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krista4

In this thread I rank my favorite Beatles songs: 204-1.

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A heart wrenching band, the comments on that video say it all

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19 minutes ago, krista4 said:

162.  One After 909 (Let It Be, 1970)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This is a good time to mention that, per tim's demand, I'm putting the album (if any) and year.  He didn't specify whether he wanted the year of recording or the year of release, so I've gone with the year of release because it's easier for me.

The Quarrymen did this song in 1960, then it was originally recorded by the Beatles in 1963, then re-recorded in 1969, and finally released in 1970.  Maybe in 1963 they viewed it similarly to the way I do - it's good but not as good as a lot of other stuff they were doing at the time.  Paul must love this song, because he seems to play it at every concert he gives.  Or maybe it's easier for a 150-year-old man to sing than many of his others.

Anyway, this is a fun little railroad ditty.  Billy Preston's piano ties it all together for me, and George's guitar work is on point, too.  The lyrics are a little silly and simple, but that might be expected since they wrote this circa 1957, before they'd matured more.   

Mr. krista:  "Those fellas seem like they were having fun."

Suggested cover:  Willie freaking Nelson

Now this is regressive. 205th

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32 minutes ago, krista4 said:

162.  One After 909 (Let It Be, 1970)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This is a good time to mention that, per tim's demand, I'm putting the album (if any) and year.  He didn't specify whether he wanted the year of recording or the year of release, so I've gone with the year of release because it's easier for me.

The Quarrymen did this song in 1960, then it was originally recorded by the Beatles in 1963, then re-recorded in 1969, and finally released in 1970.  Maybe in 1963 they viewed it similarly to the way I do - it's good but not as good as a lot of other stuff they were doing at the time.  Paul must love this song, because he seems to play it at every concert he gives.  Or maybe it's easier for a 150-year-old man to sing than many of his others.

Anyway, this is a fun little railroad ditty.  Billy Preston's piano ties it all together for me, and George's guitar work is on point, too.  The lyrics are a little silly and simple, but that might be expected since they wrote this circa 1957, before they'd matured more.   

Mr. krista:  "Those fellas seem like they were having fun."

Suggested cover:  Willie freaking Nelson

Really enjoyed that one.  Not super refined but a fun song.   Feels like something I'd like to hear in a live venue.  Had never heard it before.

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Finally we get to A Hard Day's Night:

161.  When I Get Home (A Hard Day's Night, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

I could see people disliking the vocal on this chorus despite the great three-part harmonies,, but I love the way they roar out of the gate and pull you right in.  John's vocal on this is full of urgency and enthusiasm - I think it's really an under-appreciated performance from him - and it makes me feel like there's something we're all rushing to get to.  Everything in this song sounds slightly angry and on edge to me, which makes me both love and hate it.  I love the interplay of the guitars even if I don't quite understand what they're doing.  This is all messy and jangly and aggressive and rocking your face off.  Whooooooaaa-aaaahhhh!

Mr. krista:  "It’s a little sloppy but that sounds good.  You can’t hear any bass in this song.  I kind liked it but can’t hear any bass.  Seems incomplete because there’s no bass."  [Editor's note:    no idea what he's talking about; I hear a driving bass line.]

Suggested cover:  None.  :( 

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32 minutes ago, krista4 said:

162.  One After 909 (Let It Be, 1970)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

This is a good time to mention that, per tim's demand, I'm putting the album (if any) and year.  He didn't specify whether he wanted the year of recording or the year of release, so I've gone with the year of release because it's easier for me.

The Quarrymen did this song in 1960, then it was originally recorded by the Beatles in 1963, then re-recorded in 1969, and finally released in 1970.  Maybe in 1963 they viewed it similarly to the way I do - it's good but not as good as a lot of other stuff they were doing at the time.  Paul must love this song, because he seems to play it at every concert he gives.  Or maybe it's easier for a 150-year-old man to sing than many of his others.

Anyway, this is a fun little railroad ditty.  Billy Preston's piano ties it all together for me, and George's guitar work is on point, too.  The lyrics are a little silly and simple, but that might be expected since they wrote this circa 1957, before they'd matured more.   

Mr. krista:  "Those fellas seem like they were having fun."

Suggested cover:  Willie freaking Nelson

I’m now questioning if I’ve actually never listened to the Let It Be album. I don’t recognize that song at all. It’s like the Beatles doing an impression of The Band. 

