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Dynasty & Redraft: WR Riley Ridley, Bears

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Georgia junior WR Riley Ridley declared for the 2019 NFL Draft.

Ridley made the announcement over Twitter, and is one of several Georgia players that are expected to declare for the draft soon. The 6-foot-1, 198-pound wideout caught 43 passes for 599 yards with nine touchdowns, and while those numbers aren't going to wow anyone, his raw talent is considered among the best at the position. The Draft Network's Jon Ledyard compared him to Michael Thomas -- a more raw version to be fair -- so if Ridley tests as well as many expect, he could be among the first few wideouts selected in 2019. Jan 4 - 4:20 PM

Source: Riley Ridley on Twitter

 

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The Draft Network's Jon Ledyard views Georgia junior WR Riley Ridley as a "slightly more raw Michael Thomas."

Ledyard writes that while Ridley is not quite as polished at this stage of his development as Thomas at a similar point, he sees them as being on a "similar plane as prospects." The analyst is intrigued by the forward steps Ridley has taken in development since signing on with the Bulldogs, highlighting that the 6-foot-1, 198-pound junior's route-running "has made major leaps this season." Concluded Ledyard, "Growth isn’t linear for everyone, but Ridley’s improvement over his time at Georgia is a good indicator that his best may also be yet to come in the NFL." He believes Ridley could draw consideration as the top receiving prospect in the pool come the spring. 

Tue, Oct 16, 2018 07:20:00 PM

Source: The Draft Network

 

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1 hour ago, Ilov80s said:

I don’t get the hype here at all

GMTA

 

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8 hours ago, Ilov80s said:

I don’t get the hype here at all

Rarely is the younger brother the better player in the NFL. That's just a note you all may want to make. Of course Calvin put up very good #s for ATL and I think this could be a brother combo where both will be good for a while.

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Riley Ridley - WR -  Bulldogs

The Athletic's Dane Brugler projects Georgia WR Riley Ridley as "a better pro than college pass catcher."

Ridley (6'1/198) only had a 43-599-9 receiving line at Georgia in 2018, but that's not overly concerning for Brugler because of Ridley's tape. A less dynamic version of his older brother (Calvin Ridley), Riley Ridley shows excellent route running and plays with a muscular frame. Ridley can also win in the NFL on double-moves and by catching with his hands (not his chest), but his lack of big-time production could keep him out of Round 1.

Source: The Athletic 

Feb 1 - 9:18 PM

 

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Riley Ridley - WR -  Bulldogs

NFL Network's Daniel Jeremiah calls Georgia WR Riley Ridley the best route runner in the 2019 NFL Draft.

Jeremiah sneaks Ridley into his top-32 in large part to his precise cuts and set-ups on his routes. This opinion has been held by other analysts in the community despite below-average production at Georgia. As a junior, Ridley only caught 43 passes across 14 games, which would make him a statistical outlier if he were to be a productive NFL player. However, Ridley did score nine touchdowns as he consistently broke down corners on double moves and won in the red zone on his limited targets. The debated prospect is a projected Day 2 selection.

Source: NFL on Twitter 

Feb 10 - 5:37 PM

 

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Matt Miller's Scouting Notebook Excerpt:

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6. Stock Up

Georgia wide receiver Riley Ridley is more than the brother of last year's first-rounder Calvin; he's also the best route-runner I've studied in the 2019 class of wide receivers.

Ridley is smooth through his breaks and shows the ability to drop his weight and transition to breaking routes. The subtle tricks of route running look natural to him. And while he doesn't have a huge frame (6'2", 200 lbs) his technique and athleticism should allow him to be an early starter for NFL teams. He's polished, tough, physical and smart.

A good showing at the scouting combine could push Ridley into the first round.

 

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Over the last few years, route running is one of the things that seems to stand out to me as a big factor in the transition from college to pros. I am starting to focus more on those guys when I draft WR's. I agree with most in here that Ridley doesn't seem all that impressive, but I may take a shot based on the comments of his route running alone.

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39 minutes ago, kutta said:

Over the last few years, route running is one of the things that seems to stand out to me as a big factor in the transition from college to pros. I am starting to focus more on those guys when I draft WR's. I agree with most in here that Ridley doesn't seem all that impressive, but I may take a shot based on the comments of his route running alone.

Route running is huge! PFF does a route report every as part of their premium package. I adjust my ranking a bit based on the WR’s route running abilities/knowledge.

