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krista4

In this thread I rank my favorite Beatles songs: 204-1.

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Well Ms Krista, you finally through a curve ball and got me.  I love the Beatles but the early stuff gets old to me after an album whereas I can listen to the middle albums back to back all day.  It seems you are similar.  And, as I have mentioned, I'm a bigger fan of Help! than most.   Your slotting of Dizzy Miss Lizzy surprised me.  It is about 30 or 40 spots early for me.  

Im stupid busy at work these days and will follow along as time allows.  I didn't go any where.  This is my favorite thread and love the work!  

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6 minutes ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

How often is it that there isn't a cat on your lap/chest?

Fair point.

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20 minutes ago, pecorino said:

I'm not going to comment on Savoy Truffle and Bungalow Bill because I may say something that I regret. Suffice to say I don't think they should be triple-digiters.

Nothing to regret!  I’d love to hear your thoughts on these two and why you love(?) them.  Your last sentence is what I’d hope to avoid - there is no “should be higher/lower” argument in a list of my preferences, but I want to hear how others feel about these, whether or not their preferences would be the same.

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4 hours ago, krista4 said:

 

179.  Savoy Truffle (White Album, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

I get that it's supposed to be humo(u)rous.  "Oh, Eric Clapton's teeth are all rotted out, but he loves chocolate soooooo much!"  I don't need to hear about all the chocolates Eric Clapton likes, and I cringe when I hear the beginning "creeeee-am tangerine."  What I do like is the jazziness of it all - especially the horns and the organ.  Apparently George later apologized to the brass players for making their sound "dirty" through the distortion, but, as he explained to them, it's the way he wanted it.  I'm with George on that decision.  This is also a song where I think Ringo's drumming stands out by virtue of his refusal to stand out.  I need to do a separate "Ringo" write-up in here soon, but what I love most about him, evidenced well on this song, is his commitment to the support of the song, the subtle ways in which he makes a song better without making it about him.  Listen closely to his work on this one, hitting the perfect groove at every moment.  :heart: 

Mr. krista gets the humo(u)r:  "I think it’s funny.  And I think it’s funny that these bad-assed, drug-addled rockers are chocoholics.  Everybody’s heroin-addled and Clapton just wants a Milky Way.  And it rocks.  It’s a pretty good rock song.  The drums are good, and horns are good."

Suggested cover:  @Eephus might disapprove of this countdown, but I'm stealing his suggestion for a cover of this one anyway.  Ella Fitzgerald

Ouch. This is definitely top 20 for me.....

If I had to choose I would likely classify myself as an early Beatles fan, but have always really liked Savoy Truffle and Glass Onion.

Edited by ManOfSteelhead
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3 minutes ago, ManOfSteelhead said:

Ouch. This is definitely top 20 for me.....

What are the rest?

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We must be fairly simpatico when it comes to the Beatles.  You're pretty far in for me not to have had a "no way, that song can't be that low" moment.

Also, Bungalow Bill and the other White Album tracks you've posted took me back to the summer after HS in my then GFs basement.  We were way too occupied to skip the songs we didn't like.

Beatles White, CSNY Hits, Moody Blues, Zep's Houses of the Holy and Kahsmir were all in super heavy rotation that summer (she had older siblings and had adopted their music). 

Edited by Dinsy Ejotuz
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On 1/15/2019 at 1:12 PM, timschochet said:

Regarding my last post, I tend (like most people I suspect) to think of the Beatles in 3 different stages: 

Early Beatles (Meet the Beatles to A Hard Days Night) 

Mid Beatles (Help to Revolver) 

Late Beatles (Sgt Pepper to Let It Be)

Then in each of those stages there are sub stages (for late Beatles for instance, there is early late Beatles, mid late Beatles, and late late Beatles.) 