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Also on the subject of Badfinger: They were the band Weezer was trying to emulate during the Maladroit era, a grossly underestimated record.  

Maladroit!  

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By the way, can I express my support for italicized lyrics? I really quite love them when done by NV. They seem...edifying in some small way. Peace.  

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14 hours ago, Getzlaf15 said:

He had more to drink than you, amirite?          another in the 190'a for me

I wasn’t 100% sober for any of this #####, don’t remember saying most of it, and actively disagree with many of my own opinions. 

Not my “Fool on the Hill” opinion, though. That song stinks.

 

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160.  Slow Down (single, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Our third and final Larry Williams cover (after "Bad Boy" and "Dizzy Miss Lizzy"), this one gets the higher ranking because it's quite good compared to the original - in fact, I even prefer it.  John sure did love him some Larry Williams (no doubt due to his Terrence Howard-like good looks), and he does this one justice with a fabulous vocal and maybe the best John scream ever.  This has a funky groove - maybe not as funky or bluesy as the original, but it adds extra oomph and playfulness missing from Williams's version.  This was by far the longest music-only intro to one of their songs at the time, and I love the way that 35 seconds sets the pulse for the song.  The only hitch in this song is the sloppy solo by usually-spot-on George; maybe he was sick that day or something.

Mr. krista:  "I might like the Beatles one a little better. That usually doesn’t happen.  It’s kind of a bummer that in serious rock now people can’t just put a brllrrprprp sound in there.  I feel like what punk rock did was kind of reclaim that for…the world."

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2 minutes ago, Oliver Humanzee said:

I wasn’t 100% sober for any of this #####, don’t remember saying most of it, and actively disagree with many of my own opinions. 

Not my “Fool on the Hill” opinion, though. That song stinks.

 

you should disagree with your opinion on this one also. :D

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13 minutes ago, krista4 said:

160.  Slow Down (single, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Our third and final Larry Williams cover (after "Bad Boy" and "Dizzy Miss Lizzy"), this one gets the higher ranking because it's quite good compared to the original - in fact, I even prefer it.  John sure did love him some Larry Williams (no doubt due to his Terrence Howard-like good looks), and he does this one justice with a fabulous vocal and maybe the best John scream ever.  This has a funky groove - maybe not as funky or bluesy as the original, but it adds extra oomph and playfulness missing from Williams's version.  This was by far the longest music-only intro to one of their songs at the time, and I love the way that 35 seconds sets the pulse for the song.  The only hitch in this song is the sloppy solo by usually-spot-on George; maybe he was sick that day or something.

Mr. krista:  "I might like the Beatles one a little better. That usually doesn’t happen.  It’s kind of a bummer that in serious rock now people can’t just put a brllrrprprp sound in there.  I feel like what punk rock did was kind of reclaim that for…the world."

For contrast, I’m not saying that the version released on the Live at the BBC album is better than the studio version, but George’s solo might be better.

By the way, Live at the BBC is a fun rabbit hole album for other covers that were never released otherwise.  They had a pretty deep repertoire.  I’m glad Spotify finally has it.

Edited by Ted Lange as your Bartender
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5 minutes ago, krista4 said:

160.  Slow Down (single, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Mr. krista:  "I might like the Beatles one a little better. That usually doesn’t happen.  It’s kind of a bummer that in serious rock now people can’t just put a brllrrprprp sound in there.  I feel like what punk rock did was kind of reclaim that for…the world."

I still like George’s janky solo and the “brllrrprprpr” mouth noise.  And rock music from the late ‘60’s onward really did seem humorless and staid and lacking the sense of ridiculousness that would make John Lennon blow a raspberry on tape.  Until we were saved by the Cramps and Ramones and the B-52’s.

 

 

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1 hour ago, JZilla said:

A heart wrenching band, the comments on that video say it all

Probably the saddest story of any band ever. 

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18 minutes ago, krista4 said:

160.  Slow Down (single, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Our third and final Larry Williams cover (after "Bad Boy" and "Dizzy Miss Lizzy"), this one gets the higher ranking because it's quite good compared to the original - in fact, I even prefer it.  John sure did love him some Larry Williams (no doubt due to his Terrence Howard-like good looks), and he does this one justice with a fabulous vocal and maybe the best John scream ever.  This has a funky groove - maybe not as funky or bluesy as the original, but it adds extra oomph and playfulness missing from Williams's version.  This was by far the longest music-only intro to one of their songs at the time, and I love the way that 35 seconds sets the pulse for the song.  The only hitch in this song is the sloppy solo by usually-spot-on George; maybe he was sick that day or something.

