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krista4

In this thread I rank my favorite Beatles songs: 204-1.

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Seems we have a Friday night party going on in here!

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Just now, shuke said:

Seems we have a Friday night party going on in here!

:banned:

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Twice now I've written up a song and then hit the wrong button and lost everything.  ####!  The perils of drunken countdowns.  :(

Third time's a charm.

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19.11% done

two more to hit twenty percent

not sayin' just sayin'

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Just now, krista4 said:

Twice now I've written up a song and then hit the wrong button and lost everything.  ####!  The perils of drunken countdowns.  :(

Third time's a charm.

this happened to me tonight - wrote out this beautiful email / update thingy to a friend on an app and fat fingered it into nowhere

revised message:

"sup"

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166.  Flying (Magical Mystery Tour, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Since this is my third attempt at a write-up, I'll keep it short.

I know a lot of people don't appreciate this one, but I find it soothing and could listen to it for hours.  So suck it.

Fun fact:  first song to be credited to all four of the lads.

Mr. krista:  "“[10 seconds in] I like this a million times better [than Fool on the Hill].  I like this one.  I like that song.  I wish it were 20 minutes long.  I like it’s all spacey and surfy in the beginning, like Shadowy Men, like a really extended theme song to a great comedy sketch show.  I like the lalalalalas.  It’s clear it’s transitional music to get from one part of the thing to the other part, but for what it is, it’s great.  It’s excellent sorbet after the ##### sandwich that is Fool on the Hill.”"

Suggested covers:  OMG here it is with Chet Baker on flugelhorn!  But I actually enjoy this one more, though it might be the cover pic of Mr. Rourke(?) and the "zee plane, zee plane" guy that gets me over the finish.

 

Edited by krista4
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9 minutes ago, BobbyLayne said:

19.11% done

two more to hit twenty percent

not sayin' just sayin'

I'll see your two more and add one...I've two more queued up (and by queued up I mean I wrote #### out that I"ve lost) and then will probably quit for the night.

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2 minutes ago, krista4 said:

165.  Flying (Magical Mystery Tour, 1967)

B

Mr. krista:  "“[10 seconds in] I like this a million times better [than Fool on the Hill].  I like this one.  I like that song.  I wish it were 20 minutes long.  I like it’s all spacey and surfy in the beginning, like Shadowy Men, like a really extended theme song to a great comedy sketch show.  I like the lalalalalas.  It’s clear it’s transitional music to get from one part of the thing to the other part, but for what it is, it’s great.  It’s excellent sorbet after the ##### sandwich that is Fool on the Hill.”"

 

He had more to drink than you, amirite?          another in the 190'a for me

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6 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Mr. krista:  "“[10 seconds in] I like this a million times better [than Fool on the Hill].  I like this one.  I like that song.  I wish it were 20 minutes long.  I like it’s all spacey and surfy in the beginning, like Shadowy Men, like a really extended theme song to a great comedy sketch show.  I like the lalalalalas.  It’s clear it’s transitional music to get from one part of the thing to the other part, but for what it is, it’s great.  It’s excellent sorbet after the ##### sandwich that is Fool on the Hill.”"

Did I miss FOTH getting ranked? Are you foreshadowing #164?

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OMG speaking of which:

164.  The Fool on the Hill (Magical Mystery Tour, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Is it as bad as Mr. krista alleges?  Is it indeed a sandwich composed of excrement?  Check page 6 to find out!!!

So anyway, obviously I like this one more than Mr. krista does.  It's one of those "imagined worlds" from Paul, and for whatever reason I always associate it with "Rocky Raccoon."  I guess it's the fact that both are Paul-created worlds relating to a solitary (by choice or by circumstance) man who is perhaps misunderstood.  As I've previously mentioned, I have mixed feelings about these fictitious Paul worlds; I prefer the personal style of John, but the creativity with which Paul can paint these pictures is amazing to me.  I always feel like I can literally picture the people he describes.

 I think this song is gorgeous, love the tempo change at the end, and enjoy the flautists.  Really I just wanted to be able to type "flautists."  What a pleasing word. And I gotta say it's my favorite song with Paul on recorder.  But the song suffers for me from some self-importance or...wait...let me have Mr. krista explain.