Tex

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13 hours ago, kutta said:

Over the last few years, route running is one of the things that seems to stand out to me as a big factor in the transition from college to pros.

Agree and have made a few posts around here saying the same thing. It's something I've only been tracking since the year Odell came out but it's pretty compelling evidence. And while I know most of this discussions we have this time of year is dynasty related it's even more critical to me to identify the best route runners for redraft, they are the WR's that are NFL ready.  I've heard various people say Ridley or Brown are two best route runners in this draft and like you it's led me to being more open to taking a shot on Ridley over a more dynamic looking player, which I've already done in redrafts.

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1 hour ago, menobrown said:

Agree and have made a few posts around here saying the same thing. It's something I've only been tracking since the year Odell came out but it's pretty compelling evidence. And while I know most of this discussions we have this time of year is dynasty related it's even more critical to me to identify the best route runners for redraft, they are the WR's that are NFL ready.  I've heard various people say Ridley or Brown are two best route runners in this draft and like you it's led me to being more open to taking a shot on Ridley over a more dynamic looking player, which I've already done in redrafts.

Do you have a particular method for evaluating route running?  It just seems like such a hard thing to get your arms around.  I'm not a tape hound, feel I do a pretty good job of developing gut feelings about guys and weighing them against their landing spots and have been pretty successful in rookie drafts over the years, but I'm not one who can sit and break down tape at a deep level.

Would you mind sharing your process a bit?

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4 hours ago, menobrown said:

Agree and have made a few posts around here saying the same thing. It's something I've only been tracking since the year Odell came out but it's pretty compelling evidence. And while I know most of this discussions we have this time of year is dynasty related it's even more critical to me to identify the best route runners for redraft, they are the WR's that are NFL ready.  I've heard various people say Ridley or Brown are two best route runners in this draft and like you it's led me to being more open to taking a shot on Ridley over a more dynamic looking player, which I've already done in redrafts.

I scoff at the idea that there has to be a "great route runner" in every class.  I don't see it this year.  One of the best in recent years was Amari Cooper and I don't see that type of route running by anyone, let alone Riley Ridley.  I think people are labeling him that way because of his brother and projection to be a good route runner than what they've actually seen.  I don't see anyone in this class that stands out a lot in terms of their route running, but there are a lot of great WR's.  

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6 hours ago, skinfanjon said:

Do you have a particular method for evaluating route running?  It just seems like such a hard thing to get your arms around.  I'm not a tape hound, feel I do a pretty good job of developing gut feelings about guys and weighing them against their landing spots and have been pretty successful in rookie drafts over the years, but I'm not one who can sit and break down tape at a deep level.

Would you mind sharing your process a bit?

Not good enough to figure that out on my own I'm afraid and for sure not with the resources I have available. I think without All-22 college tape it's kind of hard for anyone but I've also made several posts in the last month or so that I'm struggling just to get normal game video's this year more then past years. My go to was NFL Draft Breakdown. So a hard thing to grade is harder for me then ever this year.

With at least a few full game clips I think I can get kind of idea but it's still something I'd consider my major scouting weakness. Watching film it's easy to see if a WR has a varied route tree and and you can get some kind of basic idea how that WR runs some routes but I think whatever I come up with pales in comparison to someone breaking down WR's with more tape and time to study. 

I'd easily tell you WR's are my most difficult thing to study an scout but I think so for NFL as well. You see them missing that position a lot in first round and  I posted  in another thread but I recall what Greg Ballard said last year that WR's were hardest position to scout and unlike me he was not really into route running. He said all he wanted to look at with WR's was film cutups that show them against press man coverage because most of the time otherwise they were just allowed to run free.

So long story short I need help on grading route running and more then anything else.  Charts and studies that show production from different parts of the field help to know how varied a route runner a player might but most of all I rely on ex-scouts to point me in the right direction on route running.  Some traits will jump out at you, like it's really easy to see how shifty Marquise Brown is in creating separation, but when I heard an ex-scout say say and so is the best route runner he has studied in the draft that holds more water then my own personal opinion. This is why you won't see me say "so an so is the best route runner in the draft" but you will see me use phrases like "I heard"  or "people are saying" so and so is one of the best route runners in the draft.  And when I said earlier I'd been tracking best route runners since Odell came out I was referring to fact I keep tabs on who the few ex-scouts I listen to have been saying they felt or heard were the best route runners. 