Mr. krista:  "I might like the Beatles one a little better. That usually doesn’t happen.  It’s kind of a bummer that in serious rock now people can’t just put a brllrrprprp sound in there.  I feel like what punk rock did was kind of reclaim that for…the world."

That this record is all but forgotten shows how good these guys were. This is Grade A Bar Band stuff here, something the Beatles were better at than any of their contemporaries (they were better at most everything else, too). All those nights in Hamburg paid off on this one.

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***INSERT DOCTOR ROBERT HERE AT 159.  SEE UPDATED RANKINGS HEREAFTER.***

Rubber Soul finally gets a cut.

158.  What Goes On (Rubber Soul, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

When I said this was going to be a Ringo-friendly thread, I was referring to his drumming (which I'll discuss in detail at another time), but i do love Ringo's singing voice as well and think it serves this song well with its straightforward self-assuredness.  This was originally a John-penned composition, in their Quarrymen days, which was later updated and expanded with contributions from Paul and Ringo to make it Ringo's first songwriting credit and a rare (or maybe the only?) John/Paul/Ringo-shared credit.  Ringo was once quoted as saying something along the lines that his contribution was "about five words of it, and I haven't done a thing since!"  God I love Ringo.

This song has such a fine rockabilly feel that for years I thought it was a cover.  Ringo is, as always, a metronome, but I think Paul's bass and George's C&W-swingy guitar work shine on this one.

Mr. krista:  "Yeah, this is good."

Suggested cover:  Sufjan Stevens  Well, this is interesting at least.  Wait through the first 40 seconds; it picks up.

Edited by krista4

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Slow Down is another of my favorites from Rock and Roll Music. Bad Boy is my most favorite (and might even sneak into my all time top 10 Beatles songs) but I love Slow Down. I really really love rockabilly music- it’s probably why I love early X so much. Even the Stray Cats works for me. 

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1 hour ago, JZilla said:

 

On the subject of Badfinger

The original and best version of this heart wrencher

Harry Nilsson performed the backing vocals.  His then-wife, Diane, has an uncredited part where she gave very hard, intermittent squeezes to Harry's #### in order to achieve that "little extra" at the top of the range.  Diane said that it didn't hurt that the two were not getting along especially well at the time.  

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1 minute ago, timschochet said:

Slow Down is another of my favorites from Rock and Roll Music. Bad Boy is my most favorite (and might even sneak into my all time top 10 Beatles songs) but I love Slow Down. I really really love rockabilly music- it’s probably why I love early X so much. Even the Stray Cats works for me. 

Was thinking of the Stray Cats the other night. Interesting. I also love rockabilly, down to its aesthetic.

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Just now, Binky The Doormat said:

Harry Nilsson performed the backing vocals.  His then-wife, Diane, has an uncredited part where she gave very hard, intermittent squeezes to Harry's #### in order to achieve that "little extra" at the top of the range.  Diane said that it didn't hurt that the two were not getting along especially well at the time.  

Apparently Harry Nilsson was John Lennon’s “Let’s do hard drugs together” buddy in the early 70s. 

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Just now, timschochet said:

Apparently Harry Nilsson was John Lennon’s “Let’s do hard drugs together” buddy in the early 70s. 

The Walkmen cut an entire album of Nilsson's. #####cats is an aughts legend of weirdness and a band gone slightly awry.

The Walkmen, by the way, were awesome.  

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57 minutes ago, krista4 said:

160.  Slow Down (single, 1964)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Our third and final Larry Williams cover (after "Bad Boy" and "Dizzy Miss Lizzy"), this one gets the higher ranking because it's quite good compared to the original - in fact, I even prefer it.  John sure did love him some Larry Williams (no doubt due to his Terrence Howard-like good looks), and he does this one justice with a fabulous vocal and maybe the best John scream ever.  This has a funky groove - maybe not as funky or bluesy as the original, but it adds extra oomph and playfulness missing from Williams's version.  This was by far the longest music-only intro to one of their songs at the time, and I love the way that 35 seconds sets the pulse for the song.  The only hitch in this song is the sloppy solo by usually-spot-on George; maybe he was sick that day or something.