Interesting-ish fact:  By far the most cover versions to sort through so far.

Mr. krista:  "I do not really care for that song very much. When the best part of the song is the flute, your song is pretty well ####ed.  Unless you’re a Beethoven sonata…  Yeah, I didn’t care for that song.  It’s a standard trope of the fool outcast as the visionary.  There are a million douchebags on the internet that think they’re that guy now; they’re on libertarian websites in their mom’s basements, wearing a fedora."

Suggested covers:  Aretha Franklin holy ####.  WTF version from The Four Tops.  If Yoko had sung it - Bjork.

Edited by krista4
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Uno mas.

163.  Only a Northern Song (Yellow Submarine, 1969)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This one starts so strongly for me than every time it comes on, I immediately think, "Oh, I need to move this up in the rankings!"  But then it kind of meanders, drags on too long and goes in places that seem destined just as filler rather than a complement to the rest. There, it loses me.  Before it gets into that meandering soundscape, though, I love the Indian feel, the "dragging" vocal, and the various instrumentation.

This is one of many of George's protest songs - this one against the dominance of the John/Paul songwriting team as well as the band's publishers! - and I dig the fact that he did these.  His lyrics are clever - I like the "doesn't really matter what chords I play" bit that indicates he's sick of taking a backseat to his bandmates and also being ignored by the label and producers.  Subtle but compelling.  This was recorded during the Sgt. Pepper's time period but didn't make the cut there, perhaps underscoring his complaints.

In addition to Paul on trumpet (holy hell is there nothing he can't do?), this is one of my favorite songs to feature a glockenspiel.

Mr. krista:  "I like that one.  I like it a lot.  I guess it was a little too pissy to be on Sgt Pepper's, but I like the sound collage, the trumpets, good psychedelia.  40 years later The Flaming Lips had pro tools and put out a record like – well, any of the records they put out in the aughts – and it’s 'amazing and so forward-looking' but it just sounded like the Beatles."

Suggested cover:  Well, I think this is super-fun and might even like it better than the original - Yonder Mountain String Band

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Not only is this a good stopping point because bed, but it's a logical break for me in terms of thinking there's a distinction between these and the songs that come next.  We're next going to get into a group of ~15 that I could move around here or there before hitting another slightly higher tier.  In those 15, though, we'll finally take songs from both A Hard Day's Night and Rubber Soul off the board for the first time.  :shock: 

Edited by krista4
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1 hour ago, BobbyLayne said:

Did I miss FOTH getting ranked? Are you foreshadowing #164?

Not intended foreshadowing but turned out that way in the rankings.  All his comments come from last summer when we listened to all the albums in order, so sometimes his comments need explanation when spliced in.

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22 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Not intended foreshadowing but turned out that way in the rankings.  All his comments come from last summer when we listened to all the albums in order, so sometimes his comments need explanation when spliced in.

I think many, like me, have perhaps underestimated how much effort & thoughtfulness you put into this. I realize (79th time this caveat has gone out from various folks) these are your subjective rankings, not the definitive all-time Beatles song rankings. But anyone challenging placement (silly thing) better level up first.

The lawyer from Seattle did not come to play.

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I always thought that drum crash in "Every Little Thing" was supposed to represent a heart beating. Not that that makes it any less jarring......

 

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6 hours ago, BobbyLayne said:

I think many, like me, have perhaps underestimated how much effort & thoughtfulness you put into this. I realize (79th time this caveat has gone out from various folks) these are your subjective rankings, not the definitive all-time Beatles song rankings. But anyone challenging placement (silly thing) better level up first.

The lawyer from Seattle did not come to play.

They are far from definitive!  Just a matter of personal preference, and my descriptions of what I love or (less often) hate about a song are meant to spark discussion, not to be a statement of fact.  

 

Edited by krista4
Sounded sorta jerky.
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14 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

I always thought that drum crash in "Every Little Thing" was supposed to represent a heart beating. Not that that makes it any less jarring......

 

Interesting.  Now I have to re-listen with that in mind.  