:goodposting:

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On 1/15/2019 at 10:17 PM, krista4 said:

It's a "With the Beatles" run:

193.  Little Child (With the Beatles, 1963)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

When @wikkidpissah made reference to something along the lines "their clangy early stuff" (although I'm sure he said it in more eloquent words), I immediately wondered if this was one of the songs he had in mind (the other that jumped to mind was Hold Me Tight).   I enjoy the energy of this song, and the harmonica, and for some reason I'm particularly enamored with Paul's harmonies on it - it might just be me, but I hear sarcasm in the "I'm so sad and lonely."  But the song, like Not a Second Time, seems to go nowhere, albeit with great energy.  It's also a bit sloppy - the drums sound off to me, the guitars seem drowned out, and there are actual mistakes, such as overdubbing of John singing two different sets of lyrics.  Kind of an upbeat mess.

Mr. krista:  "I like that you can tell all these songs are probably recorded in the same two-hour window.  And the piano was really good in that.  A little barnburner there."

Suggested cover:  Smithereens

I actually love this, though not so much that ai think I’d rank it inside say the Top 150.

WDWDIITR is dreck & should have been 200-204.

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47 minutes ago, BobbyLayne said:

WDWDIITR is dreck & would have been 200-204 were I making a list.

I’m going to keep trying to get this point across.

ETA:  I'm glad you laughed; I figured I could "pick on" you since you're such a GB of mine.  It's probably the lawyerly part of me being too into semantics, but this idea that anyone says a song "should" be higher/lower on a personal preference list doesn't make any sense to me.  

It's like when @Gr00vus posted his 50 favorite songs recently; I'd never have considered saying "you shouldn't have all those Sting songs on there."  If I were going to go in that direction, I'd have said, "Wow, you really like Sting a whole lot more than I do" or some such.  This is a little different in that I wouldn't have dreamed of saying anything negative in a thread where someone was just posting what they love the most, as opposed to this which is ranking a pre-made list, but still the concept of "should be" rather than "I'd do" eludes me in this context.

Edited by krista4
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I have a lot of catching up to do but this is one of my favorite recent threads.  I’ve got my bourbon and my Amazon Echo and just jamming.  Thanks krista!

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6 minutes ago, AAABatteries said:

I have a lot of catching up to do but this is one of my favorite recent threads.  I’ve got my bourbon and my Amazon Echo and just jamming.  Thanks krista!

I hope you’re not enjoying any truffles with that bourbon.

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My bold prediction for the songs that end up on the podium

Gold: She Said She Said  ... the most Beatles sounding song ever

Silver: Something

Bronze: Nowhere Man

 

Hot Take: Come Together would not crack my top 150.

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1 hour ago, Dinsy Ejotuz said:

We must be fairly simpatico when it comes to the Beatles.  You're pretty far in for me not to have had a "no way, that song can't be that low" moment.

Also, Bungalow Bill and the other White Album tracks you've posted took me back to the summer after HS in my then GFs basement.  We were way too occupied to skip the songs we didn't like.

Beatles White, CSNY Hits, Moody Blues, Zep's Houses of the Holy and Kahsmir were all in super heavy rotation that summer (she had older siblings and had adopted their music). 

I don't remember ever going over the turntable, getting down on one knee, tilting my head so I could accurately see the track grooves, and gingerly lifting the arm and placing the needle ever so carefully onto the next track in order to skip a song.  

Albums were meant to be listened to in the order they were set into the vinyl.  

Get off my lawn you attention-deficit millennials!!!

 

ETA:  our singles playlist.

Edited by Binky The Doormat
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8 hours ago, krista4 said:

185.  Everybody's Trying to Be My Baby (Beatles for Sale, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This is the last of my list of "covers that fell short of the original," and when I've mentioned earlier that at this time I felt George's vocals lacked some maturity, this is my primary example.  Even the double-tracking and the slapback echo* on his voice doesn't give it enough depth.  Listen to the original from Carl Perkins and you might agree:  I believe Perkins when he sings it.  Love this song (both versions), though.

*Created with STEED (single tape echo/echo delay)

Mr. krista:  "Good cover, probably a commentary on what it’s like to be famous all of a sudden."