Mr. krista:  "I might like the Beatles one a little better. That usually doesn’t happen.  It’s kind of a bummer that in serious rock now people can’t just put a brllrrprprp sound in there.  I feel like what punk rock did was kind of reclaim that for…the world."

John's vocals are perfect on this cover. Solid tune.

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157.  You Like Me Too Much (Help!, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

A George song that sounds decidedly un-George to me, with the sparkling harmonies (provided not only by Paul but by a double-tracked George vocal), sunniness, and slight old-timey-ness I think it feels more like a Paul track.  I dig the tremolo on the opening piano part and John's work overall on the Pianet.  The piano parts were George Martin and Paul playing at different ends of the piano, giving it that old-timey swing feel.  Maybe it's just a fluffy bit of pop, but it makes me want to go do the Lindy.  [Note:  I do not know how to do the Lindy.]  Recommend this one for vacuuming while singing it to your pet.

Mr. krista:  "This song’s kind of ####ed up.  I would like to know…when someone says 'I really do' you immediately doubt them...I wonder if the Beatles knew so much they were being sardonic.  But maybe it was just lazy."

Suggested cover:  The Challengers :lmao: :lmao: :lmao: 

Edited by krista4
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4 minutes ago, krista4 said:

 

Suggested cover:  The Challengers :lmao: :lmao: :lmao: 

WTF? It's like everyone's dancing to a different song except the 3 Go Go Girls, who dance like they're in a front-loaded washing machine. Also, pretty sure the emcee is tripping.

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4 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:
11 minutes ago, krista4 said:

 

Suggested cover:  The Challengers :lmao: :lmao: :lmao: 

WTF? It's like everyone's dancing to a different song except the 3 Go Go Girls, who dance like they're in a front-loaded washing machine. Also, pretty sure the emcee is tripping.

🤣 this encompasses a significant percent of what was wrong with 60s music and "scene."

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156.  Your Mother Should Know (Magical Mystery Tour, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

It's another dance-hall/swingy Paul song, this one with a straightforward message:  don't be such a jerk to your parents because they might not be as dumb as you think.  This song was in contention to be the number chosen for the Our World charity concert, but lost out to "All You Need is Love," which I think was the right move.  Paul attributes the retro feel of the song to his hanging out with his aunt and uncle at the time; I attribute it to his being Paul.  The bright harmonies and interplay of the piano and harmonium are the highlights for me on this one.

The best way to listen to this one is while watching the scene in the movie in which it appears.  :lol:  Only Ringo has any idea how to dance, though Paul is passable; maybe that's not a surprise from the rhythm section.  Note John almost falls right off around 0:16, but surprisingly he does seem to be having (stiffly danced) fun.  I have no idea what George is doing.  I never stop laughing when I watch this.

Not-fun fact:  this song's session was the last that Brian Epstein attended before dying of an overdose a few days later.  

Mr. krista:  "This seems longer than its run time.  Doesn’t it seem like Paul McCartney was just writing a vaudeville musical about a down-on-his-luck gambler who goes back to his hometown to reconcile his past and he meets his old girlfriend and his mom and a bunch of other crap happens?  I think he would have been happy doing that, writing musicals."

Suggested cover:  Actual Wolf  Chosen primarily because I like the band name.

Edited by krista4
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I need to work out.  When I come back, I'll post a selection from the White Album that seems sure to piss some folks off, but includes probably my favorite Mr. krista comments.  :)

Edited by krista4

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Bigger fan of most of the MMT stuff than most here. Special credit to the George Martin production.

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10 minutes ago, Leroy Hoard said:

Bigger fan of most of the MMT stuff than most here. Special credit to the George Martin production.

I think it has better songs, top to bottom, than Pepper

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19 hours ago, krista4 said:

OMG speaking of which:

164.  The Fool on the Hill (Magical Mystery Tour, 1967)

 

First one I'm artificially outraged about.  Probably top 30 for me.

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5 hours ago, krista4 said:

Rubber Soul finally gets a cut.