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3 hours ago, krista4 said:

They are far from definitive!  Just a matter of personal preference, and my descriptions of what I love or (less often) hate about a song are meant to spark discussion, not to be a statement of fact.  I do wish I could see more specifics about why people love (or hate, as the case may be) some of these, though.  I think there was some of that with Baby's in Black, for instance, but not as much with, for example, Savoy Truffle, which many people seemed to love but only stated a "that should be higher" notion.  Actually Mr. krista's argument in favor of the latter was the most compelling so far (but obviously didn't change my mind.)

When you get to the one my daughters Preprofessional (“well la-Tee-da”) ballet danced to, I’ll be arguing vociferously it’s too low. #fairwarning

Edited by BobbyLayne

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9 hours ago, Mister CIA said:

 

Edited by zamboni

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I absolutely love “The Fool On the Hill”. I love schmaltzy, preachy, Paul. “My Love”, “Let Em In”, “Picasso’s Last Words”, “With a Little Luck”- even “Silly Love Songs” has grown on me over the years. Adore all that stuff. 

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10 hours ago, krista4 said:

Coincidentally just heard this song (on the Beatles channel) while driving earlier this week, and admitted sheepishly to Mr. krista how much I liked it, but that I couldn't name another Badfinger song.  I know of their existence and that they recorded on Apple Records for a time, but they've escaped my notice.  He googled and gave me a list of their other well-known songs, but neither of us could identify any by title, though I'm sure we'd recognize some if we heard them.  Anyway, this is a good jam IMO.

 

10 hours ago, krista4 said:

I think it might have been the band name, for all these years.  It's terrible.  I will check 'em out fully.  Which songs/albums do you recommend for a starter kit?

Paul wrote some of their biggest hits.

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16 minutes ago, Dr. Octopus said:

 

Paul wrote some of their biggest hits.

Yeah, they’ve just slipped through the cracks for me.  

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10 hours ago, Binky The Doormat said:

No Dice and Straight Up albums.  Just give the albums a listen all the way through.  

The main singles you would recognize are "Day After Day", "No Matter What", "Come And Get It", and "Baby Blue".  The band is a tragic story ...but that's for another day.  

ETA: No Dice front/back album cover. 

Straight Up is my favorite of their albums, and you're right, they are a tragic story.

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catching up:

On 1/18/2019 at 1:32 AM, krista4 said:

Let's clear out a few covers before morning.  These are all still in the category of songs that I think are terrific, but to which the Beatles covers don't add much new.  I didn't intend to have these covers bunched up like this, but when I look above them I can't say I prefer any of them to a Beatles original up there.   

But before we get to the covers, I need to post one of those very love-it-or-hate-it songs.  I happen to love it.

175.  You Know My Name (Look Up the Number) (Single, 1970)

 

Missed this one first time thru - glad it was quoted for me to notice it.

This must have been re-released as a single in the early 80s, because my corner bar's otherwise pretty-standard jukebox had this on it. Easily the most popular song on it, i revel in the memory of smashed group sings/dances to it

15 hours ago, krista4 said:

I like that song more than most humans do.

Object to your heart's content; I don't mind!

Mr. Kite is the one that stands out to me right now as being ranked differently than I wish it were (suck it, Savoy Truffle fans).  As I was going over the next couple of tiers, I found several I'd put below it.  The problem it faced was that I moved it down right before ranking, but when I moved it down I didn't look at what was above it and move those down as well.

This thread's most important contribution is distracting some of us from the political forum a bit.

could it be that you consider the old-timey stuff regressive? though i understand the Beatles attraction to it, it is time they could have spent blowing our minds instead of blowing their own

12 hours ago, krista4 said:

I think it might have been the band name, for all these years.  It's terrible.  I will check 'em out fully.  Which songs/albums do you recommend for a starter kit?