 

Edited by menobrown
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3 hours ago, Zyphros said:

I scoff at the idea that there has to be a "great route runner" in every class.  I don't see it this year.  One of the best in recent years was Amari Cooper and I don't see that type of route running by anyone, let alone Riley Ridley.  I think people are labeling him that way because of his brother and projection to be a good route runner than what they've actually seen.  I don't see anyone in this class that stands out a lot in terms of their route running, but there are a lot of great WR's.  

It's all relative. If I said I was looking for exceptional route runners in every draft that would be one thing,but when someone is looking for the best route runners in a draft it's all relative.

But saying that ever since I heard Marquise Brown labeled as one of the best route runners I paid more attention to trying to study that from him and he looks pretty impressive and I totally think you are wrong on why scouts feel like Ridley is a good route runner, if the people I pay attention to where that ignorantly simplistic I'd have not been paying attention to them for this long.

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1 hour ago, menobrown said:

It's all relative. If I said I was looking for exceptional route runners in every draft that would be one thing,but when someone is looking for the best route runners in a draft it's all relative.

But saying that ever since I heard Marquise Brown labeled as one of the best route runners I paid more attention to trying to study that from him and he looks pretty impressive and I totally think you are wrong on why scouts feel like Ridley is a good route runner, if the people I pay attention to where that ignorantly simplistic I'd have not been paying attention to them for this long.

Do you have any analysts whose opinion you place a lot of stock in?

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1 hour ago, menobrown said:

It's all relative. If I said I was looking for exceptional route runners in every draft that would be one thing,but when someone is looking for the best route runners in a draft it's all relative.

But saying that ever since I heard Marquise Brown labeled as one of the best route runners I paid more attention to trying to study that from him and he looks pretty impressive and I totally think you are wrong on why scouts feel like Ridley is a good route runner, if the people I pay attention to where that ignorantly simplistic I'd have not been paying attention to them for this long.

We will know years down the road, but even considering him and Hollywood being the best 2 route runners in this class, doesn't exactly speak volumes to me.  I think they're both explosive enough that making cuts makes it seem that way, but I don't see great routes. 

On a sidenote but somewhat on topic; Isn't there a website that charts the type of routes and how often they're run for prospects?  I remember seeing some tree's last year that had that for some top prospects.  

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1 hour ago, menobrown said:

I totally think you are wrong on why scouts feel like Ridley is a good route runner, if the people I pay attention to where that ignorantly simplistic I'd have not been paying attention to them for this long.

Not much after the catch and arrested for marijuana possession in March of 2017.  Two red flags.

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NFL Network's Daniel Jeremiah ranks Georgia WR Riley Ridley as his 29th overall prospect.

Jeremiah spends some time in his blurb to point out Ridley's flaws -- mainly production and burst -- but he's bullish on Ridley as a receiver who can contribute right away. Ridley (6'2/200) attacks the ball and has strong hands, but it's his footwork that helped him the most in college, often beating corners deep on double moves. While history is against Ridley producing in the NFL because of his lack of production, there are still plenty of reasons to believe in him as a Round 2 prospect. If Ridley shows more burst than expected at the NFL Combine, then he has an outside chance of sneaking into the end of Round 1.

SOURCE: NFL.com

Feb 25, 2019, 6:33 PM

 

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Georgia WR Riley Ridley ran the 40-yard dash in an unofficial 4.58 seconds at the NFL Scouting Combine.

Ridley (6'1/199) didn't have the greatest forty time, and he only had a 30.5-inch vertical, so this wasn't the showing that Ridley truthers wanted to see. Draft analysts love Ridley's footwork as a route runner, but the analytics community is more skeptical of Ridley given his lack of production (43.8 YPG). However, Ridley did use fancy footwork to beat corners deep which set him up for nine touchdowns on just 62 targets (14.1% TD rate). Perhaps the most debated receiver in the class, Ridley's range of where he'll be drafted goes from late Round 1 to Round 3.

SOURCE: NFL.com

Mar 2, 2019, 5:00 PM

 

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The Draft Network's Benjamin Solak named Georgia WR Riley Ridley as one of Saturday's losers at the NFL Scouting Combine.

Ridley (6'1/199) posted just a 26th percentile SPARQ score after running a 4.58 second 40-yard dash and a 30.5-inch vertical. Neither he or his brother Calvin Ridley tested overly well, but at least Calvin ran well (4.43 40). Despite the underwhelming athleticism, Solak compares Ridley to Packers WR Davante Adams and believes "Ridley is still a fine prospect on tape and worthy of a Day 2 draft selection."