George LOVED Carl Perkins - absolutely revered him. and it was never clearer than in this special from 1985.  The whole concert is on YouTube, I just posted a clip.  Even when I was kid and saw this for the first time, what stayed with me even then was just how damn HAPPY George was to be there, jamming with his hero.  It was so freaking cool

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2 minutes ago, Ted Lange as your Bartender said:

George LOVED Carl Perkins - absolutely revered him. and it was never clearer than in this special from 1985.  The whole concert is on YouTube, I just posted a clip.  Even when I was kid and saw this for the first time, what stayed with me even then was just how damn HAPPY George was to be there, jamming with his hero.  It was so freaking cool

not sure, but that big ####in' guitar of his looked like something Carl Perkins would play ...any connection (don't feel like researching right now and thought you might know).

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3 minutes ago, Binky The Doormat said:

I don't remember ever going over the turntable, getting down on one knee, tilting my head so I could accurately see the track grooves, and gingerly lifting the arm and placing the needle ever so carefully onto the next track in order to skip a song.  

Albums were meant to be listened to in the order they were set into the vinyl.  

#facts

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177.  Misery (Please Please Me, 1963)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Upon further review, I might have had this lower, but here we are.  I'm a piano player, and looking back on my original notes on this one, I might have given too much of a benefit of that charming little piano bit that comes up in the middle eight, first at 0:45.  George Martin replaced George Harrison's guitar solo there with his own piano solo instead, overdubbing it at a slower speed than the rest of the song, which had been recorded at twice the normal speed.  I think worked well; makes it sound almost like a harpsichord.  I hear this song, perhaps incorrectly, as sardonic and playful,  especially in this piano part and in John's "lala"s and "woowoo"s at the end.

This song was offered to Helen Shapiro at the beginning of 1963, which would have been an achievement for the Beatles at the time since she had two #1 hits.  She turned it down.  Oopsie.

Mr. krista:  "I like the song.  The lyrics are so appealing – 'the world is treating me bad.'  But the real dread that would be is belied by the fact that all these dudes are singing together and seemingly having a good time doing it.  Reminds me of a Phil Spector girl group.  The lyrics are always desperate affairs with pathos attached to them, but then the vocals are precise and beautiful.  Anyway, I like it a lot.  Great pop music."

Suggested cover:  Paul Carrack  

 

 

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28 minutes ago, Mister CIA said:

My bold prediction for the songs that end up on the podium

Gold: She Said She Said  ... the most Beatles sounding song ever

Silver: Something

Bronze: Nowhere Man

 

Hot Take: Come Together would not crack my top 150.

 Come Together is going to be alarmingly low on my list compared to what most people think as well.

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16 minutes ago, Ted Lange as your Bartender said:

George LOVED Carl Perkins - absolutely revered him. and it was never clearer than in this special from 1985.  The whole concert is on YouTube, I just posted a clip.  Even when I was kid and saw this for the first time, what stayed with me even then was just how damn HAPPY George was to be there, jamming with his hero.  It was so freaking cool

That clip is so awesome! 

The fact that we can type a few letters onto a keyboard and watch stuff like that is still miraculous to me.  Think about all the stuff that happened in the other 5000 years of recorded history before ubiquitous video and the Internet that's been lost forever.

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

I’m going to keep trying to get this point across.

ETA:  I'm glad you laughed; I figured I could "pick on" you since you're such a GB of mine.  It's probably the lawyerly part of me being too into semantics, but this idea that anyone says a song "should" be higher/lower on a personal preference list doesn't make any sense to me.  

It's like when @Gr00vus posted his 50 favorite songs recently; I'd never have considered saying "you shouldn't have all those Sting songs on there."  If I were going to go in that direction, I'd have said, "Wow, you really like Sting a whole lot more than I do" or some such.  This is a little different in that I wouldn't have dreamed of saying anything negative in a thread where someone was just posting what they love the most, as opposed to this which is ranking a pre-made list, but still the concept of "should be" rather than "I'd do" eludes me in this context.