The way i heard, Jeff Lynne was going to join this band under its original name Goodfinger (and who doesnt love a goodfinger now & then?!). When Lynne decided against it to form a 2nd band w Roy Wood, ELO, they changed the name in a huff

11 hours ago, krista4 said:

So it's the next several songs, along with "All Together Now," that made me see that "Kite" is too low for my taste.  Stand by for future updates, but for now:

166.  Every Little Thing (Beatles for Sale, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Winner of the "Biggest Drop from Initial Rankings" award!  When we did the album-by-album listen, I was forced to listen to some songs that I usually don't focus on, and in the context of that album both Mr. krista and I thought this was great.  So it went into a higher-than-justified tier and has spent its remaining months dropping and dropping.  Don't get me wrong, I still think this song is terrific, but it also has flaws that I was reminded of on frequent listens.  Those flaws include but are not limited to...those drums.  You know the part.  Those big bashing timpani that seem, charitably, inappropriate.  WTF is going on there?

This song is unusual in that it appears to be a rare one in which the chief songwriter (Paul) is not the lead singer (John), though I say "appears to be" because, as in many instances, it's not entirely clear who should get most of the songwriting credit and who is singing which part, though it seems clear John's the lead in the verses and that Paul is the backing vocal and not an overdub of John.  But some disagree.  It's a bit of a mess in that regard.  It's also not clear who is playing which guitar parts, though the consensus is John is on a Rickenbacker.  This is just one of many, many instances of not knowing who did what on a Beatles song, which I think is interesting and notable considering how full our information is these days.  I haven't read the Geoff Emerick book about recording the Beatles (I know, I know, I must - I've bought it but haven't read), but I think he must have the most information to solve some of these questions.

I just realized I haven't said anything that i like about this song.  I do love the vocals and think that what I hear as the softer side of Paul and the acerbic side of John make for a great blend.    That is also evident to me in the lyrics:  what could be taken as simple, even trite, lines sound instead like there's more than that beneath them...the line "Yes, I know I'm a lucky guy" always makes me question if that's meant to be sincere or sarcastic, or more likely a combination of both.  There's something about that descent of that line in particular that draws me in and makes me want to know what comes after, and then surely enough, despite being written (we think) by sunny Paul, it is:  

"I remember the first time
I was lonely without her
Can't stop thinking about her now"

Italics for Friday-night emphasis.

And so right after he says how lucky he is, he is mourning being without her.  🤭

Aw hell, I've written so much about a song ranked in the 160s, but I find it so intriguing.  It's sneakily complex, and despite that timpani I love to hear it.

Mr. krista:  "This is my favorite song on the record so far. I’d like to listen to it again. Surprisingly heavy and kind of dark. This is like the black album. Pretty sweet timpani action."

Suggested cover:  There is a pretty well-known Yes cover of this song, and if Yes if your thing, go for it.  For me, I'll take Lou Ann Barton instead.  I don't love it, but it's not Yes.

This would be among my selections if i did a record of Beatle covers. The boys themselves left a lot undone with it and no one's picked up the ball to my satisfaction

9 hours ago, krista4 said:

OMG speaking of which:

164.  The Fool on the Hill (Magical Mystery Tour, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Is it as bad as Mr. krista alleges?  Is it indeed a sandwich composed of excrement?  Check page 6 to find out!!!

So anyway, obviously I like this one more than Mr. krista does.  It's one of those "imagined worlds" from Paul, and for whatever reason I always associate it with "Rocky Raccoon."  I guess it's the fact that both are Paul-created worlds relating to a solitary (by choice or by circumstance) man who is perhaps misunderstood.  As I've previously mentioned, I have mixed feelings about these fictitious Paul worlds; I prefer the personal style of John, but the creativity with which Paul can paint these pictures is amazing to me.  I always feel like I can literally picture the people he describes.

 I think this song is gorgeous, love the tempo change at the end, and enjoy the flautists.  Really I just wanted to be able to type "flautists."  What a pleasing word. And I gotta say it's my favorite song with Paul on recorder.  But the song suffers for me from some self-importance or...wait...let me have Mr. krista explain.

Interesting-ish fact:  By far the most cover versions to sort through so far.

Mr. krista:  "I do not really care for that song very much. When the best part of the song is the flute, your song is pretty well ####ed.  Unless you’re a Beethoven sonata…  Yeah, I didn’t care for that song.  It’s a standard trope of the fool outcast as the visionary.  There are a million douchebags on the internet that think they’re that guy now; they’re on libertarian websites in their mom’s basements, wearing a fedora."