159.  What Goes On (Rubber Soul, 1965)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

When I said this was going to be a Ringo-friendly thread, I was referring to his drumming (which I'll discuss in detail at another time), but i do love Ringo's singing voice as well and think it serves this song well with its straightforward self-assuredness.  This was originally a John-penned composition, in their Quarrymen days, which was later updated and expanded with contributions from Paul and Ringo to make it Ringo's first songwriting credit and a rare (or maybe the only?) John/Paul/Ringo-shared credit.  Ringo was once quoted as saying something along the lines that his contribution was "about five words of it, and I haven't done a thing since!"  God I love Ringo.

This song has such a fine rockabilly feel that for years I thought it was a cover.  Ringo is, as always, a metronome, but I think Paul's bass and George's C&W-swingy guitar work shine on this one.

Mr. krista:  "Yeah, this is good."

Suggested cover:  Sufjan Stevens  Well, this is interesting at least.  Wait through the first 40 seconds; it picks up.

Beautiful song.

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On 1/19/2019 at 4:11 PM, JZilla said:

 granny ####

Funny you should mention that.

155.  Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da (White Album, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

A #1 hit in several countries, this was also voted the worst song of all time in a 2004 online poll in the UK.

Inspired by a phrase used by his Nigerian friend Jimmy Scott (full name:  Jimmy Anonmuogharan Scott Emuakpor), while in India Paul wrote this story about a fictitious couple named Desmond and Molly.  The Beatles recorded it joyfully and merrily during the White Album sessions, all agreeing it was one of their best efforts, and it became a smash hit single.

Wait, that's not quite right.  Actually the other Beatles hated it, hated all the time spent on recording and re-recording it, and this was one of the songs that inspired John to start complaining about Paul's "granny ####."   John famously and furiously acted out during one of the re-recordings, started smashing the piano keys as hard as he could and at twice the speed of prior recording, shouting "This is how the ####### song should go!"  I guess he was right, as this was the intro take that was used in the final product.  Paul's profane tirade against George Martin during later vocal re-recordings then drove away Geoff Emerick, who could no longer stand the atmosphere and vowed never to record with them again (though he did later return for Abbey Road).

Despite the fact that the atmosphere was tense (put charitably) at this point, the song somehow sounds joyous, with the other Beatles hootin' and hollerin' in the background, shouting out clever little retorts.  I think this is the ultimate love-it-or-hate-it song in the Beatles catalogue, and since I vacillate between the two, it falls in the middle of my rankings.  Sometimes I just can't bear that faux-ska sound or the inanity of the lyrics, and sometimes I get caught up in the harmless fun of it and want to dance around.  What can I say; I'm a woman.

If this is "love it or hate it," let's mark Mr. krista firmly in the latter column:  "I hate this ####### song.  I hate the stupid laughter; I hate the background noise. That’s what happens when white people try to play reggae.  It’s awful.  I’m surprised he didn’t put on a fake Jamaican accent like George Harrison did in "Gone Troppo."  All of the Beatles should feel deep shame about this song.  Every time it comes on the radio, they should feel like they just got caught masturbating.  Because they did."

Suggested covers:  Arthur Conley, with Duane Allman on guitar  The Marmalade has a #1 hit with this cover.  Desmond Dekker was the inspiration for naming the character "Desmond."  For a couple more where the videos are pure gold: Andy Williams and Don Ho ; Bing Crosby

Edited by krista4
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23 minutes ago, shuke said:

First one I'm artificially outraged about.  Probably top 30 for me.

:lmao:  

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Damn, ob-la had a ton of covers to sort through.  I listen to awful cover songs so you don't have to.

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11 minutes ago, krista4 said:

 

If this is "love it or hate it," let's mark Mr. krista firmly in the latter column:  "I hate this ####### song.  I hate the stupid laughter; I hate the background noise. That’s what happens when white people try to play reggae.  It’s awful.  I’m surprised he didn’t put on a fake Jamaican accent like George Harrison did in "Gone Troppo."  All of the Beatles should feel deep shame about this song.  Every time it comes on the radio, they should feel like they just got caught masturbating.  Because they did."

 

😂

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7 minutes ago, Getzlaf15 said:

It's not funny. :hot:

:lmao: 

 

(You knew that was coming.)

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Just now, krista4 said:

:lmao: 

 

(You knew that was coming.)

softball

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37 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Funny you should mention that.

156.  Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da (White Album, 1968)

 Desmond Dekker was the inspiration for naming the character "Desmond."  

Whoa. Learn something new every day. Love me some Desmond Dekker. He's going on my wake mix tape, I think.  

The Beatles sound nothing like him. I didn't even know this was faux ska, it's so far away from it.  Hwarf. 

