and helping you in. All the guys are doing great now but the first month or two was difficult. If you can work from home the longer the better.

Edited by Da Guru

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On 12/5/2018 at 1:02 PM, AhrnCityPahnder said:

 

Seeing my normally "all-business" dad in the recovery bed with the morphine drip ... cracking jokes, unaware his sack was spilling out of his little hospital gown was a really special moment in our relationship.   :unsure: 

did....did you put it back for him?

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I'll definitely provide a update tonight of the past several days.

Spoiler: things are going pretty daggone good.

Except for one thing :oldunsure:

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I had my left hip replaced in Feb 2007 and it gave me a new lease on life.  I had mine done at the Mayo Clinic here in Minnesota.  I was up the next day using a walker and out of the hospital in two days or one, I can't remember.  One thing that is a must is a device that you loop around your foot to help you get in and out of bed and also a car.  The worst part, and I don't think they still do this, are those tight leggings you had to have someone (my wife helped me) put on and off.  This was to prevent blood clots.  It was extremely difficult getting these on.   Even though I was supposed to be off work for 6 weeks, I was ready to go back to work after 4, but my doctor wouldn't allow it.

I also have arthritis in my right hip and will need that replaced in the future.

 

ETA:  I once asked my doctor, "How do I know when it is time?".  he said, "If you have to ask that question then it isn't time".  Then one night the pain was so bad I was in tears and knew it was time.

 

 

Edited by JohnnyU

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