Suggested covers:  Aretha Franklin holy ####.  WTF version from The Four Tops.  If Yoko had sung it - Bjork.

Dislike agreeing w Timmy almost as much as disagreeing w Ollie, but this might even be Top 50 for me. An ultimate "why is my 'sad' so much more beautiful than my 'happy'" type of tune.

 

Just loving this thread thru&thru. As you must have sensed in order to put in the work involved, you're the perfect one to present the arguablymostarguable band of all time in this format

Edited by wikkidpissah
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2 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

 

Dislike agreeing w Timmy almost as much as disagreeing w Ollie, but this might even be Top 50 for me. An ultimate "why is my 'sad' so much more beautiful than my 'happy'" type of tune.

 

In my top 75 for sure also.   Not sure how you can dislike that song.

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1 hour ago, Getzlaf15 said:

In my top 75 for sure also.   Not sure how you can dislike that song.

Fool would be pretty up there for me, too, but different strokes for different folks is what makes this thread.

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2 hours ago, wikkidpissah said:

 

could it be that you consider the old-timey stuff regressive? though i understand the Beatles attraction to it, it is time they could have spent blowing our minds instead of blowing their own

Good way to put it.

I'm happy to see the love for "Fool" in here.  I love the song, too.  It's one that has suffered for me from all the listens, and I can't quite put my finger on why.  I had it much higher in my initial rankings and it's just kept dropping.

 

 

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My goals for today are to work out for two hours and to post at least the next 15 songs.  Look out!

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13 hours ago, krista4 said:

So it's the next several songs, along with "All Together Now," that made me see that "Kite" is too low for my taste.  Stand by for future updates, but for now:

166.  Every Little Thing (Beatles for Sale, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Winner of the "Biggest Drop from Initial Rankings" award!  When we did the album-by-album listen, I was forced to listen to some songs that I usually don't focus on, and in the context of that album both Mr. krista and I thought this was great.  So it went into a higher-than-justified tier and has spent its remaining months dropping and dropping.  Don't get me wrong, I still think this song is terrific, but it also has flaws that I was reminded of on frequent listens.  Those flaws include but are not limited to...those drums.  You know the part.  Those big bashing timpani that seem, charitably, inappropriate.  WTF is going on there?

This song is unusual in that it appears to be a rare one in which the chief songwriter (Paul) is not the lead singer (John), though I say "appears to be" because, as in many instances, it's not entirely clear who should get most of the songwriting credit and who is singing which part, though it seems clear John's the lead in the verses and that Paul is the backing vocal and not an overdub of John.  But some disagree.  It's a bit of a mess in that regard.  It's also not clear who is playing which guitar parts, though the consensus is John is on a Rickenbacker.  This is just one of many, many instances of not knowing who did what on a Beatles song, which I think is interesting and notable considering how full our information is these days.  I haven't read the Geoff Emerick book about recording the Beatles (I know, I know, I must - I've bought it but haven't read), but I think he must have the most information to solve some of these questions.

I just realized I haven't said anything that i like about this song.  I do love the vocals and think that what I hear as the softer side of Paul and the acerbic side of John make for a great blend.    That is also evident to me in the lyrics:  what could be taken as simple, even trite, lines sound instead like there's more than that beneath them...the line "Yes, I know I'm a lucky guy" always makes me question if that's meant to be sincere or sarcastic, or more likely a combination of both.  There's something about that descent of that line in particular that draws me in and makes me want to know what comes after, and then surely enough, despite being written (we think) by sunny Paul, it is:  

"I remember the first time
I was lonely without her
Can't stop thinking about her now"

Italics for Friday-night emphasis.

And so right after he says how lucky he is, he is mourning being without her.  🤭

Aw hell, I've written so much about a song ranked in the 160s, but I find it so intriguing.  It's sneakily complex, and despite that timpani I love to hear it.

Mr. krista:  "This is my favorite song on the record so far. I’d like to listen to it again. Surprisingly heavy and kind of dark. This is like the black album. Pretty sweet timpani action."

Suggested cover:  There is a pretty well-known Yes cover of this song, and if Yes if your thing, go for it.  For me, I'll take Lou Ann Barton instead.  I don't love it, but it's not Yes.