I still like the song, though, because of Life Goes On (the show, IIRC).  

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1 hour ago, krista4 said:

Funny you should mention that.

156.  Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da (White Album, 1968)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

A #1 hit in several countries, this was also voted the worst song of all time in a 2004 online poll in the UK.

Inspired by a phrase used by his Nigerian friend Jimmy Scott (full name:  Jimmy Anonmuogharan Scott Emuakpor), while in India Paul wrote this story about a fictitious couple named Desmond and Molly.  The Beatles recorded it joyfully and merrily during the White Album sessions, all agreeing it was one of their best efforts, and it became a smash hit single.

Wait, that's not quite right.  Actually the other Beatles hated it, hated all the time spent on recording and re-recording it, and this was the song that first inspired John to start complaining about Paul's "granny ####."   John famously and furiously acted out during one of the re-recordings, started smashing the piano keys as hard as he could and at twice the speed of prior recording, shouting "This is how the ####### song should go!"  I guess he was right, as this was the intro take that was used in the final product.  Paul's profane tirade against George Martin during later vocal re-recordings then drove away Geoff Emerick, who could no longer stand the atmosphere and vowed never to record with them again (though he did later return for Abbey Road).

Despite the fact that the atmosphere was tense (put charitably) at this point, the song somehow sounds joyous, with the other Beatles hootin' and hollerin' in the background, shouting out clever little retorts.  I think this is the ultimate love-it-or-hate-it song in the Beatles catalogue, and since I vacillate between the two, it falls in the middle of my rankings.  Sometimes I just can't bear that faux-ska sound or the inanity of the lyrics, and sometimes I get caught up in the harmless fun of it and want to dance around.  What can I say; I'm a woman.

If this is "love it or hate it," let's mark Mr. krista firmly in the latter column:  "I hate this ####### song.  I hate the stupid laughter; I hate the background noise. That’s what happens when white people try to play reggae.  It’s awful.  I’m surprised he didn’t put on a fake Jamaican accent like George Harrison did in "Gone Troppo."  All of the Beatles should feel deep shame about this song.  Every time it comes on the radio, they should feel like they just got caught masturbating.  Because they did."

Suggested covers:  Arthur Conley, with Duane Allman on guitar  The Marmalade has a #1 hit with this cover.  Desmond Dekker was the inspiration for naming the character "Desmond."  For a couple more where the videos are pure gold: Andy Williams and Don Ho ; Bing Crosby

I feel anymore that I'm the only one who still loves this song.  This might be my kids' favorite Beatles song, and their infectious joy when it's on permeates through my cold, dark heart and I can't help but love it too.  I knew the stories of the anger while recording it, and part of me wants that to take it down some, but, if I let every song that they were pissed at each other feel less goodly, I have to stop liking them around "Things We Said Today."  

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I like Ob La Di. The lyrics are pretty stupid to be sure, but it’s got a catchy melody, and I really like the backup singing beginning in the second chorus. Just a fun pop tune. 

Dudes like your husband hate sappy Paul. I like sappy Paul. And your husband annoys me with his “I’m too cool for this song” attitude. I’ll bet in the 90s Mr Krista sported a ponytail and a turtleneck sweater. I can just see him. He used to read Herman Hesse didn’t he? 

Want to do something about it Oliver? Tell me where you live and the next time I’m in that city for a charity event we can get together and discuss it personally. 

Edited by timschochet
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15 minutes ago, timschochet said:

I like Ob La Di. The lyrics are pretty stupid to be sure, but it’s got a catchy melody, and I really like the backup singing beginning in the second chorus. Just a fun pop tune. 

Dudes like your husband hate sappy Paul. I like sappy Paul. And your husband annoys me with his “I’m too cool for this song” attitude. I’ll bet in the 90s Mr Krista sported a ponytail and a turtleneck sweater. I can just see him. He used to read Herman Hesse didn’t he? 

Want to do something about it Oliver? Tell me where you live and the next time I’m in that city for a charity event we can get together and discuss it personally. 

I think tim just flopped his #### out on mr. krista's prep table.  

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6 minutes ago, Binky The Doormat said:

I think tim just flopped his #### out on mr. krista's prep table.  

"90's Mr. Krista

Edited by Getzlaf15
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I didn't intend to have all of Paul's "granny ####" bunched up like this, but I guess it makes sense that it would shake out that way.