SOURCE: The Draft Network

Mar 3, 2019, 6:40 AM

 

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NFL Film's Greg Cosell said Georgia WR Riley Ridley's "traits exceeded his college production."

Ridley (6'1/199) has "a very good feel for how to run routes" and can create separation at the top of his routes, but partially because of Georgia's run-first offense, Ridley wasn't featured like most of the other wide receiver prospects. In 2018, Calvin Ridley's younger brother only caught 43 passes for 559 yards, but he did score nine touchdowns. After running a 4.58-second 40-yard dash at the NFL Scouting Combine, Ridley is considered more of a second-rounder, rather than a Day 1 prospect.

SOURCE: Ross Tucker Podcast

Mar 7, 2019, 3:47 PM

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16 minutes ago, Faust said:

NFL Film's Greg Cosell said Georgia WR Riley Ridley's "traits exceeded his college production."

Ridley (6'1/199) has "a very good feel for how to run routes" and can create separation at the top of his routes, but partially because of Georgia's run-first offense, Ridley wasn't featured like most of the other wide receiver prospects. In 2018, Calvin Ridley's younger brother only caught 43 passes for 559 yards, but he did score nine touchdowns. After running a 4.58-second 40-yard dash at the NFL Scouting Combine, Ridley is considered more of a second-rounder, rather than a Day 1 prospect.

SOURCE: Ross Tucker Podcast

Mar 7, 2019, 3:47 PM

That would be surprising.

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Most of the film grinders made who had Ridley as a top 5 WR seem to be backing away now.

Edited by Ilov80s

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11 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Most of the film grinders made who had Ridley as a top 5 WR seem to be backing away now.

Sure about that? Cosell is a film grinder and his comments don't sound like someone backing off.

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4 minutes ago, menobrown said:

Sure about that? Cosell is a film grinder and his comments don't sound like someone backing off.

He’s just one of many. I certainly could be wrong but that’s my impression from the podcasts and post draft rankings I’ve seen.

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24 minutes ago, menobrown said:

Be surprised if he's not a second round pick myself.

Yeah I don't know. Not great stats. Poor combine when all the other recievers improved their stock. I just dont see what he has going for him. Good route running maybe.

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7 minutes ago, cloppbeast said:

Yeah I don't know. Not great stats. Poor combine when all the other recievers improved their stock. I just dont see what he has going for him. Good route running maybe.

Was not supposed to test well at combine when some mocked him in late one. Don't think a lot has changed.  Route running is huge, not an afterthought. I think he's a second round lock myself.

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Also let me add I'm lower on him after the combine myself. The 40 was about what I thought but the other tests were worse.  Huge hands was about the only positive.  But I think NFL teams will value his route running and how that makes him more NFL ready and he'll still find his way into round two, likely to a "trust the tape" kind of team.

 

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35 minutes ago, menobrown said:

Was not supposed to test well at combine when some mocked him in late one. Don't think a lot has changed.  Route running is huge, not an afterthought. I think he's a second round lock myself.

Both Browns, Samuel, Harmon, Isabella, Campbell, Arcega-Whiteside, and Ridley have all been projected to go in the 2nd (assuming Butler and Harry go in the 1st). Seems like a lot but everybody keeps saying how this draft is WR stacked.

Edited by cloppbeast

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The only thing I continually see about this guy is the route running, and while I agree that is important and something teams look at, I really can't see him as a 2nd round pick.

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Yahoo Sports' Eric Edholm projects Georgia WR Riley Ridley to Round 3.

Ridley (6'1/199) has a wide range of where he can be selected at, but Day 2 seems to be the most realistic landing spot. Ridley is one of the best route runners in the class and shows some athleticism on tape, but he tested like a below average athlete at the NFL Scouting Combine and only has 69 career receptions. One of the most debated prospects in the class, Ridley will likely be selected by a team that doesn't weigh analytics into the evaluation.

SOURCE: Yahoo Sports

Mar 18, 2019, 6:54 PM

 

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The Athletic's Dane Brugler believes Georgia WR Riley Ridley "projects as a better pro than college pass-catcher."

Ridley (6'1/199) is a divisive prospect after producing just a 26th percentile SPARQ athletic composite score at the NFL Scouting Combine. He also only recorded 69 career receptions in his time at Georgia. Film enthusiasts like Brugler enjoy that Ridley "is smooth in/out of the drive phase with natural body control and ball skills." Brugler ranked him at No. 54 overall in his latest Top-100 Big Board, placing him as a potential Day 2 selection.