Really enjoy the sound and harmony.  Not much of a fan of the lyrics.

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12 hours ago, krista4 said:

for whatever reason I always associate it with "Rocky Raccoon."  I guess it's the fact that both are Paul-created worlds relating to a solitary (by choice or by circumstance) man who is perhaps misunderstood.

Huh?!  Do you picture a dude when you listen to this?  Because that never crossed my mind.  It's about a raccoon.  It says so right there in the title.  

And you may have to trust me on this, but if you imagine Rocky as an actual raccoon for your entire life this song is way better.

Edited by Dinsy Ejotuz
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On 1/17/2019 at 6:51 PM, krista4 said:

Back to the countdown!  We're going to pop our Sgt. Pepper's Cherry!

*** AFTER OFFICIAL REVIEW, THIS SONG HAS BEEN MOVED TO #165.***

 Being For The Benefit Of Mr Kite!  (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967) 

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

It's getting really tough at this point, because I like all of these songs, and there's nothing left in the countdown that I'd turn off when it comes on (with one possible exception I'll mention when we get to it).  This is a John song with some of the hallmarks of a Paul song - the "circus" quality reminds me of Paul's dance-hall songs, and the invention of a new world is usually a Paul practice.  But was it an invention?  John admits that he cribbed most of the details from an 1800s circus poster he bought at an antique shop - from the Hendersons to Henry the Horse to the hogshead of real fire.  Interesting article and image of the poster here! 

John didn't particularly like the song and said he was "just going through the motions because we needed a new song."  I have a more favorable impression of the song than John does, as I love the creation of the circus atmosphere that makes me feel like I'm there (even though I hate circuses) - credit to George Martin for all of that.  I could listen to the part between 0:59-1:29 over and over - and I do - though I feel the ending soundscape starts to drag a little.  Don't sleep on the Paul's bass or Ringo's drums on this one.  We'll have to discuss Ringo on all of this album, as I think it's one of the many places where he really shines.

Mr. krista:  "Pretty good song about a circus.  Good circus song.  There’s probably a song somewhere about the Flying Wallendas that’s better."

Suggested covers:  I've studiously avoided this movie, but I like Eddie Izzard's version.  If only this were better quality - The Residents with the London Sinfonietta

 

 

Oh, but first, please see edit above.

I don't expect to do this again even though I see others I could tinker with, but this one was just far off my actual ranking of it.

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Just now, Getzlaf15 said:

again?

if you need me, i'll be sitting on a hill perfectly still w my pal Timmy. You can guess who'll be talking perfectly loud...

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12 hours ago, krista4 said:

165.  Flying (Magical Mystery Tour, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Since this is my third attempt at a write-up, I'll keep it short.

I know a lot of people don't appreciate this one, but I find it soothing and could listen to it for hours.  So suck it.

Fun fact:  first song to be credited to all four of the lads.

Mr. krista:  "“[10 seconds in] I like this a million times better [than Fool on the Hill].  I like this one.  I like that song.  I wish it were 20 minutes long.  I like it’s all spacey and surfy in the beginning, like Shadowy Men, like a really extended theme song to a great comedy sketch show.  I like the lalalalalas.  It’s clear it’s transitional music to get from one part of the thing to the other part, but for what it is, it’s great.  It’s excellent sorbet after the ##### sandwich that is Fool on the Hill.”"

Suggested covers:  OMG here it is with Chet Baker on flugelhorn!  But I actually enjoy this one more, though it might be the cover pic of Mr. Rourke(?) and the "zee plane, zee plane" guy that gets me over the finish.

 

Mrs APK liked this song a lot and remembered it from the album like 25 years ago.    She also thinks so far that Mr Krista is far and away the MVP of the thread.  Lastly, she seemed confused by the entire premise of the thread.  ("Wait, krista is ranking over 200 Beatles songs?   Really?")   This was followed later by "is she the one with lots of cats who lives in Nicaragua or something?"

Anyway, there are obviously some issues in the APK household with focus and communication.