154.  When I'm Sixty-Four (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, 1967)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

Paul wrote this on his dad's piano when he was 14-16 (depending upon which interview you believe), so even though it was included on Sgt Pepper's, I don't think of it as being entirely of those canonical sessions.  Sure, some lyrics were added and the musicality of it was enhanced by what they were doing at the time, but at its core this is still a simple vaudevillian-style song from Paul's early years.  I've never considered it a serious work, which I think makes me enjoy more than if I did, and Paul himself says that he originally wrote it tongue-in-cheek without a sense of how/when it would ever be used, with hopes that maybe it would make it into a cabaret show some day.  This is simply a fun little song, and if you don't sing along when you hear it, there might be something wrong with you, or you are Mr. krista, or both.

Originally slotted to be the b-side to "Strawberry Fields Forever" before that was changed to a blockbuster double-a-side record with "Penny Lane," what shine most on this in my opinion are the flowing clarinets, the backing vocals, the final "hoo!", and the shift to a minor key for the bridge followed by the introduction back into major before the verse through the use of a cheerful chime.  Though I find most of the lyrics slight, I find this clever:

Send me a postcard, drop me a line
Stating point of view
Indicate precisely what you mean to say
Yours sincerely, wasting away

Fun facts:  Paul switches to a Scottish accent for the line "Grandchildren on your knee...".  He also had the recording sped up significantly in production to, according to Geoff Emerick and George Martin, simulate a more youthful voice or, according to Paul, make the song more "rooty-tooty."

Mr. krista:  "The Kinks had a lot of songs like that, that were English music hall variety.  But the Kinks were funny because they were really sardonic.  They were in love with England but still cynical.  So Village Green Preservation Society was just as complex musically.  Paul is kind of lacking that cynicism that might have made that song good.  It’s just in the style it’s in because that’s how it was written, not because it has anything to say about a monarchy or an empire or anything.  Music like that is why I tended to like the Kinks more than the Beatles.* That part where he rolls his r’s makes me want to throw him through a wall."

*Divorce pending.

Suggested covers:  Keith MoonThe Del McCoury Band

 

153.  Maxwell's Silver Hammer (Abbey Road, 1969)

Beatles version:  Spotify  YouTube

A favorite of noted FFA nice-guy @Gr00vus, this song might be the only one with Ringo listed on "anvil."  I've probably rated this higher than many others would, including the rest of the Beatles who all hated it.  John didn't even play on it but claimed that the numerous takes led it to cost more money to make than anything else on the record.  

It's another bit of Paul's "granny music" with a made-up cast of characters, so different in style to the more personal songwriting of John and George.  I loved this description from Paul of the differences in their writing styles:  "Some of my songs are based on personal experiences, but my style is to veil it.  A lot of them are made up, like 'Maxwell's Silver Hammer,' which is the kind of song I like to write.  It's just a silly story about all these people I'd never met.  It's just like writing a play:  you don't have to know the people; you just make them up.  I remember George once saying to me, 'I couldn't write songs like that.'  He writes more from personal experience.  John's style was to show the naked truth.  If I was a painter, I'd probably mask things a little bit more than some people."

Though in a similar style, it gets a slight nod from me over "When I'm Sixty-Four" by virtue of the fact that it cracks me the hell up. You can just find yourself humming along with this jaunty ditty and then realize it's about murder.  Paul McCartney is one weird dude.  He has said that the song is supposed to be symbolic of when something suddenly goes wrong in your life (all is going well and then "bang bang!"), but I prefer just to enjoy it as a homicidal rampage.

The song's placement on Abbey Road seems a little jarring to me, so I wasn't surprised to learn that Paul originally wrote it for the White Album but it wasn't recorded in time to make the cut.  My favorite aspects of this song are those anvil hits on the "Bang bang," the synth, the slurring of the bass to make it sound like a tuba, and of course the humor.  Paul sings it in a fashion almost like he's telling a children's story - a violent, gruesome children's story.

Mr. krista:  "I think the lyrics are good.  I like songs about guys who kill people with hammers. But I don’t much like this song."

Suggested cover:  Though it's from The Film That Shall Not Be Named, I'm such a fan of his that I can't resist:  Steve Martin

Edited by krista4
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The last two “music hall” type songs by Paul always remind me of  some of Ray Davies stuff from the same era. 

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