My favorite thread rn. Looking forward to every part of this.

Haven’t analyzed what it’s comprised of exactly but my Spotify Beatles playlist is 347 songs. I think it’s everything that was available at midnight on Christmas 2015? Growing up in rural mid-Michigan, I was the youngest but each of us had a clear ATF growing up: oldest sister - Beach Boys, older brother - Rolling Stones, other sister - The Who, and for me it was the Fab Four.

Love your write ups, thanks for doing this.

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

I hope you’re not enjoying any truffles with that bourbon.

I do like truffles

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24 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

i disagree

Do you...quit?

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According to Charlie Daniels, "Carl Perkins' songs personified the rockabilly era, and Carl Perkins' sound personifies the rockabilly sound more so than anybody involved in it, because he never changed."[2] Perkins's songs were recorded by artists (and friends) as influential as Elvis Presley, the Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, Johnny Cash and Eric Clapton which further established his place in the history of popular music. Paul McCartney claimed that "if there were no Carl Perkins, there would be no Beatles."[3]

 

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20 minutes ago, Dinsy Ejotuz said:
39 minutes ago, Ted Lange as your Bartender said:

George LOVED Carl Perkins - absolutely revered him. and it was never clearer than in this special from 1985.  The whole concert is on YouTube, I just posted a clip.  Even when I was kid and saw this for the first time, what stayed with me even then was just how damn HAPPY George was to be there, jamming with his hero.  It was so freaking cool

That clip is so awesome! 

The fact that we can type a few letters onto a keyboard and watch stuff like that is still miraculous to me.  Think about all the stuff that happened in the other 5000 years of recorded history before ubiquitous video and the Internet that's been lost forever.

Yeah, this is really special.  I watched it a long time ago but need to revisit, like, now.

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22 minutes ago, Dinsy Ejotuz said:

That clip is so awesome! 

The fact that we can type a few letters onto a keyboard and watch stuff like that is still miraculous to me.  Think about all the stuff that happened in the other 5000 years of recorded history before ubiquitous video and the Internet that's been lost forever.

When I was young I wished I had enough money to listen to every record out there. Now I don't have to be rich.

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Just now, Leroy Hoard said:

When I was young I wished I had enough money to listen to every record out there. Now I don't have to be rich.

Exactly!  And you can link to the video too.

 

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Here's one things this awesome thread is doing for me:  it's making me realize I need to pay much more attention to the lyrics of Beatles songs.  I've grown up with these songs, but their musicianship was so freakin' innovative and evocative that that aspect is always what drives me when I listen.  Lyrical content comes second.  I see a song Krista throws up and I immediately start humming the tune, but, reading the thoughts of she and Mr. K, I have realized multiple times "Wow, I need to listen to those words better.  I had no idea."  Maybe I've been inoculated by the pablum of "Walrus" and "Come Together" (agree on the low ranking, btw) to expect the Beatles lyrics to too-often venture into self-indulgence for the sake of a tune, but this thread is giving me a new appreciation for many of their songs in a lyrical way.   Sadly, I'm not sure I could have even told you "Savoy Truffle" was about chocolate.  I just knew it was a rockin' tune.  

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I was a schoolboy when I heard my first Beatle song.  Love Me Do I think it was and from then it didn't take me long.

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Back to the countdown!  We're going to pop our Sgt. Pepper's Cherry!

*** AFTER OFFICIAL REVIEW, THIS SONG HAS BEEN MOVED TO #165.***

 Being For The Benefit Of Mr Kite!  (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967) 

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

It's getting really tough at this point, because I like all of these songs, and there's nothing left in the countdown that I'd turn off when it comes on (with one possible exception I'll mention when we get to it).  This is a John song with some of the hallmarks of a Paul song - the "circus" quality reminds me of Paul's dance-hall songs, and the invention of a new world is usually a Paul practice.  But was it an invention?  John admits that he cribbed most of the details from an 1800s circus poster he bought at an antique shop - from the Hendersons to Henry the Horse to the hogshead of real fire.  Interesting article and image of the poster here! 