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Holy cow, when I don't have the chance to check this thread in almost 24 hours, it's almost as wondrous and overwhelming rejoining it as it must have been for Yoko to walk into the studio with the boys, only with fewer beds and eye rolls.  

A few random thoughts from the last 2 pages, if anyone cares more than Brian Epstein cared for women:  

- I might be the world's biggest "Hold Me Tight" fan.  God, I love that song.  And the fact that it seems just a touch off-key adds to it for me.  I crank that sucker anytime it comes on.  

- I'm completely down on putting "The Fool on the Hill" down in this neighborhood, although, for me, there's no way it's lower than "The Long and Winding Road".  

- I can't remember the last time I listened to "Flying".  

- This thread is so freakin' enjoyable.  I was born 3 years after the Beatles grew up, and I remember putting my parent's album of "Rubber Soul" on a lot as a kid.  I can't wait to relive those songs in this countdown.  

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42 minutes ago, Alex P Keaton said:

This was followed later by "is she the one with lots of cats who lives in Nicaragua or something?"

 

Well, she's not wrong.  She just prefers late-middle kristas to late kristas.

34 minutes ago, Shaft41 said:

Holy cow, when I don't have the chance to check this thread in almost 24 hours, it's almost as wondrous and overwhelming rejoining it as it must have been for Yoko to walk into the studio with the boys, only with fewer beds and eye rolls.  

A few random thoughts from the last 2 pages, if anyone cares more than Brian Epstein cared for women:  

- I might be the world's biggest "Hold Me Tight" fan.  God, I love that song.  And the fact that it seems just a touch off-key adds to it for me.  I crank that sucker anytime it comes on.  

- I'm completely down on putting "The Fool on the Hill" down in this neighborhood, although, for me, there's no way it's lower than "The Long and Winding Road".  

- I can't remember the last time I listened to "Flying".  

- This thread is so freakin' enjoyable.  I was born 3 years after the Beatles grew up, and I remember putting my parent's album of "Rubber Soul" on a lot as a kid.  I can't wait to relive those songs in this countdown.  

:lmao: at the bold.  

Paul's vocal on TLAWR is what saves it for me.  By the way, I will be ranking the "naked" version of that one.  I can't stomach the Wall of Sound one.

Re:  Flying, I knew I liked it better than most people, but I'm surprised no one else has stood up for the song.

 

OK, I've updated the first two posts and all the post-Kite picks to their newly assigned rankings.  Time to move on.  I expect disagreement on my next pick.

Edited by krista4

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On 1/18/2019 at 2:10 AM, krista4 said:

174.  Long Tall Sally (Single, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Paul's vocal on this is terrific, and I think Little Richard's vocal on it isn't one of his best.  But you know, it's Little ####### Richard.  So it can't be quite the same.  John and George's guitars (each with a separate solo) are stellar, and Ringo keeps it all together brilliantly the way Ringos do.  If you didn't hear the original, you'd be more impressed, but still I think this is a faithful and passionate cover.  Little Richard has indicated in various interviews that he taught Paul his screaming, and I think it shows.

Speaking of Little Richard, wonder what it would have been like to see him play with Jimi Hendrix in his touring band and Billy Preston on keyboard, or with the Beatles during their early days in the UK and Hamburg.  Those are a couple of those "what event would you like to have witnessed" moments for me.  :heart: 

Fun fact:  This song has the longest life of those the Beatles played live in concert, all the way from the days of The Quarrymen through the Candlestick Park concert in 1966 - and sub-fun-fact, it was the last song played during that last concert.

Another fun fact:  This was released by Little Richard at such an inordinately fast pace so that Pat Boone couldn't cover it, as he had done with "Tutti Frutti."  To me, the Beatles version starts out a bit slow but then hits that great Little Richard groove.

@Shaft41, I'm sorry to say that the lyrics don't matter on this one.  :)   I have no idea what they're even saying through all the ebullience.  

Mr. krista:  "Good Little Richard cover.  One of the things I like about The Beatles is that they were huge fans of the Beatles.  They loved the music they were doing and that really goes a long way.  They were clearly gripped by rock music and super stoked to make it."  I played the song again for Mr. krista tonight and noted how well I thought Paul did the vocal:  he laughed uproariously.  Then I let him know that he had previously used the not-Mr.-krista-like words "super stoked" in a description and asked if he wanted to update:  "Nah, who am I to argue with me?"