SOURCE: The Athletic

Mar 19, 2019, 8:52 PM

 

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Bleacher Report's Matt Miller compared Georgia WR Riley Ridley to Green Bay Packers WR Davante Adams.

While Miller can see some of the appeal to Ridley's game, calling him a "graceful route-runner and impressive pass-catcher," the analyst voices has concerns over the 6-foot-1, 199-pounder's "inability to separate or make plays after the catch with speed." We've never really understood the Ridley hype train (which was moving at speed earlier this evaluating season before a poor combine showing caused the brakes to slam on). Miller currently ranks the Georgia product as his No. 10 wideout, while The Athletic's Dane Brugler ranks Ridley as the No. 54 overall prospect in the class.

SOURCE: Bleacher Report

Apr 4, 2019, 2:25 PM

 

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Fantasy Labs' Adam Levitan writes that Georgia WR Riley Ridley met 5-of-7 wide receiver minimum thresholds for fantasy football success.

Ridley (6'1/199) fails Levitan's vertical jump and three-cone minimum threshold, and he barely squeaked inside of the 40-yard dash threshold despite weighing less than 200 pounds. These thresholds are simply for size and athleticism, and it only gets worse when we evaluate his production profile. However, Ridley's route running has been consistently praised by draft analysts and he's still expected to be a Day 2 selection, so there's still some optimism if you're willing to ignore the analytics.

SOURCE: DK Playbook

Apr 14, 2019, 11:30 AM

 

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Bob McGinn's surveying of NFL evaluators lands Georgia WR Riley Ridley as the No. 6 wide receiver prospect.

Ridley (6'1/199) doesn't have the athleticism or production of a top-10 wide receiver prospect, but the NFL apparently loves him. At Georgia, Ridley only caught 69 passes across three seasons, and Fantasy Labs' Adam Levitan failed Ridley for his vertical and three-cone results. With the NFL reportedly still showing interest, it's probably correct to project him as a third-round selection.

SOURCE: Evan Silva on Twitter

Apr 17, 2019, 1:46 PM

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NFL Media analyst Lance Zierlein compared Georgia WR Riley Ridley to free agent WR James Jones.

Ridley is the younger brother of Falcons' rookie wideout Calvin Ridley, and while he doesn't offer big bro's upside, he's certainly an NFL talent. Zierlein lists Ridley's strength in his profile, particularly his ability to play through press coverage. He also notes that he's sure-handed with a wide catch radius. He also notes that his long speed is "non-threatening," and that he isn't really a threat after the catch, either. "Ridley isn't the fastest receiver on the block, but there is enough under the engine to race cornerbacks down the field if he's challenged on an island," writes Ridley. "His separation windows may always be a little tighter, but his timing and ability to turn contested catches in his favor should make him a better pro than college player with an upside of WR2."

SOURCE: NFL.com

Apr 19, 2019, 3:45 PM

 

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NFL Media's Daniel Jeremiah hears that Georgia WR Riley Ridley will be drafted near or in the third round.

Jeremiah notes that Ridley (6'1/199) isn't a starting-level athlete and doesn't have a lot of production (he only has 69 career receptions), but he calls him a "bargain" in the third round because of his route running skills. The lead draft analyst says some receivers separate with speed and quickness, but he doesn't believe that Ridley needs that to get open in the NFL with his ability to maneuver within his routes. There is not a bigger divide between the analytics and tape grinding communities at the wide receiver position than what we have with Ridley.

SOURCE: Andrew Howard on Twitter

Apr 18, 2019, 5:02 PM

 

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Bears selected Georgia WR Riley Ridley with the No. 126 overall pick in the 2019 NFL Draft.

Ridley (6’1/194) turned pro as a true junior after managing a career 70/1,026/13 (14.7 YPR) receiving line in Georgia’s run-heavy attack featuring Nick Chubb and Sony Michel, followed by Elijah Holyfield and D’Andre Swift. Calvin’s younger brother, Ridley combined underwhelming college production with underwhelming athleticism at the Combine, slugging out a 4.58 forty with forgettable vertical (30 ½") and three-cone (7.22) results. Ridley’s appeal comes purely from his technical skills; NFL Network’s Daniel Jeremiah deemed Ridley the best route runner in the draft. Despite his immense upside, Ridley admittedly lands in a spot that leaves him fighting for snaps behind Allen Robinson, Taylor Gabriel, Anthony Miller, and specialist Cordarrelle Patterson.