John didn't particularly like the song and said he was "just going through the motions because we needed a new song."  I have a more favorable impression of the song than John does, as I love the creation of the circus atmosphere that makes me feel like I'm there (even though I hate circuses) - credit to George Martin for all of that.  I could listen to the part between 0:59-1:29 over and over - and I do - though I feel the ending soundscape starts to drag a little.  Don't sleep on the Paul's bass or Ringo's drums on this one.  We'll have to discuss Ringo on all of this album, as I think it's one of the many places where he really shines.

Mr. krista:  "Pretty good song about a circus.  Good circus song.  There’s probably a song somewhere about the Flying Wallendas that’s better."

Suggested covers:  I've studiously avoided this movie, but I like Eddie Izzard's version.  If only this were better quality - The Residents with the London Sinfonietta

 

 

Edited by krista4
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Pretty sure there were 205 Beatles songs.  Krista you may need to start this over.

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9 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Back to the countdown!  We're going to pop our Sgt. Pepper's Cherry!

176.  Being For The Benefit Of Mr Kite!  (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

It's getting really tough at this point, because I like all of these songs, and there's nothing left in the countdown that I'd turn off when it comes on (with one possible exception I'll mention when we get to it).  This is a John song with some of the hallmarks of a Paul song - the "circus" quality reminds me of Paul's dance-hall songs, and the invention of a new world is usually a Paul practice.  But was it an invention?  John admits that he cribbed most of the details from an 1800s circus poster he bought at an antique shop - from the Hendersons to Henry the Horse to the hogshead of real fire.  Interesting article and image of the poster here! 

John didn't particularly like the song and said he was "just going through the motions because we needed a new song."  I have a more favorable impression of the song than John does, as I love the creation of the circus atmosphere that makes me feel like I'm there (even though I hate circuses) - credit to George Martin for all of that.  I could listen to the part between 0:59-1:29 over and over - and I do - though I feel the ending soundscape starts to drag a little.  Don't sleep on the Paul's bass or Ringo's drums on this one.  We'll have to discuss Ringo on all of this album, as I think it's one of the many places where he really shines.

Mr. krista:  "Pretty good song about a circus.  Good circus song.  There’s probably a song somewhere about the Flying Wallendas that’s better."

Suggested covers:  I've studiously avoided this movie, but I like Eddie Izzard's version.  If only this were better quality - The Residents with the London Sinfonietta

 

 

I knew as soon as I post a heartfelt soliloquy about the importance of lyrics that you'd bust something like this out.  

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1 hour ago, Ted Lange as your Bartender said:

George LOVED Carl Perkins - absolutely revered him. and it was never clearer than in this special from 1985.  The whole concert is on YouTube, I just posted a clip.  Even when I was kid and saw this for the first time, what stayed with me even then was just how damn HAPPY George was to be there, jamming with his hero.  It was so freaking cool

So true about CP and George 

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20 minutes ago, Dinsy Ejotuz said:

I know I like a lot of Beatles' songs, but I doubt I like 174 more than this one.

There are soooooo many great ones.

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28 minutes ago, Shaft41 said:

I knew as soon as I post a heartfelt soliloquy about the importance of lyrics that you'd bust something like this out.  

:lmao: Bad timing.  This one is definitely all about the sound.

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39 minutes ago, Binky The Doormat said:

This is very ####### funny.

Mr. krista:  "Pretty good song about a circus.  Good circus song. 

Dear Madam Barnum, XTC and, uh... 

Edited by Dinsy Ejotuz
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2 hours ago, Mister CIA said:

Hot Take: Come Together would not crack my top 150.