 

 

Another favorite clip of mine was when the Beatles performed live on Drop-In, a Swedish TV  show in October 1963.  I’m putting it here because Sally closes out this raucous set at the 9:30 mark of the video.  A couple of reasons why I love this clip so much:

1) it’s one of the few live Beatles performances without the usual accompanying cacophony of loud screaming underscoring it, so you can really hear how tight of a live band they were at this point.

2) This was late 1963 so Beatlemania hadn’t quite kicked into nuclear overdrive yet.  Check out the face on the blonde male host at about the 10 minute mark.  His brain doesn’t quite comprehend what he’s witnessing in front of him, but he knows he’d rather be nowhere else in the world in that moment.  I’d give anything to have experienced that.

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162.  One After 909 (Let It Be, 1970)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This is a good time to mention that, per tim's demand, I'm putting the album (if any) and year.  He didn't specify whether he wanted the year of recording or the year of release, so I've gone with the year of release because it's easier for me.

The Quarrymen did this song in 1960, then it was originally recorded by the Beatles in 1963, then re-recorded in 1969, and finally released in 1970.  Maybe in 1963 they viewed it similarly to the way I do - it's good but not as good as a lot of other stuff they were doing at the time.  Paul must love this song, because he seems to play it at every concert he gives.  Or maybe it's easier for a 150-year-old man to sing than many of his others.

Anyway, this is a fun little railroad ditty.  Billy Preston's piano ties it all together for me, and George's guitar work is on point, too.  The lyrics are a little silly and simple, but that might be expected since they wrote this circa 1957, before they'd matured more.   

Mr. krista:  "Those fellas seem like they were having fun."

Suggested cover:  Willie freaking Nelson

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23 minutes ago, Ted Lange as your Bartender said:

Another favorite clip of mine was when the Beatles performed live on Drop-In, a Swedish TV  show in October 1963.  I’m putting it here because Sally closes out this raucous set at the 9:30 mark of the video.  A couple of reasons why I love this clip so much:

1) it’s one of the few live Beatles performances without the usual accompanying cacophony of loud screaming underscoring it, so you can really hear how tight of a live band they were at this point.

2) This was late 1963 so Beatlemania hadn’t quite kicked into nuclear overdrive yet.  Check out the face on the blonde male host at about the 10 minute mark.  His brain doesn’t quite comprehend what he’s witnessing in front of him, but he knows he’d rather be nowhere else in the world in that moment.  I’d give anything to have experienced that.

Eager to watch this later!

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1 minute ago, krista4 said:

162.  One After 909 (Let It Be, 1970)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This is a good time to mention that, per tim's demand, I'm putting the album (if any) and year.  He didn't specify whether he wanted the year of recording or the year of release, so I've gone with the year of release because it's easier for me.

The Quarrymen did this song in 1960, then it was originally recorded by the Beatles in 1963, then re-recorded in 1969, and finally released in 1970.  Maybe in 1963 they viewed it similarly to the way I do - it's good but not as good as a lot of other stuff they were doing at the time.  Paul must love this song, because he seems to play it at every concert he gives.  Or maybe it's easier for a 150-year-old man to sing than many of his others.

Anyway, this is a fun little railroad ditty.  Billy Preston's piano ties it all together for me, and George's guitar work is on point, too.  The lyrics are a little silly and simple, but that might be expected since they wrote this circa 1957, before they'd matured more.   

Mr. krista:  "Those fellas seem like they were having fun."

Suggested cover:  Willie freaking Nelson

I had a feeling this song was coming up soon.

Maybe I’m the only one but I think the version of this released on the Anthology album is far superior to the Let It Be version

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4 minutes ago, Ted Lange as your Bartender said:

I had a feeling this song was coming up soon.

Maybe I’m the only one but I think the version of this released on the Anthology album is far superior to the Let It Be version

Would you say you've "got a feeling"? ;)

I agree with you and should have posted that one, too, for comparison.  Thanks for having my back.

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