Apr 27, 2019, 11:18 AM

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https://247sports.com/college/georgia/Article/Georgia-Bulldogs-Riley-Ridley-all-around-winner-on-field-129872083/

“The advanced stats are on his side, too. According to Pro Football Focus, Ridley's contested catch rate was the best in the SEC at 75 percent. Alabama's Jerry Jeudy, who won the Biletnikoff Award as the nation's top receiver at season's end, was next at 63.6 percent.

Ridley also averaged 1.8 yards per every route ran in 2018 and produced a whopping 133.3 quarterback rating when targeted. When you look at those numbers, it's no mystery why he was Jake Fromm's most consistent target during the 14-game campaign.”

Security blanket possession guy, but he won’t see the field unless Robinson gets dinged, which he already has.  Clearly will be his understudy.

Edited by -X-

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3 hours ago, -X- said:

https://247sports.com/college/georgia/Article/Georgia-Bulldogs-Riley-Ridley-all-around-winner-on-field-129872083/

“The advanced stats are on his side, too. According to Pro Football Focus, Ridley's contested catch rate was the best in the SEC at 75 percent. Alabama's Jerry Jeudy, who won the Biletnikoff Award as the nation's top receiver at season's end, was next at 63.6 percent.

Ridley also averaged 1.8 yards per every route ran in 2018 and produced a whopping 133.3 quarterback rating when targeted. When you look at those numbers, it's no mystery why he was Jake Fromm's most consistent target during the 14-game campaign.”

Security blanket possession guy, but he won’t see the field unless Robinson gets dinged, which he already has.  Clearly will be his understudy.

One of my favorite landing spots in a draft that otherwise did not pair talent and opportunity particularly well for fantasy purposes. Trubisky is an ascending QB in an offense predicated on  timing and route running, a real strength of Ridley. ARob, Burton, and Miller are all decent, but not one of them stands out for me as a clear WR1. To me, that role is open and I think Ridley has a real chance to well exceed his perceived draft value. Most have him as a second rounder in fantasy but I would take him late in round 1. In three years, I see Ridley as a top 30 fantasy WR. 

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5 observations about the Bears' draft, including David Montgomery's impact on Tarik Cohen, Riley Ridley's fit and the expanded kicker competition

Excerpt:

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3. Receiver Riley Ridley helps a position of need.

On the Bears’ list of draft needs, I would have put wide receiver behind running back, tight end and defensive back. But not much further down.

That’s less a criticism of the Bears’ 2018 receiver group and more an acknowledgement of how bare the cupboard was when Nagy took over. The first-year coach inherited Josh Bellamy and Kevin White. That is, literally, almost nothing. We knew it would take multiple offseason cycles to restock that group, especially to the level Nagy wants it and Trubisky needs it.

Similarly, investing heavily in a position doesn’t necessarily make it a position of strength. Last offseason, the Bears invested in some promising wide receivers, specifically Allen Robinson and Anthony Miller. But I suspect few defensive coordinators lost sleep about defending them. After all, Cohen led the Bears with 71 receptions and was second (to Robinson) with 725 yards.

It’s fair to expect improvement from the receivers this season because of Trubisky’s experience in Nagy’s scheme, the receivers’ experience playing with him and because Cohen can more regularly be part of that group.

Meanwhile, Ridley helps because of his refined route running. That’s a solid fit for a head coach who demands detailed splits and depths to make his offense work.

“There are certain route runners that just know how to set guys up,” Pace said Saturday. “He has a savviness to him to know how to set guys up. For as big as he is, he knows how to drop his weight and quickly get out of break points. So when you’re watching him, you consistently see him separating from man coverage.”

The Bears wanted to add speed to their offense, and neither Ridley nor Montgomery is known for top-end long speed. That’s the trade-off when you don’t pick until the third round.

That said, Ridley should contribute sooner rather than later because he’ll prioritize the route details upon which Nagy insists.

Receivers coach Mike Furrey constantly stayed on Miller during his rookie season, impressing upon the Memphis second-rounder the importance of understanding how the positioning and timing of his route affected the entire play. Riley will comprehend that and help deepen the group.

“You see the names of the players that are now in our offense, and there are a lot of weapons,” Nagy said. “There are a lot of guys that can do a lot of things with the ball. And when you are a defensive coordinator and you need to try to focus or game plan on more than one or two or three people, which I feel like we have, that’s an advantage for us. Between now and the first game of the year, we have to figure out how we want to do it.”

 

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