:hifive: 

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Let's clear out a few covers before morning.  These are all still in the category of songs that I think are terrific, but to which the Beatles covers don't add much new.  I didn't intend to have these covers bunched up like this, but when I look above them I can't say I prefer any of them to a Beatles original up there.   

But before we get to the covers, I need to post one of those very love-it-or-hate-it songs.  I happen to love it.

176.  You Know My Name (Look Up the Number) (Single, 1970)

Beatles:  Spotify  YouTube

I understand a lot of people hate this song, and in terms of "noise" songs a lot would put Mr. Kite above it, but...this song cracks me up. It always makes me laugh with its madness, and I'm fascinated every time I hear it.  One of the most bizarre facts about this to me is that it was the b-side to "Let It Be."  I can just imagine some sweet human buying that single and then freaking out over WTF was on the other side.

(Quick aside:  I've noticed that @DaVinci always mentions this song as his favorite, which I've always assumed was sarcasm, but I'd love to hear his thoughts on it either way.)

One of the main appeals to me of this song is that they sound like they're having such a damn great time.  And in 1967 (recorded three years before its release, btw), that's notable.  I'm also a fan of the Beatles and post-Beatles songs that sound like different songs mushed together - see, e.g., Band on the Run, You Never Give Me Your Money, etc.  Obviously I'm not saying this is on par with those, but I do love the songs that move from one segment to another, one tempo and feel to another, but somehow work, and the four-or-is-it-five separate parts of this keep me interested along the way.  I dunno; a lot of people think this one is nonsense, which I couldn't argue with, but hey, at one point Paul said that this was his favorite song of theirs, so I can't be completely off, right?  Paul's pretty weird, though.  Regardless, it's my favorite song that features a burp at the end.

Fun facts:  one of the many crazy sound effects on this song is Mal Evans either, depending upon what you believe, running a spade through some gravel or shaking a bag of some gravel.  In any case, gravel was a supporting vocal here.    Also, listen for Brian Jones of the Stones on sax.

Mr. krista:  "This is better if you imagine Muppets doing it."

Suggested cover:  After typing four earnest paragraphs about this, and thereafter checking the notes to find Mr. krista's comments (which are copied in full), I'm laughing too hard to look for a cover.  Maybe later.  (And when I just reminded him of his comment from months ago, I can't get him to stop singing this to me in an Animals-from-the-Muppets voice.)

Edited by krista4
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14 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Regardless, it's my favorite song that features a burp at the end.

Fun Fact A to Z: Table of Contents off of the Roots's Things Fall Apart features a belch at the beginning of the song. 

NSFW, like everything I post.  

Edited by rockaction
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To the covers!  I love each one of these.

175.  Anna (Go to Him) (Please Please Me, 1963)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This is one of the most purely beautiful John vocals, in my opinion.  Nothing crazy-powerful like "Twist and Shout," but full of such desperation and depth.  Word is he had a cold while recording it, so I recommend to all young singers to go outside without a coat or masturbate too much or whatever moms tell their sons will cause them colds (I might have mixed that up with "what gives you crossed eyes").  John's perceived anguish might be heightened by that cold-induced raspiness.  The seemingly flat backing vocals perfectly highlight John even more beautifully.  The other part that I absolutely adore about this song is George's guitar riff that replaces the piano on the original, to positive effect, though you'll see below that Mr. krista was less impressed.

Given how much I've raved about this, why not higher?  As I've mentioned, my rankings of covers are heavily based on how they measure up to the originals.  And if you listen to Arthur Alexander's original of this, well holy #### that vocal is so incredible I just can't move this higher.  Good god, so forceful yet delicate.

Side note:  I have an affection for the fact that, when faced with losing a girl to another guy, in this case John (via Arthur Alexander) takes it quite well, as opposed to other songs we'll cover later.

Fun fact:  a special pressing was made of this song as a single on Vee Jay records, as it was believed that the record would appeal to black audiences.  It's believe that only a handful still exist, and a copy sold for $35k in 2012.

Another fun fact:  Arthur Alexander's first hit, You Better Move On, was covered by The Rolling Stones.  Not a bad run there, Art.

Mr. krista:  "That’s ghostly weird (the backing vocals).  I like the drum part a lot, with the open high hat.  If you took out every instrument but the drums, John Lennon could still sing it and it would be 90% of the song.  That drum pattern is all the song.  That guitar lick you like doesn’t mean anything.  I’m struck by what a good band they were already.  Fitting together like a puzzle, the guitar finishing the drums’ phrases, etc."

 

174.  Long Tall Sally (Single, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Paul's vocal on this is terrific, and I think Little Richard's vocal on it isn't one of his best.  But you know, it's Little ####### Richard.  So it can't be quite the same.  John and George's guitars (each with a separate solo) are stellar, and Ringo keeps it all together brilliantly the way Ringos do.  If you didn't hear the original, you'd be more impressed, but still I think this is a faithful and passionate cover.  Little Richard has indicated in various interviews that he taught Paul his screaming, and I think it shows.

Speaking of Little Richard, wonder what it would have been like to see him play with Jimi Hendrix in his touring band and Billy Preston on keyboard, or with the Beatles during their early days in the UK and Hamburg.  Those are a couple of those "what event would you like to have witnessed" moments for me.  :heart: 

Fun fact:  This song has the longest life of those the Beatles played live in concert, all the way from the days of The Quarrymen through the Candlestick Park concert in 1966 - and sub-fun-fact, it was the last song played during that last concert.

Another fun fact:  This was released by Little Richard at such an inordinately fast pace so that Pat Boone couldn't cover it, as he had done with "Tutti Frutti."  To me, the Beatles version starts out a bit slow but then hits that great Little Richard groove.

@Shaft41, I'm sorry to say that the lyrics don't matter on this one.  :)   I have no idea what they're even saying through all the ebullience.  

Mr. krista:  "Good Little Richard cover.  One of the things I like about The Beatles is that they were huge fans of the Beatles.  They loved the music they were doing and that really goes a long way.  They were clearly gripped by rock music and super stoked to make it."  I played the song again for Mr. krista tonight and noted how well I thought Paul did the vocal:  he laughed uproariously.  Then I let him know that he had previously used the not-Mr.-krista-like words "super stoked" in a description and asked if he wanted to update:  "Nah, who am I to argue with me?"

 

173.  Words of Love (Beatles for Sale, 1964)

Beatles version: Spotify  YouTube

I ####### love this song.  The only reason it isn't higher is it's a little "Weezer does 'Africa'" for me, so note-by-note true to the Buddy Holly original that I'm befuddled as to why it was recorded.  But holy hell, it's a great song - so I guess there's my answer.  As I was thinking about this song, not even playing it, I realized I was tapping out the percussion on the couch cushions.  Makes me wanna spin around in circles.  The harmonies give the song a sweet essence.  By the way, if anyone ever wants to do a thread dedicated to the brilliance of Buddy Holly, I'll be right there with you.

Mr. krista:  "Nice.  Seemed like harmonies to George and they sang to him. Simple percussion like someone slapping his knee.. But again not as much as Holly."  I just read this aloud to Mr. krista and asked WTF he'd been talking about.  His response:  "Something tells me there was a problem in the transcription."  Yeah, mighta been.

 

172.  Rock and Roll Music (Beatles for Sale, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

To me, a much superior Chuck Berry cover to the flat "Roll Over Beethoven," this one was recorded in one freaking take that features the brilliant vocals by John.  The reason it can't be higher is because Chuck freakin' Berry, but the energy of this thrills me when it comes on shuffle.  I love the way each verse seems to build into a frenetic chorus, and OMG Ringo's cymbals on this.  #######' rocks.  

Mr. krista:  "You know how I feel about Chuck Berry and you know how you feel about Beatles rave-ups so you know I think it’s awesome.  Any song with big long five/six note breaks with someone singing over top of it, especially the way Lennon does, does it for me.”

 

Edited by krista4
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